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Team Members (Roll No.

25 to 33)
Measures to Promote
Kaustav Chowdhury
Creativity and Khushahal Upraity
Krishna Prasad
Kumar Shringar Sah
Innovation In CKN Manikandan
Manish Raj

Organizations Mayank Bhardwaj


Mayank Khandelwal
Mohit Anand
Organization Behavior | May 31, 2018
Measures of Creativity and Innovation in Organization

Table of Contents

1. Introduction

2. Theory and frame works

3. The developments across Industries

4. Present case study

5. Result and Analysis

6. Conclusion

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Measures of Creativity and Innovation in Organization

Historical Studies and Research

Introduction:

Historians have been interested in innovation per se but especially for its contribution to
economic growth. This contribution has been widely interpreted through new processes and products
but also new ways of organising economic and business activity. Historians have had less to say,
however, about creativity than innovation. Interest has largely focussed upon the end result of
creativity, that is, innovation.

This is in large part because of the greater interest in the economic and social consequences
of innovation than its origins. In addition, creativity is not easily substantiated through historical
evidence since it is not so obviously outcome-based, or as easily documented, as innovation. Nor has
much been written about the reverse causality, that is, of innovation upon subsequent creativity.
However, increased interest in recent years on the role of human capital in economic progress and
the development of knowledge sectors has motivated closer historical consideration of the creative
origins of innovation.

Creativity, Innovation and the Economic Development of Nations:

Historians have laid emphasis on technological innovation as both a shorthand to describe


different phases of economic development and as a causal factor in transitions between different
epochs. One of the key drivers of a nation’s nature and pace of economic development is innovation,
particularly through the development of cost-reducing processes, the introduction of new products
and services, and the development of new ways or organising the activities of firms. Different
industries progressed and changed based on technological innovations through the century:

❖ The British ‘industrial revolution’ from the late eighteenth century.

❖ Steam’s use in railways and shipping motivated new advances in iron, steel, and engineering
and with it a major stimulus to the European economies.

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❖ American firms carried these advances through into the twentieth century, particularly by
extending German technology into organisational and marketing innovations.

❖ Firms began to challenge those in Europe and North America particularly through holistic
innovation in manufacturing systems, known as lean production, new approaches to labour
management, and the development of imaginative forms of inter-firm transacting especially
just-in-time contracting

The Diffusion and Transfer of technology :

Besides playing a role in the economic development of individual nations, innovation


provides us with a closer understanding of the interaction between the economic rise and decline of
nations. "Technological leapfrogging” is the ability of emerging economies to invest in the latest
phase of innovations unencumbered by the sunk costs and interdependent requirements of older
technologies. This process is made the more compelling where a command structure, normally that
of government, provides the leadership for a poor, undeveloped economy to invest in innovation
catch up as was the experience of late nineteenth-century Russia.

The Institutional sources of creativity :

A modified view of innovation mutes the centrality of the macro-invention and its spreading
effects achieved through externalities. Instead, “innovation is perceived as a broad process,
pervasively embedded in many industries. Its embracing nature is not the reverberation from a macro-
invention but rather “a general social propensity to innovate” as eighteenth-century Britain.

The institutional sources of the creative spur behind the principal phases of innovation
highlighted above have not gone unrecorded. Creativity has variously been associated with major
cultural and intellectual movements, types of educational institutions, the capabilities of firms
themselves, and the facilitating role of government. The so called Age of Reason and the
“Enlightenment” of seventeenth-century and eighteenth-century England, which were associated
with a spirit of rational and critical enquiry into real world phenomena, has been widely viewed as an
essential prerequisite to the subsequent “industrial revolution”. This was seen as fostering an
environment of individual observation, inventiveness, and the generation of “useful knowledge” as a
public good, epitomized by Watt’s realization of the practical implications of the expansiveness of
steam in a boiling kettle. An emphasis upon more formal scientific and technical training in educational
institutions provided a breeding ground for creativity and experimentation in German industry in the
late nineteenth century. American firms of the early twentieth century such as General Electric and
Westinghouse developed in-house research laboratories capable of developing a series of related
technical advances in engineering and chemicals.
Likewise, Japanese firms contained notable research capabilities, but also drew upon
government organizations and incentives to pursue innovation in fields such as steel and computing.
Behavioural patterns and social processes help to provide an understanding of how ideas are shaped.

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Attitudes to individualism and uncertainty undoubtedly impact on the desire to experiment.


Individualism expressed as a willingness to think and act differently from the mainstream will
engender new ideas and approaches. A literature exists that associates de-familiarisation, the
breakdown of large extended kinship ties, with the fostering of individualistic enterprise cultures,
which includes a desire to innovate. Inventiveness requires a degree of risk-taking given the likelihood
of failure; it additionally represents a desire to mitigate sources of uncertainty through the
introduction of needed innovations. A desire to mitigate environmental uncertainties helped to shape
business decisions and structures and related to this is the fact that much creative thinking and
innovative activity was designed to reduce uncertainty.

Social capital and trust-based networks:

Sociologists, economists and, more recently, historians have begun to analyses the role of
trust-based networks in sharing ideas and the flow of information relevant to innovation across
organizational divides and geographic boundaries. At the core of this approach is the concept of social
capital, which analyses the degree of interaction among individuals and between organizations who
trust one another. Such information networks help to determine the extent, nature and direction of
the flow of ideas although this is not always optimal since networks can have exclusive as well as
inclusive implications. Geographic contiguity among related industries can foster trust and generate
reciprocating cycles of creativity and innovation as firms provide an innovation response to a
perceived need which in turn motivates new creative opportunities; such is the Silicon Valley story.

Concepts and Definitions

• Creativity can be defined as the ability to think and act in ways that are new and novel. It is easy
to associate creativity with an individual – the word associations themselves go with people. So
individuals and teams can be creative. But it is harder to use the word with organizations.

Three concepts associated with Creativity:

❖ Imagination: Unconventional, Spontaneity & Intuition

❖ Problem Solving: Intellect, Ability & Organization

❖ Struggle: Process of churning ideas through conscious and unconscious struggle

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The Creative Process

5 Steps in Creative Process:

❖ Opportunity or Problem Recognition: A person discovers that a new opportunity exists or a


problem needs resolution.

❖ Immersion: The individual concentrates on the problem and becomes immersed in it. He or
she will recall and collect information that seems relevant, dreaming up alternatives without
refining or evaluating them.

❖ Incubation: The person keeps the assembled information in mind for: a while. He or she does
not appear to be working on the problem actively; however, the subconscious mind is still
engaged. While the information is simmering it is being arranged into meaningful new
patterns.

❖ Insight: The problem-conquering solution flashes into the person's mind at an unexpected
time, such as on the verge of sleep, during a shower, or while running. Insight is also called
the Aha! Or Eureka! Experience.

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❖ Verification and application: The individual sets out to prove that the creative solution has
merit. Verification procedures include gathering supporting evidence, using logical
persuasion, and experimenting with new ideas.

Roadblocks to Creativity in Organizations:

❖ Some of the measures taken by organisation can come out as “deliberate” to some
employees, especially if creativity is not ingrained and not an essential part of the culture but
only treated as an organisational deliverable. Creativity should be instinctive and not
premeditated.

❖ Employees not coming forward with their inventive ideas could be because of them not
knowing whether the organisation supports creativity. A major roadblock in this case is the
risk of rejection or fear of repercussions of making mistakes.

❖ Homogeneous work environments cannot contribute to flourishing creative solutions to a


problem. Hence the stress on workforce diversity and cross-departmental projects to promote
social and cultural mingling.

❖ All work and no fun have a true meaning. As a drab working environment will only make
employees look forward to the end of the day and not work things differently.

Innovation is often defined as implementation of ideas generated during the creative process.
That is, creativity is a precursor for innovation since creativity is what generates ideas that are
innovated upon.

An innovation is an idea, practice, or object that is perceived as new by an individual or other unit of
adoption. The perceived newness of the idea for the individual determines his or her reaction to it.

----Everett Rogers, Diffusion of Innovation

Systematic Innovation consists of the purposeful and organized search for changes, and in the
systematic analysis of the opportunities such changes might offer for economic or social innovation.
Innovation does not have to be technical…nor does it have to be a thing. Few technical innovations
can compete in terms of impact with such social innovations as insurance

--- Peter F. Drucker, Innovation & Entrepreneurship

Creativity and Innovation were traditionally two adjacent, yet separate, research fields. The
first was mostly dealt with by psychologists, the second mainly by economists. Research conducted
over the last decade has broken all boundaries of a field that was once also the prerogative of science
historians, art critics, company consultants and marketing experts.

Types of Innovation
Four distinct types of innovation:

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❖ Invention - Described as the creation of a new product, service or process. Something that
has not been tried before.

❖ Extension - The expansion of an existing product, service or process. This would mean that
the entrepreneur takes an existing idea and applies it differently.

❖ Duplication - Copying (replicating) an existing product or service and then adding the
entrepreneurs own creative touch. In order to improve it.

❖ Synthesis - A combination of more than one existing products or services in to a new product.
or service. This means that several different ideas are combined in to one new product or
service.

Role of Innovation

❖ Competitive advantage protection: A strategic approach for pre-empting, protecting against,


or jumping ahead of competition.

❖ Accelerate growth, experience incremental margin enhancement & build additional core
competency to bolster competitive advantage.

Innovation Process

i. Analytical planning – Carefully identifying the product or service features, design as well as
the resources that will be needed.
ii. Resource organization – Obtaining the required resources, materials, technology, human or
capital resources.
iii. Implementation – Applying the resources in order to accomplish the plans
iv. Commercial application – The provision of value to customers, reward employees, and satisfy
the stake holders.

