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Unit Theme: Twelfth Night, or What You Will ~ Reality vs.

Performance

Grade: 10

Timeline: 5 Weeks

Teacher Jasmine
Fernandez

Subject English

Rationale:
This English unit is designed to help students answer the essential question “How do social
expectations affect the development of our identity?” A question such as this one will resonate with
adolescents, an audience that knows what it feels like to have to constantly switch between different
roles when seeking acceptance and comfortability.
Social norms/expectations are ubiquitous in society, and they influence various aspects of
human behavior. We perform a certain way to form our desired realities. However, what we say does
not always reflect who we are, and vice versa. Saying and being are not one and the same, and this idea
is one of the major themes addressed in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, or What You Will. Using this
play, supplemented by other texts regarding the themes of reality and performance, students will
analyze the difference between saying and being. They will examine how diction, style/tone,
meaning, context, characterization, and the like affect their perceptions of multifaceted characters and
complex situations. Furthermore, they will generate opinions not only on how they view the plot of the
main play, but make text-to-self, text-to-text, and text-to-world connections. Increasing students’
intrapersonal and interpersonal awareness will help them form a better understanding of the concept of
human identity, what people want the world to see and what may actually lurk beneath the surface.

Student Learning Outcomes

Focus Standards: Determine a theme or Analyze how complex Determine the meaning
English: central idea of a text and characters (e.g., those of words and phrases as
analyze in detail its with multiple or they are used in the text,
development over the conflicting including figurative and
course of the text, motivations) develop connotative meanings;
including how it over the course of a analyze the cumulative
emerges and is shaped text, interact with other impact of specific word
and refined by specific characters, and advance choices on meaning and
details; provide an the plot or develop the tone. (9-10.RL.4)
objective summary of theme. (9-10.RL.3)
the text. (9-10.RL.2)

Analyze how the author Determine an author’s Write


unfolds an analysis or point of view or informative/explanatory
series of ideas or events, purpose in a text and texts to examine and
including the order in analyze how an author convey complex ideas,
which the points are uses rhetoric to concepts, and
made, how they are advance that point of information clearly and
introduced and view or purpose. (9- accurately through the
developed, and the 10.RI.6) effective selection,
connections that are organization, and
drawn between them. analysis of content. a.
(9-10.RI.3) Introduce a topic;
organize complex ideas,
concepts, and
information to make
important connections
and distinctions; include
formatting (e.g.,
headings), graphics (e.g.,
figures, tables), and
multimedia when useful
to aiding comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with
well‐chosen, relevant,
and sufficient facts,
extended definitions,
concrete details,
quotations, or other
information and
examples appropriate to
the audience’s
knowledge of the topic.
c. Use appropriate and
varied transitions to link
the major sections of the
text, create cohesion, and
clarify the relationships
among complex ideas
and concepts. d. Use
precise language and
domain‐specific
vocabulary to manage the
complexity of the topic.
e. Establish and maintain
a formal style and an
appropriate tone while
attending to the norms
and conventions of the
discipline in which they
are writing. f. Provide a
concluding statement or
section that follows from
and supports the
information or
explanation presented
(e.g., articulating
implications or the
significance of the topic).
(9-10.W.2)

Produce clear and Use technology, Draw evidence from


coherent writing in including the internet, literary or informational
which the development, to produce, publish, texts to support analysis,
organization, and style and update individual reflection, and research.
are appropriate to task, or shared writing a. Apply grades 9-10
purpose, and audience. products, taking Reading standards to
(Grade‐ specific advantage of literature. b. Apply
expectations for writing technology's capacity grades 9-10 Reading
types are defined in to link to other standards to
standards 1–3 above.) information and to informational text and
(9-10.W.4) display information nonfiction. (9-10.W.9)
flexibly and
dynamically. (9-
10.W.6)

Write routinely over Initiate and participate Evaluate a speaker’s


extended time frames effectively in a range of point of view, reasoning,
(time for research, collaborative and use of evidence and
reflection, and revision) discussions (one-on- rhetoric, identifying any
and shorter time frames one, in groups, and fallacious reasoning or
(a single sitting or a day teacher-led) with exaggerated or distorted
or two) for a range of diverse partners on evidence. (9-10.SL.3)
tasks, purposes, and grades 9–10 topics,
audiences. (9-10.W.10) texts, and issues,
building on others'
ideas and expressing
their own clearly and
persuasively. (9-
10.SL.1)

