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How to Help

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By: Isabelle Tsosie, Celeste Sanchez, and Giselle Adame
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Objective

➔ Teachers will be able to enhance school


safety through various school security
measures using a threat assessment model.
InTASC Standard 9
➔ 9(d) The teacher actively seeks professional, community, and technological
resources, within and outside the school, as supports for analysis, reflection,
and problem-solving.
➔ 9(j) The teacher understands laws related to learners’ rights and teacher
responsibilities (e.g., for educational equity, appropriate education for learners
with disabilities, confidentiality, privacy, appropriate treatment of learners,
reporting in situations related to possible child abuse).
➔ 9(o) The teacher understands the expectations of the profession including
codes of ethics, professional standards of practice, and relevant law and
policy.
Bell Ringer
Look at the picture and the statistics...

…WHAT IF you could change something about school


security that can prevent school shootings in the U.S, what
would it be? Write it down on a half piece of paper.
Teachers ARE Part of School Security
➔ As a Teacher, you can actually change something about school
security. You can help to prevent the number of school shootings
across America from rising through learning about a
Comprehensive Targeted Violence Prevention Plan (CTVPP)
and implementing the plan in your class and at school.

➔ Thus, in union with physical security and emergency


management, a threat assessment process is an effective
way to ensure the safety and security of schools in our nation.
Key Considerations
➔ Threat assessment procedures recognize that students engage in a
series of concerning behaviors, most which will be non-threatening
and non-violent, but may still require intervention.
➔ The starting point for intervention should be minor so that schools
can identify students in distress before the students behavior
escalates towards a higher level that concerns safety.
➔ Teachers and staff should take ALL incoming reports seriously,
and assess any information and address any information that
regards concerning behaviors or statements.
➔ Everyone in the school environment has a role to play in
preventing school violence and creating schools a safe
place to be in!
Key Considerations (cont.)

➔ No profile of a student attacker


◆ “There have been male and female attackers, high-achieving students with good grades as
well as poor performers,” (U.S. Secret Service National Threat Assessment Center, 2018)
➔ Stop focusing on personality traits or academic performance
◆ 👏It’s👏time👏to👏focus👏on👏a👏student’s👏risk👏for👏violence👏
◆ Threat Assessment Process
● “...designed to gather the most relevant information about the student’s communications
and behaviors, the negative or stressful events the student has experienced, and the
resources the student possesses to overcome those setbacks and challenges,” (U.S.
Secret Service National Threat Assessment Center, 2018)
Question
A student from your class randomly tells you that Johnny is
always posting that he hates school and everyone in the
school on social media, what would you do?

1. Ignore the comment since every student hates


school
2. Speak to Johnny about the issue
3. Report him to the school principal so he can get a
referral
Answer
➔ A student from your class randomly tells you that Johnny is always putting he
hates school and everyone in the school on social media, what would you do?

2. Speak to Johnny about the issue

Teachers and staff should take ALL incoming reports seriously, and assess any
information and address any information that regards concerning behaviors or
statements.
The Game Plan - COMPREHENSIVE TARGETED
VIOLENCE PREVENTION PLAN (CTVPP)
➔ “...the focus of which is to decrease the risk of students
engaging in harm to themselves or the school
community. These recommendations serve as the
starting point on a path to implementation that will need
to be customized to the specific needs of your school,
your student body, and your community. When creating
these plans, schools should consult with legal
representatives to ensure that they comply with any
applicable state and federal laws or regulations.”
The Game Plan of CTVPP… but more
Step 1: Establish a Multidisciplinary Threat Assessment (M.T.A.) Team
➔ Those who can direct, manage, and document the M. T.A. process so
that they may assess the risk of the school community.
➔ Establish protocols and procedures followed for each assessment
➔ Meet on a regular basis
Step 2: Define Prohibited and Concerning Behaviors
➔ Behaviors that are unacceptable and that justify intervention
◆ Also identify behaviors that may not necessarily be indicative of
violence
➔ Key moments of intervention should be early enough to identify before
escalation
Step 3: Create a Central Reporting Mechanism
➔ Create a platform to voice concerns (anonymously); and reports should
be acted upon, kept confidential, and handled appropriately.
➔ Training for recognizing behaviors, roles + responsibilities, and how to
report the information.
Step 4: Determine the Threshold for Law Enforcement Intervention
➔ Beneficial for the team is a S.R.O. is a member
➔ If not available, clear threshold for situations when law enforcement is
asked to support or take over an assessment.
The Game Plan of CTVPP… but even more
Step 5: Establish Assessment Procedures
➔ Teams need to establish clearly defined processes and procedures to guide their assessments.
◆ Motive: What motivated the student to engage in the behavior of concern? What is the student trying to
solve?
◆ Inappropriate Interests: Does the student have inappropriate interests in weapons, school attacks or
attackers, mass attacks, other violence?
◆ Capacity: Is the student organized enough to plan and execute an attack? Does the student have the
resources?

Step 6: Develop risk management options to enact once an assessment is complete


➔ Create individualized management plans to mitigate identified risks.
◆ Notify law enforcement immediately if the student is thinking about an attack, ensure the safety of potential
targets, create a situation less prone to violence, redirect the student’s motive, and reduce the effect of
stress.
Step 7: Create and promote a safe school climate
➔ Built on a culture of safety, respect, trust, and emotional support.
➔ Encourage communication, intervene in conflicts and bullying, and empower students to share their concerns.
Step 8: Provide training for all stakeholders
➔ School personnel, students, parents, and law enforcement.
Question
➔ How many steps does the Comprehensive Targeted
Violence Prevention Plan have?

Thumbs up for 10
Thumbs down for 8
Thumbs to the side for 5
Answer
➔ How many steps does the Comprehensive Targeted
Violence Prevention Plan have?

Thumbs down!! There is 8 steps in the


Comprehensive Targeted Violence Prevention Plan!
CLOSURE
Works Cited
Enhancing School Safety Using a Threat Assessment Model. (2018, July 13). Retrieved from
https://www.dhs.gov/publication/enhancing-school-safety-using-threat-assessment-model

Saric, D. (2018, May 22). America Has Had Nearly 300 School Shootings Since 2009; More Than Any G7
Country. Retrieved from
https://www.hotnewhiphop.com/america-has-had-nearly-300-school-shootings-since-2009-more-than-any-
g7-country-news.50783.html