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Elevating Safety Culture through

Behaviour Based Safety

Copyright © 2012 Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd. All rights reserved. 1


Before we begin

• Welcome
• Emergency Alarms & Exits
• Safety Contact
• Ground Rules
• Introductions

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SAFETY CONTACT

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Ground Rules
 Bags against the wall
 Cell phones/BB “OFF” or on “vibrate mode”
 No Laptops
 Lunch & Bio breaks
 One conversation at a time
 Participation by all
 Any other ground rules?

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Introduction of Participants

Take 2 minutes to share:


• Your educational background
• Job title and current responsibility, including in the safety
journey.
• Some thing good from your colleague, that you observed
during your 5 mins Conversation

5 Mins
A B C
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Introduction to
Culture

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Simply stated, culture is:

“The way we do things around here”

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Can We change ?

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The Dynamic Curve of Change

Time Line

Decline Phase
All organizational programs, safety initiatives, etc., Have a defined life span

Acceptance
And
Integration
Phase

Change Initiated

Initial Acceptance
Initial Resistance

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The Dynamic Curve of Change
Time Line

Re-inventing / Re-Investing Team

A cross-functional team that develops


new ideas and or approaches Decline Phase
to existing problems and or identifying
elements which may be both known
and unknown to the organization

Acceptance
And
Integration Change initiative must occur
Phase Prior to the decline phase!
Why?
Because in the decline phase, the
Change Initiated Standard response is to “cut”
Spending and programs.

Initial Resistance
Initial Acceptance

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The Reality of Change in Organizations

5% 10% 80% 5%

Percentage of Employee Engagement


Explorers Pioneers Homesteaders Resistors & Saboteurs

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1.Re arrange Seating location.
2.Feed back about re location.
3.Now, Choose your team by yourself.
4. Again relocate as per your wish.
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SHEEP CULTURE

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The Champions for change

 Develop change and improvement momentum by building


around the champions who are most likely to make the
effort succeed.

 They will help to bring the others on board.


 They are also the ones you and everyone else can learn
the most from.

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Handling Resistors

 Resistors often have strong passion and high


energy. They resist because they care.
Understand the roots of their resistance and
re-channel it.

 Get them inside the circle of wagons.


 Effective leadership is about influence! And
getting others to follow you willingly.

Influence

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Safety
Background

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Strengths and Concerns…

 Begin to think about safety in terms


of injuries to people.

Table groups 30 min PW1

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“You get the level of
safety that you
demonstrate you
want.”

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Cause of Injuries

Unsafe Conditions

Unsafe Acts

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Good Safety = Good Business

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4 Key Ingredients

Approach to Safety - Key Ingredients for Excellence*

1. Integrated Management System


(integrated approach to managing all Safety, Health and Environmental issues)

2. Culture of Anticipation (Reactive to Proactive)


(how risks are understood by people and systematically addressed)

3. Culture of Openness and Collaboration


(how people work together and support each other)

4. Operational Discipline
(how following the rules is transformed into organizational pride)

* In Safety and Other Business Parameters e.g.:


Productivity, Quality, Customer Service,
Compliance, etc.

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1. Integrated Management System

Safety Observation

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2. Culture of Anticipation (Reactive to Proactive)

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3. Culture of Openness and Collaboration

External Motivation
COMPLIANCE
Internal Motivation
Rules, Procedures, COMMITMENT
Protocols
Felt Leadership, Role Modeling,
Influencing, Engagement

Reactive Dependent Independent Interdependent


“I follow the rules because I have to” “I follow the rules because I want to”
• Safety by Natural • Management Commitment • Personal Knowledge, • Help Others Conform
Instinct • Condition of Employment Commitment, & • Others’ Keeper
• Compliance is the Standards
• Fear/Discipline • Networking Contributor
Goal • Internalization
• Rules/Procedures • Care for Others
• Delegated to Safety • Personal Value
Manager • Supervisor Control, • Organizational Pride
Emphasis, and Goals • Care for Self
• Lack of Management • Practice, Habits
Involvement • Value All People
• Training • Individual Recognition

Reactive Working style Proactive


Zero accidents: Zero accidents: Zero accidents: Zero accidents:
“a heresy” “a dream” “a goal” “a choice”

Authoritarian Leadership Coaching

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4. Operational Discipline
Commitment of every
member of an organization
to execute each and every
job the right way.
Characteristics of Operational Discipline

– Leadership by example. • Common shared values.