Present information, Make strategic use of Demonstrate command


findings, and supporting digital media in of the conventions of
evidence clearly, presentations to Standard English
concisely, and logically enhance understanding grammar and usage when
such that listeners can of findings, reasoning, writing or speaking. a.
follow the line of and evidence and to Use parallel structure. b.
reasoning and the add interest. (9- Use various types of
organization, 10.SL.5) phrases (noun, verb,
development, substance, adjectival, adverbial,
and style are appropriate participial, prepositional,
to purpose, audience, and absolute) and clauses
and task; use (independent, dependent;
appropriate eye contact, noun, relative, adverbial)
adequate volume, and to convey specific
clear pronunciation. (9- meanings and add variety
10.SL.4) and interest to writing or
presentations. (9-10.L.1)

Apply knowledge of Demonstrate


language to understand understanding of
how language functions figurative language,
in different contexts, to word relationships, and
make effective choices nuances in word
for meaning or style, meanings. a. Interpret
and to comprehend figures of speech (e.g.,
more fully when reading euphemism, oxymoron)
or listening. a. Write in context and analyze
and edit work so that it their role in the text. b.
conforms to the Analyze nuances in the
guidelines in a style meaning of words with
manual. (9-10.L.3) similar denotations. (9-
10.L.5)

Enduring Social expectations Theme-Related Essential How do social


Understanding: affect the development Questions expectations affect
Important Concepts of our identity by the development
presenting us with a of our identity?
variety of ideals, What is the
conditions, and relationship
pressures which we feel between diction
some innate inclination and meaning?
to meet. As human How do language
beings, we possess a and performance
natural desire for construct
validation and success, definitions of
so when opportunities to identity?
achieve such coveted How does
things present language shift in
themselves, we change meaning across
ourselves to an extent to texts and contexts?
please whoever we need
to to be rewarded.
Diction refers to one’s
word choice and style of
expression when
speaking or writing.
Diction varies
depending on context.
Similarly, the meaning
of the words used can
vary depending on the
context, as well. People
do not always say what
they mean, for example,
and vice versa.
Our words and actions
construct our identities,
and thus our realities.
Language can be
interpreted in a myriad
of ways, and these
interpretations evolve
due to the passing of
time, changes in
circumstance, new
discoveries, etc. One
interpretation does not
necessarily hold
precedence over
another.

Technology English: Students will be keeping a “Digital Writing Journal” (DWJ) in


Integration Google Drive for everyday writing responses. Students will also use
technology/the internet to access Google Classroom as well as complete
various individual and group assignments throughout the unit (e.g. research,
writer’s workshop, accessing videos and production software/resources, etc.).

Unit Performance Task: Students will create a multimodal presentation


addressing the unit theme of saying versus being/reality versus performance.
They will be tasked with creating four different artifacts to represent their
enduring understandings/takeaways, at least one of which must be produced
using digital tools (i.e. production and/or presentation software/resources).
Self- and peer evaluations will also be submitted via Google Classroom.

Unit Essay Students will have two options to choose from for the unit essay.

Prompt A: Write a 3-5-page paper (MLA format) analyzing a definition


that Shakespeare develops over the course of Twelfth Night, or What
You Will. How do the language and performance of the play construct
this definition? What does the development of this definition help us
understand about the plot, characters, and themes?

Prompt B: Referencing at least three resources (i.e. videos, articles,


readings) from this unit, one of which must be Twelfth Night, or What
You Will, write a 4-6-page paper (MLA format) evaluating the
relationship between reality and performance. How do the two inform
each other? Do people’s realities have performative qualities? Are
performances just acts, or is there some truth/reality behind them?
Consider such questions in crafting your response.

