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Gradual

Release of Responsibility
Model of Instruction
Name: Mia Angelis
Grade: 2nd
Standards:
Reading: Literature Standard 7
Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of
its characters, setting, or plot.

Writing Standard 8
Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

Objectives: Students will make predictions based on the text and their prior knowledge about what will happen
next.

Materials: Smart board, “The Mightiest,” markers, writing paper, prediction website with artwork
https://www.onceuponapicture.co.uk/the-collections/the-prediction-collection/

Essential Questions: What is a prediction? A statement about what will or what might happen in the future.
How do we make predictions? We make predictions based on text, pictures, scenarios, and our prior knowledge—
with those tools we predict what will happen next.

A prediction is a smart guess about what will happen next using clues in the text pictures and our background
knowledge.

Student Friendly Objective: I will learn how to make predictions using the text, pictures and my background
knowledge.
I will succeed when I make predictions using the correct sentence frame. I predict _____ because _____.


Vocabulary: (review from previous lesson) prediction, background knowledge, supporting details

Adaptations for Students with Special Needs/
Adaptations for EL: Further scaffolding with prediction sentence frame structures, additional one-on-one support
during Phase II, if necessary. For Fenix—ask explicit writing prompt question to ensure he stays on task and knows
exactly what to write about. Do more constant check-ins during Phase II.


DAP: Begin with assessment of prior knowledge, new understandings are built on prior knowledge, students
express their understanding through multiple methods; concepts are taught using multiple techniques.
RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE TEACHER RESPONSIBILITIES OF
STUDENTS
Phase I: 1. assess prior knowledge, engage with the concepts
Exploration and Explanation through, discussion,
Concept Development First, teacher will read today’s lesson objective pictures, texts, role plays.
(student friendly objective). Next have a student read
it. Then have the students turn to their partner and
share with each other.
Have the objective clearly written on the board.
Student Friendly Objective:
I will learn how to make predictions using the text,
pictures and my background knowledge.
I will succeed when I make predictions using the
correct sentence frame. I predict _____ because
_____.





“What do we know about predicting? We have heard
the word predicting before, what did we learn last
time? What does it mean? Turn and talk with your
partner.”
(Allow for adequate response time) –
Write ideas on board after listening to multiple
students to create a whole class definition.

Yes, predicting means to make a statement about
what will or what might happen in the future based
off of the text, picture or our prior knowledge.

2. interactively engage students in an exploration of
concepts, strategies, vocabulary, etc.
Today I am going to show us some pictures and read a
new story “The Mightiest.” During these activities our
goal is to think about predicting in our heads.

(Have the below sentence structures type up on the
smart board or written on white board ahead of time,
this will make for easy reference).
I predict ___ because______.
This makes me predict that ______ will happen
because _____.”
*Remind the students frequently of the sentence
structure to aide in their success of using it later on.

Let’s look at some of the pictures on the board
together.

Pull up the picture of “Crocodile” on the board. (This
is from the website provided in materials).


3. interactively model, demonstrate, discuss new
concepts, strategies, key vocabulary

Looking at the picture “Crocodile” on the board I am
going to walk through the prediction process out
loud.

Show a BAD prediction:
“The crocodile is going to eat the fishing hook.”

Ask questions about the BAD prediction. Did I use my
sentence frame correct? What am I missing? Did I
provide a reason why? Etc.

Now show them the CORRECT way to make a
prediction (using the sentence structure):

“I predict that the crocodile is going to bite the fishing
hook because he has a mischievous look on his face
and the fishing hook is close to his mouth.”

Pull up a new picture for them to make a prediction
about.
“Old Man of the Woods”

What do you predict is going to happen in this
picture?
What makes you predict this?

Do you think the kids are trying to be noticed by the
ogre? Yes or No, and WHY.

After doing the photo predictions,
Say:
“With your partner sitting next to you, I want you to
tell them what a prediction is and the sentence frame
we use.
Think of the way I stated my questions: I predict
_____ because____. This makes me predict that
______ will happen because _____.”

Gives students about two minutes to discuss. Circle
the room and listen—ensure there is no confusion
before continuing on to the book.

“Today we are going to read “The Mightiest.” During
the reading I am going to stop us periodically so that
we can make predictions.
Before I begin, can someone raise their hand and tell
us what they said or their partner said about what a
prediction is? – Do we agree? (Clear up any
confusion)”

(Tip: Restate the students answer so that the WHOLE
class can hear.)
Begin reading “The Mightiest”

Prompt students with the first prediction of the
story… “What do we predict is going to happen…?”

With their carpet partners, have the students work
together to make predictions on what is going to
happen. Ask for students to share their predictions or
their partner’s predictions.

Remind students throughout that there is no right or
wrong answer, but when we use the pictures, text,
and our background knowledge we can make
educated guesses or PREDICTIONS—they
[predictions] just need to make sense.

Stop periodically throughout the story and prompt
students with predictions, allow the students to
share their predictions with their carpet partners.

