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DYSLEXIA AND MUSIC TRAINING

Poster · June 2017


DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.20465.89444

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3 authors, including:

Alessio Surian
University of Padova
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REPLACE  THIS  BOX  WITH  
DYSLEXIA AND MUSIC TRAINING REPLACE  THIS  BOX  WITH  
YOUR  ORGANIZATION’S   YOUR  ORGANIZATION’S  
HIGH  RESOLUTION  LOGO   HIGH  RESOLUTION  LOGO  

Alessio  Surian,  PhD ;  Antonella  Nicolek,  MA ;  Giovanna  Ferrari,  MA


1 2 2  
1University  of  Padova,  2Music  Therapy  School  “G.  Ferrari”  

Abstract   Methods  and  Materials  


The  study  presents  the  results  of  the  TIME   The  training  focuses  on  providing  adequate  
(Training  interac7ve  musical  ɘlements)  course   cogni7ve  s7mula7on  within  an  educa7onal  
offered  to  Italian  pupils  (aged  8-­‐10)  affected  by   game  framework.  
dyslexia.  The  training  makes  use  of  the  elements   Rhythmical  sequences  are  associated  to  colours,  
of  the  musical  language  to  improve  the   shapes,  numbers,  and  movements.  They  are  
automa7c  process  of  reading  and  wri7ng,  as  all   proposed  to  the  subjects  paying  aqen7on  to  
abili7es  implied  by  this  process  are  strictly   increase  gradually  the  level  of  difficulty.    
connected  to  the  organiza7on  of  the  musical    
language.   The  level  of  difficulty  concerns  both  the  
  presenta7on  of  phonemes  and  gestures,  as  well  
It  has  been  implemented  and  tested  with   as  the  rela7on  of  phonemes  and  gestures  with  
posi7ve  results  both  as  individual  and  as  group   different  images  and  numbers.  
course.  It  uses  phono-­‐rhythmical-­‐motor    
elements  in  an  interac7ve  way,  in  order  to  make   TIME  was  tested  through  two  studies  involving  
the  reading/wri7ng  process  easier.     one  individual  case  study  and  one  group  study  
  including  data  from  Rapid  Automa7za7on  
Rhythmical  sequences  are  associated  to  colours,   Naming  (RAN,  Denckla  e  Rudel,  1976)    test  –   Tab.  1.  Case  study  Test-­‐Retest  results.  
shapes,  numbers,  and  movements.   retest.  

IntroducCon   Results   Discussion  


The  TIME  training  approach  is  based  on  the  idea   The  (3-­‐month)  individual  case  study  data   The  two  exploratory  study  presents  encouraging  
that  (music)  learning  is  supported  by  rhythm   concerning  an  8  years  old  child  are  displayed  in   results.  
experience  that  is  enacted  with  one’s  own  body   Table  1.   We  intend  to  invite  primary  and  secondary  schools  
as  indicated  by  various  music  educa7on  scholars   Data  show:   to  include  the  TIME  training  in  their  ac7vi7es  to  
such  as    Émile  Jaques-­‐Dalcroze  (1865-­‐1950),   1.  improved  reading  speed  ability  in  rela7on  to   support  children  and  youth  with  reading  disabili7es.  
Edgar  Willems  (1890-­‐1978),  Carl  Orff   colours,  shapes  and  numbers;   We  understand  that  this  rhythm  centred  training  
needs  specific  facilita7ng  skills  and  therefore  we  
(1895-­‐1982),  Murray  Schafer  (1933-­‐),  Reinhard   2.  improved  ability  to  avoid  mistakes  in  rela7on  
would  like  to  iden7fy  the  core  TIME  trainer  
Fla7schler  (1950-­‐),  Tupac  Man7lla  (1978-­‐)  with   to  colours  and  shapes,  but  not  to  numbers.  
competences  in  order  to  design  appropriate  train  
Percuac7on.   3.  increase  (+  1)  of  the  number  of  remembered   for  trainers.  
  items;   At  the  same  7me,  in  those  schools  that  offer  
Two  exploratory  studies  were  implemented   4.  memory  span  increase  (reverse  span  shiNs   suitable  condi7ons,  we  would  like  to  follow-­‐up  the  
based  on  the  hypothesis  that  in  order  to   from  2  to  4).   studies  by  implemen7ng  a  research  design  that  
facilitate  children’s  reading  ability  it  is  important     involves  control  groups  as  well  in  order  to  offer  
to  strengthen  their  self-­‐confidence  in  dealing   The  (3-­‐month)  group  study  data  including  three   evidence  based  data  that  can  support  the  
with  rhythm,  voice  and  their  body  while  re-­‐ girls  and  one  boy  aged  11  years.  are  displayed  in   understanding  and  the  planning  of  further  TIME  
coding  wriqen  signs  into  their  phonological   Table  2.     training  ac7vi7es  in  Italian  primary  and  secondary  
transla7on.     Data  show  significant  achievements  concerning   schools.  
This  is  facilitated  by  the  rapid  naming  of  serial   the  reading  speed  and  reading  accuracy  –  except  
s7muli  that  children  have  to  associate  with   for  “G”  who  faced  concurring  psychological  
sound-­‐gestures.   difficul7es.  
Selected  References  
Dege  e  Schwarzer  G.  (2011),  The  effect  of  a  
music  program  on  phonological  awareness  in  
preschoolers,  «Front  Psychol»,  vol.  2(124)  
Denckla  M.B.  e  Rudel  R.G.  (1976),  Rapid  
Automa8zed  Naming  (R.A.N.):  Dyslexia  
differen8ated  from  other  learning  disabili8es,  
«Neuropsychologia»,  vol.  14,  pp.  471-­‐479.  
Patel  A.D.  (2006),  Musical  rhythm,  linguis8c  
rhythm  and  human  evolu8on,  «Music  
Percep7on»,  vol.  24,  n.  1,  pp.  99-­‐104.  
Stambak  M.  (1951),  Le  problème  du  Rythme  
dans  le  dèveloppement  de  l’enfant  et  dans  les  
dyslexies  d’évolu8on,  «Enfance»,  vol.  4,  n.  5,  pp.  
480-­‐502.  

Tab.  2  Group  Study:  Four  children  Test-­‐Retest  


.   results  

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