The unit essay must be submitted to Google Classroom and turnitin by


the teacher-designated due date.
Unit Performance In groups of 5 (same group as lit circle group), students will create and
Task present a multimodal project addressing the unit theme of saying versus
being/reality versus performance. They will be tasked with creating four
different artifacts to represent their enduring understandings/takeaways.
Each artifact must align to one or more of the following categories:

1. Performance
2. Visual
3. Written
4. Digital

All group members are expected to put in an equal amount of effort into
the creation and presentation of the project. In addition to making four
artifacts, students must also complete self- and peer evaluations and
submit them to Google Classroom by the teacher-designated due date.
The information from these documents will be used alongside the group
evaluation grade to calculate individual final grades.

Common Instructional Strategies

All Learners
● Digital writing journal (DWJ)
● Use of reading guides and graphic organizers for note taking
● Choral vocabulary and comprehension responses
● Use of Marzano strategies
● Opportunities for individual and collaborative group work
● Think-pair-share/think-write-pair-share
● Differentiation in reading materials
● Exit tickets

English Language Learners


● Read alouds
● Connection to prior knowledge
● Repetition of necessary content
● Providing wait time
● Reading guides and graphic organizers
● Establishing weekly goals for writing (i.e. gradually increasing expectations for word count,
sentence fluency, syntactic variation, etc.) as well as for participation in discussions
● Tri-modal instructional plans incorporating audio, visual, and kinesthetic learning modalities
● Supportive groupings with native speakers

(Resource / Speech Language)


● Modeling activities with examples
● Providing wait time
● Repetition of necessary content
● Reading guides and graphic organizers
● Establishing weekly goals for writing (i.e. gradually increasing expectations for word count,
sentence fluency, syntactic variation, etc.) as well as for participation in discussions
● Supportive groupings with students of mixed ability levels
● Extended time to complete assignments if stated in IEP/504

GATE
● Providing independent reading list and encouraging outside research related to unit topic
● Opportunities for mentoring peers and co-teaching with teacher
● Meaningful assignment/project extensions for real-world application

Individual Unit Theme: Twelfth Night, or What You Will –Reality vs. Performance

Subject: English Grade Level: 10

Focus Standards

● Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the
course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details;
provide an objective summary of the text. (9-10.RL.2)
● Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop
over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the
theme. (9-10.RL.3)
● Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative
and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning
and tone. (9-10.RL.4)
● Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in
which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that
are drawn between them. (9-10.RI.3)
● Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses
rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose. (9-10.RI.6)
● Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and
information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of
content. a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make
important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g.,
figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. b. Develop the topic
with well‐chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details,
quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the
topic. c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create
cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. d. Use precise
language and domain‐specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. e. Establish
and maintain a formal style and an appropriate tone while attending to the norms and
conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. f. Provide a concluding statement or
section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g.,
articulating implications or the significance of the topic). (9-10.W.2)
● Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are
appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade‐ specific expectations for writing types are
defined in standards 1–3 above.) (9-10.W.4)
● Use technology, including the internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared
writing products, taking advantage of technology's capacity to link to other information and to
display information flexibly and dynamically. (9-10.W.6)
● Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
(9-10.W.9)
● Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and
shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and
audiences. (9-10.W.10)
● Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building
on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. (9-10.SL.1)
● Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any
fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence. (9-10.SL.3)
● Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such
that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance,
and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task; use appropriate eye contact, adequate
volume, and clear pronunciation. (9-10.SL.4)
● Make strategic use of digital media in presentations to enhance understanding of findings,
reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. (9-10.SL.5)
● Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when
writing or speaking. a. Use parallel structure. b. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb,
adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, and absolute) and clauses (independent,
dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest
to writing or presentations. (9-10.L.1)
● Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to
make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or
listening. a. Write and edit work so that it conforms to the guidelines in a style manual. (9-
10.L.3)
● Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word
meanings. a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze
their role in the text. b. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations. (9-
10.L.5)

Essential Understandings Knowledge/Skills

Important Concepts: SWBAT:


Reality vs. Performance – Understanding how Gain knowledge of new ideas by reading various
individuals perform in ways that may or may types of literary and informative texts.
not accurately reflect their true identities in an
effort to achieve their desired realities. Interpret different views and perspectives.
Analyzing how language and performance
inform/reveal the multifaceted dimensions of a Discuss how social expectations affect the
text’s plot and characters. development of identity.