Myths of Innovation

❖ Innovation is planned and predictable.

❖ Technical specifications should be thoroughly prepared in advance.

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❖ Creativity relies on dreams and blue-sky ideas.

❖ Big projects will develop better innovations than smaller ones.

❖ Technology is the driving force of innovation and success.

Few Frameworks of Innovation

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Incremental & Modular Innovation:

Example of Hard disk: An improvement in the magnetic disk capacity and a faster rotation
speed represent two examples of Incremental innovation. Modular innovations will require new
knowledge for one or more components, but the architectural knowledge remains unchanged. In
1980s most hard disk manufacturers substituted the ferrite read/write heads with thin-metal heads

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Architectural Innovation:

The linkage of components is changed, but the knowledge of single components will remain
the same.

The hard disk industry witnessed several waves of miniaturization. The first mainframe
computers were packed with 14-inch diameter disks, some years later the industry came out with 8‘,
5,25‘, 3,5’ and 1,8‘ disk drives. Each and every time the size of the hard disk diminished the knowledge
of the linkages between components was evolving while the single components were using pretty
much the same technology such changes are thus architectural innovations.

Radical innovation:

When a certain innovation revolutionizes both component and architectural knowledge it will
be a radical innovation.

Radical innovation was the passage from magnetic to optical technology. The introduction of
the laser in the disk drive industry required not only new components but it also changed the
configuration of such components inside hard disks.

Disruptive Innovation:

A disruptive innovation introduces a different set of features, performance, and price


attributes relative to existing products, making it an unattractive combination for mainstream
customers at the time of product introduction because of inferior performance on the attributes these
customers value and/or a high price—although a different customer segment may value the new
attributes.

Canon’s introduction of slower but inexpensive table-top photocopiers in the late 1970s
relative to Xerox’s high-speed big copiers is an example of disruptive innovation.

The Individual Adoption Process


The individual adoption curve indicates how individuals react to innovations over time. The
adoption process places adopters into categories and explores how the earlier adopters influence
later adopters. This information is used to segment markets, design promotional campaigns, and
can be used to develop e-business strategies.

The Adoption Curve:

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The adoption curve is used as a model to understand who is likely to be an innovator and how
interpersonal influence passes to later adopters of innovations.

Shared Characteristics of Adopter Categories

Adopter Categories Shared Characteristics


Innovators Requires a shorter adoption period than any other group.
Venturesome, mobile, daring. Risk takers. Financial resources to
absorb unprofitable innovations, understand and apply complex
technical knowledge to cope with a high degree of uncertainty.
Early Adopters Greatest degree of opinion leadership, role model within social
system, respected by peers, successful.
Early Majority Interact frequently with peers, seldom holds positions of opinion
leadership, deliberate before adopting a new idea.
Late Majority Responds to pressure from peers., economic necessity, skeptical,
cautious.
Laggards No opinion leadership. Isolated. Point of reference is in the past.
Suspicious of innovations, innovation-decision process is lengthy,
resource limited.

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Relativity and Innovation within an Organisation

Some researchers and practitioners believe that creativity is an inborn trait, though it may be true in
most cases, there is no denying that to flourish a creative environment in the workplace employees
should be given space and opportunities to showcase their talents.

Some of the ways by which creative thinking within an organisation can be promoted are:

Rewards and Recognition: Rewarding employees for their ingenuity is one way to motivate them to
come forward with innovative ideas. Once the ideas are put forward it is also the management’s job
to consider those ideas and implement the best one chosen, so as to not discourage employees to
showcase their creativity in future.

Suggestion Boxes: Providing a suggestion box or something similar can also help in bringing out
creative ideas from more private employees, who prefers anonymity and confidentiality, though who
should also be recognized for their suggestions.

Brainstorming Sessions: the company should manage both private and public mediums in order to
provide employees a perfect intermediate to portray their creativity.

Creative Task Teams: Assemble an innovation team tasked with coming up with ideas to improve a
more distinctive aspect of the workplace.

Training in innovation techniques: The staff may be able to bounce an idea around, but they may be
unfamiliar with the skills involved in creative problem-solving. An organisation may find training
sessions in techniques such as brainstorming, lateral thinking and mind-mapping worthwhile.

Cross-fertilise: Broadening people’s experiences can be a great way to spark ideas. Short-term job
swaps and shadowing in-house can introduce a fresh perspective to roles. Encourage people to look
at how other businesses do things, even those in other sectors, and consider how they can be adapted
or improved.

ACT on ideas: Lastly and most importantly, creative thinking is only worthwhile if it results in action.
Provide the time and resources to develop and implement those ideas that are worth acting upon.
Failure to do so not only means your firm will fail to benefit from innovation, but the flow of ideas may
well dry up if staff feels the process is pointless.

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Innovation

Innovation is essential for the growth of any company. But that’s a very generic way of
describing innovation. To successfully implement innovation, one need to know exactly what makes
an innovative organization as well as how it contributes to its growth.
For the majority, innovation is about seeking an approach to blue-sky thinking. But that’s a
far too clichéd definition & It requires investment of resources to fulfil the needs of innovative
management in an organization.
Truly innovative organizations spend hours developing an approach to imaginative thinking in
their workers so that they can cultivate new ideas. In other words, the secret of their unprecedented
success is associated with their ability to get the best out of the creative tanks of their employees. But
that requires an innovative culture where everyone is able to think independently.
Business leaders perceive innovation as something that triggers progress and lacking it can
stifle the growth of an organization. Unfortunately, the majority of the companies still lack a strategy
to create an innovative culture.
Innovation is not a temporary thing and rather it is a long-term strategy that demands an
investment of time and efforts. Therefore, if you want toit is to be ensured that an organization
continues to benefit from the positive outcomes of innovation, following strategies need to be
implemented.

1. Give workers a sense of freedom:


Employers that impose rules tend to suffocate the creativity of their employees. This limits
the freedom of the most valuable asset and they will feel reluctant to ever think outside the box. The
essence of an innovative organization lies in their employees’ ability to contribute to the creative
process of the organization. A company need to give its workers the autonomy to practise their novel
ideas. It calls for a sense of freedom that can enable the workers to unshackle themselves from the
clutches of hierarchical imposition so that they can focus on new ideas to execute their day-to-day
tasks.

2. Provide the team with the resources to implement innovative ideas:


Make it possible for the workers to convert their ideas into reality. Without the right
resources, even the best ideas tend to fall flat. The most innovative companies in the world invest in
their R & D department to allow their creative team to execute the innovative concepts for future
product development.

3. Invest time in the creative nourishment of the workers


The essence of innovation is achieved when an Organization is able to demonstrate to
its workers a path that leads to creativity. Apart from preaching the team about creativity,
demonstrate the specific ways to find creativity so that they can implement innovation in their work.

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For example, Google was among the first companies to create a business model based on innovation.
The company allocates 20% of its time to nurture the innovative side of their employees.

4. Don’t focus only on R&D


An organization should not confine innovation to just the R&D department. To implement an
effective innovative culture, it is important that each and every department of the company
is included. When a holistic innovation strategy is implemented, an Organization is able to foster a
change in the mindset of every single member of the team.

5. Allow employees to fail


Failure is a part the learning process. If employees are penalized for making mistakes, a fear
of failure is injected in them. Such an approach drastically affects their ability to come up with creative
ideas. Fear cannot cultivate creativity.
When employees are given the scope to make a mistake, they are allowed to think
independently without any constraints of fear. So they shall be able to think beyond the boundaries of
their job.

6. Develop an accommodating leadership style


As the leader of a company, it is the responsibility of the leader to foster and nurture the
attitudes of individual team members. Being a leader, one cannot develop a culture of innovation if
he/ she fails to show the way to innovation through his/ her own attitude and behaviour. Expecting
the workers to give more in less time is one such way to kill the desire of workers to do something
extraordinary. When short-term results are preferred over long-terms benefits of innovative ideas,
the innovative spirit is killed. Rather than resorting to a ‘do more’ approach, employees need to be
given more room to experiment and learn so that they can improve. But when employees are deprived
of time, the urge in them to learn different perspectives to their work is suffocated.

7. Don’t look down on subordinates


Intellectual arrogance is the biggest enemy of implementing innovation into any organization.
When the ideas of employees disregarded just because they are subordinates, the process of creative
thinking in them is hindered. Such an organization cannot possibly thrive on the creative ideas of their
workers. To promote a culture of innovation, the leadership team need to shut down any
preconceived notions about its employees and rather allow them to speak their minds. A conducive
environment needs to be created & maintained that encourages them to share their opinion and be
a part of every creative process in the business.

8. Acknowledge the contribution of employees


Employees feel valued when their efforts are recognized. Similarly, if a culture of innovation
in your organization is to be promoted, there is a need to implement an incentive-based policy that
rewards workers on the degree of innovation in their work. Such a policy will make employees feel
appreciated for their innovative efforts and it will pave the way to a culture of innovation in any
organization. Innovation provides a culture of creative thinking that enables workers to think beyond
the regular hurdles of their work and come up with something new and unique.

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Ten Types Of Innovation

Profit Model
How the organization turns its value into profit. Innovative examples would be Gillette flipping
their profit model from expensive razors, with cheap refills, to selling the handles cheaply and charging
more for the blades - thus teaching consumers that blades are disposable, and they don’t need to be
sharpened and maintained; or Hilti, who provide power tools for the construction industry, and offer
a subscription service which means companies no longer need to own the tools, which removes the
need to service and maintain expensive equipment.
Network
The value that is created by working with others. We are evermore connected today, and it becomes
essential for firms to work with others, to gain processes, technology, or brand credibility. Open
Innovation is itself a form of Network innovation - leveraging the skills and expertise of people outside
your firm. The US retail firm Target is a good example, with its extensive partnering network, including
Michael Graves, the architect who designed a range of kitchen appliances.

