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Issue #754 Harrisburg, PA Dec.

10, 2018

PA Environment Digest Blog​​ ​Twitter Feed​​ ​ Facebook Page

EQB To Consider Proposed Increases In Air Quality, NPDES, Water Quality Permit Fees
Dec. 18

The ​Environmental Quality Board​ is scheduled to meet on December 18 to consider proposed


increases to Air Quality permit and NPDES and Water Quality permit fees. The Board will also
be asked to make a change to final non-coaling permit fees at the request of the Independent
Regulatory Review Commission.
Proposed Air Quality Fees
DEP is proposing a ​total increase of $12.6 million in Air Quality fees​ for the federal Title
V-- $5.9 million-- and state non-Title V-- $6.7 million-- permit fees.
The proposal includes a new annual maintenance fee for both kinds of permits, a new fee
for asbestos notifications and an increase in the existing operating permit fees.
There is no proposed increase of the Title V per ton emission fee, beyond the annual
increase based on the Consumer Price Index.
These are the first Air Quality fee increases since 2005. Since then, DEP budget cuts
have resulted in eliminating 21 percent of its staff or 72 positions.
DEP is projecting a $4.359 million deficit in the non-Title V permit account in FY
2019-20 and a zero returning balance in the federal Title V account by FY 2022-23 with the
current fee structure.
Without the proposed fee increases, DEP would have to cut its Air Quality staff by 30
percent or 80 positions.
Failure to adopt proposed fee increases for the federal Title V program will result in
action by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to penalize Pennsylvania for failure to
maintain adequate funding for this federal program.
Proposed Water Quality/NPDES Fees
DEP is proposing a total increase of $6 million in Chapter 92a NPDES-- $5 million-- and
Chapter 91 Water Quality-- $1 million-- permit fees.
The NPDES permit fee increases would cover approximately 4,000 facilities and the
Water Quality permit fees from 500 to 600 applicants annually.
Chapter 91 wastewater facility fees have not been increased since 1971 and NPDES
permit fees were last increased in 2010.

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Since 2007, DEP’s Clean Water Program staff has been reduced by 25 percent due to cuts
in state General Fund appropriations.
DEP believes 25 additional staff are necessary in the Bureau of Clean Water to
adequately carry out its responsibilities.
The ​U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has told DEP several times​ since 2010 the
agency does not have adequate resources to carry out its federally mandated responsibilities for
the NPDES Program, including the MS4 Stormwater Pollution Prevention Program.
Final Noncoal Mining Fees
In ​response to a concern expressed​ by the Independent Regulatory Review Commission,
DEP withdrew the final regulation adopting an increase in noncoal mining permit fees to return it
to the Environmental Quality Board to add clarifying language.
The IRRC asked DEP to add language to the regulation making it clear the fees adopted
in the package do not exceed the cost of administering the program as required by the Noncoal
Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act.
The language would not change the timing or amount of the phased-in fee increases
adopted in the package.
Returning the regulation to the EQB to add the clarifying language will delay finalization
of the regulation, however, the fee increase was not set to go into effect until January 1, 2020
anyway.
Other Agenda Items
Also on the agenda are--
-- Proposed changes required by EPA to requirements for the control of fine particulate matter
under the New Source Review Program for nonattainment areas.
-- Proposed changes to Class A Stream designations for multiple streams in Berks, Cambria,
Cameron, Carbon, Centre, Clearfield, Clinton, Columbia, Crawford, Elk, Erie, Indiana,
Lackawanna, Lycoming, McKean, Potter, Schuylkill, Somerset, Susquehanna, Tioga and Wayne
counties.
The EQB meeting will be held in Room 105 of the Rachel Carson Building starting at
9:00.
For more information, visit the ​Environmental Quality Board​ webpage. Questions should
be directed to ​Laura Edinger by calling 717-772-3277 or send email to: ​ledinger@pa.gov​.
NewsClips:
Lancaster Farming: Can PA Meet Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Goals?
November State Revenue Collections $95.5 Million Above Estimate; $333.6M Above Estimates
Year-To-Date
Fayette, Somerset Counties Benefit From Federal Water Infrastructure Loans
Op-Ed: Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund, Greatest Conservation Program No One Ever
Heard Of
Editorial: Congress Must Fix Our Decaying National Parks
Related Stories:
Adequacy, Stability Of Funding For DEP Water Quality Protection Programs Report On EQB
Agenda
DEP Air Quality Advisory Committee To Discuss Proposed Fee Increases June 14
DEP To Adopt Change Recommended By IRRC To Final Noncoal Mining Fee Package
[Posted: Dec. 4, 2018]

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NFWF Announces $13.1 Million In Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund Grants, Including
PA

On December 3, the National Fish and Wildlife


Foundation and the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency announced more than ​$13.1 million in
grants​ to support the restoration and conservation of
the Chesapeake Bay watershed in six U.S. states and
the District of Columbia.
The 49 grants will generate nearly $21.9
million in matching contributions for a total
conservation impact of nearly $35 million.
Pennsylvania will benefit from $1.9 million
in grants for in-state projects and from another $2
million in grants for regional projects that include
the Commonwealth.
This year’s ​Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund grant recipients​ in Pennsylvania are:
-- Turkey Hill Clean Water Partnership: Building A Market-Driven Model For
Conservation Action, ​Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay​​ ($1 million)​​: Build on existing
partnership with Turkey Hill Dairy and the Maryland and Virginia Milk Producers Cooperative
Association to accelerate conservation planning and practice implementation. Project will
provide farmers with technical and financial assistance necessary to meet Turkey Hill
commitments for sustainable milk production.
-- Engaging The Plain Sect Community & Market For Clean Water, ​Lancaster Farmland
Trust​​ ($198,463)​​: Increase adoption of farm conservation practices through engaging Plain Sect
community leaders, creating learning farms to provide peer-to-peer understanding
and enthusiasm for conservation, and implementing best management practices on farms. Project
will engage market demand for sustainability via dairy supply chain players under increasing
pressure from consumers to address sustainability and create replicable model that can scale
more broadly across the watershed.
-- Lakemont Park Green Infrastructure & Urban Runoff Management, ​Blair County
Conservation District​​ ($195,000)​​: Construct green infrastructure in Lakemont Park, including
three rain gardens, a vegetated permeable pavement lot, a rainwater harvesting system for
stormwater reuse, and a riparian buffer. Project will manage upland urban runoff and will
become part of the maintenance program for the park/recreational area. The project also
provides opportunity for education and examples for additional community green infrastructure
redevelopment.
-- Increasing Rotational Grazing & Crop Cover Practices Through Farmer & Community
Engagement, ​Capital Resource Conservation and Development Area Council, Inc​​.
($194,431)​​: Support the adoption of cover crop grazing and other rotational grazing practices
both on four study farms and an additional 6 to 10 farms, transitioning land to rotational grazing.
Project will result in 200 acres of best management practices and innovation in rotational
grazing.
-- Fish Passage Improvement & Culvert Replacement In The Upper Sinnemahoning Creek

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Watershed, ​Western PA Conservancy​​ ($136,466)​​: Replace four culverts at priority locations
for native brook trout populations in the upper Sinnemahoning Creek watershed. Project will
result in 4 miles of stream opened to fish passage and restored.
-- Unassessed Waters Initiative, ​Western PA Conservancy​​ ($50,000)​​: Conduct 1,000 fish
surveys on previously unassessed streams, coordinating priorities, data collection, and data
management. Project will provide data on previously unassessed streams in order to ensure
proper stream classification, which is vital to successfully protecting Pennsylvania's water
resources.
-- Train The Trainer: Increasing Efficiency Of Agricultural Outreach, ​National Wildlife
Federation​​ ($49,750)​​: Host a webinar series and six messaging and communications training
events for agricultural outreach professionals within the Chesapeake Bay Watershed in
Pennsylvania. Project will increase the efficiency of agricultural outreach professionals by
providing the tools and cultural frameworks needed to influence farmers to use water quality best
management practices.
-- Continuing Momentum To Reduce Stormwater Pollution In The Oxford Region,
University Of Maryland Environmental Finance Center​​ ($49,950)​​: Support the Oxford
Regional Planning Committee in their efforts to address stormwater pollution in both the
regulated and unregulated parts of municipalities. Project will develop a partner structure for
program delivery and will translate pollution reduction goals to the local level while providing a
sustainable financing strategy to support initiation and continued implementation of
programming throughout the watershed.
-- Identifying & Designing Restoration In Tier II Eastern Brook Trout Patches, ​Tioga
County Conservation District​​ ($37,640)​​: Identify, prioritize, design and permit habitat
restoration projects within two Tier II eastern brook trout patches, the Tioga River and Babb
Creek. Project will enhance the ability of the Tioga County Conservation District to implement
effective priority habitat restoration and sediment reduction projects, motivate individuals and
local governments to implement projects, and increase benefits to water quality and eastern
brook trout habitat.
Regional Grants Also Benefiting Pennsylvania
-- One Water Partnership, ​Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake​​ ($1 million)​​: to scale up
the engagement of the faith community in watershed restoration efforts in Maryland and
Pennsylvania. Project will engage nonprofits, local governments, citizen stewardship groups, and
faith-based institutions to enable 36 congregations to install green infrastructure with measurable
impacts on local water quality.
-- Mountains To Bay Grazing Alliance: A Collaborative To Increase Rotational Grazing,
Chesapeake Bay Foundation​​ ($850,350)​​: Expand and strengthen a network of private and
public partners to promote the adoption of rotational grazing systems that enhance soil health,
protect and improve water quality, and contribute to farm economic viability. Project will
include on-farm demonstrations, peer-to-peer dialog, establishment of local grazing groups, and
development of outreach materials that highlight the economic and soil health benefits of
grazing.
-- Soil Health Conservation, Engagement And Technical Assistance, ​Stroud Water
Research Center​​ ($199,976)​​: Partner with Cover Crop Coaching to increase access to technical
expertise on soil health and increase adoption rates. Project will enable Cover Crop Coaching to
direct farmer meetings, host train-the-trainer events, and increase outreach to landowners renting

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cropland to tenant farmers. Project will help address the shortfall of technical expertise on soil
health, and will increase adoption rates of cover crops and no-till.
The complete list of grants ​is available online​.
The grants were awarded through the Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund, a partnership
between NFWF and the EPA’s Innovative Nutrient and Sediment Reduction Grants Program and
Small Watershed Grants Program.
Additional support is provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural
Resources Conservation Service, the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the
Altria Group Restoring America’s Resources partnership and CSX.
Grant recipients were announced at the Cork Factory Hotel in downtown Lancaster in
conjunction with the NFWF–hosted, biennial Chesapeake Ag Forum, a conference that brings
together the best practitioners and partners advancing agricultural conservation practices across
the Chesapeake Bay watershed.
“The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania plays a significant role in the health of the
Chesapeake Bay watershed,” said U.S. Senator Bob Casey. “But more importantly, actions taken
in Pennsylvania to improve the Bay begin with efforts to restore clean water to the Conestoga,
the Susquehanna, and the thousands of miles of rivers and streams right here in the
Commonwealth. Financial resources, beginning with our Federal agency partners like the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency, are critical to these ongoing collaborative local efforts.”
The projects supported by the 49 grants announced will support methods to improve
waterways, restore habitat and strengthen iconic species in Delaware, Maryland, New York,
Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia.
The funds will engage farmers and agricultural producers, homeowners, churches,
businesses and municipalities in on-the-ground restoration that supports quality of life in their
communities, improving local waterways and, ultimately, the health of the Bay.
“EPA is pleased to support innovative and sustainable approaches to improving the health
of our rivers and streams,” said EPA Regional Administrator Cosmo Servidio. “These
investments in partnerships with states and local organizations encourage community
stewardship of resources that will help preserve and enhance healthy waterways throughout the
Chesapeake Bay watershed.”
The INSR Program awarded more than $7.3 million to eight projects, with recipients
providing more than $10.4 million in match. The program provides grants to accelerate the
implementation of water quality improvements specifically through the collaborative and
coordinated efforts of sustainable, regional-scale partnerships with a shared focus on water
quality restoration and protection in local waterways and the Chesapeake Bay.
“The grants announced today will empower communities and businesses throughout the
Chesapeake Bay watershed to become better stewards of natural resources,” said Jeff Trandahl,
executive director and CEO of NFWF. “In many cases, these grants fund voluntary efforts to
decrease sedimentation and runoff from farms and businesses, which boosts water quality
throughout the 64,000-square-mile watershed and advances long-running efforts to improve the
overall health of the Chesapeake Bay.”
The SWG Program awarded more than $5.7 million to 41 projects, with recipients
providing nearly $11.4 million in match.
The program provides grants to organizations and municipal governments that are
working to improve the condition of their local watershed through on-the-ground restoration,

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habitat conservation and community involvement.
Grant recipients expect to reduce pollution through infrastructures including greener
landscapes and community outreach initiatives that promote native landscaping and improved
practices for managing runoff.
Since 2006, the INSR Program has provided more than $84.7 million to 176 projects that
reduce the amount of nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.
Since 1999, the SWG Program has provided more than $57 million to support 845 projects in the
region to protect and restore the natural resources of the Bay watershed.
For more information about the program, visit the NFWF ​Chesapeake Bay Stewardship
Fund​ webpage.
To learn more about how Pennsylvania plans to meet Chesapeake Bay pollution
reduction requirements, visit DEP’s ​Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan​ webpage.
NewsClips:
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
Lancaster Farming: Can PA Meet Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Goals?
Bay Journal: Multifunction Stream Buffers Offer Food For Thought For PA Farms
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Receives NFWF Grant To Expand Rotational Grazing
Crable: New Round Of Inspections Show Two-Thirds Of Chesapeake Bay Watershed Farmers
Have Runoff Plans
Thompson: Project To Limit Harmful Run-Off From Turkey Hill Supplier Farms Gets Boost
Crable: Farmers, Groups, Turkey Hill To Get $6.5M In Water Quality Funding
Stream Buffer Project Completed In Blair County By Trout Unlimited, Conservation District
Volunteers
Lancaster Farming: Stream Buffers Make Financial Sense
Alliance For The Chesapeake Bay, Partners Plant 14.81 Acres Of Forest Buffer In PA
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County’s Watershed Planning
Who’s Responsible For Plastic Tree Tubes Along Lancaster County Creek?
Months After Storms, Chesapeake Bay Debris Cleanup Presses On
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Receives NFWF Grant To Expand Rotational Grazing
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County's Watershed Planning
Bay Journal: Multifunction Stream Buffers Offer Food For Thought For PA Farms
EDF Blog: New Resource Available To Help Dairy Industry Clean Up Local Watersheds
[Posted: Dec. 3, 2018]