– Practice consistent with • Up-to-date
procedures. documentation.
– Sufficient resources. • Absence of shortcuts.
– Employee involvement. • Excellent housekeeping.
– Active lines of • Pride in the organization.
communication.
– Strong teamwork.
• …

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Common Elements of a Safety Program

 Safety Observation program

 Incident investigation system

 Training

 Involvement of entire organisation

 Management commitment

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Basic Beliefs

 All injuries can be prevented.

 All injuries must be reported immediately.

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Seminar Procedure

 In each area, we will


 Describe what has worked for world class
companies.

 Examine similarities and differences.

 Consider what might be appropriate for


our organisation.

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Safety Organization

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Assigning Responsibility for Safety…

 Which are primarily the responsibility of


the safety professional vs. the line
organisation?

Individual 15 min PW5

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Characteristics of a Good Organisation

 Maximum involvement.

 Analysis and judgement at all levels.

 Information flows up.

 Information flows down.

 All branches and levels work together.

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The Central Safety, Health, & Environmental Committee

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Typical Standing Subcommittees
 Safety Observation (Behaviour Based Safety)
 Incident and Injury Investigation
 Rules and Procedures
– PPE, LOTO, ESMS, Road Safety, WAH.

– CSE, JSA, Lone Working, Material Handling.

– PTW, Machine Guarding, Fire Management etc…

 Training & Capability building


 Contractor Safety Management

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SAMPLE – ORGANISATION CHART
AD Central SHE
COUNCIL

Plants /
Sub Committee
Location Apex

Safety
Kandivali Nashik Rudrapur Zaheerabad Igatpuri
Observation

Factory
Incident Plant
Implementation
Investigation SubCommitee
Committee

Contractor
Safety
Safety Body Shop Paint Shop Assembly shop
Observation
Management

Training &
Incident
Capability Scorpio BS Xylo BS
Investigation
Building

Contractor
Rules & Self Directed • All Committees Shall meet once in a Month
Safety
Procedures Team # 1
Management
• Maintain an attendance of 85 %
Training &
Self Directed
Capability
Team # 2 • Defined Charter & KPI’s
Building
• Road Map
Rules & Self Directed
Procedures Team # 3 • Pit stops

Self Directed
Team # 4
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Leadership’s Role:
A Safety Organisation

 Establish a system to oversee the safety


management system and its progress

 Chair the oversight committee

PW11

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Safety Perception
Survey

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Safety Survey

What is the survey tool?


 What does the survey tool reveal

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Benchmark Best

To be considered Benchmark Best, a site must meet the following size and
safety performance criteria:

 ≥ 200 employees at the location and had a statistically significant survey


response rate
 No employee or contractor fatalities in the last 5 years
 5 year employee LWIFR ≤ 0.25 with no single year employee LWIFR
 > 0.50. LWIFR is based on 200,000 hours.
 5 year employee TRIFR ≤ 1.00. TRIFR is based on 200,000 hours.

On-site assessments are required to verify that their Safety Leadership,


Structure, and Processes and Actions are World Class.