Explain the relationship between performance and


Guiding Questions: How do social identity through speaking and writing.
expectations affect the development of our
identity? What is the relationship between Analyze the importance of specific diction, language,
diction and meaning? How do language and and meaning across different texts and contexts.
performance construct definitions of identity?
How does language shift in meaning across Synthesize several pieces of literature by formulating
texts and contexts? arguments and opinions in groups.
Justify their arguments and opinions by comparing
and contrasting 2+ pieces of literature.

Create multimodal artifacts to demonstrate enduring


understandings/takeaways related to the unit theme.

Texts Assessment

· Crowther, J (Ed.). (2003). No Fear Formative: Summative:


Twelfth Night. Retrieved from
https://www.sparknotes.com/nofear/shakespea Daily writing journal Unit essay (individual/2
re/twelfthnight/ (DWJ) responses options)
· Dickins, R. (2014). Young Reading Series
2: Twelfth night. Usborne. Active note- Presentation of multimodal
· Fitzgerald, F. S. (2016). The great Gatsby taking/reading guides project (group/4
(Adelaide eBook ed.). Retrieved from components)
https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/f/fitzgerald/f_sc Post-it responses
ott/gatsby/contents.html
· Folger. (n.d.). Shakespeare’s theater. Literature circles
Retrieved November 18, 2018, from
https://www.folger.edu/shakespeares-theater Socratic seminars
· Fuchs, E. (2004). EF’s visit to a small
planet: Some questions to ask a play. Theater, Content mini-
34(2), 4-9. Retrieved from presentations
http://web.mit.edu/jscheib/Public/foundations
_06/ef_smallplanet.pdf Exit tickets
· Geraghty, J. (2002, November).
Shakespeare: Twelfth Night. Retrieved
November 18, 2018, from
https://www.lsj.org/web/literature/twelfth-
night.php
· Rees, S. (2010). The fool’s girl. New
York, NY: Bloomsbury USA Childrens.
· Shakespeare, W. (2010). Oxford School
Shakespeare Series: Twelfth night. Oxford,
UK: Oxford University Press.
· Shulman, R. (2007). Resolution, or lack
thereof in Twelfth Night. The Delta, 2(1), 97-
104. Retrieved from
https://digitalcommons.iwu.edu/cgi/viewconte
nt.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&http
sredir=1&article=1021&context=delta
· Snyder, N. (2014, April 14).Theme of
desire in Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night”.
Retrieved November 18, 2018, from
https://owlcation.com/humanities/Theme-of-
Desire-in-Shakespeares-Twelfth-Night
· TEDx Talks. (2017, April 6). Perception
vs reality [Video file]. Retrieved from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alGmsWc
62Cs
· TwelfthNightVideos. (2012, August 10).
Twelfth Night (1969) [Video file]. Retrieved
from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DuwgQ9
Qof88

Learning Plan: Scope and Sequence Differentiation

Students will watch the “Perception Vs ELL:


Reality” video and write their impressions ● The class will engage in read alouds and
down on post-it notes. Their responses will be collaborative reads for some of the more
used to generate an opening discussion on the complex texts in order for occasional checks
titular idea, “perception versus reality,” which for understanding and vocabulary instruction
can in turn be connected to the similar concept to take place.
of “appearance versus reality,” or ● Connecting prior knowledge of identity and
“performance versus reality.” social expectations’ influence on it will help
to bridge certain language gaps that may
After a mini-lecture on Shakespeare’s life, arise, due to the previously learned concepts.
students will be tasked with jigsawing an ● Repetition of content and wait time
article on Shakespearean theater in small extensions will be used whenever necessary.
groups. Each group will create a ● Reading guides and graphic organizers will
be available for note-taking in both reading
poster/infographic that will support their
and writing activities.
brief content presentation to the rest of the ● Weekly goals for writing (i.e. gradually
class. increasing expectations for word count,
sentence fluency, syntactic variation, etc.) as
Students will engage in a read aloud of EF’s well as for participation in discussions will be
Visit to a Small Planet: Some Questions to Ask established to aid in language development.
a Play in preparation for delving into Twelfth ● An “Artist” role will be available for
Night, or What You Will. literature circles so as to help students with
limited L2 writing experience participate and
Students will read Twelfth Night, or What You make the same connections/gain the same
Will both in class and at home. They will understanding as the L1 learners in the class.
actively take notes/fill out their reading guides ● Supportive groupings will be arranged so that
as they read. They will also write post-its with ELLs can work with their native English-
commentary, questions, and more to share speaking peers. Routine role rotations in
with the class as needed to help with literature circles will enable ELLs to feel
discussion. A variety of reading techniques more engaged/involved, concentrate on
will be implemented (i.e. dramatic whole-class specific content, and develop different
read, small-group read, etc.); speaking, listening, reading, and writing
supplemental/support materials like the No skills.
Fear version, a children’s book (with CD ● Exit tickets to check individual understanding
audio) version, and a cinematic version will be of daily lessons will be given when new
available, as well. concepts or ideas are taught.
Students will write in response to daily
SPED:
prompts in their digital writing journals
● Modeling activities of all activities and
(DWJs). Multiple prompts will become
assignments will take place, and examples
available as diverse unit materials are will be provided.
introduced. ● Wait time will be given during lessons and
instructions, to make sure that understanding
Students will be grouped for literature circles is achieved by all students.
for the novels The Fool’s Girl and The Great ● Repetition of necessary content will be
Gatsby (1 text per group, evenly distributed provided.
through the class). They will rotate through 5 ● Reading guides and graphic organizers will
roles for group discussions, as well as “swap” be available for note-taking in both reading
group summaries with another group reading and writing activities.
the other text. Students are responsible for ● Weekly goals for writing (i.e. gradually
reading these texts outside of class and increasing expectations for word count,
discussing them alongside the main play and sentence fluency, syntactic variation, etc.) as
other course materials in class throughout the well as for participation in discussions will be
unit. established to support grade-level
proficiency/mastery expectations.
Students will engage in Socratic seminars over ● Supportive groupings will be arranged so that
course readings throughout the unit. students of mixed ability levels can work with
each other. Routine role rotations in literature
After completing the play, students will circles will enable SPED students to feel
collaboratively read and annotate print more engaged/involved and concentrate on
versions of the articles “Theme of Desire in specific portions of content at a time without
Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night” and getting overwhelmed.
“Shakespeare: Twelfth Night” in a split-class ● Extended time to complete assignments will
format, in which one half of the class be given as per IEP/504.
reads/annotates one article while the other half
does the same with the other. Once both large
groups are done analyzing their respective
pieces as a whole, they will split up to form
partnerships; that is, one person who read
“Theme of Desire in Shakespeare’s Twelfth
Night” will partner up with someone who read
“Shakespeare: Twelfth Night,” and from there
they will offer each other insight into their
article’s main ideas, highlights, etc. Students
are encouraged to use their phones to take
pictures of each other’s annotations for future
reference.

There will be two summative assessments


issued at the end of the unit in the following
order:
1. Unit essay (individual): Students will
write in response to one of two given
prompts stated above. Time will be
provided in class to workshop with
peers, conference with the teacher,
and so on. The final essay must be
submitted to Google Classroom and
turnitin by the due date.
2. Multimodal project and presentation
(group): In groups of 5 (same group as
lit circle group), students will create
and present a multimodal project
addressing the unit theme of saying
versus being/reality versus
performance; this project will be
comprised of four different artifacts
representing their enduring
understandings/takeaways, and all
components must align to one or more
of four categories stated above. In
addition to making four artifacts,
students must also complete self- and
peer evaluations and submit them to
Google Classroom by the teacher-
designated due date.