Chesapeake Bay Foundation Receives NFWF Grant To Expand Rotational Grazing

On December 3, the ​National Fish and Wildlife


Foundation announced​ the ​Chesapeake Bay
Foundation​ will receive more than $850,000 to
promote rotational grazing (also known as prescribed

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grazing) in Maryland, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Virginia. Rotational grazing enhances
soil health, protects and improves water quality, and contributes to a farm’s economic viability.
The grant will be matched by $850,000 in partner funding.
In Pennsylvania, Adams, Cumberland, Franklin, Lancaster, Lebanon, and York counties
will be targeted under the grant.
Partners in the Pennsylvania include ​Capital Resource Conservation and Development
Area Council​, the ​PA Grazing Lands Coalition​, ​PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture​,
Penn State University, and the ​Natural Resource Conservation Service​.
Regionally, the goal of the grant is to transition 30 farms, including 1,700 acres of
farmland, to grazing. This would reduce more than 82,000 pounds of nitrogen, more than 7,000
pounds of phosphorus, and 656 tons of sediment pollution annually.
In addition, the grant includes the formation of a steering committee of project partners to
strengthen the partnership and facilitate information exchange, expanding opportunities for
peer-to-peer dialog, and developing outreach materials that highlight the economic and soil
health benefits of grazing.
Following the announcement, Beth McGee, CBF’s Director of Science and Agricultural
Policy issued this statement.
“CBF has been involved with rotational grazing for more than 30 years. It has been
demonstrated to reduce polluted runoff, reduce a farm’s feed and labor costs, and significantly
benefit soil health. Improved soil health makes the farm more resilient to extreme weather as
well as helping capture carbon that otherwise would contribute to climate change.
“Converting farms to rotational grazing is a significant part of the Chesapeake Clean
Water Blueprint, and the Bay states have only achieved 18 percent of the 2025 goals.”
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related issues in Pennsylvania, visit the ​Chesapeake Bay
Foundation-PA​ webpage. ​Click Here​ to sign up for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left
column). ​Click Here​ to support their work.
To learn more about how Pennsylvania plans to meet Chesapeake Bay pollution
reduction requirements, visit DEP’s ​Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan​ webpage.
NewsClips:
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
Lancaster Farming: Can PA Meet Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Goals?
Bay Journal: Multifunction Stream Buffers Offer Food For Thought For PA Farms
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Receives NFWF Grant To Expand Rotational Grazing
Crable: New Round Of Inspections Show Two-Thirds Of Chesapeake Bay Watershed Farmers
Have Runoff Plans
Thompson: Project To Limit Harmful Run-Off From Turkey Hill Supplier Farms Gets Boost
Crable: Farmers, Groups, Turkey Hill To Get $6.5M In Water Quality Funding
Stream Buffer Project Completed In Blair County By Trout Unlimited, Conservation District
Volunteers
Lancaster Farming: Stream Buffers Make Financial Sense
Alliance For The Chesapeake Bay, Partners Plant 14.81 Acres Of Forest Buffer In PA
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County’s Watershed Planning
Who’s Responsible For Plastic Tree Tubes Along Lancaster County Creek?
Months After Storms, Chesapeake Bay Debris Cleanup Presses On

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Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
NFWF Announces $13.1 Million In Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund Grants, Including PA
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County's Watershed Planning
Bay Journal: Multifunction Stream Buffers Offer Food For Thought For PA Farms
EDF Blog: New Resource Available To Help Dairy Industry Clean Up Local Watersheds
[Posted: Dec. 4, 2018]

CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement
Those Plans

On December 7, Harry Campbell, executive director for the


Chesapeake Bay Foundation in Pennsylvania​, made the
following statement after the Department of Environmental
Protection reported ​inspections found that 96 percent​ of almost
3,000 small farms visited in the watershed meet state
requirements for having pollution reduction plans.
Farmers are required to have a ​Manure Management Plan​ to
reduce nitrogen and phosphorous levels, an ​Erosion and
Sediment Control Plan​ to reduce sediment levels, or both.
According to a DEP press release, 2,924 small farms were visited, representing more than
329,000 acres of farmland. Operations inspected during the period July 2017-July 2018 averaged
87 acres in size. Two-thirds of farmers visited plans prepared at the time of inspection.
Almost all of the remaining one-third worked with conservation districts and agricultural
consultants to develop their plan by the end of the inspection year.
State and local entities like the DEP and county conservation districts are entrusted with
regulating and guiding implementation of those measures.
Based on scientific studies, DEP reports that roughly 19,000 miles of Pennsylvania’s
rivers and streams are damaged by pollution. Agricultural activities account for 6,798 miles of
stream impairment.
The Commonwealth is significantly behind in meeting its clean water cleanup goals.
Mr. Campbell said:
“Farmers, as stewards of the land, recognize the critical benefits of healthy soils and
clean water.
“It is encouraging that so many farmers have taken the important steps to get the required
plans that keep soils and nutrients on the land instead of in the water.
“The real benefits of those plans occur when they are turned into actions on the ground.
The result is healthier, more productive soils and cleaner streams. It’s a win-win.
“Unfortunately, many of our family farmers are struggling financially implementing
plans which require investment of time and resources can be a significant hurdle.
“By committing sufficient resources to get more farm conservation plans put into practice
on the ground, the Commonwealth would be investing in Pennsylvania’s family farmers and
clean water.

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“The advent of a new legislative session and budget season is the ideal time for elected
leaders to get Pennsylvania back on course for cleaner waters, by making greater investments in
the right places, on the right practices and to the right partnerships.
“We look forward to working with legislators, the Wolf administration, and farmers in
finding solutions so that we can leave a legacy of healthy soils and clean water for future
generations. Pennsylvania’s economy, communities, and culture depend on it.”
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related issues in Pennsylvania, visit the ​Chesapeake Bay
Foundation-PA​ webpage. ​Click Here​ to sign up for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left
column). ​Click Here​ to support their work.
To learn more about how Pennsylvania plans to meet Chesapeake Bay pollution
reduction requirements, visit DEP’s ​Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Lancaster Farming: Can PA Meet Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Goals?
Bay Journal: Multifunction Stream Buffers Offer Food For Thought For PA Farms
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Receives NFWF Grant To Expand Rotational Grazing
Crable: New Round Of Inspections Show Two-Thirds Of Chesapeake Bay Watershed Farmers
Have Runoff Plans
Thompson: Project To Limit Harmful Run-Off From Turkey Hill Supplier Farms Gets Boost
Crable: Farmers, Groups, Turkey Hill To Get $6.5M In Water Quality Funding
Stream Buffer Project Completed In Blair County By Trout Unlimited, Conservation District
Volunteers
Lancaster Farming: Stream Buffers Make Financial Sense
Alliance For The Chesapeake Bay, Partners Plant 14.81 Acres Of Forest Buffer In PA
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County’s Watershed Planning
Who’s Responsible For Plastic Tree Tubes Along Lancaster County Creek?
Months After Storms, Chesapeake Bay Debris Cleanup Presses On
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
NFWF Announces $13.1 Million In Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund Grants, Including PA
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Receives NFWF Grant To Expand Rotational Grazing
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County's Watershed Planning
Bay Journal: Multifunction Stream Buffers Offer Food For Thought For PA Farms
EDF Blog: New Resource Available To Help Dairy Industry Clean Up Local Watersheds
[Posted: Dec. 7, 2018]

DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County's Watershed


Planning

By Allyson Ladley Gibson, Coordinator, ​Lancaster Clean Water Partners​ ​(Facebook)

"Our residents have a strength and determination to


succeed."
All or part of 43 Pennsylvania counties are in the
Chesapeake Bay watershed. Across these counties,
community residents are working hard to reduce

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nitrogen and sediment pollution levels in streams and rivers.
They’re coming together to hammer out a plan they’ll submit to DEP called a ​Phase 3
Watershed Implementation Plan​—or Phase 3 WIP, for short—that specifies pollution-reducing
actions they’ll take.
These Pennsylvanians are helping their communities in a big way. They’re also helping
the state meet federal requirements for water quality in the Bay.
“Planning” seems inadequate to describe their endeavor, which requires great teamwork,
vision, and passion for community, as well as skill in case-making, numbers-crunching, and
logistics-nailing. So, as they strive for healthy local waters, we’re inviting them to share a bit
about their efforts in a series of posts we call “Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Watershed
Planning.”
Lancaster County starts us off. Watch for other county contributions to follow. And if
you agree there’s much to be proud of in your community’s efforts, help spread the word by
sharing their posts with friends and neighbors on social media. Use the hashtag
#healthywatersPA.
Taking the lead in county Phase 3 WIP plan development:​​ Lancaster Clean Water
Partners—more than 100 partner groups —are focused on making Lancaster County’s streams
clean and clear within our generation.
Folks leading our effort include Joellyn Warren, West Lampeter Township and Lancaster
County Clean Water Consortium; Ruth Hocker, City of Lancaster; Justin Evans, Mount Joy
Township; Mark Huber, Lancaster County Planning Commission; Brian Gish, Chesapeake Bay
Foundation; Joe Sweeney, Water Science Institute; Peter Hughes, Red Barn Consulting; and Jeff
Hill, Matt Kofroth, and Chris Thompson, Lancaster County Conservation District.
Healthier streams and rivers mean:​​ Healthy waters mean better quality of life for all of
Lancaster County--the bugs in the stream, the microbes in the soil, and the people in the
landscape.
One thing we’re especially proud of: ​We’re especially proud of the positive, respectful
conversations among all partners at both small group and large public meetings we’ve had. The
extensive collaboration that Phase 3 WIP planning requires takes some getting used to, but
everyone wants to see our waters clean and clear, so they’re open to this collective process.
Main areas we’re focusing our planning on:​​ We really need a centralized data system
for restoration, agriculture, and stormwater best management practices, as well as better
documentation of practices that are already on the ground so we get credit for the amazing work
that has been done.
Our big pluses:​​ Lancaster County residents have a strength and determination to
succeed, no matter the situation. We see Phase 3 WIP plan development as an opportunity to
create a local strategy to make our county’s streams clean and clear within our generation.
We’re grateful for the amount of Lancaster-specific data we have (though could always use
more), so that we can really customize our approach. This is key to success.
In addition, because Lancaster County presents the largest opportunity for Pennsylvania
to make progress on its clean water goals in the Bay watershed, we’re a logical choice for
additional funding and resources.
Our top challenge(s):​​ And we are in need of additional funding and resources. The rate
at which we need to scale up conservation efforts to meet a target 11-million-pound reduction of
nitrogen in 6 years is the biggest challenge. County, state, federal, and private resources/funding

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will need to likewise scale up, if Lancaster County is going to lead the way with the local
implementation efforts. We need more support.
We’re thinking outside the box on:​​ We’re trying to think innovatively about having
streambank vegetation buffers become the norm on public lands, how to tackle stormwater
permits at a watershed level, local nutrient management options for agriculture, and how our
municipalities can partner with farmers to achieve real reductions.
The key to our success will be:​​ Our success will rely on continued local participation in
both developing our county Phase 3 WIP plan and then implementing it. Increased technical and
financial support. A broader engagement across sectors, so that clean water rises as a priority
county-wide.
To follow Lancaster County’s progress, visit the ​Lancaster Clean Water Partners
Facebook page.
[​Note:​​ Adams, Franklin, Lancaster and York ​counties are the first to field test​ the draft
county clean water planning process​ to develop local plans to reduce nutrient and sediment
pollution to meet Chesapeake Bay pollution reduction milestones.]
For more information on meeting Chesapeake Bay cleanup milestones, visit ​PA’s
Chesapeake Bay Watershed Plan​ webpage.
(​Photo:​ ​Matt Kofroth,​ Watershed Specialist for L
​ ancaster County Conservation District​ and a
student monitor a stream in the county.)
NewsClips:
Crable: New Round Of Inspections Show Two-Thirds Of Chesapeake Bay Watershed Farmers
Have Runoff Plans
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
Lancaster Farming: Stream Buffers Make Financial Sense
Stream Buffer Project Completed In Blair County By Trout Unlimited, Conservation District
Volunteers
EPCAMR NFWF Grant To Help Develop Green Infrastructure Space Plans In Wilkes-Barre
Alliance For The Chesapeake Bay, Partners Plant 14.81 Acres Of Forest Buffer In PA
EDF Blog: New Resource Available To Help Dairy Industry Clean Up Local Watersheds
Thompson: Project To Limit Harmful Run-Off From Turkey Hill Supplier Farms Gets Boost
Crable: Farmers, Groups, Turkey Hill To Get $6.5M In Water Quality Funding
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County’s Watershed Planning
Who’s Responsible For Plastic Tree Tubes Along Lancaster County Creek?
Can Pittsburgh Region’s Infrastructure Handle All The Precipitation?
PASA: Exploring Connections Between Soil Health & Nutrition At Blackberry Meadows Farm
PASA: Too Much Of A Good Thing: Compost Brings Phosphorus Challenges To Red Earth
Farm
PASA: Stuck In A Rut: Stagnant Organic Matter Levels At Bending Bridge Farm
Related Stories:
Lancaster Clean Water Partners Release Draft Plan To Clean Up 11 Million Pounds Of Pollution
From County Streams
PA To Pilot County-Level Chesapeake Bay Clean Water Planning Process In 4 Counties
PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee Takes No Action On Stormwater
Recommendations

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Related Stories This Week:
NFWF Announces $13.1 Million In Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund Grants, Including PA
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Receives NFWF Grant To Expand Rotational Grazing
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
Bay Journal: Multifunction Stream Buffers Offer Food For Thought For PA Farms
EDF Blog: New Resource Available To Help Dairy Industry Clean Up Local Watersheds
[Posted: Dec. 4, 2018]

Bay Journal: Multifunction Stream Buffers Offer Food For Thought For PA Farms

By Donna Morelli, ​Chesapeake Bay Journal

Don English strode along the mowed


path through his streamside buffer on
Happy Hollow Farm in Southcentral
Pennsylvania with the confidence of an
experienced tour guide
. The tiny headwater stream of Deer
Creek gurgled by, hardly visible in the
tangled sprays of goldenrod and deep
purple bergamot growing tall in the
sunny spaces between larger trees and
shrubs.
It was August, and monarch butterflies and bees were still flitting about. The blueberries
were gone, and the elderberries were not quite ripe.
Stopping, he leaned on stacked beehives, pointing out the native trees and shrubs —
about 80 species in all-- and announced that the bees had collected enough pollen from the
explosion of flowers here to generate 70 pounds of honey so far this year.
The 4-acre streamside buffer designed by his landscape architect wife, Ann, filters
pollutants from stormwater and provides wildlife habitat. It also generates nuts, berries, honey
and syrup — a bounty that could also deliver a financial return.
It truly is multitasking.
“When I designed [the buffer], I had never heard the term ‘forest farming’ before,” Ann
said. “When I did, I said, ‘hey that’s what we’re doing.’ ”
Planting streamside buffers is an important strategy for improving water quality in the
Chesapeake Bay region. These strips of trees, shrubs and grasses secure the soil, filter toxins and
absorb nitrogen and phosphorus that would otherwise be carried into streams by stormwater.
On farms, though, planting buffers often means taking land out of production. In recent
years, farmers have become increasingly reluctant to do so.
Pennsylvania is far behind in its Bay cleanup goals, and its catch-up strategy relies in part
on planting 95,000 new acres of buffers by 2025. The state hopes to boost those plantings by
promoting a compromise: buffers that yield a cash crop.
The state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources has put money behind the
concept by including funds for “multifunctional buffers” in a grant program launched in 2017.