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Safety
Observation

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Benefits of Safety Observation
 Demonstrate leadership commitment to safety
 Reinforce positive safety behaviour
 Raise safety awareness
 Motivate people to be committed to and responsible for safety
 Correct unsafe behaviours in a positive, proactive way
 Prevent injuries and property loss
 Establish standards/procedures
 Test understanding of standards/procedures
 Test compliance with standards/procedures
 Identify strengths and weaknesses in the safety system

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Iceberg
Fatalities
Lost Time Injuries
Medical Treatment Cases
First-Aid Cases

Unsafe Acts
Unsafe Conditions

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Safety Observation Categories
 Unsafe act: Unsafe Act is conduct (whether witnessed or not) that
unnecessarily increases the likelihood of injury, violates
established safety rules, or is contrary to expected conduct.
Employees’ unsafe acts show poor safety attitudes and indicate a
lack of proper safety training. An unsafe act
 Offers injury potential to the employee involved and may expose other people
to injury.
 Could be a violation of either an established safety rule or procedure, or of an
unwritten rule of common sense or good judgment.
 May not have been previously recognized as presenting injury potential, and
may violate no applicable existing rule or procedure.
 Need not be limited to a specific job.
 Can be an action or inaction that may lead to an accident or injury if not
corrected

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Safety Observation Categories

 Unsafe Condition: An unsafe condition is a condition, may be


caused by the action or inaction of employees in an area that may
lead to an incident or injury if uncorrected. It may be caused by
faulty design, incorrect fabrication or construction, or inadequate
maintenance and subsequent deterioration. The key point that
differentiates unsafe conditions from unsafe acts is that unsafe
conditions are normally beyond the direct control of employees in
the area where the condition is observed.

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When Someone Is Working Safely / Unsafely

1. Observe; decide how to get the person’s attention;


stop the unsafe act (safely).
2. Comment on what the employee was doing safely.
3. Discuss with the employee
The possible consequences of the unsafe act.
Safer ways to do the job.
4. Get the employee’s agreement to work safely in the
future.
5. Discuss other safety issues of the job.
6. Thank the employee.

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Safety Observation Categories

 Reactions of People
 Positions of People
 Personal Protective Equipment
 Tools and Equipment
 Procedures
 Orderliness Standards (Housekeeping)

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Reactions of People

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Reaction of People

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Positions of People

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Position of People

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Personal Protective Equipment

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Personal Protective Equipment

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Tools and Equipment

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Tools & Equipment

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Procedures

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Procedures

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Housekeeping

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Housekeeping

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Observing Unsafe Situations...

 For pictures to be shown:

 Note behaviors or situations you


consider safe & unsafe.

Table groups 15 min. PW17-18

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Photo 1

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Photo 2

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Photo 3

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Photo 4

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Photo 5

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Photo 6

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Safety Observation Categories...

 For Your Area:

 List 1 situation per category

Individual 10 min PW19

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Reasons for Reluctance...

 List why people are reluctant to


approach others about safety.

Table groups 5 min PW20

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Contacting Someone Working Safely

 Start with a positive comment.

 Engage the employee in conversation.

 End with thanks.

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Positive Comments and Questions

 A positive comment
 Is real.
 Is about something important.
 Recognises positive effect of efforts.

 A positive question
 Explores.
 Is for learning, not teaching.

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Talking with Employees Who Are
Working Safely...

 Develop skill in formulating language

Table groups 15 min PW22

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Reasons for Working Unsafely...

 Possible reasons – add your own

Individual 10 min PW23

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When Someone Is Working Safely / Unsafely

1. Observe; decide how to get the person’s attention;


stop the unsafe act (safely).
2. Comment on what the employee was doing safely.
3. Discuss with the employee
The possible consequences of the unsafe act.
Safer ways to do the job.
4. Get the employee’s agreement to work safely in the
future.
5. Discuss other safety issues of the job.
6. Thank the employee.

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Discussing the Unsafe Act

 If you comment
 Express your concern.
 Focus on effects, not acts.
 If you question
 Question to explore.
 Question to learn, not to teach.

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Discussing the Unsafe Act...

 Practice questioning and commenting skills.

Table groups 15 min PW25

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Making a Whole Safety Contact...

 Steps 2 and 3

Table groups 15 min PW26

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

Photo 8

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks.

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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1. Observe, decide, stop
2. Positive
3. Discussion
4. Agreement
5. Other issues
6. Thanks

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Safety Observation Process
1. Schedule the safety
observation.