Structure
How you organize the talent and assets within your company. When done well, these are very
hard for competitors to copy. W. L. Gore is famous for its flat organizational structure, teams are often
small, and driven by commitments rather than management orders; all employees become
shareholders after a year. Zappos, and its Holacracy, would be another structural innovation example.

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Process
How a company goes about producing its products and services - its core operations.
Sometimes it’s a patented approach, or a breakthrough methodology such as Toyota’s lean
production. Zara has risen to prominence in the retail industry with its reimagining of the fashion
supply chain, taking a sketch through to shop floor within weeks.
Product Performance
The quality, feature set, capability of a firm's products. This is often considered the total sum
of innovation, and revolves around the R&D department. It’s certainly important, but only one of the
ten types. Examples could be Dyson’s breakthrough dual cyclone technology with no bag, taking 15
years and more than 5,000 prototypes to produce; or Corning’s Gorilla Glass, a core component of
many leading technology brands.
Product System
How you create additional value by adding other firms’ products and services to yours, or how
you combine multiple products to create significantly more value. The web browser Mozilla is built on
open-source software, and allows developers to create add-ons to enrich the product. Oscar Mayer
offers “lunchables”, combinations of food snacks for school lunches, making it easy for parents and
fun for kids.
Service
How you make your product easier to use, more enjoyable, or get better value from. Zappos
is famous for its customer service, with employees empowered to take the initiative to solve the
customer's issue - whether it means spending hours on the phone with them, or sending them flowers.
Men’s Wearhouse offer lifetime pressing on their suits and coats.
Channel
How you connect with your customer. It differs from Network, in that it’s not about whom
you work with to make those connections, but more about the ways in which you connect. Nike’s
NikeTown flagship stores offer a rich and unique experience for shoppers, with product launches, and
athletic staff, including ex-basketball professionals.

Brand
Your brand can be a powerful innovation in itself, it can represent the values you stand for, or
a simple but big idea that resonates with customers. Virgin is a classic example of brand, led by Sir
Richard Branson, and companies such as Virgin Atlantic Airways, Virgin Records, Virgin Trains, and
Virgin Galactic; Virgin stands for being different and fun, spicing up the industries in which it ventures.
Intel is another powerful brand, making a computer component so valuable that having the “Intel
Inside” on the box elevates the value of the overall product.
Customer Engagement
How you understand and then leverage the desires and needs of your customers. They can be
hard to spot, often sitting among one of the other nine types. The question is how to interact with
your customers and delight them? Blizzard Entertainment, who makes World of Warcraft, is an expert
at customer engagement - understanding what makes users play for hundreds of hours, and what
drives them to collaborate and connect with other users. Apple of course is another company that
thrives on the engagement of its devotees.

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Innovation in IT Industry

Infosys Organization culture to foster Innovative and creative at work place:


Life @ Infosys: These are aspects of life at Infosys that describe what it is like to be an Infoscion.
❖ Excel at challenging and exciting work assignments
❖ Continuous learning for professional and personal development
❖ Enjoy a fun place to work
❖ Synchronize with the Company's Business and Growths CONTINUOUS LERANING
❖ Organizational commitment to continuous personal and professional development keeps
Infosys at the forefront in a fast-changing industry.
❖ This learning area includes technology, management, leadership, cultural and communication
skills, and other soft skills.

Fun and Culture

❖ Supports arts, culture, or sports.


❖ "Art Gallery" on campus dedicated to displaying the works of Infoscions
❖ Daily quiz competitions, and regular music meetings that keep the place abuzz with creativity.
❖ Inculcom is the base organization that hosts cultural programs for Infoscions. Each event
emphasizes a specific area like music, dance, or quiz. DAY TO DAY CULTURE OF INFOSYS
❖ Spot awards.
❖ Every Tuesday – Formal dressing.
❖ Cubicle decoration.
❖ Employees can easily meet the top management persons.
❖ Team outing after completion of a project.

Infosys works with clients to develop innovative products and services to amplify impact and
accelerate growth. With innovation at the heart of what we do, our product innovation strategy
comprises three core elements:

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❖ Design thinking: A way of thinking that simultaneously considers customer empathy,


technological feasibility, and economic viability. Infosys has formally partnered with the
Stanford school to bring these techniques to clients who seek to bring products to the market
effectively.

❖ Agility: Provides flexibility to cause changes during product development, bringing products
closer to customer experience. Being agile also helps weed out unwanted elements and
accelerates time to market (TTM).

❖ Simplicity: A key component of change and a catalyst for collaboration and product
simplification, including content and processes of product development, launch, and
management. This technique achieves maximum functional performance when using cost-
effective material.

We bring all three elements together to identify new product and innovation opportunities
through a combination of software, hardware, and services.
We help clients translate strategy into execution through service offerings, innovation
networks, and thought leadership.
Service offerings:
❖ Extend product innovation beyond traditional PLM to improve revenue and margin

❖ R&D transformation acts as fuel for growth

❖ Product effectiveness comprises customer empathy, technical feasibility, and economic


viability

Innovation network:
❖ Product strategy and idea acceleration

❖ Rapid prototyping and innovation labs

❖ Co-development and launch

Thought leadership:
❖ R&D centers with 1,000+ people; output incorporates patents, best-in-class frameworks and
models

❖ Process control baselines provide benchmarking and best practices for product development
and management

❖ Standards include CMMI, PCMM, BS 7799, TL 9000, ISO 13485, ISO14001, MBNQA, Six Sigma,
AS 9100, BSI

❖ Leverage Infosys experience in the co-creation process to convert intellectual capital into
client business value

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1.Google Inc.- We see creativity as a way to solve problems - large and small:
Work culture at Google:
True Flexibility:
Google has been one of the first companies to really understand the need for employees to
have a flexible schedule and work on their terms to unleash their creativity and a greater level of
productivity. They've let their employees explore how they'd like to work and given them the freedom
within the environment to approach work in a way that suits them.
The Freedom to be Creative
Google has really teased out the most fun parts of working intech and amplified those to the
maximum. It gives people a chance to solve huge problems while delivering people the most important
resource they can have: information. They are a little irreverent with recreation and generous with
perks. Those things always increase employee happiness, which has a direct relationship with
productivity.
A Fun Environment:
Google is just a fun place and doesn't feel like work. That is difficult to achieve in a company
where employees often work long days and even weekends. However, with the perks,
environment, and flexibility on where employees can work, Google has managed to create a very
creative and enjoyable workplace.
The People and Their Expertise:
You have instant access to experts in just about every technological field, and the intense
hiring process ensures that the huge majority of Googlers are not just smart and capable -- they’re
also kind and humble.
Dog-Friendly Workplace:

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Dogs are viewed as a way to enhance the quality of your work life. In the employee code of
conduct, Google has written an entire section on dogs. Any company focused on the finer details that
blur the distinction between the home and work environments is bound to get high marks on culture.
Shared Values Across the Organization:
While Google's office perks are great, it’s not just the benefits that make а great culture. It’s
something else: It’s the way management and teammates treat one another. That's what truly matters
at the end of the day.

Good ideas sell products. Great ideas change lives. From opening up our brand to opening up
museums,
Engineers see the world differently. While most of us accept what we see or adapt to our
environments, an engineer wonders ‘Why?’ Why are things the way they are? Why can’t we change
them? This passion for solving problems drives a lot of our creative thinking at Google. We aspire to
be a company that tackles issues that affect billions of people, whether they’re small, everyday
concerns or huge, global-scale problems.
Curiosity and creativity are never far apart. You need to be curious to identify problems worth
solving, and then come up with new solutions. We try to foster this in the Google culture. Our teams
are full of curious, energetic, passionate people from diverse backgrounds, and they have
unconventional approaches to work, play, and life. Our atmosphere may be casual, but as new ideas
emerge – at lunch, on campus, in the gym – they are traded, tested, and put into practice with dizzying
speed. Often these ideas become launch pads for new projects destined for worldwide use.
We don’t just solve problems with our software, but also with our marketing. Ultimately, we
want to help people understand how technology can enhance their lives, letting them spend time
doing more important things than reading a manual. To do that, we remind ourselves to constantly
ask ‘why’ and keep a few rules of thumb in mind: Focus on one real person, be open, say yes, and have
a purpose.
In a world where everything we do is counted in the billions (clicks, visits, users), it’s easy to
think solely in terms of numbers and digits. That’s why we try to focus on one real person. That real
person could be your mom, your brother, or your friend. Boiling technology down to a simple message