12
So far, the program has helped fund about 350 acres of new buffers-- both multifunctional and
conventional-- in Pennsylvania’s portion of the Bay watershed at a cost of $1.6 million.
“Our program is sort of unique in the Bay region,” said Tracey Coulter, the DCNR
agroforestry coordinator. “We are embracing this idea, and we are funding it.”
The idea is gaining interest. Various tour groups have been funneled through the
Englishes’ farm to see firsthand a mature and productive multifunctional buffer. DCNR staff and
grant recipients account for some of the visitors, but Don said the largest groups have been
members of the nonprofit Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture.
The long-term goal is to entice more farmers to plant buffers, a critical step in reaching
the state’s 2025 goal.
Most buffer plantings on farmland are funded by the federal Conservation Reserve
Enhancement Program, which provides annual payments for converting cropland to streamside
buffers.
But CREP participation has declined, in part because farmers are reluctant to retire
cropland. CREP also prohibits generating income from buffers. With state support for
multifunction buffers, which can still produce a harvest, advocates hope more farmers might
plant buffers.
In the meantime, the multifunction concept is attracting a variety of landowners, and
officials are tracking results.
“Right now we’re trying to get buffers in the ground and we’re documenting cost, growth
and yields, if any,” said Kelly Rossiter, the DCNR Rivers Program Specialist.
She said buffers might become more valuable over time because they could produce
some crops, such as blueberries and elderberries, within a few years, and others, such as
chestnuts, walnuts and hazelnuts, as they mature.
Surprisingly, the grant program was able to launch despite the legislature’s consistent
cuts to environmental programs. To do so, the DCNR partnered with the Pennsylvania
Infrastructure Investment Authority, a pseudo-state organization known as PennVest, which
manages revolving loans for water quality projects.
Executive Director Brion Johnson said the funds contributed to the grant program are an
investment to help PennVest learn if the buffers can eventually produce enough revenue to pay
back a loan.
“I am optimistic that it will pay off, but there is no data to support a business plan at this
time,” Johnson said.
Multifunction buffers may produce edible products and potential income, but their
effectiveness at filtering pollution may be less than that of a conventional forest buffer.
Bernard Sweeney, a senior research scientist and former director of the ​Stroud Water
Research Center​ in Chester County, PA, said that buffers lose some of the pollution-fighting
power when they are partially planted with forbs or shrubs.
He cited a 2014 study that looked at how well various buffers reduced the amount of
toxins reaching waterways. Results showed that wider buffers generally removed more
pollutants, and shrubs removed up to two times the amount of pollutants as grass.
But trees removed up to three times as much as grass and shrubs.
“I personally would love to see at least 35 feet of canopy trees next to the stream with the
crop trees providing additional width outside of that core buffer,” Sweeney said. “However, life
is a compromise and, if a narrower core of canopy trees is all that a given landowner can provide,

13
then it is a good starting point that we can later build upon to get where we need to be.”
The DCNR grant program provides more flexibility on buffer width and plant types than
other state and federal programs to make it more appealing to more landowners. But the grant
terms stipulate that buffers must be a minimum of 35 feet wide, with the first 15 feet planted
with large tree species.
The landowner must also commit to keeping the buffer intact for 25 years.
The research community is getting involved, too. In November, the Scientific and
Technical Advisory Committee of the state-federal Chesapeake Bay Program partnership
brought together scientists, farmers and nonprofit organizations to discuss multifunctional
buffers.
Lara Fowler, a Penn State Law School professor and STAC member said about 50 people
came to the two-day forum.
“We recognize that Pennsylvania has such a heavy lift [in the Bay cleanup],” Fowler said.
“Our goal is to put together a diverse group of people-- farmers, scientists and nonprofits-- to
explore how we can accelerate planting more multifunctional buffers toward Pennsylvania’s goal
of 95,000 more acres.”
Only about half of the projects funded to date are on farms. Most of the interested
landowners tend to own smaller parcels or have an educational mission-- like one municipality
planting a food forest in Lancaster County.
Others include Amish farmers who may be looking for a modest financial return from the
planting, and families like the Englishes, who have full-time jobs elsewhere and consider the
buffer a labor of love.
Fifty-six acres to be planted along tributaries of the West Branch and central
Susquehanna River will mostly be in or near wilderness and span four northcentral counties.
A Lancaster County project will supplement a 17-acre restored floodplain with a
buffer-to-table project:
Officials from Warwick Township are talking with two local restaurants about using what
the buffer produces in their dishes.
David Wise, restoration manager at the Stroud Center, has been promoting buffers to
farmers for about 20 years and has been on the creative end of several successful strategies.
He prefers what he calls the “tried and true” method: simply offering farmers a payment
for taking streamside cropland out of production through federal programs, sweetened with
additional funds and perks from nonprofit organizations like Stroud and the ​Chesapeake Bay
Foundation​.
“We would love to see this succeed,” he said of the DCNR program. “We’re just not as
optimistic as we’d like to be.”
The concept isn’t going to appeal to every farmer, said Eric Burkhart, an ethnobotanist
who teaches at PennState University and studies nontimber forest products.
“Not every landowner who has streamfront property that we want to vegetate is going to
say, ‘sure I can make money on this,’ ” he said. “Landowners who this appeals to tend to be
driven more by philosophy and passion than your average growers.”
Burkhart doesn’t think that marketing the products is an issue. Sellers who specialize in
medicinal crops, herbs, berries, ginseng, mushrooms and leeks can’t keep up with the demand.
It’s a growing market, he said.
On the other hand, planting and harvesting woodland food is very labor intensive

14
compared to crops like corn and soybeans, which can be harvested mechanically, and therefore is
expensive.
“We don’t have anyone who is successfully modeling this,” Burkhart said. “We need
more of the DCNR-type program to get things on the landscape for proof of concept.”
To the south, at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, researchers surveyed landowners in three
watersheds to see if there were any trends in the types of people interested in growing food in
streamside buffers.
The findings agreed with Burkhart’s statement: Small farm owners who are
philosophically oriented showed the greatest interest.
There is no reason that researchers, funders and proponents of agroforestry should
discount these landowners, said John Munsell, a Virginia Tech professor of agroforestry. In some
areas, those landowners make up a significant portion of a watershed.
Small farm and nonfarm landowners often have goals for their land that fit well with
multifunctional buffers. Don and Ann English exemplify that point.
The couple designed and planted their buffer on weekends. Their weekdays are spent at
jobs in the environmental field.
“Our goal was not production,” Ann said. “It is a long-term commitment, and we’re
doing it for the experience. Don grew up with that piece of land. It was his family farm, and I’ve
known it for a long time. It is important to us.”
Resources
For more information on buffers, financial and technical assistance available, visit
DCNR’s ​Forest Buffers​ webpage.
New DCNR Grant Round
To learn more about grant opportunities to support riparian buffer, trail and recreation
projects, visit DCNR’s ​Community Conservation Grant Program​ webpage. A new grant round is
opening January 22.
Forest Buffer Summit
The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and Western PA Conservancy
will be hosting a ​Riparian Forest Buffer Summit​ on February 20-21 at the Best Western Premier
Conference Center, 800 East Park Drive in Harrisburg.
(​Photos:​ Don English checks beehive, removes protective tree tubes from trees in a buffer
planted 5 years ago.)
NewsClips:
Crable: New Round Of Inspections Show Two-Thirds Of Chesapeake Bay Watershed Farmers
Have Runoff Plans
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
Lancaster Farming: Stream Buffers Make Financial Sense
Stream Buffer Project Completed In Blair County By Trout Unlimited, Conservation District
Volunteers
EPCAMR NFWF Grant To Help Develop Green Infrastructure Space Plans In Wilkes-Barre
Alliance For The Chesapeake Bay, Partners Plant 14.81 Acres Of Forest Buffer In PA
EDF Blog: New Resource Available To Help Dairy Industry Clean Up Local Watersheds
Thompson: Project To Limit Harmful Run-Off From Turkey Hill Supplier Farms Gets Boost
Crable: Farmers, Groups, Turkey Hill To Get $6.5M In Water Quality Funding

15
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County’s Watershed Planning
Who’s Responsible For Plastic Tree Tubes Along Lancaster County Creek?
Can Pittsburgh Region’s Infrastructure Handle All The Precipitation?
PASA: Exploring Connections Between Soil Health & Nutrition At Blackberry Meadows Farm
PASA: Too Much Of A Good Thing: Compost Brings Phosphorus Challenges To Red Earth
Farm
PASA: Stuck In A Rut: Stagnant Organic Matter Levels At Bending Bridge Farm
Related Stories:
NFWF Announces $13.1 Million In Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund Grants, Including PA
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Receives NFWF Grant To Expand Rotational Grazing
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County's Watershed Planning
EDF Blog: New Resource Available To Help Dairy Industry Clean Up Local Watersheds

(Reprinted from the ​Chesapeake Bay Journal​. ​Click Here​ to sign up for your own copy.)
[Posted: Dec. 5, 2018]

EDF Blog: New Resource Available To Help Dairy Industry Clean Up Local Watersheds

By Suzy Friedman, ​Environmental Defense Fund

It’s a tough time to be a dairy farmer. Nationwide


milk prices are at record lows due to an oversupply
of milk and changing consumer preferences, and the
industry faces increasing public and regulatory
pressure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and
improve water quality.
These challenges hit home for the dairy industry in
the Chesapeake Bay region.
Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia cannot meet
U.S. EPA-mandated water quality goals without an
all-hands-on-deck effort that includes dairy
cooperatives, processors and farmers.
This increases the pressure on the dairy industry, but it also creates an opportunity for the
sector, with support from partners and other stakeholders, to show leadership.
A new ​open-source sustainability guide [PDF]​ provides a roadmap for the dairy industry
to improve water quality and foster economic and environmental resilience at a critical moment.
The runoff challenge in the Chesapeake
In 2010, EPA set total maximum daily load limits for nitrogen, phosphorous and
sediment pollution runoff into the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. Meeting the milestones for
reducing nutrient loading overall, and from agriculture, is a big challenge.
State progress reports indicate that Pennsylvania in particular is significantly behind in its
nutrient reduction targets.
For dairies in Pennsylvania and throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed, becoming

16
more economically and environmentally sustainable has never been more important.
Adopting on-farm conservation practices such as improved nutrient management and
manure storage offers often-overlooked opportunities to improve operational resilience and
manage environmental and economic risks.
An opportunity for dairy cooperatives and processors
While many sustainability changes happen on the farm, responsibility for improving
environmental outcomes is shared throughout the supply chain.
Dairy cooperatives and processors are a linchpin for industry-wide sustainability
progress. These businesses have strong and direct relationships with the majority of dairy
farmers in the region and engage directly with milk buyers and retailers.
Implementing sustainability strategies can help meet growing consumer demands to
know where and how their food was produced, address regulatory pressures around water
quality, improve community relationships, reduce supply risks caused by extreme weather, and
sustain yields over the long term.
A roadmap for sustainability success
EDF just published a new resource to make getting started on sustainability seem less
daunting. Developed with input from a diversity of experts and stakeholders, including members
of the dairy industry, ​Water Quality Guide for Dairy Sustainability in the Chesapeake Bay [PDF]
provides dairy cooperatives and processors with tools and training to make measurable
environmental and economic progress.
This guide explains the important steps that dairy processors and cooperatives can take to
improve water quality, including:
-- Determining a starting point.
-- Identifying goals and desired outcomes.
-- Developing or selecting a data collection platform or process for tracking progress.
-- Developing an on-farm continuous improvement program for participating farmers and their
advisers.
-- Supporting farmer participation and rewarding results.
-- Communicating results to customers, communities and other important stakeholders.
With the information and additional resources identified in the guide, cooperatives and
processors can move forward on water quality regardless of their size, budget, or whether or not
they have a dedicated sustainability expert on staff.
Working with government programs and nonprofits identified in the guide, as well as
connecting with trusted farmer advisers, are cost-effective options.
The dairy industry is vital to the Chesapeake Bay region’s economy, culture and
environment. Proactively addressing water quality is vital for the near- and long-term wellbeing
of the dairy industry, the communities that depend on the sector, and the quality of the region’s
natural resources.
As pressures on the dairy industry mount, the recommendations in this guide will help
dairies advance meaningful solutions to water quality challenges, realize economic value from
sustainability and meet growing demand for corporate stewardship.
We welcome an opportunity to help you put this guide to use to advance water quality
goals in collaboration with member and supplying farmers.
[To find more resources to help the dairy industry in Pennsylvania, visit the Department
of Agriculture’s ​Center for Dairy Excellence​ website.

17
[For more information on meeting Chesapeake Bay cleanup milestones, visit ​PA’s
Chesapeake Bay Watershed Plan​ webpage.]