2. Observe people in the workplace.

3. Talk with employees.

4. Document the safety


observation.

5. Follow up.

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Schedule : Layered Safety Observation System

Who What How often With whom

• Entire operation • Once per quarter • Mid-management


Top management • Segments • One to four times • Team members
per month • Employees

Entire area One to four times First-line


Mid-management per month supervision

Own work area Three to five times Employees


First-line per week
supervision
• Own work area • Three to five times • Each other
Team • Cross-Observe per week
with other teams • As requested • Other teams

Entire operation Three to five times Everyone


Safety pro or area per week
Safety network

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Schedule : Layered Safety Observation System
A) Operating plants during normal operation of the Plant:
Position Area Frequency Remarks
Plant Head Plant 2 /Month
Location

Factory / Functional Plant 2 /Month 1 every 2 Months in other area


Head Location

Area / Bay / CX owner Plant 4 / Month 1 every Month in other area


Location

Other trained Observers Plant 4 / Month 1 every Month in other area


Location

Safety Professionals Plant 8 / Month Safety Group to cover complete Plant


Location

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Schedule : Layered Safety Observation System Cont…
B) All Offices and facilities other than those located at Operating Plants
(and not covered above): Corporate SHE to facilitate preparation of schedule

Position Area Frequency Remarks

MD / President Full Business 2 /Year 1 in Plant /Project

Sr. VP (Mfg.) Full Business 4 /Year 3 in Plant /Project

Corporate HOD (Finance, Mrkg,


Sales, HR, IR, SHE, Leagal, Corpo
Full Business 2 /Year 1 in Plant /Project
Affairs, Communication, ERM,
Internal Audit etc)

Corporate Safety Pros Full Business 4 / Month 3 in Plant /Project

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Behaviour Safety Observation Process

Behaviour Safety Observation

All trained employees will perform Safety


Confirmation & Communication
observations - 1/ Hour / Employee / Week
The Area Incharge confirms the closure of Safety
Observation / The Closure of Observation will be
communicated to the Safety Observer / The Observer
will check the same during his next schedule.
Behaviour Safety Observation Process

Behaviour Safety Observers will follow Six Step


Safety Observation Process
1. Observe - Safe Stop
2. Comment on Safe Behaviour / Conditions.
Implementation of CAPA
3. Discuss Safe / At risk Behaviour
4. Get Agreement to work safely The Assigned Member will perform CAPA for the
5. Ask for Other Safety issues obseration with in the target date and mark for
6. Thank the employee closure.

Reporting Action Plan

The Respective Area In charge assigns the


All Observed Safety Observations will be recorded
observations to the respective staff and reports the
in Safety Observation format / portal -
target date for closure ( Minor : Max 30 Days ; Serious :
Observations reach concerned area in charge
Max 10 Days ; Fatal Potential : Immediate)

Key Perfromance Indicators :


1. % of Training against Plan 4. UA : UC ( Bench Mark , 80 : 20 )
2. % of Leaders trained as observers 5. % Closure of Observation ( On time)
3. % of Schedule Adherence 6. Quality of Observation ( Scale of 1 - 10)
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4. Un safe Situations ( Unsafe Condition + Un Safe Acts) capturted / Hour
Approaches to Safety Observation.

Table groups 10 min PW 28 -29

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Approaches to Safety Observation...

 Review Approaches on PW29


 List

 Advantages
 Concerns

Table groups 10 min PW30-31

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Using Safety Observation Information

1. Reinforce positives.

2. Detect developing problems.

3. Assess personnel.

4. See trends.

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Reacting to Safety Observation Information…

 Reacting to Individual Reports:

 You are the Operations Manager


 Read Safety Observation Reports: PW34-35
 Read Walk-Through: PW36-37
 How would you react?