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focusing on real benefits that matter to people can make a product personal. It shows people how
technology connects to and enhances their daily lives. It’s not always easy; people are more complex
than machines, after all. We certainly don’t get it right every time, but our best creative work carries
a simple yet meaningful message. Our ‘Dear Sophie’ ad for Chrome shows how one person – a new
dad – can use the web to share memories with his daughter as she grows up.
We embrace creativity all around us. Ideas can come from anyone, not just a ‘Creative’
department. We open-source ideas internally, and we also collaborate with many content creators,
artists, developers, brands, agencies, and people who come to us with wonderful ideas. They stretch
and inspire us. Collaboration is essential to problem-solving in our increasingly complex world. That is
why we believe so strongly in the power of open technologies and platforms. They enable anyone,
anywhere, to apply their unique skills, perspectives, and passions to the creation of new products and
features on top of our platforms.
“It’s too easy to say ‘no’ all the time. It’s too easy to be cautious. Pushing the boundaries of
creativity means saying ‘yes,’ taking risks, trying new things, learning, and being surprised. So we don’t
just open-source ideas at Google, we open-source our brand.”
Whether helping a small business owner, a new dad, or a kid who wants to learn more, it’s a
healthy disregard for the impossible that compels us to find creative solutions to all sorts of problems.
One of our initiatives, ‘Chrome Experiments’ encourages interesting uses of HTML5 on our
Chrome browser. Perhaps the most well-known experiment to come out of this is The Wilderness
Downtown, an interactive multimedia video set to music from Arcade Fire. It was collaboration
between the band, our Data Arts team and writer/director Chris Milk. The project wasn’t about the
technology. It was about how we could use technology to redefine the music video experience.
Because let’s face it, not a lot has changed since MTV debuted ‘Video Killed the Radio Star’ almost 30
years ago.
There are plenty more examples, for which we can take very little credit. Through Google+,
artists like will.i.am from the Black Eyed Peas, and singer-songwriter Daria Musk, are re-imagining
what a live concert can be. Sal Khan is using the YouTube platform to revolutionize a system of
education that has barely changed in two centuries. In 2006, the former hedge fund analyst began
remotely tutoring family members, posting video lessons for them to watch in their own time, at their
own pace. Since then, his ‘Khan Academy’ has grown into an online collection of over 2,800
educational videos with over 118 million views. They are fun, clever, and incredibly creative. For Khan,
they all started as a solution to a problem: How can I schedule tutoring sessions around work, soccer
practice, and different time zones?
Creativity can also be a decision you make. And the truth is, it’s too easy to say ‘no’ all the
time. It’s too easy to be cautious. Pushing the boundaries of creativity means saying ‘yes,’ taking risks,
trying new things, learning, and being surprised. So we don’t just open-source ideas at Google, we
open-source our brand.
Every day, illustrators and engineers create beautiful interpretations of our logo, and we
display these ‘Doodles’ on our homepage. For a number of years, one of my favourite marketing
programs has been Doodle 4 Google. It is a competition that asks students to design a Doodle around
a theme such as ‘Our Community’ or ‘My Future’. No one is more creative than kids, and this contest
drives that home for me every year. By inviting users of all ages to share their imagination, we
ultimately share ownership of our brand.
It wasn’t a coincidence that we released the beta version of Gmail, offering one GB of free
storage, on April Fool’s Day, 2004. That much storage is normal now, but at the time no one else came
close, so people thought we were joking. When they realized we weren’t, it was a delightful surprise
and also a huge story. We didn’t do it with a flashy ad, we did it with a decision. Similarly, we chose to
license the little green Android robot under Creative Commons, meaning anyone can do whatever

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they want with it. This has helped the immense success of Android and has also fostered an incredible
momentum of creative energy all over the world.
Creativity is most powerful when it has a purpose. Through projects at Google, we have
opened up the world’s best museums (Art Project), helped kids develop a love of science (Google
Science Fair and YouTube Space Lab), showed how much we all have in common (Life in a Day), and
brought small businesses onto the web (Getting America’s Businesses Online). We have a strong sense
of why we exist and why we do what we do. We believe that our legacy – as a company and as
individuals – should be to make a difference in the world around us.
Whether helping a small business owner, a new dad, or a kid who wants to learn more, it’s a
healthy disregard for the impossible that compels us to find creative solutions to all sorts of problems.

2.Microsoft’s Innovation Management Framework


It is designed to help companies develop a comprehensive, integrated approach to implement
and support an innovation management strategy. This framework is a repeatable reference
architecture for innovation and is intended to allow companies to share and learn about innovation
management best practices and enabling technologies as a starting point for strategic discussions for
their company’s innovation management strategy.
The framework includes best practice processes and solutions that offer a strategic roadmap.
The roadmap offers techniques that are proven through experience to improve innovation and
innovation management performance. For example, the framework shares lessons learned from
Microsoft’s own innovation strategies and processes that help fuel innovation across the Microsoft
enterprise. These processes are used within Microsoft, enabling teams to quickly implement
innovation programs that are fit for purpose.”

1. Envision:

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Innovation is critical to achieving the goals of the modern business strategy. The Envision
process should put in place the strategy and plan to achieve the innovation goals in the business
strategy.
2. Engage:
At the front end of innovation where ideas are generated, sometimes referred to as
“ideation,” is where Engage occurs.
In this process, companies engage employees, customers, and partners in an innovation
community to capture and share new ideas. Formalizing engagement transforms it from a passive,
unfocused, ineffective “suggestion box” to a proactive approach that effectively produces targeted
ideas. The goal is to generate ideas that will drive new business value. As Braden Kelley of Business
Strategy Innovation explains, “The key in the engage processes is to get closer to the customer, what
they desire, how they will make their lives better, and how your product will displace something.”
3. Evolve:
The third process, “Evolve,” takes the output of the Engage process to the next level. In this
process, companies evolve ideas – as individuals or as teams – to increase their quality and value.
Soliciting and capturing ideas is not enough. Early feedback allows great ideas to be improved upon
and issues to be raised so they can be resolved (if possible).
4. Evaluate:
Simply discussing ideas is not enough. “It’s important to be able to organize, de-duplicate, and
merge ideas and take them to the next step in order to turn ideas into money,” offers Newsgator’s
Markus von Aschoff. At some point companies must identify the innovations they believe are
candidates for further investment. Unfortunately, many companies are drowning in too many ideas.

5. Execute:
Of course all of the best ideas, proposals and business plans in the world are of no value unless
they can be turned into a reality. The “Execute” sub-process takes the input from the previous
processes and executes a formal project to further develop the idea or commercialize it.
The Microsoft DIRA Framework

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This Innovation Management Framework is tightly aligned with Microsoft’s Discrete Industry
Reference Architecture for the discrete manufacturing industry. The DIRA framework covers three
primary business imperatives that are critical to the growth and profitability of a manufacturing
enterprise. These imperatives are

Innovate - Manage cross-boundary innovation and accelerate time-to-market


Perform - Deliver operational excellence with reliable business continuity
Grow - “Observe & serve” customers globally to drive growth with profitable proximity
This framework represents the “Innovation Management” portion of the “Innovate”
imperative (see diagram). This framework will also align with the Product Lifecycle Management (PLM)
Framework, which also falls under the Innovate imperative of DIRA.

Innovation in Oil and Gas Industry


Indian Oil Start Up Fund – Fuelling the Future:

IndianOil has launched a start-up scheme to promote promising start-ups and nurture an eco-
system conducive for innovations in the domestic hydrocarbons sector. Driven by IndianOil's Research
& Development Centre based at Faridabad, the scheme aims to support projects that establish
innovative technology and business process re-engineering ideas with significant business potential,
social relevance and focussed on environment-protection.

The start-up scheme has been administered through a dedicated online portal and shall
facilitate the community of technology and business-process innovators and entrepreneurs in
pursuing their promising re-engineering ideas to the stage of validated Proof of Concept (PoC) by way
of funding of the incubation ecosystem and intellectual mentoring.
The scheme aimed to support innovative ideas that have significant business potential, social
relevance and/or are focussed on environment-protection. Further, such validated PoCs may be
supported for commercialisation through equity participation.
As a first step, IndianOil Open Innovation Challenge was called for ideas in the domains of
Technology Process Re-engineering (TPRE) as well as Business Process Re-engineering (BPRE). These
were screened for shortlisting by a Level-1 committee through a structured evaluation matrix. The
shortlisted proposals of Level-1 were further reviewed by a Level-2 committee through presentations
and personal interactions with the applicants.
The selected proposals were incubated by IndianOil till they reach PoC stage, with the required
physical and intellectual support. Besides financial support, mentor support and specific
technical assistance in terms of guidance or testing on need-basis were also provided.
Funding was proposed over a period of 36 (thirty-six) months for TPRE projects and for 18
(eighteen) months for BPRE projects in instalments against agreed/accepted milestones. Fund
disbursements were planned based on the milestones achieved.
IndianOil also aimed at aiding commercialisation of select validated PoCs through equity
participation. Citizens of Indian origin willing to work in India besides individuals affiliated to academic

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institutions having incubation centres approved by the Central Government, or entrepreneurs from
IndianOil could apply under the scheme.
IndianOil took initiatives with the start-up scheme to promote collaborative research, develop
a vibrant & innovative ecosystem, nurture innovation & entrepreneurship, boost start-ups with rural
orientation, and open up avenues for young employees of the Corporation to launch start-up projects.
Further, IndianOil supports participative culture in the management of the company. With the
growth in the number of millennial joining the workforce, IndianOil take special care to ensure our
young officers feel proud and take ownership. To boost their motivation, engagement and loyalty as
well as to enhance agility & adaptability in the decision-making process, various unique interventions
are being initiated, such as BEST (Budding Executive Search for Talent), Young Officers’ Conclave,
Youth Day celebrations, etc.
With a view to fostering engagement with young executives, the Budding Executive Search for
Talent (BEST) initiative are launched every year inviting suggestions in Technical, HR and Finance fields.
Out of the total entries, entries are shortlisted to be presented at the Divisional level apart from
felicitating teams at the Regional level under Recognition & Reward Scheme to motivate and recognise
performers.