Suzy Friedman​ is senior director for agricultural sustainability at the Environmental Defense
Fund. She can be contacted through ​the EDF website​ or by calling 202-387-3500.
NewsClips:
Crable: New Round Of Inspections Show Two-Thirds Of Chesapeake Bay Watershed Farmers
Have Runoff Plans
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
Lancaster Farming: Stream Buffers Make Financial Sense
Stream Buffer Project Completed In Blair County By Trout Unlimited, Conservation District
Volunteers
EPCAMR NFWF Grant To Help Develop Green Infrastructure Space Plans In Wilkes-Barre
Alliance For The Chesapeake Bay, Partners Plant 14.81 Acres Of Forest Buffer In PA
EDF Blog: New Resource Available To Help Dairy Industry Clean Up Local Watersheds
Thompson: Project To Limit Harmful Run-Off From Turkey Hill Supplier Farms Gets Boost
Crable: Farmers, Groups, Turkey Hill To Get $6.5M In Water Quality Funding
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County’s Watershed Planning
Who’s Responsible For Plastic Tree Tubes Along Lancaster County Creek?
Can Pittsburgh Region’s Infrastructure Handle All The Precipitation?
PASA: Exploring Connections Between Soil Health & Nutrition At Blackberry Meadows Farm
PASA: Too Much Of A Good Thing: Compost Brings Phosphorus Challenges To Red Earth
Farm
PASA: Stuck In A Rut: Stagnant Organic Matter Levels At Bending Bridge Farm
Related Stories:
NFWF Announces $13.1 Million In Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund Grants, Including PA
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Receives NFWF Grant To Expand Rotational Grazing
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County's Watershed Planning
Bay Journal: Multifunction Stream Buffers Offer Food For Thought For PA Farms
[Posted: Dec. 6, 2018]

AP: Gov. Wolf: Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan May Be Something PA Should Adopt

On ​December 7, the Associated Press reported ​Gov. Tom Wolf is


considering whether to support a ​petition submitted to the
Environmental Quality Board​ November 27 creating a
cap-and-trade greenhouse gas reduction plan to address climate
change Pennsylvania.
The AP said Wolf “...hasn’t come to a conclusion on it,
but he agrees climate change is a problem and that a
cap-and-trade program may be something Pennsylvania should
adopt.”

18
The 407-page petition, submitted by more than 61 individuals, would eliminate
greenhouse gas emissions from major sources in Pennsylvania by 2052.
Cap-And-Trade Recommendations
The recommendation to adopt a cap-and-trade program to put a price carbon has also
been included in two other recent reports.
On November 30, the ​Senate-House Nuclear Energy Caucus​ issued a report on the impact
of prematurely closing the state’s nuclear power plants which recommended, as one option,
putting a price on carbon (greenhouse gas) emissions which the report said could be done if
Pennsylvania adopted a cap-and-trade program. ​Click Here​ to read more.​
On December 4, members of ​DEP’s Climate Change Advisory Committee​ reviewed a
draft update to the state’s Climate Change Action Plan prepared by a DEP consultant which also
made a recommendation to adopt a cap-and-trade program to put a price on carbon. A final
report is due out by mid-February. ​Click Here​ to read more.
Other PA Climate Actions
There have also been a series of other recent climate-related actions in Pennsylvania.
On November 28, the ​Senate Democratic Policy Committee​ held a hearing in Pittsburgh
on local and state efforts to address climate change.
“In the absence of federal leadership on climate change, it is imperative that Pennsylvania
continue to participate in cooperative efforts to stave off the catastrophic consequences of global
warming,” said Sen. Jay Costa (D-Allegheny). “We need to maintain efforts to keep
Pennsylvania on track to combat climate change.” ​Click Here​ to read more.
On December 3, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale announced plans to prepare a
special report exploring how Pennsylvania is responding to climate change in light of a failure by
national leaders to recognize and act on the issue.
DePasquale said his report will focus on state government’s response to climate change
and steps that can better prepare the state for the future, noting that the problem will impact
communities of all sizes. ​Click Here​ to read more.
DEP’s ​Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ is scheduled to meet December 13 on
a draft regulation to set limits on volatile organic compound emissions-- with the “co-benefit” of
reducing methane emissions-- from existing well sites, pumps, storage and other equipment at oil
and gas facilities. ​Click Here​ to read more.
Visit DEP’s ​Climate Change​ webpage for more information on climate-related actions.
NewsClips:
AP: Gov. Wolf: Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan May Be Something PA Should Adopt
AP: Gov. Wolf Eyes Greenhouse Gas Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan
Cusick: Wolf On Climate Change: We Are Having Real Problems
Legere: Draft PA Climate Plan Update Envisions Dramatic Shift In PA’s Energy Mix
Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update
Cusick: Auditor General To Look At State Response To Climate Change
Auditor General On Climate Change: Future Generations Will Ask Did They Do Something?
Auditor General To Review Climate Change’s Likely Impact In PA
Hopey: Paris To Pittsburgh Documentary Puts Pittsburgh In Leading Role In Climate Change
Efforts
Philly Affirms Commitment To Reduce Climate-Changing Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Crable: 2018 Could Become Wettest In 104 Years

19
Here’s What Made 2018 Wettest Year On Record In State College Area
Letter: Are Local Governments Ready For Floods From A Warming Climate?
Letter: Is It Time To Sell The Beach House?
Op-Ed: Why It’s Important To Curtail Methane Leaks From Oil & Gas Facilities
Editorial: We Must Act Aggressively And Immediately On Climate Change
WVU Climate Conference: Switch From Coal To Gas To Reduce Emissions
Portrait Of A Planet On The Verge Of Climate Catastrophe
High Stakes As International Climate Conference Begins
Climate Diaspora Trying To Save Paris Climate Agreement From Trump
UN Chief: Climate Change Is Most Important Issue We Face
Coal Looms Large As Climate Change Talks Begin In Poland
Climate Talks Shift To Nitty-Gritty Details Of Paris Accord
Global Carbon Emissions Jump To All-Time High In 2018
Climate Reality Check: Global Carbon Pollution Up In 2019
Why The Climate Change Problem Is Starting To Look Too Big To Solve
[2015 Article] ​Holding Warming Under 2 Degrees C - It May Already Be Too Late
EIA: U.S. Coal Consumption Lowest In 29 Years
U.S. Clean Coal Program Fails To Deliver On Promised Smog Cuts
EPA Outlines Rule Change To Encourage New Coal-Fired Power Plants
EPA Announces Plan To Weaken Greenhouse Gas Rule
Related Story:
4th National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Is Human Caused; Flooding, Wildfires,
Health Impacts, Infrastructure, Economic Damage Will Increase Without Action
Related Stories This Week:
Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update
Auditor General DePasquale Announces Plans For Special Report On Climate Change In PA
PA Solar Center Invites Responses To RFP To Assist Nonprofit Groups In Converting To Solar
Energy
LancasterOnline Editorial: We Must Act Aggressively And Immediately On Climate Change
[Posted: Dec. 7, 2018]

Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update

On December 4, members of DEP’s ​Climate Change Advisory


Committee​ got the chance to comment on the draft 180-page 2018
PA Climate Action Plan Update and recommendations prepared for
DEP by their ​consultant ICF​.
DEP is required to prepare an update to the PA Climate Action
Plan every 3 years by ​Act 70 of 2008​.
Many of the comments were familiar, because they revolved
around the roles coal, natural gas and nuclear energy do and don’t
play in helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in
Pennsylvania.
Some members thought the Plan should “set the table” more by
explaining how far Pennsylvania has already come in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, for

20
example, from the electric power generation sector.
Members and DEP have noted ​Pennsylvania has already exceeded the original EPA
Clean Power Plan goal​ of reducing power plant greenhouse gas emissions to 89,822,308 tons
through a combination of market-driven techniques like switching from coal to natural gas and
the ​Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards​ requiring the purchase of renewable energy by
electric utilities.
The ​updated Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory​ prepared for the Committee shows
power plant emissions of greenhouse gases were reduced from 116.13 million tons in 2000 to
86.37 million tons in 2015, far below the CPP target.
Total greenhouse gas emissions from all sectors in Pennsylvania have been reduced from
324.79 million tons in 2000 to 286.78 million tons in 2015, as reported to EPA.
Another comment questioned the greenhouse gas emission reduction targets of a 26
percent reduction in net emissions by 2025 from 2005 levels and an 80 percent net reduction by
2050 used to gauge the results of the recommended strategies in the draft Plan.
Even though the targets are in line with the goals established by the 2015 ​U.N. Paris
Climate Agreement​, the concern raised was over whether than Plan assumes everyone else in the
world was doing their part to reduce greenhouse gas emissions or whether Pennsylvania was
going it alone.
ICF staff at the meeting said the analysis of the effectiveness of the recommendations
made in the Plan did not rely on the actions of other states or countries.
Another Committee member questioned a basic assumption used to do the projections in
the draft Plan. The statement said in part, “A carbon emission limit for each year is established,
using a 30 percent reduction from 2020 CO2 [carbon dioxide] levels by 2030. Post-2030 the
emissions cap is ​stringent enough to phase out most remaining coal generation​ other than waste
coal by 2050. The carbon emissions limit in each year is first met through the expansion of the
AEPS and nuclear generation and then by ramping up natural gas generation and displacing coal
generation, then by reducing coal generation further through a reduction in exports.” ​(​page 72​)
The question was whether DEP was comfortable with its report saying they want to phase
out “most remaining coal generation” in the state.
Others raised questions about the assumptions made about nuclear power generation in
the draft Plan, in particular this section--
“While Beaver Valley and Three Mile Island nuclear plants will close in 2021 and 2019
respectively in the BAU Scenario, these plants will be brought back online or kept open as part
of this strategy and all other levels of nuclear generation in Pennsylvania will remain constant
through 2050. Prices used in this analysis represent what would be needed to pay to the nuclear
facilities to keep the existing nuclear running.” ​(p​ age 72​)
Members also talked about the various assumptions involved in setting a price for carbon
in a cap-and-trade program to limit greenhouse gas emissions, in particular statements in the
draft Plan suggesting the price for carbon should be set high enough to reduce the
cost-competitiveness of coal relative to natural gas which is higher than what is needed to meet
carbon limits and overall greenhouse gas reductions. Specifically--
“For the cap and trade program carbon prices are designed to achieve the cap selected for
modeling purposes (see above); the carbon price is high enough to reduce the
cost-competitiveness of coal relative to natural gas, which is the incremental step beyond the
AEPS [Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards] that is needed to meet carbon limits and overall

21
GHG reduction targets used for this modeling exercise.” ​(p​ age 72​)
Major Recommendations
The draft Plan ​includes over 100 recommended actions, in addition to citizen and
business actions, that would help the Commonwealth reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Fifteen
actions under 7 general strategy categories were selected as the most cost-effective with the
biggest greenhouse gas reductions--
-- Increase end use energy conservation and efficiency--
-- Update building codes
-- Increase adoption of energy efficiency and expand Act 129
-- Create an Act 129-like efficiency program for natural gas
-- Expand energy assessments and provide training on energy efficiency
-- Implement sustainable transportation planning and practices--
-- Reduce vehicle miles traveled for single-occupancy vehicles
-- Implement a strategic plan and incentives for increasing electric vehicle use
-- Increase the use of clean public transportation through electric municipal bus fleets
-- Increase use of clean, distributed electricity generation resources--
-- Invest in and promote building-scale solar
-- Incentivize and increase use of combined heat and power (CHP)
-- Create a diverse portfolio of clean, utility-scale electricity generation--
-- Increase Alternative Portfolios Energy Standard (AEPS) Tier 1 targets, further increase
in-state generation, use of renewables
-- Implement policy to maintain nuclear generation at current levels
-- Limit carbon emissions through an electricity sector cap and trade program
-- Reduce upstream impacts of fossil fuel energy production--
-- Implement policies and practices to reduce methane emissions across oil and natural gas
systems
-- Increase production and use of alternative fuels--
-- Increase recovery and use of gas from coal mines, agriculture, wastewater, and landfills for
energy
-- Use agricultural best practices---
-- Implement and provide training for no-till farming practices.
What’s Next
The Committee as a whole does not vote to approve or recommended against the Plan
Update or specific items in the Plan based on its bylaws, but members of the Committee were
encouraged to submit specific comments on the draft Plan to DEP in writing by December 21.
DEP staff said they will review the comments and hope to have a final Plan ready for the
Committee’s next meeting now scheduled for February 12.
DEP said they would like to discuss how to implement whatever final recommendations
are included in the Plan at the February meeting.
For more information and available handouts, presentations, past Plans and reports, visit
DEP’s ​Climate Change Advisory Committee​ webpage. Questions should be directed to ​Lindsay
Byron, DEP, by calling 717-772-8951 or sending email to: ​lbyron@pa.gov​.
Other Climate-Related Proposals
In addition to DEP’s Update to the Climate Action Plan, there have been a series of
proposals and actions on climate-related issues in the last 2 weeks. This is a quick summary.