Resource Lexile Author / Link to original or How will resource be Evaluation:


Publisher citation used in class (describe
whether it will be a Read ● Is this a reliable
Aloud, collaborative source for the
reading, independent resource?
research, etc) ● Is the author an
expert? Credentials?
● What year? Is this
the most recent
information or is
there a reason for
using an older
resource?
● Original purpose of
the resource (inform,
persuade, entertain)?
● Is there is bias? Is it
appropriate to have a
bias for this material
(as in, does it fit the
purpose of the
unit?)?
● Why is this material
appropriate to the
unit? How this
resource will help
students reach your
planned objectives?
Website #1: 1200L- Folger https://www.folger.e Jigsaw/teach assigned ● Reliable - online
“Shakespeare 1300L du/shakespeares- excerpt to whole class library run by
’s Theater” theater
scholars about
everything
Shakespeare
● Folger Shakespeare
Library is the
world’s largest
Shakespeare
collection, housing
original sources to
modern
interpretations. It is
run by a number of
well-established
educators, historians,
etc.
● N/A - the time this
source was originally
published is not
specified, but as it
undergoes updates as
needed, it is assumed
that the information
is at its most recent
state
● Original purpose - to
inform
● This source is
unbiased since its
purpose is to offer
purely historical
insight. It fits the
purpose of the unit
by providing students
background
knowledge into
Shakespearean
theater.
● This material is
appropriate to the
unit because it offers
detailed overviews of
Shakespearean
theater, which
contributes to the
context of the play to
be read. It will help
students reach my
planned objectives by
helping them
visualize and develop
an appreciation for
Shakespearean
theater.
Website #2: 900L- Nancy Snyder / https://owlcation.co Collaborative ● Reliable - online
“Theme of 1000L Owlcation m/humanities/Them reading/annotation education resource
Desire in e-of-Desire-in-
Shakespeare’ Shakespeares- created by a network
s Twelfth Twelfth-Night of educators and
Night”
academics
● The author has a
degree in Secondary
Education (English)
and writes about a
variety of literary
topics.
● 2014 - recent,
humanities blog
contribution
● Original purpose - to
inform
● There is bias in the
text, but it is
appropriate for there
to be bias in this
material as it is one
person’s own literary
interpretation of the
play. It fits the
purpose of the unit
by posing a potential
way to explain how
characters’ realities
are shaped by desire-
driven actions.
● This material is
appropriate to the
unit because it
combines history and
literature to provide
a unique
interpretation of
characters’
motivations. It will
help students reach
my planned
objectives by
discussing how
characters perform
in their pursuit of an
ideal reality under
certain social
expectations.
Informationa 1100L- Rachel https://digitalcomm Independent research ● Reliable - PDF of a
l Text #1: 1200L Shulman / ons.iwu.edu/cgi/view scholarly essay
“Resolution, Illinois content.cgi?referer=
● The author is a
or Lack Wesleyan https://www.google.
Thereof in University The com/&httpsredir=1 lauded alumnus of
Twelfth Delta &article=1021&cont Illinois Wesleyan
Night” ext=delta
University who
majored in English
and history.
● 2007 - fairly recent,
presented at an
annual literature
conference
● Original purpose - to
persuade
● This source does
contain bias as it
argues that
Shakespeare’s play,
while one of his
greatest comedies,
lacks resolution. It
fits the purpose of the
unit by questioning
characters’
performances and
the
realization/satisfactio
n of their realities.
● This material is
appropriate to the
unit because it
expresses how
expectations play a
role in defining
performance and
reality. It will help
students reach my
planned objectives by
broadening their
perspectives on the
play’s multifaceted
characters and
complex situations.
Informationa 700L-800L Elinor Fuchs / http://web.mit.edu/j Read aloud prior to ● Reliable - PDF of a
l Text #2: Duke scheib/Public/found beginning the play scholarly essay
EF’s Visit to University ations_06/ef_smallpl
● The author is an
a Small Press anet.pdf
Planet: Some award-winning
Questions to playwright and
Ask a Play theater critic. She is a
professor of
dramaturgy and
dramatic criticism at
Yale.
● 2004 - a bit older,
companion text to the
study of dramaturgy
● Original purpose - to
inform
● This source is
unbiased since its
purpose is to give a
walkthrough of how
to analyze plays. It
fits the purpose of the
unit by teaching
students how to
approach plays, a
genre which might be
unfamiliar.
● This material is
appropriate to the
unit because it
enables students to
approach the study
of plays with useful
guidance/ scaffolding.
It will help students
reach my planned