Innovation in Automotive Industry

Tesla’s Organizational Culture Type & Features

Tesla, Inc. has an innovative problem-solving organizational culture. This type of corporate
Culture motivates employees to develop profitable solutions to current and emerging problems in the
target market. For example, the company employs its organizational culture in developing advanced
electric vehicles as a solution to environmental issues surrounding automobiles that have internal
combustion engines. The company’s ability to keep introducing advanced electric vehicles reflect the
benefits of its corporate culture. Tesla Inc. identifies six main features of its organizational culture:
1. Move Fast

2. Do the Impossible

3. Constantly Innovate

4. Reason from “First Principles”

5. Think Like Owners

6. We are ALL IN

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Move Fast. Speed affects Tesla Inc.’s competitive advantage. This characteristic of the
organizational culture highlights the importance of employees’ capability to rapidly respond to trends
and changes in the international market. For example, the corporation’s human resources provide the
capability to develop cutting-edge products that match or exceed those from competing automotive
firms. In this way, Tesla’s corporate culture facilitates business resilience through speedy responses
to current issues and challenges in the global automotive industry.

Do the Impossible. In developing cutting-edge products, Tesla must ensure that its corporate
culture encourages employees to think outside the box. This cultural characteristic recognizes the
importance of new ideas and solutions, but it also emphasizes the benefits of considering
unconventional ways. For example, human resource managers train employees to go beyond
conventional limits of productivity and creativity in automotive design, leading to the development of
new solutions to energy and transportation needs. This condition opens new opportunities for Tesla
Inc. to strategically improve its business performance. This cultural condition also makes the company
an influential entity in prompting radical ideas in the
international automotive and energy solutions market.

Constantly Innovate. Innovation is at the heart of Tesla, Inc. This feature of the organizational
culture focuses on the continuous nature of innovation at the company. For example, the corporation
continuously researches and develops solutions that improve current energy storage product designs.
In this context of the business analysis, constant innovation helps develop cutting-edge electric cars
and related products. Continuous innovation maintains the competitive advantage necessary to
address the strong force of industry competition determined in the Porter’s Five Forces analysis of
Tesla Inc. The company addresses this need through a corporate culture that rewards constant
innovation. Managers motivate employees tocontribute to constant innovation in business processes
and output.

Reason from “First Principles” CEO Elon Musk promotes reasoning from first principles. These
principles revolve around identifying root factors to understand and solve problems in the real world.
For example, Tesla Inc.’s energy storage products are one of the solutions to challenges in using
renewable energy, and challenges in improving the efficiency of energy utilization. Through the
company’s corporate culture, employees use first principles in fulfilling their jobs. Tesla’s human
resource management involves training programs to orient employees to this feature of its
organizational culture.

Think Like Owners. Tesla employs its organizational culture as a tool to maintain a mindset
that supports business development. For example, the company motivates its workers to think like
they own the organization. This ownership mindset supports Tesla’s corporate vision and mission
statements by encouraging employees to take responsibility and accountability in their jobs and in the
overall performance of the multinational business. The ownership mindset is a powerful behavioral
factor that helps grow and strengthen the integrity of businesses in various industries. This corporate
cultural trait aligns workers with the company’s strategic objectives, thereby improving strategic
effectiveness.

We are ALL IN. Tesla, Inc.’s organizational culture unifies employees into a team that works to
improve the business. For example, this cultural characteristic helps minimize conflicts through
teamwork. Such teamwork also develops synergy in the company’s human resources. As a result, the

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corporate culture maximizes the benefits from employees’ talents and skills. Synergistic teamwork
contributes to Tesla’s competitiveness in the international automotive market. This unifying cultural
approach also facilitates corporate management and strategy implementation throughout the
organization.

The abovementioned cultural characteristics indicate that Tesla, Inc. focuses on encouraging
innovation that leads to useful products for the global market. The company’s progress and growth
are based on technological innovation. Tesla Inc.’s organizational culture has remained focused on
such innovation since the founding of the business. However, it is expected that the company will
gradually change its corporate culture to accommodate new needs as the business expands and
diversifies its product offerings.

TRIZ process for creative problem solving :

Seven Steps to Creating a Successful Innovation Framework

Heidi Hattendorf, director of Innovation Development, Motorola Solutions takes a deep dive
into how you can create an innovation framework at your company that will positively impact your
business results and culture. The article describes seven steps that will help you implement an “inside
out” approach to innovation at your company.

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Great ideas can come from anywhere. This includes:


❖ Outside in – customer and partner feedback, consumer technology and market trends
❖ Top down – executive vision, existing products or technology framework
❖ Inside out – your employees’ domain, customer and business knowledge
At Motorola Solutions, our process for “outside in” and “top down” innovation is based off of
immersive customer research. We observe and work side-by-side with our customers. For example,
we put on uniforms, participate in fire and SWAT training, ride along on patrol and follow first
responders as they address emergencies. We do this to better understand their personal challenges
and end-to-end operations, and then we identify opportunities to innovate to help them be their best
in the moments that matter.
From an “inside out” perspective, we have an innovation framework that takes internal crowd
sourcing to a new level – giving us a balanced approach to cultivating employees’ best ideas and
protecting them through our patent strategy. These seven steps will help you implement a similar
“inside out” approach to innovation at your company.

Step 1: Create a Scalable Platform for Success

An innovation framework is a global, scalable platform created to harness the creative talents
of your employees while staying in alignment with your corporate strategy. It’s a strategic approach
to innovation from the inside out that provides a way to act on new ideas. And without a framework,
you would just have a collection of ideas.
Without a framework, you would just have a collection of ideas.
The goals for an innovation framework are straightforward:
1. positively impact your organizational culture;
2. increase employee engagement in the innovation process;
3. generate a constant stream of ideas that have measurable business impact.
A framework, infused with social media tools, helps facilitate collaboration among global
employees and creates an online environment (with offline local leadership) where they can build on
existing ideas, comment, vote, or submit their own ideas. In our innovation framework, we welcome
random breakthrough ideas. However, we have found that building targeted challenges (see “step 5”)
helps us build on our collective expertise from across the globe.

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For example, we are creating a global, virtual water-cooler conversation and ideas exchange.
Employees from Poland are exchanging ideas with others in Malaysia and the U.S., and seeing
comments by teams in China, Germany and the U.K. Now that’s powerful!

Step 2: Establish the Right Organizational Principles

We are creating a global, virtual water-cooler conversation and idea exchange.A key to promoting
innovation across your organization is to establish a community of innovation champions. They are
highly-talented, hand-picked advocates with extensive business connections and reach who represent
business units and regional teams. They promote a powerful exchange of ideas for large challenges
that have a significant impact on the business. At Motorola Solutions, they support our hub-and-spoke
innovation framework model that is centralized within our Chief Technology Office.

Step 3: Engage your Organization’s Employees

The true test of any concept is how others ultimately grasp and accept it, and make it their
own. Bringing the right people together in the beginning can mean a better chance for success in the
end. That’s the power of the innovation framework and the network of innovation champions that
support it. They consistently promote, evangelize, coach and encourage teams to innovate. Because
innovation champions are embedded in the businesses where decisions to adopt new ideas are made,
they are the ideal candidates to evaluate, challenge and decide whether to bank ideas or pursue them.
This close coupling of resources is essential to the success and sustainability of the program.
Step 4: Build an Idea Management Tool

An idea management system comprises a critical part of the innovation framework. It makes
it easy for employees to participate and brings transparency to this process. Ours begins with an
interactive portal where every idea is tracked and a history is established. All ideas submitted must be

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reviewed and feedback is stored in the system. As ideas progress, innovators are automatically
updated when a new state is reached or a comment is submitted. The tool also supports social
collaboration with both innovation champions and subject matter experts to filter ideas and focus
more resources around high-potential ones.
Step 5: Focus on Targeted Innovation

In addition to fostering the open exchange of ideas, having an innovation framework also
functions to challenge internal stakeholders to solve specific problems. We call this “targeted
innovation.” It begins with a challenge from a business, customer or industry trend. Background, scope
and duration information is provided to ensure focus is applied to the right areas. By focusing ideation
activities where there is a business need, the probability of a concept being adopted is much greater.

When we first established our innovation framework, we used targeted innovation campaigns
– focused on improvements to existing products and features – to train employees on this new
approach to collaboration and innovation. These have since evolved to address cross-business and
technology challenges to spur more disruptive thinking and ideas.
Step 6: Manage the Backend of Innovation

A rigorous triage process helps ensure that ideas are reviewed frequently and efficiently.
Concepts that immediately show promise or align to business strategy move forward, while those that
do not are banked for later consideration. This process consists of a number of idea states, beginning
with “submitted (new)” and either ending with “adopted” or “banked.” Our triage process is built on
the premise of reducing risk while providing incremental funding, rewards and recognition as ideas
move forward. The ultimate goal is to quickly identify and adopt high-impact business ideas.
Step 7: Celebrate Successes!

With a rich history of innovation, Motorola Solutions has long recognized contributions to our
breakthrough solutions, technologies and intellectual property rights (IPR) portfolio with both
monetary and performance-based awards. Our innovation framework makes global contributions
more visible at the individual, facility and business unit level. This promotes a more innovative and
accountable culture. Several innovators have commented that their greatest reward is having their
idea acknowledged and acted upon.
Pulling it all Together
From leadership sponsors to employees, it takes engagement from all levels across a company
to make an innovation framework successful. The rewards of seeing ideas grow to prototypes and
ultimately to new customer deliverables keep innovators looking for what’s next. And when pulled
together, these seven steps create a powerful, collaborative system to ignite innovation at your
company

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Benchmarking is the process of studying in detail and identifying the best practices and
processes of the top company in the industry and use it as model/benchmark. It is hoped that the
learnings from the process will enable the benchmarker to create effective improvements resulting in
increased competitiveness. The process of benchmarking is a snapshot in time of a company’s success,
that the benchmarker hopes to imitate. Benchmarking can be carried out on any part or process of a
company that requires improvement in practices. From Human resources to production, sales or
marketing, everything can be measured against the best and most successful players in the market
and adjustments made to increase competitiveness

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Brainstorming

Brainstorming as an approach or technique can be an effective way of generating many ideas


on a specific issue which can then be filtered and reviewed to determine which idea or approach is
the most appropriate.
Brainstorming as a technique is most effective with groups of between 8 and 12 people
performed in a relaxed environment. It is a Creative group facilitation technique that encourages
participation from all group members.
Description of an approach

A typical brainstorming session will require:


❖ A facilitator
❖ A suitable brainstorming space – light, plenty of space, natural daylight
❖ Something to write ideas on, preferably a white-board, flip chart or Brown Paper.
The responsibilities of the facilitator include:
❖ Guiding the session,
❖ Encouraging participation
❖ Capturing (in writing) the ideas.
Brainstorming works best with a varied group of people. Even in areas involving specialists
people from outside of the sector or industry can often bring a fresh idea or approach that inspires
the thinking of the experts.