22
Wolf: Maybe PA Should Adopt Cap-And-Trade
On ​December 7, the Associated Press reported ​Gov. Tom Wolf is considering whether to
support a ​petition submitted to the Environmental Quality Board​ November 27 creating a
cap-and-trade greenhouse gas reduction plan to address climate change Pennsylvania.
The AP said Wolf “...hasn’t come to a conclusion on it, but he agrees climate change is a
problem and that a cap-and-trade program may be something Pennsylvania should adopt.” ​Read
more here​.
Cap-And-Trade Petition
On November 27,​ Robert B. McKinstry, Jr.,​ the ​Clean Air Council​, ​Widener University
Environmental Law and Sustainability Center​, eco(n)law LLC and ​61​ other individuals, groups​,
businesses​ and local governments submitted a ​rulemaking petition​ to the ​Environment Quality
Board​ to establish a market-based cap-and-trade greenhouse gas emission reduction program that
eliminates those emissions from major sources by 2052.
The Department of Environmental Protection is now reviewing the petition to see if it
meets the ​requirements for consideration by the EQB​. If it is acceptable, it will go to the EQB
for a vote on whether the petition should be accepted for study. ​Read more here​.
Nuclear Energy Caucus
On November 29, Senators Ryan Aument (R-Lancaster) and John Yudichak (D-Luzerne)
along with Representatives Becky Corbin (R-Chester) and Rob Matzie (D-Allegheny), co-chairs
of the ​Senate-House Nuclear Energy Caucus​ released ​a report summarizing their findings​ on the
impact of closing nuclear power plants in Pennsylvania and outlining potential solutions.
The report, which will be transmitted to all members of the General Assembly and to
Gov. Wolf, includes four options for the future of the state’s challenged industry, including the
General Assembly taking action in 2019 to prevent the “employment, economic, and
environmental devastation” associated with the premature closure of nuclear plants in the
Commonwealth.
One of the options in the report is to put a price on carbon through a cap-and-trade or
other program. ​Read more here​.
Oil & Gas Methane Limits
DEP’s ​Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ is scheduled to meet December 13 on
a draft regulation to set limits on volatile organic compound emissions-- with the “co-benefit” of
reducing methane emissions-- from existing well sites, pumps, storage and other equipment at oil
and gas facilities. ​Read more here​.
Senate Climate Hearing
On November 28, the ​Senate Democratic Policy Committee​ held a hearing in Pittsburgh
on local and state efforts to address climate change.
“In the absence of federal leadership on climate change, it is imperative that Pennsylvania
continue to participate in cooperative efforts to stave off the catastrophic consequences of global
warming,” said Sen. Jay Costa (D-Allegheny). “We need to maintain efforts to keep
Pennsylvania on track to combat climate change.” ​Read more here​.
Auditor General Report
On December 3, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale announced plans to prepare a
special report exploring how Pennsylvania is responding to climate change in light of a failure by
national leaders to recognize and act on the issue.
DePasquale said his report will focus on state government’s response to climate change

23
and steps that can better prepare the state for the future, noting that the problem will impact
communities of all sizes. ​Read more here​.
Visit DEP’s ​Climate Change​ webpage for more information on climate-related actions.
NewsClips:
AP: Gov. Wolf: Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan May Be Something PA Should Adopt
AP: Gov. Wolf Eyes Greenhouse Gas Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan
Cusick: Wolf On Climate Change: We Are Having Real Problems
Legere: Draft PA Climate Plan Update Envisions Dramatic Shift In PA’s Energy Mix
Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update
Cusick: Auditor General To Look At State Response To Climate Change
Auditor General On Climate Change: Future Generations Will Ask Did They Do Something?
Auditor General To Review Climate Change’s Likely Impact In PA
Hopey: Paris To Pittsburgh Documentary Puts Pittsburgh In Leading Role In Climate Change
Efforts
Philly Affirms Commitment To Reduce Climate-Changing Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Crable: 2018 Could Become Wettest In 104 Years
Here’s What Made 2018 Wettest Year On Record In State College Area
Letter: Are Local Governments Ready For Floods From A Warming Climate?
Letter: Is It Time To Sell The Beach House?
Op-Ed: Why It’s Important To Curtail Methane Leaks From Oil & Gas Facilities
Editorial: We Must Act Aggressively And Immediately On Climate Change
WVU Climate Conference: Switch From Coal To Gas To Reduce Emissions
Portrait Of A Planet On The Verge Of Climate Catastrophe
High Stakes As International Climate Conference Begins
Climate Diaspora Trying To Save Paris Climate Agreement From Trump
UN Chief: Climate Change Is Most Important Issue We Face
Coal Looms Large As Climate Change Talks Begin In Poland
Climate Talks Shift To Nitty-Gritty Details Of Paris Accord
Global Carbon Emissions Jump To All-Time High In 2018
Climate Reality Check: Global Carbon Pollution Up In 2019
Why The Climate Change Problem Is Starting To Look Too Big To Solve
[2015 Article] ​Holding Warming Under 2 Degrees C - It May Already Be Too Late
EIA: U.S. Coal Consumption Lowest In 29 Years
U.S. Clean Coal Program Fails To Deliver On Promised Smog Cuts
EPA Outlines Rule Change To Encourage New Coal-Fired Power Plants
EPA Announces Plan To Weaken Greenhouse Gas Rule
Related Story:
4th National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Is Human Caused; Flooding, Wildfires,
Health Impacts, Infrastructure, Economic Damage Will Increase Without Action
Related Stories This Week:
AP: Gov. Wolf: Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan May Be Something PA Should Adopt
Auditor General DePasquale Announces Plans For Special Report On Climate Change In PA
PA Solar Center Invites Responses To RFP To Assist Nonprofit Groups In Converting To Solar
Energy
LancasterOnline Editorial: We Must Act Aggressively And Immediately On Climate Change

24
[Posted: Dec. 5, 2018]

Auditor General DePasquale Announces Plans For Special Report On Climate Change In
PA

On December 3, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale announced plans


to prepare a special report exploring how Pennsylvania is responding to
climate change in light of a failure by national leaders to recognize and
act on the issue.
DePasquale said his report will focus on state government’s
response to climate change and steps that can better prepare the state for
the future, noting that the problem will impact communities of all sizes.
“Beyond the obvious public safety concerns related to flooding
and infrastructure damage, a changing climate will impact health,
transportation, agriculture, forestry, tourism – from farms to cities, a
whole host of issues,” DePasquale said. “These factors all have the
potential to create new burdens on taxpayers and disrupt our economy.”
DePasquale criticized the Trump Administration for trying to bury its ​own climate
change report​ by releasing it over Thanksgiving weekend, after which the White House
immediately tried to cast doubt on the report’s scientific and economic conclusions.
“Willful ignorance of scientific analysis is putting future generations at risk,” DePasquale
said. “The challenges we face as a result of climate change will only get worse if we fail to adopt
a strategic national action plan – it’s not a question of if or when; it’s already happening.”
The federal report issued in late November included regional impact discussions. ​In the
Northeast​, the report specifically cited threats to public health and safety from extreme heat and
flooding; concerns about severe weather impacts on the region’s aging power, water, sewer and
transportation systems; and the impact of altered ecosystems on rural communities, farming,
forestry and tourism.
DePasquale said climate change is too important to be treated as a partisan issue.
“Those who pretend climate change isn’t real are simply trying to protect the profits of
industries that have only made the problem worse,” he added. “If their goal is to ‘play the long
game’ by cynically wagering that they won’t be around to suffer the consequences of their greed,
they should think about the mess they’re leaving behind for their own children and
grandchildren.”
DePasquale applauded the Senate Democratic Policy Committee and Senator-elect
Lindsey Williams for ​holding a hearing in Pittsburgh​ last week on potential state-level actions on
climate change.
DePasquale will conduct his own hearings as part of developing the special report, which
is expected to be completed by summer.
For more information, visit the ​Office of Auditor General​ website.
NewsClips:
Cusick: Auditor General To Look At State Response To Climate Change
Auditor General On Climate Change: Future Generations Will Ask Did They Do Something?
Auditor General To Review Climate Change’s Likely Impact In PA
AP: Gov. Wolf: Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan May Be Something PA Should Adopt

25
AP: Gov. Wolf Eyes Greenhouse Gas Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan
Cusick: Wolf On Climate Change: We Are Having Real Problems
Legere: Draft PA Climate Plan Update Envisions Dramatic Shift In PA’s Energy Mix
Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update
Hopey: Paris To Pittsburgh Documentary Puts Pittsburgh In Leading Role In Climate Change
Efforts
Philly Affirms Commitment To Reduce Climate-Changing Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Crable: 2018 Could Become Wettest In 104 Years
Here’s What Made 2018 Wettest Year On Record In State College Area
Letter: Are Local Governments Ready For Floods From A Warming Climate?
Letter: Is It Time To Sell The Beach House?
Op-Ed: Why It’s Important To Curtail Methane Leaks From Oil & Gas Facilities
Editorial: We Must Act Aggressively And Immediately On Climate Change
WVU Climate Conference: Switch From Coal To Gas To Reduce Emissions
Portrait Of A Planet On The Verge Of Climate Catastrophe
High Stakes As International Climate Conference Begins
Climate Diaspora Trying To Save Paris Climate Agreement From Trump
UN Chief: Climate Change Is Most Important Issue We Face
Coal Looms Large As Climate Change Talks Begin In Poland
Climate Talks Shift To Nitty-Gritty Details Of Paris Accord
Global Carbon Emissions Jump To All-Time High In 2018
Climate Reality Check: Global Carbon Pollution Up In 2019
Why The Climate Change Problem Is Starting To Look Too Big To Solve
[2015 Article] ​Holding Warming Under 2 Degrees C - It May Already Be Too Late
EIA: U.S. Coal Consumption Lowest In 29 Years
U.S. Clean Coal Program Fails To Deliver On Promised Smog Cuts
EPA Outlines Rule Change To Encourage New Coal-Fired Power Plants
EPA Announces Plan To Weaken Greenhouse Gas Rule
Related Stories:
Auditor General DePasquale Urges National Strategy On Climate Change
Senate Climate Change Hearing: In The Absence Of Federal Leadership, PA Must Act
Clean Air Council, Widener Law & Sustainability Center, 61 Others Petition EQB To Set Up A
Cap-And-Trade Program To Reduce PA Greenhouse Gas Emissions
4th National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Is Human Caused; Flooding, Wildfires,
Health Impacts, Infrastructure, Economic Damage Will Increase Without Action
Related Stories This Week:
AP: Gov. Wolf: Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan May Be Something PA Should Adopt
Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update
PA Solar Center Invites Responses To RFP To Assist Nonprofit Groups In Converting To Solar
Energy
LancasterOnline Editorial: We Must Act Aggressively And Immediately On Climate Change
[Posted: Dec. 3, 2018]

LancasterOnline Editorial: We Must Act Aggressively And Immediately On Climate


Change

26
​ ancasterOnline.com December 5​--
The following editorial appeared on L

The Issue
The federal government on Nov. 23
released a new assessment of the risks​ posed by
climate change.
It emphasized that the effects of global
warming are already underway, in the form of
more intense hurricanes, heat waves and wildfires
(to name a few calamities).
And it emphasized that climate change is
only going to create greater health and financial
problems for the United States moving forward.
Regarding this dire analysis authored by
officials from multiple federal agencies, President Donald Trump stated, “I don’t believe it.”
Meanwhile, in a separate climate report released Nov. 27, the United Nations ​handed out
failing marks​ for world governments. It said global greenhouse gas emissions are rising again,
with “no signs of peaking,” which jeopardizes the stated goals of the 2015 Paris climate
agreement and the hopes of limiting the Earth’s warming in coming decades.
We’re at a turning point
In light of the overwhelming scientific evidence, we must urge our leaders to enact and
support sweeping and immediate initiatives to counteract the man-made aspects of climate
change.
We, as individual citizens, must be examples and leaders, too. We must change our
consumption habits, pivot toward renewable energy and be willing to make inconvenient
adjustments to our fossil-fueled lifestyles.
We can do these things.​​ Or we can doom our descendants, starting with those who have
already been born, to a likely future of ​devastating hurricanes​, droughts, ​crop disasters​, food
shortages, ​health epidemics​ and ​coastal flooding​ across the globe.
This challenge is daunting on its own, but additionally so because not everyone agrees
about the urgency or science of climate change.
Our president is not alone among the nonbelievers. Especially when it comes to the
immediacy of the climate-change threat.
Although 74 percent of women and 70 percent of men, ​according to a Yale study​, believe
that climate change will prove harmful to future generations, only 48 percent of women and 42
percent of men believe that it’s a problem right now.
The ​federal government’s​ and the ​United Nations’ reports​-- both of which we should all
take time to read-- are designed to serve as red alerts.
The federal assessment, especially, is geared toward showing that climate change is
affecting our lives as we speak. In addition to the obvious natural disasters, the report cites
tangible concerns like increased instances of asthma attacks and heat stroke in emergency rooms.
“Viewing climate change as a public health emergency is literally second nature,” Renee
Salas, a doctor at Massachusetts General Hospital, ​told Wired’s Adam Rogers​.
On Monday, Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale announced that his office

27
will prepare a report​ on how the state is, in his words, “responding to climate change in light of a
failure by national leaders to recognize and act on the issue.”
He emphasized, especially for Pennsylvania and the Northeastern U.S., the threats to
public health and our “aging power, water, sewer and transportation systems.” He mentioned the
risks for our state’s farms, forests and rural communities. No place will be immune.
We appreciate the importance that DePasquale, Gov. Tom Wolf and others in the state
are placing on climate change. But hearings, studies and documents such as the ​newest
Pennsylvania Climate Action Plan​ from the state Department of Environmental Protection must
be followed by strong action. Without delay.
Not a partisan issue
This isn’t news we want to hear. Some of us resist the overwhelming science of climate
change, believing that adhering to scientists’ recommendations might harm the U.S. economy.
But it becomes clearer and clearer that the far greater threat to our economy is doing
nothing or too little to address climate change.
The U.S. government assessment states our economy ​could lose hundreds of billions of
dollars​-- up to 10 percent of the country’s gross domestic product-- by 2100 if no action is
taken.
“Beyond the obvious public safety concerns related to flooding and infrastructure
damage, a changing climate will impact health, transportation, agriculture, forestry, tourism –
from farms to cities, a whole host of issues,” DePasquale stated Monday. “These factors all have
the potential to create new burdens on taxpayers and disrupt our economy.”
It doesn’t help that television news networks tend to treat this subject as if it were ​just
one more partisan issue​ — and to book guests who are mainly concerned with its politics.
Consider former Pennsylvania senator and current cable pundit Rick Santorum, who
proclaimed on CNN that climate scientists “​are driven by the money that they receive​.”
Research scientists working outside the fossil fuel industry are not raking in piles of cash.
The truth is that scientists are not “split” on climate change. And the rhetoric that “each
side has its scientists” is hobbling our ability to move forward with necessary discussions and
strong legislation.
Texas Tech professor Katharine Hayhoe, one of the authors of the federal government’s
climate assessments, ​wrote this last week in The Washington Post​: “In reality, more than 97
percent of climate scientists agree that global warming is happening and that humans are causing
it. At least 18 scientific societies in the United States, from the American Geophysical Union to
the American Medical Association, have issued official statements on climate change. And it’s
been more than 50 years since U.S. scientists first raised the alarm about the dangers of climate
change with the president-- at the time, Lyndon B. Johnson. The public confusion has been
manufactured by industry interests and ideologues to muddy the waters.”
The waters are much more than muddied. They’re rising, along all of America’s coasts.
Make it our moon shot.
While we champion the rights of everyone to have their say, there are some issues on
which we have an obligation to take a stand, no matter how difficult. We’re worried about the
future of this land we love-- and more specifically, what it might look like for our grandchildren.
To those who dispute the science of climate change, we’d ask: What do you have to lose
by supporting the needed initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions? If climate-change
science is correct, an aggressive approach might salvage our future.