Table groups 45 min PW38

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Plant Safety Observations As Current / Leading Indicator

Two results above “site alarm


Number of Unsafe Situations
per Safety Observation Hour

point” might be leading


indicator of future injury
Site Alarm Point

JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP


Current Year

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Leadership’s Role:
Safety Observation
 Establish a safety observation system

 Conduct your own layered safety observations

 Ensure that others are conducting safety


observations

 See that appropriate action is taken

 Review safety observation information

 Develop improved safety metrics

PW41
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Module- 4
Integrating Safety into
Existing Management
Systems

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Non-Compliance
Models

Non
Compliance

Source: Human Risk and Safety Management by Ian Glendon, Sharon Clarke and Eugen Mckenna

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Key Messages

 Everyone can make errors no matter how well trained and motivated they are
 There are two types of non-compliances-Errors and Violations. Controls will be
more effective if the types are identified and addressed separately
 Sometimes we are ‘set up’ by the system to fail. The challenge is to develop error-
tolerant systems and to prevent errors from occurring
 Reducing human error involves far more than taking disciplinary action against an
individual. Disciplinary action should be selective, far & few between. There are a
range of measures which are more effective controls including design of the job
and equipment, procedures, and training
 Paying attention to individual attitudes and motivations, design features of the job
and the supervision / organisation will help to reduce violations

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Examples of Safety Non-Compliances
NON-COMPLIANT
ERROR MINOR VIOLATION MAJOR VIOLATIO
SITUATIONS
A person not recognizing a The Supervisor putting the The Supervisor putting t
Not recognizing hazard hazard due to lack of training employee in low hazardous employee in high hazard
and being exposed to risk area/jobs without training area/jobs without trainin
Non intended omission of a
Omission step in a series of steps while
performing a task
A person who is trained a
not locking out the syste
Non-Compliance to while doing maintenance w
Lockout Tagout thereby exposing himself
Standard others to the risk of
electrocution/ Major
injury/fatality
An employee given PPE
Non-Compliance to Non use of PPE who is trained but still cho
PPE Standard intermittently not to wear the PPE where
required to be worn

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Examples of Safety Non-Compliances …Contd.

NON-COMPLIANT
ERROR MINOR VIOLATION MAJOR VIOLATIO
SITUATIONS
Failure to report a MTC
Failure to report a First Aid (Medical Treatment Case)
Case, near misses and Minor (Lost Time Injury), HIPO (
Non Reporting / Under fire Potential Incident), Major
reporting of Incidents and Fatality
Falsifying safety & heal
records
Non –Compliance to Mobile usage (talking an
Safe Driving Standard / texting) and/or not weari
Travel Safety Policy seat belt
Not having a work permit o
Non-Compliance to Having a work permit but not
fulfilling the permit
Permit to Work displaying at the appropriate
requirements
Standard / Site Work locations or not having it on
Permit systems person

Non-Compliance to
Risk assessment not done in Allowing a person to wor
Working at Height
spite of training height without safety harn
Standard
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Examples of Safety Non-Compliances …Contd.

NON-
COMPLIANT ERROR MINOR VIOLATION MAJOR VIOLATION
SITUATIONS
Safety not being taken into
Non-Compliance of consideration during project
Safety in projects work, line expansion,
construction etc.
A medical/health Allowing an employee to
condition of a person work even though he/she
Health
resulting in an unsafe shows visible signs of
situation/incident fatigue

Smoking in a designated
Smoking
“Non Smoking Area”

Distracting/interrupting
Distraction /
an employee while Horseplay
Interruption
carrying out the tasks

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Examples of Safety Non-Compliances …Contd.

NON-
COMPLIANT ERROR MINOR VIOLATION MAJOR VIOLATION
SITUATIONS
Picking up the wrong
Non-Compliance in Machine Guard not put back
component from a mixed
Maintenance work in place posing risk to injury
box
Non-Compliance to
Safety Interlock Bypassing Safety Interlocks
requirements
Speaking on Mobile phone
Mobile Usage or texting while walking in a
hazardous area
Operating an incorrect
Valve Operation on account of it not been
identifiable by signage