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Ground Rules for effective Brainstorming

In the classical approach to brainstorming there are four basic rules. These rules are designed to
reduce social inhibitions among groups members, stimulate idea generation, and increase overall
creativity of the group:
❖ Focus on quantity: It is not the quality or practicality that is important – just sheer number of
ideas. It is believed that quantity breeds quality. The greater the chance of producing a radical
and effective solution.
❖ Withhold criticism: Any judging at this stage inhibits lateral thinking and may inhibit some group
members from participation.
❖ Welcome unusual ideas: New perspectives are welcomes and assumptions suspended.
❖ Combine and improve ideas: This also encourages building on the ideas previously generated.

Lean thinking is a business methodology that aims to provide a new way to think about how to
organize human activities to deliver more benefits to society and value to individuals while eliminating
waste. The term lean thinking was coined by James P. Womack and Daniel T. Jones to capture the
essence of their in-depth study of Toyota’s fabled Toyota Production System. Lean thinking is a new
way of thinking any activity and seeing the waste inadvertently generated by the way the process is
organized by focusing on the concepts of:
❖ Value,
❖ Value streams,
❖ Flow,
❖ Pull,
❖ Perfection.
The aim of lean thinking is to create a lean enterprise, one that sustains growth by aligning
customer satisfaction with employee satisfaction, and that offers innovative products or services
profitably while minimizing unnecessary over-costs to customers, suppliers and the environment. The
basic insight of lean thinking is that if you train every person to identify wasted time and effort in their
own job and to better work together to improve processes by eliminating such waste, the resulting
enterprise will deliver more value at less expense while developing every employee’s confidence,
competence and ability to work with others.
There are five basic steps in assessing lean operations:
❖ Identify the activities that create value

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❖ Determine the sequence of activities (also called the value stream)


❖ Eliminate activities that do not add value
❖ Allow the customer to “pull” products/services
❖ Improve the process (start over)
For example, let’s take a look at the most fundamental cycle within a lean operation, the order-to-
delivery cycle. The top level activities, in sequence, are taking an order, building the order, and
delivering the order. The activities that do not add value are such things as: order entry,
backlog, inventory, and shipping delays.
In a lean operation, we could have the customer enter their own orders; products made on demand,
so we would have no backlog or inventory, and then product could be shipped overnight for minimal
shipping delay (or downloaded in the case of software).
Companies with very short order-to-delivery cycles (and not using inventory as a buffer) are lean
operations. Lean operations have a strong cash cycle. In general, the shorter the cycle the leaner the
operation. Do you know any companies like this?
Internet business are like this. They carry very little inventory, customers enter their own orders via
the web, make product on demand, and ship within 24 hours. Therefore, the order-to-delivery cycle
is very short (within 24 hours).

5s Systems:

Another important tool used in lean thinking is the 5S system of organization. The idea is that a messy
workplace, desk, or manufacturing cell makes it hard to find things, easier to get distracted, and can
introduce accidents or mistakes. The 5S’s stand for:
• Sort – Sort needed and unneeded items
• Set in Order – Arrange things in their proper place
• Shine – Clean up the workplace
• Standardize – Standardize the first three S’s
• Sustain – Make 5S a part of the job
Note the visual nature of lean. Lean Thinking is very visual, picturesque, even Zen like. It is definitely
a state of mind. Clean, clear, and focused at the task at hand and nothing else. It does not require a
lot of mathematical analysis, unlike Six Sigma.

Lateral thinking is solving problems through an indirect and creative approach, using reasoning that
is not immediately obvious and involving ideas that may not be obtainable by using only traditional
step-by-step logic. The term was promulgated in 1967 by Edward de Bono. He cites as an example
the Judgment of Solomon, where King Solomon resolves a dispute over the parentage of a child by
calling for the child to be cut in half, and making his judgment according to the reactions that this
order receives. Edward de Bono also links lateral thinking with humour, arguing there's a switchover
from a familiar pattern to a new, unexpected one. It is in this moment of surprise that generates
laughter and new insight which demonstrates an ability to see a different thought pattern that initially
was not obvious.

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According to de Bono, lateral thinking deliberately distances itself from the standard perception of
creativity as "vertical" logic (the classic method for problem solving)
Edward de Bono defines four types of thinking tools:
❖ Idea-generating tools intended to break current thinking patterns—routine patterns,
the status quo
❖ Focus tools intended to broaden where to search for new ideas
❖ Harvest tools intended to ensure more value is received from idea generating output
❖ Treatment tools that promote consideration of real-world constraints, resources, and support

Random Entry Idea Generating Tool

The thinker chooses an object at random, or a noun from a dictionary, and associates it with
the area they are thinking about. De Bono gives the example the randomly-chosen word "nose" being
applied to an office photocopier, leading to the idea that the copier could produce a lavender smell
when it was low on paper, to alert staff.

Provocation Idea Generating Tool

A provocation is a statement that we know is wrong or impossible but is used to create new
ideas. De Bono gives an example of considering river pollution and setting up the provocation "the
factory is downstream of itself"; this leads to the idea of forcing a factory to take its water input from
a point downstream of its output, an idea which later became law in some countries. Provocations
can be set up by the use of any of the provocation techniques—wishful thinking, exaggeration,
reversal, escape, distortion, or arising. The thinker creates a list of provocations and then uses the
most outlandish ones to move their thinking forward to new ideas.

Movement Techniques

One can move from a provocation to a new idea by the following methods: extract a principle,
focus on the difference, moment to moment, positive aspects, special circumstances.

Challenge Idea Generating Tool

A tool which is designed to ask the question "Why?" in a non-threatening way: why something
exists, why it is done the way it is. The result is a very clear understanding of "Why?" which naturally
leads to fresh new ideas. The goal is to be able to challenge anything at all, not just items which are
problems. For example, one could challenge the handles on coffee cups: The reason for the handle
seems to be that the cup is often too hot to hold directly; perhaps coffee cups could be made with
insulated finger grips, or there could be separate coffee-cup holders similar to beer holders, or coffee
shouldn't be so hot in the first place.

Concept Fan Idea Generating Tool

Ideas carry out concepts. This tool systematically expands the range and number of concepts
in order to end up with a very broad range of ideas to consider.

Disproving

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Based on the idea that the majority is always wrong (as suggested by Henrik Ibsen and by John
Kenneth Galbraith, take anything that is obvious and generally accepted as "goes without saying",
question it, take an opposite view, and try to convincingly disprove it. This technique is similar to de
Bono's "Black Hat" of Six Thinking Hats, which looks at identifying reasons to be cautious and
conservative

TRIZ process for creative problem solving :

Seven Steps to Creating a Successful Innovation Framework

Heidi Hattendorf, director of Innovation Development, Motorola Solutions takes a deep dive
into how you can create an innovation framework at your company that will positively impact your
business results and culture. The article describes seven steps that will help you implement an “inside
out” approach to innovation at your company.

Great ideas can come from anywhere. This includes:

❖ Outside in – customer and partner feedback, consumer technology and market trends
❖ Top down – executive vision, existing products or technology framework
❖ Inside out – your employees’ domain, customer and business knowledge

At Motorola Solutions, our process for “outside in” and “top down” innovation is based off of
immersive customer research. We observe and work side-by-side with our customers. For example,
we put on uniforms, participate in fire and SWAT training, ride along on patrol and follow first
responders as they address emergencies. We do this to better understand their personal challenges
and end-to-end operations, and then we identify opportunities to innovate to help them be their best
in the moments that matter.

From an “inside out” perspective, we have an innovation framework that takes internal crowd
sourcing to a new level – giving us a balanced approach to cultivating employees’ best ideas and
protecting them through our patent strategy. These seven steps will help you implement a similar
“inside out” approach to innovation at your company.

Step 1: Create a Scalable Platform for Success

An innovation framework is a global, scalable platform created to harness the creative talents of your
employees while staying in alignment with your corporate strategy. It’s a strategic approach to
innovation from the inside out that provides a way to act on new ideas. And without a framework,
you would just have a collection of ideas.

Without a framework, you would just have a collection of ideas.

The goals for an innovation framework are straightforward:

1. positively impact your organizational culture;

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2. increase employee engagement in the innovation process;

3. generate a constant stream of ideas that have measurable business impact.

A framework, infused with social media tools, helps facilitate collaboration among global employees
and creates an online environment (with offline local leadership) where they can build on existing
ideas, comment, vote, or submit their own ideas. In our innovation framework, we welcome random
breakthrough ideas. However, we have found that building targeted challenges (see “step 5”) helps
us build on our collective expertise from across the globe.

For example, we are creating a global, virtual water-cooler conversation and ideas exchange.
Employees from Poland are exchanging ideas with others in Malaysia and the U.S., and seeing
comments by teams in China, Germany and the U.K. Now that’s powerful!

