Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 5

10/24/2018 Classical Orchestra, A-B Stereo

01/11/15

CL ASS IC A L   O R C H E S T R A, A ­ B  S T ER EO

Feedback

Guidelines for miking a symphony orchestra utilizing A­B set­up.

Keywords: Classical orchestra, A­B microphone set­up. 


Achieved knowledge: You will achieve knowledge on how to mike this instrument. 

G u id e l i n e s  t o   a   su c ce ss fu l  a mb i e n t  r e co r d in g  o f   a   f u l l  cla ss ica l
o r ch e s tr a  u si n g   A ­ B   s t e r e o

The overall aim when recording large orchestras using just a main stereo pair is to faithfully reproduce the
instruments, the tonal balance of the orchestra, the directivity of instrument sections and the concert hall in which
the orchestra is to be recorded. This juggling act requires more than a few compromises and the art is in reducing
these compromises to a minimum. 

If you are not familiar with the A­B Stereo techniques, it is recommended that you read the A­B Stereo section on

https://www.dpamicrophones.com/mic-university/classical-orchestra-a-b-stereo 1/5
10/24/2018 Classical Orchestra, A-B Stereo

here. 

Pla cin g   t h e  A ­ B   S t e r e o   p a i r

The position of the main stereo pair will also be the perspective of the future listener; therefore the sound engineer's
goal is to create the illusion of natural perspective in placing the main stereo pair. In doing so, there is not
necessarily any correlation between the actual placement of the microphones and the best seats in the hall, and
consequently, placing the stereo pair correctly takes much effort. The distance to the orchestra and the height of the
microphones above floor level should be adjusted for equal coverage of the different orchestra sections and for the
amount of ambience required in the recording. Usually the optimum position is above or right behind the conductor's
podium at a height of between three and four meters, so that no musicians obscure the instrument behind them. A
good rule of thumb is: if you can see the sound source you can also hear it. 

When using d:dicate™ 4006A Omnidirectional Microphones in large orchestral setups, the distance from the sound
sources to the main stereo pair normally requires the use of the DD0297 Diffuse­field Grids. These grids give the
microphones a linear diffuse­field response and help compensate for the air absorption losses of higher frequencies
due to the distance. 

In rare setups the orchestra is arranged around the conductor in a semi circle. In these situations it is important that
the main stereo pair isn't placed too close to the centre of the semi circle as the instruments around the edges will
be recorded too far off axis, creating a heavy coloration (comb­filter) of sound due to the direct time delay occurring
between the microphones. 

Dist a n ce   b e t we e n   t h e   mi c r o p h o n e s

Channel separation in the A­B Stereo technique is determined by the distance between the microphones.
Compromises have to be made so that the orchestra sounds natural with a proper stereo width. Normally the
spacing is adjusted between 40 and 60 cm. Some producers favour greater spacings of between 1 and 2.5 meters
and sometimes more, but in these cases a hole will start to appear in the middle of the stereo image. This can only
be compensated by using a third microphone placed between the two others. DPA's UA0837 Stereo Boom allow the
use of two microphones separated by distances of between 15 and 60 cm. 

Experience will show that the optimum microphone spacing is dependent on both the size of the orchestra and the
reverberation time of the concert hall. When increasing the number of instruments in the orchestra, the microphones
need to be spaced further apart to give the listener the optimum stereo image. The microphone spacing should also
be increased to improve channel separation in more reverberant rooms.  Feedback

Micr o p h o n e  a n g le   a n d   a co u s ti ca l   a tt a ch me n t s

The stereo image is checked in the control room, where individual sections of the orchestra can be fine­tuned by 
adjusting the angle of the microphones. The spatial qualities of these microphones can be used to brighten up the
sections or to give them lower priority in the recording. For example, by aiming the microphones at the back wall just
over the orchestra, it is possible to brighten up the sound reflection from the wall and thereby add a convincing
depth to the recording. 

More ambience can be added to the recording without losing the fine position of the main stereo pair by fitting the
UA0777 Nose Cone onto the microphones. This makes it possible to capture the full spectrum of the reflected sound
from the walls in the concert hall, as the Nose Cones turns the microphones into perfect omnidirectionals across the
whole frequency range. 

Ad va n t a g e s

https://www.dpamicrophones.com/mic-university/classical-orchestra-a-b-stereo 2/5
10/24/2018 Classical Orchestra, A-B Stereo

The use of A­B Stereo techniques without support microphones can create an extremely convincing depth in the
stereo image and capture a realistic room impression. The sound sources, ie musical instruments and room
reflections, are picked up with the correct time alignment relative to the placement of the main stereo pair, which
explains why this method is often regarded as the purist's choice.

Re la t e d   co n t e n t

In Microphone University we have loads of content that could be relevant to you. Learn more about multichannel
techniques by reading the articles below. 

Classical orchestra, a­b stereo
Coincident arrays vs. Spaced arrays
d:mension™ 5100 mobile surround microphone guide
Decca tree
Fukada tree
Hamasaki square
Matching microphones
Microphone spacing and angling
Multimiking a classical orchestra
Principles of the A­B stereo technique
Principles of the baffled stereo technique
Principles of the binaural stereo technique
Principles of the blumlein stereo technique
Principles of the DIN stereo technique
Principles of the double MS technique
Principles of the IRT cross technique
Principles of the MS stereo technique
Principles of the NOS stereo technique
Principles of the OCT technique by Günther Theile & Helmut Wittek
Principles of the ORTF stereo technique
Principles of the WCSA technique
Principles of the XY stereo technique

Feedback


3   MM  SUBMINI AT URE

https://www.dpamicrophones.com/mic-university/classical-orchestra-a-b-stereo 3/5
10/24/2018 Classical Orchestra, A-B Stereo

Tiny but mighty

Precision engineering and miniscule optimizations of our capsule technology have created a
subminiature that significantly outperforms all other mics in their class – and beyond.

6 0 6 6   HE A DS ET   MI C

Feedback


An all­day professional headworn solution

The 6066 mics sport a completely redesigned, lightweight, one­size­fits­all headset that attaches over
the ears for maximum comfort.

6 0 6 0   &  6 0 6 1  L AVA L I E R

https://www.dpamicrophones.com/mic-university/classical-orchestra-a-b-stereo 4/5
10/24/2018 Classical Orchestra, A-B Stereo

You’ve never heard a subminiature like this before

What they lack in size, they more than make up for in clarity, consistency and durability – three
qualities that really matter.

DPA Microphones A/S
Gydevang 42­44 
DK­3450 Alleroed 
Denmark 
Tel. +45 4814 2828 

Copyright 2018 DPA Microphones
Feedback


https://www.dpamicrophones.com/mic-university/classical-orchestra-a-b-stereo 5/5