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Critical Roles
 Disciplinary Committee:
 Independent of Incident Investigation Committee
 Determines the appropriate level of disciplinary action, after
examining the report presented by the Incident Investigation
committee
 Comprises of Senior Line Management/Plant Head, Site HR Head
and Safety Head
- If needed Corporate HR & SHE would get involved

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Progressive Discipline
Intention:
Changing Behavior

While the first circle is more on training the second one is on


discipline, there is sometimes an overlap. Hence, Disciplinary
Committee must exercise best judgment on a case to case
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Summarizing…
• The Intention is Changing Behavior
• All incidents may not require a review by a disciplinary
committee as in the case of Errors
– Disciplinary Committee will be formed if evidence of minor or
major violation is revealed after investigation
• Wherever required, take inputs/clarifications from
Site/Corporate Safety/HR

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Safety Rules and Procedures: Principles

Rules should be:


 Written.
 Practical and appropriate.
 Written by those who do the work.
 Communicated.
 Available in the workplace.
 Reviewed periodically.
 Uniformly enforced.

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Rules & Procedure

1. PPE
2. LOTO
3. JSA
4. Permit To Work
5. Electrical Safety Management
6. Confined Space Entry …….

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Contractor Safety Management

Contractor
Selection

Contract
Preparation

Contract
Award

Orientation
and Training

Managing
the Work

Periodic
Evaluation

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Discipline...

 Five case studies


– Should action be taken?

– What would you do?

– Why?

Table groups 60 min PW44-48

147
Objectives of Effective Disciplinary Action

1. Communicate acceptable standards of


performance.

2. Be accepted in principle.

3. Be viewed as
 Impartial.
 Consistent.
 Fair.
4. Reinforce positive safety behaviour.

148
Standards for
Evaluating Safety Performance
 Employees must
 Make safety equal to all other aspects of the job.
 Follow all safety rules and procedures.

 Management must
 Accept responsibility for prevention of injuries.
 Accept responsibility for safety training.

149
Evaluating Safety Performance...

 Describe performance areas to be


improved.

 Be specific and quantifiable.

Individual 25 min PW52

150
Managing Contractor Safety
 Use only contractors who have the goal of
eliminating injuries and who demonstrate good
safety performance.
 Include safety requirements in the contract and a
provision for contract termination if requirements
are not met.
 Assign a contract administrator.
 Require your personnel to respond to any
contractor safety violations.
 Do safety observations on the contractor.

151
Safety and Management of Change

 Consider
– Changes to current technology.
– Changes within current technology.
– Changes in personnel

 Review and authorise all changes.

 Take safety issues into consideration.

152
Develop a Written
Management of Change Procedure

 Define what constitutes “change.”


 Establish level of review and authorisation required.
 Develop documentation.
 Ensure updating of procedures and process safety
information.
 Inform and train people involved.
 Get understanding and buy-in.
 Audit operations.

153
Leadership’s Role:
Integrating Safety

 See that safety is included in existing


management systems

 Ensure that standard safety procedures are


written and followed for all aspects of your
operation, including contractor work and
management of change.

PW57

154
Personal
Commitment

155
MAHINDRA CENTRAL SAFETY COUNCIL
Proprietorship

Every manager, supervisor, team


member, and/or employee is
responsible for
his/her safety and the safety of
anyone else in the area.

156
MAHINDRA CENTRAL SAFETY COUNCIL
Tools for Demonstrating Commitment

 General safety remarks

 Power of the question

 Modelling

 Self assessment

157
MAHINDRA CENTRAL SAFETY COUNCIL
Leadership’s Role:
Personal Commitment

 Demonstrate the importance of safety through


– Your own behaviour
– Your interactions with your employees

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MAHINDRA CENTRAL SAFETY COUNCIL
Module-6
Fostering
Involvement
of All

159
Using Safety Networks
 Network members
 Conduct safety observations.
 Identify potential for injury.
 Take corrective action.
 Communicate with employees.
 Participate in CSHEC ,subcommittees, FIC.
 Network members meet weekly to
 Discuss incidents.
 Review reports.
 Track safety trends.
 Decide on action to be taken, by whom, and when.