Step 2: Establish the Right Organizational Principles

We are creating a global, virtual water-cooler conversation and idea exchange.

A key to promoting innovation across your organization is to establish a community of innovation


champions. They are highly-talented, hand-picked advocates with extensive business connections and
reach who represent business units and regional teams. They promote a powerful exchange of ideas
for large challenges that have a significant impact on the business. At Motorola Solutions, they support
our hub-and-spoke innovation framework model that is centralized within our Chief Technology
Office.

Step 3: Engage your Organization’s Employees

The true test of any concept is how others ultimately grasp and accept it, and make it their own.
Bringing the right people together in the beginning can mean a better chance for success in the end.
That’s the power of the innovation framework and the network of innovation champions that support
it. They consistently promote, evangelize, coach and encourage teams to innovate. Because
innovation champions are embedded in the businesses where decisions to adopt new ideas are made,
they are the ideal candidates to evaluate, challenge and decide whether to bank ideas or pursue them.
This close coupling of resources is essential to the success and sustainability of the program.

Step 4: Build an Idea Management Tool

An idea management system comprises a critical part of the innovation framework. It makes it easy
for employees to participate and brings transparency to this process. Ours begins with an interactive
portal where every idea is tracked and a history is established. All ideas submitted must be reviewed
and feedback is stored in the system. As ideas progress, innovators are automatically updated when
a new state is reached or a comment is submitted. The tool also supports social collaboration with
both innovation champions and subject matter experts to filter ideas and focus more resources
around high-potential ones.

Step 5: Focus on Targeted Innovation

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In addition to fostering the open exchange of ideas, having an innovation framework also functions to
challenge internal stakeholders to solve specific problems. We call this “targeted innovation.” It begins
with a challenge from a business, customer or industry trend. Background, scope and duration
information is provided to ensure focus is applied to the right areas. By focusing ideation activities
where there is a business need, the probability of a concept being adopted is much greater.

When we first established our innovation framework, we used targeted innovation campaigns –
focused on improvements to existing products and features – to train employees on this new approach
to collaboration and innovation. These have since evolved to address cross-business and technology
challenges to spur more disruptive thinking and ideas.

Step 6: Manage the Backend of Innovation

A rigorous triage process helps ensure that ideas are reviewed frequently and efficiently. Concepts
that immediately show promise or align to business strategy move forward, while those that do not
are banked for later consideration. This process consists of a number of idea states, beginning with
“submitted (new)” and either ending with “adopted” or “banked.” Our triage process is built on the
premise of reducing risk while providing incremental funding, rewards and recognition as ideas move
forward. The ultimate goal is to quickly identify and adopt high-impact business ideas.

Step 7: Celebrate Successes!

With a rich history of innovation, Motorola Solutions has long recognized contributions to our
breakthrough solutions, technologies and intellectual property rights (IPR) portfolio with both
monetary and performance-based awards. Our innovation framework makes global contributions
more visible at the individual, facility and business unit level. This promotes a more innovative and
accountable culture. Several innovators have commented that their greatest reward is having their
idea acknowledged and acted upon.

Pulling it all Together

From leadership sponsors to employees, it takes engagement from all levels across a company to make
an innovation framework successful. The rewards of seeing ideas grow to prototypes and ultimately
to new customer deliverables keep innovators looking for what’s next. And when pulled together,
these seven steps create a powerful, collaborative system to ignite innovation at your company.

Tesla Motors
Introduction
Tesla Motors Inc. is an automotive company, which was established in 2003 by a Group of Silicon
Valley engineers who wanted to develop electric vehicles. More specifically, Tesla Motors was

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founded by Elon Musk (founder of PayPal), Marc Tarpenning and Martin Eberhard. In addition, Sergey
Brin and Larry Page (the founders of Google) are among its investors.

In 2006, when the co-founder and current CEO of Tesla Motors Elon Musk was asked about their
strategy, he stated: “The starting point is a high performance sports car, but The long term vision is to
build cars of all kinds, including low cost family vehicles”.

Corporate Strategy

Tesla Motors uses three pathways in order to enhance the number and variety of its available EVs to
consumers:

❖ Tesla trades its EVs via both online channels and company owned showrooms
❖ Other auto manufacturers are able to get their own EVs to customers sooner by buying
patented electric powertrain components from Tesla Motors
❖ Tesla Motors inspire other auto manufacturers by proving that there is pent-up consumer
demand for sportive performance and at the same time socially responsible vehicles.

The overall strategy of Tesla can be summed up in three steps. The first step was to introduce the
Roadster model to the market and consequently establish a keystone for EVs. In continuation, in 2012
the new “Model S” was introduced to the market and it is targeted at middle to upper-middle class
consumers. Finally, to produce and market a new model named “Model X”.

Partnerships

Tesla Motors manufactures and markets its own EVs. At the same time, in contradiction with
other traditional auto manufacturers, it acts as an original equipment Manufacturer (OEM) by the
production of electric powertrain components, which other companies can buy and trade with their
own brand names.

Innovation and Creativity @ Tesla Motors

In late 2015, electric vehicle manufacturer Tesla rolled out its 7.0 software, giving its cars a
suite of autonomous features such as automatized steering, lane change, and parallel parking. Tesla
is not the first or only manufacturer to offer these kinds of autopilot features, but it does have the
capability to roll them out faster than its competitors: the company started installing the hardware
for semi-autonomous functionality more than a year ago. While other manufacturers had to add new
technology and gadgets to their cars for them to be semi-autonomous, all Tesla owners had to do was
update their software, as they do for an iPhone or computer.

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The 7.0 software is constantly gathering data from drivers, so not only can Tesla iterate faster,
it can do so based on data captured by thousands of real drivers. In 2016, the 7.1 update will provide
autopilot parking--drivers won't even need to be in the car. And Tesla owner Elon Musk expects to
come out with a legit self-driving car within three years, which is just slightly sooner than the 2020
deadline set by competitors such as Google and Mercedes.

How Tesla went about being innovative and Creative

Tesla aims to disrupt the automotive industry by creating many innovative pieces that fit
together; this strategy was called "complex coordination" by Tesla investor Peter Thiel (Co founder of
PayPal). Its marketing, production, sales and technology strategies all are notably different from its
competitors.

Figure: Robotic manufacturing of the Model S at the Tesla Factory in Fremont, California

Tesla's automotive strategy is to emulate typical technological-product life cycles and initially
target affluent buyers. It then moved into larger markets at lower price points. The battery and electric
drivetrain technology for each model would be developed and paid for through the sales of earlier
models. The Roadster was low-volume and priced at US$109,000. Model S and Model X targeted the
broader luxury market. Model 3 is aimed at a higher-volume segment. This business strategy is
common in the technology industry. According to a Musk blog post, "New technology in any field takes
a few versions to optimize before reaching the mass market, and in this case it is competing with 150
years and trillions of dollars spent on gasoline cars."

Tesla's production strategy includes a high degree of vertical integration, which includes
component production and proprietary charging infrastructure. The company operates enormous
factories to capture economies of scale.

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Tesla builds electric powertrain components for vehicles from other automakers, including
the Smart ED2 For Two electric drive (the lowest-priced car from Daimler AG), the Toyota RAV4 EV,
and Freightliner's Custom Chassis Electric Van.

Vertical integration is rare in the automotive industry, where companies typically outsource
80% of components to suppliers, and focus on engine manufacturing and final assembly.

Figure: The Tesla Patent Wall at its headquarters was removed after the company announced its patents
are part of the open source movement.

Tesla's sales strategy is to sell its vehicles in company-owned showrooms and online rather
than to use a conventional dealer strategy.

Tesla's technology strategy focuses on pure-electric propulsion technology and transferring


other approaches from the technology industry to transportation, such as online software updates.

Tesla allows its technology patents be used by anyone in good faith. Licensing agreements
include provisions whereby the recipient agrees not to file patent suits against Tesla, or to copy its
designs directly. Tesla retained control of its other intellectual property, such as trademarks and trade
secrets to prevent direct copying of its technology.

Tesla Human Resources VP Arnnon Geshuri committed to bringing manufacturing jobs "back
to California". In 2015, Geshuri led a hiring surge about which he said; "In the last 14 months we've
had 1.5 million applications from around the world. People want to work here. "Geshuri emphasizes
hiring veterans, saying "Veterans are a great source of talent for Tesla, and we're going after it."

Tesla utilized renewable source of energy

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On August 1, 2016, Tesla agreed to acquire SolarCity Corp. for $2.6 billion in stock. SolarCity is
the largest installer of rooftop solar systems in the United States. More than 85% of unaffiliated Tesla
and SolarCity shareholders voted to approve the acquisition, which closed on November 21, 2016.

Table- Organizational Capabilities

Culture Behaviour Capabilities


Innovative, • Hard working • Be the first manufacturer of
creative, learning, employees mass produced electric car
collaborative, • Frequently new ideas • Continue operations to
inclusive that come from generate profits
innovative culture • Change society’s negative
• No competition perception about electric cars
between employees and make it affordable and
desirable for the average
person
Leadership Organizational Structure Management Process
Participative, very Functional with VP’s for Centralized decision making, since
engaged, since departments decisions are made at top level by VP’s
Musk funds the
company

Key Innovation Lessons from Tesla Motors

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Tesla isn’t the only car manufacturer nor the first one to try to popularize the electric car. The
electric car wasn’t just one of the top engineering feats of the past half-century, it has also been
an uphill climb in terms of public acceptance. While doing right by planet Earth is an attractive
concept, doing so at a considerable expense to one’s on pocketbook wasn’t quick to catch on. It is not
only one thing to spend an afternoon on Earth Day picking up trash but also to eliminate pollution and
save fossil fuels.