28
And if it turns out we were just being overly alarmist (which we don’t believe is the
case), the innovations needed to reshape our energy grid, infrastructure and daily lives could reap
immense economic benefits and technological breakthroughs.
Think of this as America’s 21st-century ​moon shot​.
To paraphrase President John F. Kennedy, we choose to aggressively combat climate
change not because it is easy, but because it is hard, because that goal will serve to organize and
measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to
accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win.
We must be unwilling to postpone our response to climate change.
Otherwise, we should start writing apology letters to our children, our grandchildren and
our great-grandchildren. For what we failed to do. For what we left them.
(​Photo:​ October 2018 devastation from Hurricane Michael in Florida.)
NewsClips:
Editorial: We Must Act Aggressively And Immediately On Climate Change
AP: Gov. Wolf: Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan May Be Something PA Should Adopt
AP: Gov. Wolf Eyes Greenhouse Gas Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan
Cusick: Wolf On Climate Change: We Are Having Real Problems
Legere: Draft PA Climate Plan Update Envisions Dramatic Shift In PA’s Energy Mix
Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update
Cusick: Auditor General To Look At State Response To Climate Change
Auditor General On Climate Change: Future Generations Will Ask Did They Do Something?
Auditor General To Review Climate Change’s Likely Impact In PA
Hopey: Paris To Pittsburgh Documentary Puts Pittsburgh In Leading Role In Climate Change
Efforts
Philly Affirms Commitment To Reduce Climate-Changing Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Crable: 2018 Could Become Wettest In 104 Years
Here’s What Made 2018 Wettest Year On Record In State College Area
Letter: Are Local Governments Ready For Floods From A Warming Climate?
Letter: Is It Time To Sell The Beach House?
Op-Ed: Why It’s Important To Curtail Methane Leaks From Oil & Gas Facilities
WVU Climate Conference: Switch From Coal To Gas To Reduce Emissions
Portrait Of A Planet On The Verge Of Climate Catastrophe
High Stakes As International Climate Conference Begins
Climate Diaspora Trying To Save Paris Climate Agreement From Trump
UN Chief: Climate Change Is Most Important Issue We Face
Coal Looms Large As Climate Change Talks Begin In Poland
Climate Talks Shift To Nitty-Gritty Details Of Paris Accord
Global Carbon Emissions Jump To All-Time High In 2018
Climate Reality Check: Global Carbon Pollution Up In 2019
Why The Climate Change Problem Is Starting To Look Too Big To Solve
[2015 Article] ​Holding Warming Under 2 Degrees C - It May Already Be Too Late
EIA: U.S. Coal Consumption Lowest In 29 Years
U.S. Clean Coal Program Fails To Deliver On Promised Smog Cuts
EPA Outlines Rule Change To Encourage New Coal-Fired Power Plants
EPA Announces Plan To Weaken Greenhouse Gas Rule

29
Related Stories:
AP: Gov. Wolf: Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan May Be Something PA Should Adopt
Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update
Auditor General DePasquale Announces Plans For Special Report On Climate Change In PA
PA Solar Center Invites Responses To RFP To Assist Nonprofit Groups In Converting To Solar
Energy
[Posted: Dec. 6, 2018]

PA Supreme Court Denies Appeal Of Case Challenging Use Of Eminent Domain By


Mariner East 2 Pipeline, But A Challenge Remains

On December 5, the ​PA Supreme Court denied an appeal


by the ​Clean Air Council​ and landowners challenging the
basic authority of the Mariner East 2 Pipeline to use
eminent domain authority.
The decision involved a ​Commonwealth Court
opinion in April​ that threw out all but one of the
challenges against eminent domain.
Commonwealth Court, however, said the Clean Air
Council and landowners could challenge the use of eminent domain based on Pennsylvania’s
Environmental Rights Amendment and agreed to hear arguments on that issue.
Consideration of this portion of the case is still in preliminary stages in Commonwealth
Court, according to the Clean Air Council.
NewsClips:
PA Supreme Court Upholds Mariner East 2 Pipeline Right To Use Eminent Domain
Delaware County Pipelines Risk Study Finds Risk Less Than Fatal Car Crash, House Fire
Hurdle: Delaware County Study: Pipeline Blast Could Be Devastating, But Risk Is Low
Upper Bucks Residents Lob Adelphia Pipeline Complaints At DEP Hearing
$500M Project To Expand Leidy South Pipeline Project Proposed
Crable: Homeowners Along Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Route Shocked To Find Threats Of Liens
In Mail As A Result Of Bankruptcy Case
Crable: Landowners Along Mariner East 2 Pipeline Route No Longer Facing Liens
Opposition Growing Against Natural Gas Pipeline To Supply Beaver Ethane Plant
Dec. 12 FERC Public Meeting On Transco Pipeline In Clinton County
Lebanon County Gets $700,000 From Mariner East 2 Pipeline Fines To Help With Stormwater
Projects
U.S. Senate Confirms McNamee To FERC On Party Line Vote
Related Story:
Commonwealth Court To Hear Mariner East 2 Pipeline Case Challenging Eminent Domain On
Environmental Rights Amendment Grounds
Related Stories This Week:
Williams To Hold Public Meetings On Proposed Leidy South Natural Gas Pipeline Dec. 11
Lycoming County, Dec. 12 Clinton County, More
Natural Gas Distribution Companies Expect Little Change In Natural Gas Use During Winter
Heating Season, Slight Increase In Cost

30
IFO Reports Natural Gas Production Increased 18.5% Over The 3rd Quarter 2017
AP: Gov. Wolf: Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan May Be Something PA Should Adopt
Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update
Exelon To Retire 3 Landfill Gas Generation Facilities In Pennsylvania
[Posted: Dec. 7, 2018]

In Memoriam: Donald M. Hoskins, PA State Geologist 1987 - 2001

Donald M. Hoskins, who served as


Pennsylvania State Geologist from
January 8, 1987 until his retirement in
January 27, 2001, passed away on
December 5.
Don started with the Pennsylvania
Survey in November 1956 and never left.
Even after his retirement he was active in
his life-long field of study continuing to
lead geology tours, mentoring students
and volunteering his time to help others
understand a subject he loved.
“I remember Don as the
consummate professional while he headed
the Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey,” said DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn.
“He continued his life of public service by assisting DCNR in mapping and by mentoring many
current staff. He still has an office at the survey, and he will be missed by DCNR.”
“Don was a pro’s pro. He was extremely committed to the work of his Bureau. Don
strongly believed in the value of his Bureau’s work to the health and welfare of Pennsylvania
citizens,” said Richard G. Sprenkle, Deputy Secretary, DCNR (Retired). “For instance,
topographic maps were important for bridge placement and construction, while geologic services
were critical to watershed conservation efforts and mineral extraction.
“He was very supportive of his staff including efforts to find a more suitable headquarters
as well as protecting them from adverse management and political threats,” add Sprenkle. “Don
was a true and unselfish advocate for his successor, Dr. Jay Parrish, at his retirement. He was
also quite the accomplished sailor. I have lost a good friend and will treasure what he taught me
about the natural and geologic resources of this great Commonwealth.”
The following tribute to Don ​appeared in Pennsylvania Geology​, the magazine published
by the Survey, and was written by his long-time colleague Thomas M. Berg on Don’s retirement
from the Survey in 2001--
In ​this issue of Pennsylvania Geology​, I am honored to pay tribute to fellow State
Geologist Donald M. Hoskins, who has served the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as Director
of the Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey since January 8, 1987, and who is retiring
January 27, 2001.
During his 14 years as State Geologist, the Pennsylvania Survey has achieved great
things. I was not at the Survey to observe all of them firsthand, but I did witness great
accomplishments under Don’s leadership during the years I spent there, from 1965 to 1989.

31
During most of those 24 years, I was influenced by Don’s management and geological
career together with the direction of former State Geologist Arthur A. Socolow. I learned much
from both Art and Don that has been invaluable to me as Chief of the Ohio Geological Survey.
Don came to the Pennsylvania Survey in November 1956 and shortly thereafter obtained
his doctorate in geology from Bryn Mawr College. He conducted detailed geologic mapping in
the Ridge and Valley province and authored the outstanding ​Fossil Collecting in Pennsylvania
(General Geology Report 40)​.
I got my first impression of Don Hoskins when I came to interview for a field mapping
position with the Bureau in late 1964. Don was asked to ferry me around Harrisburg to show me
some housing possibilities for my family.
I handed over the keys to my Dad’s car and got the high-speed tour. He didn’t waste a
moment. Don was obviously someone who got things done quickly, but I was glad to get the
keys back. We hit it off right away because we were both very interested in paleontology. He
still maintains that interest, as I do.
Those first impressions of Don were amplified shortly after I began work at the
Pennsylvania Survey when he led a staff field trip to his mapping area north of Harrisburg. A
convoy of state cars full of excited geologists zoomed through the valleys and along the ridge
crests.
After examining outcrops at the nose of one ridge, we discovered that someone had
closed and locked the road gate; most of the Survey was trapped in the middle of nowhere. I
naively thought someone would have to walk out and find a key.
However, with two swift blows of his rock hammer, Don dispensed with the lock and we
were on our way. Small things never got in Don’s way.
Few years passed before Don Hoskins moved into the position of Editor, and then
Assistant State Geologist. No one could ever accuse him of lacking ambition.
I knew him as Assistant Director for most of the years I was with the Pennsylvania
Survey. Don confronted state-government bureaucracy head-on. He even went to the trouble of
attending night school to obtain a master’s degree in government administration.
With the very best of them, Don could handle annual budgets, Theory-X management,
government audits, decision trees, Gantt charts, position descriptions, personnel-evaluation
systems, goal-and-objective setting, PERT networks, management by objectives, strategic
planning, and all the trendy management schemes that government bureaucrats continually
unearth.
To his great credit, Don recognized the urgent need to market the Survey and all of its
services.
I greatly enjoyed joining Don in giving presentations about the Survey to county officials,
trade organizations, other state agencies, and university geology departments.
In his own way, he always maintained the strong applied-science and public-service
focus that Art Socolow had cultivated for the Pennsylvania Survey.
Now don’t get me wrong. Don Hoskins never succumbed to management
superciliousness. Although he embraced the management world with a vengeance, he always
remained a first-rate geologist. He kept up with the science.
For decades, Don worked hard to maintain and promote the Field Conference of
Pennsylvania Geologists. A lot of good science was (and still is) accomplished through the
Conference.

32
You could always count on hearing a geological presentation by Hoskins at regional and
national Geological Society of America meetings. (Don is a GSA Fellow.) All aspects of geology
fascinated him.
At a meeting in Providence, R. I., as Don, Bill Sevon, and I were walking to our hotel
after dinner, we became captivated with the green-stone base course of a building. Picture the
scene: three well-dressed gentlemen on their hands and knees on the sidewalk with noses and
hand lenses pressed up against the stone. That’s dedication!
As I knew him, Don Hoskins was also more than the consummate scientist and
geological-survey manager. I remember many of his other outside interests.
Don grew roses, cultivating unusual varieties. He made fine wines. He became an
outstanding sailor, plying the waters of Chesapeake Bay-- always wearing his Greek fisherman’s
hat.
Don was constantly interested in physical fitness. He was dedicated to maintaining good
health by following the Royal Canadian Air Force daily fitness routine.
I will never forget sharing a motel room in Troy, N. Y., with Don and four other
geologists (saving money on a tight travel budget). At about 5:00 a.m., a fearful and persistent
stomping noise accompanied by heavy breathing awakened me in the darkened room. It was Don
running in place as he did his fitness routine.
With all of his outside interests, Don knew how to celebrate life. He and his wife Barb
were always deeply devoted to their children and their careers. His sense of history and his
fascination with the history of geology were contagious.
To know Don is to become immersed in the growth and development of our science.
As State Geologist of Pennsylvania, Don Hoskins has worked hard to maintain the
Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey. Like so many other state geologists, he has had to
struggle with the “cut government spending” wave that continues to prevail.
Politicians and government bureaucrats persistently overlook the long-term value of
geological surveys and the work that they do. Yet Don has never given up the ghost.
He has endeavored to market the Pennsylvania Survey and make the geological sciences
serve the public good. He has been faithful to neighboring state geologists and the Association of
American State Geologists (AASG), serving as president of that association.
Don has maintained influential and constructive relationships with the U.S. Geological
Survey (USGS) over the years, participating in many cooperative projects with the national
survey. Through several AASG committees, he has worked hard to help the USGS keep its focus
on citizen needs.
Pennsylvanians have been well served by Dr. Donald M. Hoskins, State Geologist and
Director of the Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey. Like his predecessors, he has left a
legacy that will sustain his successors.
The times are changing. The state geological surveys face new challenges in the
information-technology revolution. But I believe the Hoskins legacy leaves the Pennsylvania
Survey on solid ground.
Many thanks to you, Don. I wish many happy years to you as you embrace new
challenges ahead.
Click Here​ to see the full article and related photos of Don through his career at the
Survey.
For more information on the Survey today, built on a foundation of the first Pennsylvania

33
Geologic Survey in 1836, visit DCNR’s ​Bureau of Topographic & Geologic Survey​ webpage.
[​Note:​​ Details of funeral arrangements will be posted when available.]
[Posted: Dec. 7, 2018]

Senate/House Co-Sponsor Memos/Agenda/Session Schedule[Updated]/Gov’s


Schedule

Here are the Senate and House Calendars for the next voting session day and Committees
scheduling action on bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced--

Co-Sponsor Memos For Bills Coming In New Session

Click Here​ for all new co-sponsorship memos filed in the House

Click Here​ for all new co-sponsorship memos filed in the Senate

Bill Calendars

All Bills Died.

Committee Meeting Agendas This Week

All Committees Must Be Renamed.