160
Safety Action Meetings

Leader
1. States purpose.
2. Outlines facts.
3. Gives question for discussing.
Group
4. Brainstorms ideas.
5. Selects actions.
6. Decides responsibilities and timing.

161
Characteristics of the Question

1. Centres on an issue that requires action.

2. Manageable within the group’s area of


responsibility.

3. Answerable in 15 minutes.

4. Starts with phrases like


 “What can we…?”
 “How can we…?”

162
Planning a Meeting...

 Putting together a safety action meeting

Table groups 30 min PW94

163
Handling Problems…

 Develop confidence in handling problems


that might arise in a safety action
meeting

Table groups 15 min PW95

164
Safety Action Meeting...

 Practice skills in leading a safety action


meeting

 Refer to background information, PW96-99

 Use the Safety Action Meeting Observer


form to record feedback, PW100

Table groups 40 min PW96-100

165
Rewards and Recognition

 Advantages
 Focuses attention on safety.
 Promotes a team effort.
 Instills pride.
 Recognises achievement.
 Disadvantages
 May focus attention on the prize.
 Can cause hard feelings.
 May discourage the reporting of injuries.

166
Leadership’s Role:
Fostering Involvement

 Develop an inclusive culture for safety

 Create and support the systems and


organisation that foster the culture

PW103

167
Personal
Commitment

186
MAHINDRA CENTRAL SAFETY COUNCIL
Proprietorship

Every manager, supervisor, team


member, and/or employee is
responsible for
his/her safety and the safety of
anyone else in the area.

187
MAHINDRA CENTRAL SAFETY COUNCIL
Tools for Demonstrating Commitment

 General safety remarks

 Power of the question

 Modelling

 Self assessment

188
MAHINDRA CENTRAL SAFETY COUNCIL
Leadership’s Role:
Personal Commitment

 Demonstrate the importance of safety through


– Your own behaviour
– Your interactions with your employees

189
MAHINDRA CENTRAL SAFETY COUNCIL
Continuous Improvement Plan

Future

2 1. Where are you now?


2. Where do you want to go?
4
Current
3. What’s in the way?
4. What are your plans to
overcome the barriers?
Barriers

190
MAHINDRA CENTRAL SAFETY COUNCIL
Field Safety
Observations

191
Field Safety
Observation
Plan

192
Generic
Observation
Guide

193
Generic Observation Guide

194
Field Safety Observation & Closing Meeting

 Meet with your Field Safety Observation Team at the appointed time in
________. Bring the handout sheets.

 All return to Conference Room________ for the Closing Meeting on


________ at ________ to:
 Review Field Safety Observation results
 Define safety issues
 Identify broad unsafe behaviour patterns
 Evaluate the Safety Observation process
 Discuss Safety Observation Program implementation strategies
 Wrap-up

 Any questions?

195
Unsafe
Acts
Matrix

196
Unsafe Acts Matrix
ZXY Corp - current Date & Site

CATEG FATAL SER MINOR TOT UA/hr

REAC’N

POS’N

PPE

T&E

PROC

ORDL

TOT

Xx/yy=z.z UA/hr

197
Unsafe Acts Matrix
XYZ Corp - 4/13/00 & 4/27/00 Sites A & B ZXY Corp - current Date & Site

CATEG FATAL SER MINOR TOT UA/hr CATEG FATAL SER MINOR TOT UA/hr

REAC’N 1 8 1 10 .70 REAC’N

POS’N 1 1 .07 POS’N

PPE 1 11 3 15 1.1 PPE

T&E 3 11 3 17 1.2 T&E

PROC 13 2 15 1.1 PROC

ORDL 3 12 6 21 1.5 ORDL

TOT 8 56 15 79 5.5 TOT

79/14.25=5.5 UA/hr Xx/yy=z.z UA/hr

198
THANK YOU!

199
BACK-UP PHOTOS

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THANK YOU!

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MAHINDRA CENTRAL SAFETY COUNCIL