Move amongst the carpet to listen in on predictions.

Finish off the story asking predictions about what we
predict the animal’s are going to do now, what is
going to happen with those new animals, what is
going to happen next… be creative and let the kids be
creative too…

Let’s do a think/pair/share about what will happen…

Once the story is finished transition to Phase II with
directions below.

Transition to Phase II: 1. review Phase I concepts interactively engage in review and in
Review “Today we learned how to take our background understanding of directions
Phase II Expectations knowledge, words in a book, and pictures on a page for Phase II work
to generate predictions of what would happen next,
or why that happened, what is smelt like, felt like…
etc. “

2. explain directions for Phase II exercise—no new
concepts are introduced in the transition
“When we go back to our seats, we are going to work
on a short story about a prediction of what will
happen now that the story has ended. We will use
our prediction sentence frame structure… I predict
that ______ will happen because____.
It is very important for us to explain why (because)
we are making our predictions.

Make sure to start the students on the doc-
cam/board with the proper sentence structures
before releasing them to begin writing.

*Students who finish early will draw an illustration to
support their prediction.

QUALITATIVE SHIFT IN RESPONSIBILITY--THE TEACHER WILL NO LONGER BE TEACHING THE WHOLE CLASS AS ONE
UNIT. EVERY STUDENT NOW TAKES RESPONSIBILITY FOR CARRYING OUT THE CONCEPT, STRATEGY, SKILL, ETC.
Phase II: 1. provide an exercise that requires students to 1. engage with Phase II
Guided Practice practice applying the new concepts developed in exercise as independently
One-on-One Differentiation Phase I (the directions for this exercise should have as possible
Formative Assessment been explained in the transition to Phase II). 2. request further
Plans for early finishers Once students go back to their seats, provide them scaffolding—as needed
Closure with writing paper so they can write and illustrate
what they think will happen next in “The Mightiest.”

2. release responsibility to each student or group to
carry out the new concepts, strategies, skills, etc.
Start the students off on the board by writing
“I predict that there is going to be a new fight over
the crown, because…”
Ask for students to generate ideas with their
partners.
Ask for thumbs up/down for understanding; if there is
confusion explain the directions again OR ask a
student to explain the directions (this would occur
from one of the students who had a ‘thumbs up’ for
understanding the directions).

If directions yield no confusion allow the students to
come and get a piece of paper to begin writing.

Allow the students to talk with their elbow partners
quietly about their predictions.

3. scaffold in individual and group zpds--as needed
Walk around during the writing and get a feel for how
students are doing.

4. if feedback indicates class-wide confusion, back
up to Phase I and work with the whole class to
further clarify concepts
If confusion arises go back to Phase I, and do a think
through on how I make a prediction and do another
sentence starter for writing the story.
Remind students that they can make predictions
based on the text, the pictures, and their background
knowledge.

5. at the close of Phase II, interactively review key
points

If time permits: Allow a few students to share their
writing whole class and/or with their partner.

“Today we learned about predictions; interactively
thinking about what will come next in a story, or what
a picture is showing us.
Now it’s your turn to put your prediction skills to
work at home.”
Transition to Phase III: 1. review concepts taught in Phase I 1. engage in review
Review and Phase III Today we learned how to take our background 2. volunteer to
Expectations knowledge, words in a book, and pictures on a page demonstrate Phase III
to generate predictions of what would happen next, expectations
or why that happened, what is smelt like, felt like…
etc. We used the sentence frame structure … (ASK
FOR CLASS TO PARTICPATE AND STATE IT)
I predict_____ because_____
Ask the students why we use because.

2. explain directions for Phase III exercise—no new
concepts are introduced in the transition
Now it’s your turn to put these wonderful prediction
skills to the test. When you get home, I want you to
make a prediction about something. – Maybe write a
prediction about what we are going to do in class
tomorrow, what you are going to have for dinner, or a
prediction about your favorite show, the weather,
etc. You will write it, in the correct sentence frame
structure, and bring it back tomorrow.

QUALITATIVE SHIFT IN RESPONSIBILITY—STUDENTS WILL NEXT WORK AS INDEPENDENTLY AS APPROPRIATE
Phase III: 1. release responsibility to each student to carry independently complete
Independent Practice out/apply the new concepts, strategies, skills, etc. Phase III exercises
Summative Assessment independently
Students will go home and make a prediction about
something (here are some options to give the class)
what we are going to do in class tomorrow, what you
are going to have for dinner, the weather (this is
more scientific, but it may address interests in
students who like science more) or a prediction about
your favorite show. Ensure that the students use the
proper sentence frame structure.
2. scaffold if necessary
Do a thumbs up/down for understanding of the task
that they have been asked to complete, scaffold
based on such answers.

3. explain how you will formally assess student work
Students work will be assessed on using the proper
sentence frame structure and providing supporting
details (BECAUSE) to go along with their prediction.