Bills Pending In Key Committees

Check the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations​​ that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--

Senate
January 1, 15, 16, 28, 29, 30
February 4, 5, 6
Budget Hearings: Feb. 19, 20, 21, 25, 26, 27, 28, March 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
March 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27
April 8, 9, 10, 29, 30
May 1, 6, 7, 8
June 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

House ​[Updated]
January 1, 15, 16, 28, 29, 30
February 4, 5, 6, 19, 20, 21
34
Budget Hearings: Feb. 11 March 7
March 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27
April 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 29, 30
May 1, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 22, 23
June 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

Governor’s Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. ​Click Here​ to view Gov. Wolf’s Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

News From The Capitol

November State Revenue Collections $95.5 Million Above Estimate; $333.6M Above
Estimates Year-To-Date

On December 3, the Department of Revenue announced Pennsylvania collected $2.3 billion in


General Fund revenue in November, which was $95.5 million, or 4.3 percent, more than
anticipated.
Fiscal year-to-date General Fund collections total $12.4 billion, which is $333.6 million,
or 2.8 percent, above estimate.
Since the start of the 2018-19 fiscal year, overall tax revenue is $913.3 million, or 8.2
percent, more than was collected in the same period of the last fiscal year.
In its ​Monthly Trends Report released​ the same day, the Independent Fiscal Office noted
Corporate net income tax and sales and use tax (SUT) both came in above estimate for the
month. Non-tax revenues and other tax revenues also came in higher than expected, while
personal income tax (PIT) fell below estimate.
IFO had slightly different revenue projections for the fiscal year, but ended up about the
same place above estimates for fiscal year to date.
Their projections show General Fund collections were $154.1 million (7.1 percent) above
estimate for November and $338.9 million (2.8 percent) above estimate for the fiscal
year-to-date.
On November 15, the IFO projected a $1.7 billion​ FY 2019-20 budget deficit even in the
face of better than expected increases in state revenue.
On December 11 the Department of Revenue will give a mid-year budget briefing giving
their take on where the state is in following its FY 2018-19 spending plan.
Revenue Numbers
Sales tax receipts totaled $910.2 million for November, $45.4 million above estimate.
Year-to-date sales tax collections total $4.7 billion, which is $140 million, or 3.1 percent, more
than anticipated.
Personal income tax (PIT) revenue in November was $834.8 million, $30.2 million below
estimate. This brings year-to-date PIT collections to $4.9 billion, which is $71 million, or 1.4
percent, below estimate.
November corporation tax revenue of $138 million was $27.3 million above estimate.
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Year-to-date corporation tax collections total $1.1 billion, which is $207.1 million, or 23.7
percent, above estimate.
Inheritance tax revenue for the month was $81.8 million, $5.1 million below estimate,
bringing the year-to-date total to $430.7 million, which is $4 million, or 0.9 percent, above
estimate.
Realty transfer tax revenue was $46.4 million for November, $700,000 below estimate,
bringing the fiscal-year total to $228.8 million, which is $4.7 million, or 2 percent, less than
anticipated.
Other General Fund tax revenue, including cigarette, malt beverage, liquor and gaming
taxes, totaled $167.7 million for the month, $10.1 million above estimate and bringing the
year-to-date total to $759.7 million, which is $10.5 million, or 1.4 percent, below estimate.
Non-tax revenue totaled $157.8 million for the month, $48.7 million above estimate,
bringing the year-to-date total to $261.9 million, which is $68.7 million, or 35.6 percent, above
estimate.
In addition to the General Fund collections, the Motor License Fund received $260.8
million for the month, $14.4 million above estimate. Fiscal year-to-date collections for the fund
— which include the commonly known gas and diesel taxes, as well as other license, fine and fee
revenues — total $1.2 billion, which is $21.4 million, or 1.8 percent, below estimate.
NewsClips:
Lancaster Farming: Can PA Meet Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Goals?
EQB To Consider Proposes Increases In Air Quality NPDES, Water Quality Permit Fees Dec. 18
November State Revenue Collections $95.5 Million Above Estimate; $333.6M Above Estimates
Year-To-Date
Fayette, Somerset Counties Benefit From Federal Water Infrastructure Loans
Op-Ed: Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund, Greatest Conservation Program No One Ever
Heard Of
Editorial: Congress Must Fix Our Decaying National Parks
[Posted: Dec. 3, 2018]

Joint Conservation Committee Newsletter Profiles Wildlife Leadership Academy

The ​December issue​ of the ​Joint Legislative Air


and Water Pollution Control and Conservation
Committee​ features articles on--
-- ​Wildlife Leadership Academy​ Youth
Conservation Ambassadors And Other Programs
-- Earthrise: The Image That Changed Our View
Of Ourselves
-- Reducing Cost And Pollution From Acid
Mine Drainage, Mining Waste Treatment
-- Air Pollution Deaths Dropped By Half Between 1990, 2010
-- 4th National Climate Assessment Report Provides Look At Warmer Future ​(photo)
-- Health Care And Sustainability Reporting
For more information, visit the ​Joint Conservation Committee​ website, ​Like them on
Facebook​ or ​Follow them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the

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Committee.
NewsClips:
PEC, Blue Ridge High School Team Up To Cleanup Milford Dumpsite In Susquehanna County
Wilkes U. Students Help Clean Susquehanna Warrior Trail
Schneck: Active, Bright Meteor Shower Will Peak Dec. 13-14
Environmental Charter School Teachers Call For Union Representation
PA Environmental Educators Call For Workshop Proposals For 2019 Conference March 18-19
[Posted: Dec. 4, 2018]

Op-Ed: Earthrise, The Image That Changed Our View Of Ourselves

By Tony Guerrieri, Executive Director ​Joint Conservation Committee

Images have always meant something to our culture. When you think
of any environmental event over the last century, chances are it calls to
mind an image.
Environmentalism is defined by images: the 1930s Dust Bowl and soil
conservation; the “Crying Indian,” who in 1971 shed a tear in response
to litter and pollution; and, the cooling towers of Three Mile Island,
site of the 1979 nuclear accident.
But who could have predicted that the Apollo moon missions would
produce the first quintessential symbol of environmental idealism by
offering a new perspective of Earth.
Fifty years ago, Apollo 8 succeeded as the first manned mission to the Moon. On
December 21, 1968, three astronauts blasted off from Florida and left the earth’s low orbital
confines. Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders were aboard the command service module
that was headed towards the Moon.
The astronauts knew they were on an epic journey, but as it turned out, the image that
would come to represent their journey was a single picture looking backwards.
Anders was the mission’s photographer and he captured the image on Christmas Eve
1968 that changed our view of the planet-- the now famous photograph known as “Earthrise.”
As the Apollo 8 spacecraft, flying 70 miles above the desolate lunar surface, emerged
from behind the moon’s dark side, the astronauts saw something that nobody had ever seen
before a splash of color rise above the gray lunar horizon.
Anders grabbed a handheld camera and began snapping pictures. Of the ten or so photos
taken, Anders snapped the single iconic image of Earthrise-- a startling blue, startling fragile
half-sphere-- hanging in the blackness of space above the pockmarked surface of the moon.
Later, speaking about the photo, Anders said, “We came all this way to explore the Moon
and the most important thing is that we discovered the Earth.
After the mission, NASA released the color picture the astronaut had taken of Earthrise.
Images don’t tell a whole story, imaginations do. Images just guide the way.
Artists, poets, philosophers and scientists were inspired by the photo.
In the New York Times, the American poet and three-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize,
Archibald MacLeish wrote that the image of the earth would create a paradigm shift: “To see the
earth as it truly is, small and blue and beautiful in that eternal silence where it floats, is to see

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ourselves as riders on the earth together.”
Time magazine closed out 1968 with the Earthrise photograph on its cover, with a
one-word caption, “Dawn.”
In Life’s 100 Photographs that Changed the World, Galen Rowell, the famed nature
photographer, dubbed it “the most influential environmental photograph ever taken.”
Earth seems so big and indestructible from our perspective, but yet so tiny and vulnerable
when seen from space.
An inspiring image raises awareness of possibilities, of worlds beyond the one we
directly experience and of other ways of living.
People saw their planet for the first time as a whole world – a single snapshot of
humanity. Not as continents or oceans, but an entire entity.
Our entire world was shown as a small, blue finite globe in the distance with 3.5 billion
human beings depending on it for life.
It’s the image that is credited with capturing the burgeoning environmental movement
and has been used as a hopeful symbol of global unity.
As they rounded the moon for the ninth time, the crew made their memorable television
broadcast in which they took turns reading the story of the world’s creation from the Book of
Genesis.
The broadcast closed with a holiday wish from Borman: “We close with good night, good
luck, a Merry Christmas, and God bless all of you – all of you on the good Earth.”
In 1969, the U.S. Postal Service issued a six cents stamp commemorating the Apollo 8
flight around the moon.
The stamp featured a detail (in color) of the Earthrise photograph and the words, “In the
beginning God…,” recalling the Apollo 8 Genesis reading. As for the original Earthrise photo,
the environmental movement’s iconic image – it is cloistered away at NASA’s Johnson Space
Center in Houston.
Click Here​ to watch a video of the Apollo 8 Book of Genesis Reading.
For more information, visit the ​Joint Conservation Committee​ website, ​Like them on
Facebook​ or ​Follow them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the
Committee.

(Reprinted from the ​December newsletter​ of the ​Joint Legislative Air and Water Pollution
Control Committee.​ )
[Posted: Dec. 4, 2018]

The Feds

U.S.D.A. Approves Disaster Relief Funding For Farmers In 14 PA Counties

On December 3, Gov. Tom Wolf notified farmland owners in Columbia, Lebanon, and York
counties that they are eligible to receive disaster relief funding from the U.S. Department of
Agriculture.
Also eligible are the adjacent counties of Adams, Berk, Cumberland, Dauphin, Lancaster,
Luzerne, Lycoming, Montour, Northumberland, Schuylkill, and Sullivan.
“This funding will provide relief to Pennsylvania farmers who dealt with a year of
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unexpected difficulties due to severe weather,” said Gov. Wolf. “I encourage those in eligible
areas to apply, so that they can receive the assistance they need to help recoup losses ahead of
the next growing season.”
The funding will help with losses caused by disasters that occurred during the 2018 crop
year, such as excessive rain and flash flooding. It is the result of a Secretarial disaster declaration
and can include emergency loans from the federal Farm Service Agency (FSA).
Eligible farmers can apply for loans for up to eight months after a Secretarial disaster
declaration, and should contact their local FSA office for assistance.
More information on USDA’s disaster assistance program, including county lists and
maps, can be found on USDA’s ​Disaster Assistance Programs​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Wolf: Luzerne County Farmers May Be Eligible For Federal Disaster Funding
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
Lancaster Farming: Stream Buffers Make Financial Sense
EDF Blog: New Resource Available To Help Dairy Industry Clean Up Local Watersheds
Thompson: Project To Limit Harmful Run-Off From Turkey Hill Supplier Farms Gets Boost
Crable: Farmers, Groups, Turkey Hill To Get $6.5M In Water Quality Funding
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County’s Watershed Planning
Westmoreland Farmer Grows Ag Legacy As State Industry Leader
PASA: Exploring Connections Between Soil Health & Nutrition At Blackberry Meadows Farm
PASA: Too Much Of A Good Thing: Compost Brings Phosphorus Challenges To Red Earth
Farm
PASA: Stuck In A Rut: Stagnant Organic Matter Levels At Bending Bridge Farm
[Posted: Dec. 3, 2018]

U.S. Office Of Lead Hazard Control & Health Homes Has Additional Funding Available

HUD’s federal ​Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes


received additional lead hazard control funding.
HUD plans to publish the combined Lead Hazard Reduction;
(Lead Hazard Control (LHC) and Lead Hazard Reduction
Demonstration (LHRD)) notice of funding available as soon as
early 2019.
Applicants are highly encouraged to access the NOFAs using
www.grants.gov​ website, and can sign up to be notified when the
NOFA is published.
Dec. 18 Webinar
For more information about this funding opportunity, please
register for the upcoming webinar on December 18 at 2:30 p.m.
The webinar will provide a comprehensive overview of benefits and expectations of the
grant program as well as important information on the application process
Anyone interested in taking advantage of this funding opportunity should attend,
including interested state, city and local governments.
Click Here​ to register.

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For more information on this and related programs, visit HUD’s ​Office of Lead Hazard
Control and Healthy Homes​ webpage. Questions should be directed to Shannon Steinbauer,
Programs Division Director, by sending email to: ​Shannon.E.Steinbauer@hud.gov​.
NewsClips:
Op-Ed: Philly Should Avoid Lead Paint Litigation That Will Devastate Property Values
U.S. Office Of Lead Hazard Control & Healthy Homes Has Additional Funding Available
Allegheny Front: PFAS-What Is This Stuff? And Why Should You Care?
[Posted: Dec. 4, 2018]

News From Around The State

Save The Date! Statewide Watershed Connections Conference Feb. 24-25 In State College

The ​PA Environmental Council​, ​PA Organization For


Watersheds and Rivers​ and other partners will host
the statewide ​Watershed Connections - Leveraging
Our Power For Watershed Health- Conference​ on
February 24-25 in State College.
The Conference will be a significant
education, training and networking opportunity for
anyone involved in watershed groups, restoration,
water quality monitoring, building organizational
capacity and more.
The program will feature national, state and local presenters, exhibits, one-on-one
mentorship opportunities and engaging keynote and guest speakers.
PEC held workshops​ in each of DEP’s six Regional Office areas over the last year to, in
part, help develop the agenda for the Conference.
Reservations​​ are now being accepted at the ​Wyndham Garden State College​ and the
Penn State Ramada​ for this special event.
Sponsorship​​ opportunities are also available. ​Click Here​ for more information.
Check the ​Watershed Connections Conference​ webpage for updates and information
about final program. Questions should be directed to Susan Myerov by sending email to:
smyerov@pecpa.org​ or call 267-479-6102.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA
Environmental Council​ and ​PA Organization For Watersheds and Rivers​ websites, visit the ​PEC
Blog​, follow ​PEC on Twitter​ or ​Like PEC on Facebook​. Visit PEC’s ​Audio Room​ for the latest
podcasts. ​Click Here​ to receive regular updates from PEC.
NewsClips:
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
Lancaster Farming: Can PA Meet Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Goals?
Crable: New Round Of Inspections Show Two-Thirds Of Chesapeake Bay Watershed Farmers
Have Runoff Plans
Stream Buffer Project Completed In Blair County By Trout Unlimited, Conservation District
Volunteers
40
Lancaster Farming: Stream Buffers Make Financial Sense
EPCAMR NFWF Grant To Help Develop Green Infrastructure Space Plans In Wilkes-Barre
Alliance For The Chesapeake Bay, Partners Plant 14.81 Acres Of Forest Buffer In PA
EDF Blog: New Resource Available To Help Dairy Industry Clean Up Local Watersheds
Thompson: Project To Limit Harmful Run-Off From Turkey Hill Supplier Farms Gets Boost
Crable: Farmers, Groups, Turkey Hill To Get $6.5M In Water Quality Funding
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County’s Watershed Planning
Who’s Responsible For Plastic Tree Tubes Along Lancaster County Creek?
Months After Storms, Chesapeake Bay Debris Cleanup Presses On
Lackawanna River Nominated For 2019 River Of The Year
Editorial: Vote For Lackawanna River Of The Year For Rebirth
Can Pittsburgh Region’s Infrastructure Handle All The Precipitation?
AP: Hunt For Hellbenders Is Part Of Broader Plan To Protect Them
EQB To Consider Proposes Increases In Air Quality NPDES, Water Quality Permit Fees Dec. 18
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
[Posted: Dec. 5, 2018]

PA Environmental Educators Call For Workshop Proposals For Their 2019 Conference In
Philadelphia March 18-19