objectives by
providing a critical
lens through which to
break down and
analyze
Shakespeare’s play.
Online N/A TEDx Talks https://www.youtub Opening unit video ● Reliable - YouTube
Video: e.com/watch?v=alG version of a
Perception vs. msWc62Cs
TEDxYouth event
Reality
● The TEDx program
showcases brilliant
speakers, thought-
provoking video and
mind-blowing
conversation. The
speaker in this video
is an ethical,
ambitious, inquiring
student from
Mombasa whose
interest in innovation
and creativity
contributes a unique
perspective to the
unit.
● 2017 - recent, with a
format that is
familiar and
engaging to students
● Original purpose - to
inform
● Although the speaker
shares his own
perspective/experienc
es during his talk, he
takes an
unbiased/objective
stance to the subject
of perception versus
reality. This video fits
the purpose of the
unit by offering a
more
scientific/empirical
view on the unit’s
main literary theme.
● This material is
appropriate to the
unit because it
introduces students
to the idea of how
individual
perceptions shape
individuals realities.
It will help students
reach my planned
objectives by
increasing their
curiosity
surrounding the idea
of what is true/real
and the value behind
performance.
Children’s 530L Rosie Dickins / N/A Supplement for original ● Reliable - original
book: Twelfth Usborne play published text
Night
● The author has
crafted many
children’s books
during her career.
She studied literature
at Oxford, art in
France, and traveled
the world before
settling down in
London as an author.
● 2014 - recent, part of
a young
readers’/English
learners’ series
● Original purpose - to
entertain
● This resource does
not contain bias as it
is merely a simplified
retelling of the
original play for
lower-level readers.
It fits the purpose of
the unit by aiding
students with general
comprehension of the
plotline.
● This material is
appropriate to the
unit because it serves
to supplement
students’
understanding of the
original play’s events
through simplified
prose and CD/audio
assistance. It will
help students reach
my planned
objectives by
supporting their
understanding of the
original play’s
surface plot elements,
which must be
grasped before
participating in
higher-level
activities.
Trade book HL 780L Celia Rees / N/A Independent reading at ● Reliable - original
#1: The Bloomsbury home published text
Fool’s Girl
● The author is an
acclaimed British YA
novelist. She studied
history, politics, and
education in
university and has
experience as an
English teacher, as
well.
● 2010 - fairly recent
interpretation, and
the YA style will
perhaps be more
engaging for students
● Original purpose - to
entertain
● There is bias in the
text, but it is
appropriate for there
to be bias in this
material as it is the
author’s creative
interpretation of
what happens after
the original play.
This text fits the
purpose of the unit
by expanding on the
original performance
and fleshing out
characters’ realities
in a new light.
● This material is
appropriate to the
unit because it
explores potential
conflicts that could
have occurred after
the events of the
original play. It will
help students reach
my planned
objectives by adding
new dimensions to
Shakespeare himself
and his characters,
which will help them
in formulating their
stance on the theme
of reality versus
performance plus
literary critiques.
Trade book 1010L F. Scott https://ebooks.adela Independent reading at ● Reliable - eBook
#2: The Great Fitzgerald / ide.edu.au/f/fitzgera home version of original
Charles ld/f_scott/gatsby/con
Gatsby Scribner’s Sons tents.html text
● The author is
considered one of the
greatest American
writers of the 20th
century. He left
university to join the
army but gained
later critical claim
due to his written
works.
● 2016 - despite being
an older work
(originally published
1925), its popularity
is timeless, and the
way it examines the
idea of appearance
versus reality will
make for a good basis
for comparison with
Shakespeare’s play
● Original purpose - to
entertain, inform
● There is bias in the
text, but it is
appropriate for there
to be bias in this
material as it is a
fictional work
critiquing the illusory
American Dream
underneath the
appearance of a
tragic romance. This
text fits the purpose
of the unit by
offering another,
perhaps more
familiar
interpretation of the
idea of how
appearances conflict
with reality.
● This material is
appropriate to the
unit because it
examines the stories
of people pretending
to be what they are
not and the mixed
influences doing so
has on their
connected realities. It
will help students
reach my planned
objectives by
painting desires,
motivations, and
performances in a
different light, which
will help them in
formulating their
stance on the theme
of reality versus
performance plus
literary critiques.