While the marketplace is still a very long way from boasting an electric car in every driveway,
Tesla Motors has sold 258,000 of their all-electric vehicles. Sales have been bolstered by the
government’s tax credits. But no one could argue that Tesla has been anything less than a phenomenal
success in terms of innovation systems. With one of the highest customer satisfaction ratings in the
history of the automotive industry, as well as one of the most unique business models in all of
manufacturing, what can we learn from the phenomenal success of Tesla in terms of innovation?

1. New Ideas Might be Slow to Catch On

Figure: A model of Tesla Car

Tesla isn’t just innovative but trendy too. But it took more than that to convince over
thousands of customers to part with their money. Tesla is known for superior safety ratings, superb
customer service, and continually improving their cars, even after the customer makes the purchase.

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Palo Alto, California has offered special parking for electric vehicles since 2009. But until very
recently, most spaces sat empty. That’s no longer the case. Most parking spaces reserved for electric
vehicles are now occupied regularly, and users are taking advantage of the charging stations provided
there, as well. Sure, Tesla could have tossed in the towel when those spaces sat unclaimed year after
year. But they didn’t. Founder Elon Musk and his team of dedicated workers held fast and eventually
the marketplace caught up with their innovation. Don’t give up just because an innovation system
takes time to gain market acceptance.

2. The Best Place to Deliver Innovation is in a Niche

Tesla Motors was established in 2003, but did not unveil their product until 2009 and was not
able to actually deliver their products to customers until 2012. In the meantime, numerous other
electric cars and electric-gasoline hybrids hit the market to lackluster sales. As it happens, there is a
rather small group of people who are both A) strongly committed to a healthy environment and B)
able and willing to part with nearly $100,000 for a car. But that was the niche for Tesla, and with time
and patience, it’s finally taking off. Gradually, as electric automotive technology becomes more
abundant and less expensive, it is trickling out to the general public. Moral to the story is to find a
niche for your innovation system. Once you have gained traction in your niche, it will catch on
elsewhere, too.

3. Established Business Models Don’t Always Work

Figure: Charging Station at Palo, Alto

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Part of Tesla’s business plans are to make charging stations as fast, readily available, and
convenient as gas stations are today.

Tesla has not just done away with loud motors that consume finite natural resources they
have also turned the traditional car sales model on its head. For decades, auto manufacturers have
used a complicated rewards system to convince dealers to stock large lots full of vehicles for buyers
to choose from. Tesla’s vehicles are made to order. If your innovation system does not fit within the
confines of established business models, that’s okay! Find a model that does work and delve into new
territories.

4. Innovation Provides Its Own Value

As per a recent article in Forbes about how Tesla is transforming the auto industry, in spite of
posting losses in the millions of dollars for 2014 and 2015, Tesla continues to be backed by investors
to the tune of $30 billion and that reflects their faith in the company’s long-term innovation vision.
This just goes to show that innovation sometimes even trumps the bottom line. At least in the short
term.

Table- Value Proposition

Product Attributes Value Differentiator


Electric engine High performance, Yes, no other competing
environmentally conscious models are electric (BMW,
Mercedes)
Panoramic glass roof Elegant and upscale, prestige No, lots of luxury models
Low maintenance design; no Owners have to perform Yes
need for significantly
traditional transmission less repairs
system
Wireless Software Updates Performance issues easily Yes
fixed, lower risk
Best range for an electric Convenience, performance, Yes
vehicle reliability, ease of use for
everyday transport
Mobile service centers Convenience, accessibility Yes

Results & Analysis

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Results that followed their unquenchable desire to being innovative

Revenue: $ 11.76 billion (as of 2017) with a compound annual growth rate of 93.2% since it
became public in 2010

Figure: Financial performance of Tesla over the years

Production: Currently producing around 100,000 cars per annum (as in 2017)

Figure: Production overview

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Staff: 37,543 (as on 2017) hiring at a compound annual growth rate of 70.4% since 2010

Market Brand: Known worldwide for its innovation and creation

Beating the competition

Tesla has made big moves to solidify its hold in the electric car space, even with competition
beginning to mount.

Figure: Tesla- topping the list

Tesla’s impact in the automobile industry is significant. They care for their customer's safety,
and also provide great health insurance to their employees while working in a safe satellites office.
Their environmental benefits include reducing the greenhouse effect, zero emission, renewable
energy source. Even though Tesla has not made much profit; it's revolutionized industry had a great
impact on people, which have increased its market share. Other automotive manufacturers even
began creating hybrid vehicles, most through Tesla's patent.

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Future of Tesla

From electric cars to solar powered home batteries, Elon Musk tirelessly throws himself, and
his company, into new endeavours. The man who once said, “Failure is an option here. If things are
not failing, you are not innovating enough,” is evidently the face of innovation.

Many believe that buying Tesla stock is buying confidence in the future: in clean energy, in
solar power, or even in colonizing Mars. However, watching Tesla shares rise and fall in the past two
years have been like watching a climber belay up a mountain.

Tesla has come a long way since convincing the public that an electric car is a feasible,
convenient, and cost-efficient mode of daily transportation. Since then, Tesla has delivered more
than 250,000 electric cars and recently expanded its scope to solar power batteries for homes. Elon
Musk has transformed the plot of a futuristic sci-fi movie into an attainable status quo.

The next step for Tesla is transforming the brand from a luxury car to an affordable mode of
transportation. The Model 3 is the least expensive Tesla with a $35,000 price tag.

To support vehicle demand, Tesla is building the Gigafactory in Nevada to produce enough
lithium to supply the estimated 500,000 cars per year that the company expects to produce by 2020.

Tesla is trying to overcome its latest obstacle of convincing the public that owning an electric
car is a convenient and feasible option for everyone. Tesla’s first quarter 2015 sales in China lagged
behind expectations due to misconceptions on how to charge the car. Tesla is having a hard time
breaking into the massive potential market in China because most families live in apartments in the
cities that lack family-style garages. Tesla is working within this framework to offer free at-home
charging and set up charging stations in partnership with residential buildings.

Now, Tesla is setting its sights on clean energy and encouraging the world to consume less
and store more. By announcing the Powerwall, Tesla is reminding consumers that it is more than just
a car company, but an energy innovation company too. Tesla’s Powerwall is a rechargeable lithium-

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ion battery that will store energy for homes. It will allow homeowners to save money by charging
during periods of low electricity demand and expending during times of high demand.

Does Tesla have the ability to single-handedly change the way the world consumes? With
someone as tenacious and resilient as Elon Musk at the forefront of the company, the majority of
analysts think so.

Conclusion - Creativity and innovation in an organisation

With so much at stake for an organisation, it is obvious that innovation is not an optional extra. Rather,
creating an innovative environment is vital for a company’s survival. The best strategy for promoting
innovation in an organisation is to encourage activities and strategies that remove barriers and
transform the culture from resistant to resourceful, and which rewards innovators.

To achieve this, the following recommendations are among the most important.

1. Link innovation & Creativity to the core cultural values of the organisation.
2. Create a sense of urge for change and make the most of the physical work environment.
3. Develop a structure that is most appropriate for the kind of innovation & creativity desired
and consciously nurture a culture to suit.
4. Publicly celebrate successful innovation & creative ideas.
5. Investigate which of the most significant barriers to innovation are perceived rather than
actual barriers, to better direct resources.
6. Interview innovators within an organisation and find out the barriers that stop them from
using their talents.
7. Develop an accessible internal database system for all new ideas within the organisation to
advance collaborative efforts.
8. Offer education and training for all employees.
9. Develop teams and groups with diverse skills and analytical styles.
10. Goals and objectives of the innovative culture must be communicated clearly, continuously,
and promptly to all employees.

Barriers to innovation can be reduced if people are made aware of the big picture and understand
how their work fits in with the overall effort. For an organisation which has not yet embraced a culture
of creativity and innovation, the solution might seem worse than the problem. The solution requires
change – massive changes – not the least of which is a commitment on the part of an organisation’s
leaders. For the resistance to change is not confined to the lower levels of the firm; even the attitudes
of the higher-ups can form barriers to innovation.

As it is noted, effort must be expended removing all barriers from every levels of the organisation.
This will involve creating a new work environment, with a new work ethic, and a new culture. It will
necessitate the flattening-out of hierarchies, and the abandonment of old and comfortable ways. It

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means paying attention to the personal development of an employee’s potential, for everyone is able
to contribute to the success of the organisation, given the appropriately nurturing environment. A
strategy which sees experimentation and risk as normal, and which supports collaboration and
participation of the entire organisation, is one which will promote creativity and innovation.

It is submitted that creativity and innovation in an organisation is easier said than done – Is a fact” is
quite. To change and transform the entire enterprise’s traditional thinking paradigm to an innovative
paradigm is neither simple nor easy nor without cost. It is common for management to pay lip service
to innovation and organize lengthy innovation talk fests, but go no further. Innovation, however;
should not be viewed as mere cost, but rather viewed an investment with great pay back.

Though the returns are not always evident within short period, the payoff from creativity and
innovation can be achieved gradually by a change in the behaviour and thinking of the entire
organisation, not only the bottom but also the top.

REFERENCES
https://www.fastcompany.com/company/tesla-motors- innovation and creativity @
Tesla motors
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla,_Inc.- Solar City
https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/120314/who-are-teslas-tsla-main-
competitors.asp
https://www.statista.com/statistics/314768/number-of-tesla-employees/
https://ideascale.com/3-key-innovation-lessons-from-tesla-motors/
https://www.businessinsider.in/Heres-how-Teslas-electric-cars-stack-up-against-the-
competition/articleshow/53964503.cms

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