On December 4, the ​PA Association of


Environmental Educators​ are now
accepting proposals for interactive
workshops, multi-speaker presentations,
roundtable and panel for their upcoming
2019 Conference on March 18-19. The
deadline for proposals is January 14.
The Conference theme is-- Cityscapes &
Greenscapes-- which highlights how
environmental education intersects and/or spans varied landscapes, urban, suburban, rural and
green spaces in between.
Over the years, the environmental education space has grown from just "greenscapes," to
now becoming a foundation for outdoor recreation, conservation initiatives, "green" city
planning, STEM education and more; so, it's time to highlight these methods of connection
through presentations at the Conference.
Each year our membership delivers high-quality workshops that give attendees
experiences to take back and apply to their practices, programming, facilities, partnerships and
staff. Presentations and workshops should be interactive, engaging and fun, applying best
practices in environmental education and interpretation.
The Conference will be held at the ​Renaissance Philadelphia Airport Hotel​ March 18-19,
with limited workshop spaces available on March 17.
Click Here​ to submit a proposal or for more information.
For more information on programs, initiatives, resources and other upcoming events, visit
the​ ​PA Association of Environmental Educators​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for the PAEE
newsletter (bottom of page, left). ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to support

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PAEE’s work.
NewsClips:
PEC, Blue Ridge High School Team Up To Cleanup Milford Dumpsite In Susquehanna County
Wilkes U. Students Help Clean Susquehanna Warrior Trail
Schneck: Active, Bright Meteor Shower Will Peak Dec. 13-14
Environmental Charter School Teachers Call For Union Representation
[Posted: Dec. 5, 2018]

December Catalyst Newsletter Now Available From Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition

The December issue of ​The Catalyst Newsletter​ is


now available from Butler County-based ​Slippery
Rock Watershed Coalition​ featuring articles on--
-- Westminster College Students Present Erico
Bridge AMD Treatment System Data ​(photo)
-- 2018 PA Botany Symposium Presentations
-- The KIDS Catalyst - Snowbirds!
-- New Displays & Fun Winter Presentations At
Jenning Environmental Center!
-- ​Click Here​ to sign up for your own copy.
The Catalyst newsletter is distributed to over 1,200
individuals in over a dozen countries including: Brazil, Peru, South Korea, Mexico, England,
Wales, Venezuela, South Africa, New Zealand, Australia and Germany.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Slippery
Rock Watershed Coalition​ website.
Thinking Of Holiday Gifts?
Visit ​Clean Creek Pottery​ to help mine reclamation efforts.
NewsClip:
Swoyersville Residents Concerned About Impact Of Trucks Hauling Coal Waste For
Reclamation Project
[Posted: Dec. 4, 2018]

DEP Opportunity To Bid On Mine Reclamation, Clearfield County, Tank Removal,


Delaware County

The Department of Environmental Protection published notices in the December 8 PA Bulletin


of the opportunity to bid on a mine reclamation project in ​Clearfield County​ and a tank removal
project in Delaware County ​(p​ age 7588).​
The ​Department of Environmental Protection​​ has available a current list of
Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Acid Mine Drainage, Surface Mine Reclamation, Cleaning Out
and Plugging Oil and Gas Wells, Waterways Engineering (Concrete Dams/Concrete Lined
Channels, Walls and Box Culverts, etc.), Hazardous Site Remediation, Removal and Disposal of
Underground Storage Tanks, and Wetland Restoration projects available for bidding. ​Click Here
for the list.
The ​Department of Conservation and Natural Resources ​has a current list of bid

42
proposals for construction projects in State Parks and State Forests available online. ​Click Here
for the list.
[Posted: Dec. 7, 2018]

West Branch Susquehanna Restoration Coalition Meets Dec. 11 In Clinton County

The ​West Branch Susquehanna Restoration Coalition​ is


scheduled to meet December 11 at the ​Clinton County
Conservation District Environmental Learning Center​, 45
Cooperation Lane in Mill Hall from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.
The first part of the meeting will be a holiday party
followed by the Coalition’s business meeting.
The agenda​ for the business meeting includes updates on
acid mine drainage abatement funding, a policy and legislative
update, grant opportunities and a variety of local watershed
updates. ​Click Here​ for more information on the meeting.
For more information on programs, activities and how
you can get involved, visit the ​West Branch Susquehanna Restoration Coalition​ website.
Questions should be directed to Rachel Dester by sending email to: ​rachel.kester@tu.org​ or call
ing 814-577-7611.
[Posted: Dec. 6, 2018]

DEP: New Water System Completed For 700 Residents Affected By Industrial Pollution In
Lackawanna County

On December 4, the Department of Environmental Protection announced the completion of a


new community drinking water system for 700 residents in three Lackawanna County townships
whose water supplies were affected by pollution.
The $20 million system for residents in Scott, Waverly, South Abington, and North
Abington townships will replace private water wells contaminated with organic solvents
trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) from the nearby Ivy Industrial Park.
Another 70 potentially affected homes were already connected to existing water lines.
“To be able to see this project through until completion is a tremendous accomplishment
for the department and residents,” said Mike Bedrin, Director of DEP’s Northeast Regional
Office in Wilkes-Barre. “Once the contamination was detected all parties involved worked to
address the issue, provide temporary water sources, and see that a new and permanent source of
water was ultimately available to residents.”
The new water system is part of a 2011 consent order and agreement between DEP and
the companies responsible for the groundwater contamination, Bostik, Inc. and Sandvik, Inc.,
both tenants of the Ivy Industrial Park in South Abington and Scott townships.
The agreement required both companies to pay the cost of design, construction, and
installation.
In 2005, DEP staff discovered contamination of the groundwater near the Ivy Industrial
Park by organic solvents TCE and PCE. DEP then named both facilities as responsible for
contaminating groundwater with volatile organic chemicals stemming from industrial operations

43
at both sites.
During construction, residents were provided with either bottled water for use or
treatment systems on their wells, all paid for by Bostik and Sandvik.
The construction work on the system was conducted by two local companies, ​Pioneer
Construction Company, Inc​. and ​TSE, Inc​. The consulting firm, ​Gannett Fleming of Harrisburg,
managed day-to-day operations of the project.
PA American Water​ is providing water service to the homeowners.
For more information on remediation of contaminated sites around the state, visit DEP’s
Hazardous Sites Cleanup Program​ webpage.
NewsClip:
Swoyersville Residents Concerned About Impact Of Trucks Hauling Coal Waste For
Reclamation Project
Allegheny Front: PFAS-What Is This Stuff? And Why Should You Care?
Boil Water Advisory Lifted In Part Of Bucks County
Maykuth: Pennsbury School To Reopen Monday In Bucks, But Boil Water Remains In Force
Mechanical Issues Blamed For Boil Water Advisory In Bucks County
University Of Scranton Classes Resume After Water Main Break
Longtime King’s College Prof Who Helped Curb 1980s Giardiasis Outbreak To Retire
Fayette, Somerset Counties Benefit From Federal Water Infrastructure Loans
[Posted: Dec. 5, 2018]

Delaware River Basin Commission Winter Photo Contest Begins Dec. 21

The ​Delaware River Basin Commission​ will


accept entries for its ​Winter Photo Contest​ from
December 21 to February 15.
The purpose of DRBC’s seasonal photo
contest is to highlight amateur and professional
photography representing the beauty, diversity,
function, and significance of the water resources
of the Delaware River Basin, a 13,539-square
mile watershed.
DRBC also announced Kevin Haines’
photograph, titled Bridge Between Two Seasons,
was chosen as the winner of the commission’s
Fall 2018 Photo Contest. Forty-three photographs were submitted by 12 individuals for the
contest.
“I have been hiking, canoeing, and photographing the Delaware River since 1972 and
love every trip,” said Kevin Haines of Brick, N.J. “I appreciate the DRBC hosting this photo
contest that features one of our most beautiful natural resources, the Delaware River.”
The winning image was chosen by a judging panel of four DRBC staff members and will
be featured on the ​commission’s website​ and on DRBC’s Twitter, Instagram, and Flickr social
media sites.
The photo will also be published in the Commission’s 2018 annual report, and the winner
will receive a certificate of recognition.

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“We thank everyone who entered this season’s photo contest,” said DRBC Executive
Director Steve Tambini. “While there were many great entries to choose from, Kevin’s photo
stood out for its juxtaposition of the red metal bridge with its natural surroundings, a unique
perspective that enhances the photo’s composition of a landscape transitioning to fall.”
Click Here​ to enter your photo or for more information.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Delaware
River Basin Commission​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regulator updates. ​Follow DRBC
on Twitter​. ​Visit them on YouTube​.
(​Photo:​ Kevin Haines’ photograph, titled Bridge Between Two Seasons, was chosen as the
winner of the commission’s Fall 2018 Photo Contest.)
NewsClip:
Dec. 7 Delaware RiverKeeper RiverWatch Video Report
Related Story:
PA Great Outdoors Visitors Bureau Now Accepting Entries To Winter Fun Photo Contest
[Posted: Dec. 5, 2018]

Sustainability Expo Highlights Penn State's Leadership In Engaged Scholarship

By Marchella Verdi, ​Penn State News

Nearly 300 Penn State faculty, staff and students along


with local community members turned out to celebrate
engaged scholarship at the biannual Campus and
Community Sustainability Expo at the State College
Borough Building on November 29.
The expo presented work from 18 projects by students in
eight courses involved with the ​Sustainable Communities
Collaborative​ this fall, who provided research and design
ideas for 11 municipal, campus, and non-profit community
partners.
Ilona Ballreich, program manager for the SCC, emceed the event and congratulated
students on the impact of their work on Penn State and community partners.
“Student research and recommendations are moving the needle on our communities’
sustainability challenges, while providing students with rewarding experiences that prepare them
for jobs beyond college,” Ballreich said.
The evening’s program kicked off with a thank you and recognition from Tom Fountaine,
State College Borough manager. The borough has been one of the principal community partners
of the SCC since ​Penn State’s Sustainability Institute​ first created the engaged scholarship
program in 2013.
This fall, students delivered to the borough research on everything from communications
strategies promoting the borough’s sustainability leadership, to risk management tabletop
exercises for the borough’s IT staff, to a mapping project of light pollution.
During the expo, more than 40 student teams had an opportunity to present posters to
Penn State faculty and staff, as well as to community leaders.
One of the teams from Judd Michael’s Environmental Resource Management 497 course

45
presented a project exploring the potential for the campus bookstore to offer more recycled
content notebooks.
The team noted that the experience of working as a group to find potential solutions to
real-world problems was eye-opening and rewarding.
“Giving people an option to use recycled materials is not enough; that is why we are
looking for other solutions,” said students Ariana Caruso, Emily Kurchock, Ayrton Marriott,
Alex Nicastro and Enlin Wang.
The team’s final proposal and partnership with the Penn State HUB-Robeson Center
Bookstore will result in notebooks made from recycled materials being added to the store starting
in the Spring 2019 semester, with an increased number of notebooks available in the Fall 2019
semester.
The expo recognized students’ projects in two categories-- one for posters that most
effectively communicated student teams’ research processes and recommendations and one for
projects that were deemed most likely to have the greatest, action-ready impact in helping
community partners achieve their sustainability goals.
The prize winners were:
Poster Awards
-- 1st Place: ​Spring Creek Watershed Atlas​​: Preservation of Hiking Trails, Faculty lead: Frans
Padt, CED 309, Community partner: ​Spring Creek Watershed Association
-- 2nd Place: The Phishermen – Anti-Phishing Campaigns​​, Faculty lead: Michael Hills, IST
440, Community partner: State College Borough
-- 3rd Place: Macroinvertebrate Sampling at Buffalo Run​​, Faculty lead: Heather Gall,
ASM/ERM 309, Community partner: ​Centre County PA Senior Environment Corps
Greatest Project Impact
-- 1st Place: "Bellefonte: Preserve the Past. Fuel the Future."​​ Faculty lead: Tara Wyckoff,
COMM 473, Community partner: Bellefonte Borough
-- 2nd Place: Incident Response: Mass Casualty Tabletop Exercise​​, Faculty lead: Michael
Hills, IST 440, Community partner: State College Borough
-- 3rd Place: Integrating the Borough Calendar with ALEXA Technology​​, Faculty lead:
Michael Hills, IST 440, Community partner: State College Borough
Spring Creek Watershed Atlas
Students in the team from Frans Padt’s Community, Environment and Development 309
course were pleased that their poster won for their trails project.
“It feels great to be recognized for our hard and dedicated work,” exclaimed students
Alec Bottari, Catherine Martinez, and Sasha Pershanina.
The team focused their research on local hiking trails in State College and tried to think
about ways to promote awareness and use of this underappreciated resource.
After weeks of research and preparation, the team proposed to the Spring Creek
Watershed Commission that the trails could become more user friendly by developing a robust
map system, signage containing fun facts about specific locations, and rankings of trail difficulty.
Penn State Student Farm
Beyond the presentation of student research, the expo also featured an exhibit of student
artwork made from natural dyes derived from materials from the ​Penn State Student Farm​. The
work was part of projects from the new Sustainable Studio art course offered by Kim Flick and
Ann Shostrom.

46
In her keynote speech at the event, Penn State Vice President for Outreach Tracey Huston
celebrated Penn State’s longstanding commitment to outreach and community engagement.
She noted that the SCC program sits alongside other forms of engaged scholarship like
Penn State’s focus on “living laboratories” to enable students to create world-class research and
deepen their understandings of their studies.
Sustainable Communities Collaborative
The ​Sustainable Communities Collaborative ​facilitates partnerships between Penn State
classes and community partners seeking help to advance their sustainability goals. Students
engage in applied, real-world research that benefits communities that otherwise lack the time,
resources, or expertise to undertake initial steps on their projects.
The student projects do not replace the work of professionals, but act as catalysts to begin
new work.
Currently six Penn State campuses employ the SCC model, which last year engaged 446
students on the University Park campus alone, led by 19 faculty from eight colleges on 46
distinct projects serving 17 community partners.
(​Photo​: ​Centre County PA Senior Environment Corps​. Visit the ​Nature Abounds website​ for
information on PA Senior Environment Corps opportunities in your county.)

(Reprinted from ​Penn State News​.)


NewsClips:
PEC, Blue Ridge High School Team Up To Cleanup Milford Dumpsite In Susquehanna County
Wilkes U. Students Help Clean Susquehanna Warrior Trail
Schneck: Active, Bright Meteor Shower Will Peak Dec. 13-14
Environmental Charter School Teachers Call For Union Representation
PA Environmental Educators Call For Workshop Proposals For 2019 Conference March 18-19
[Posted: Dec. 7, 2018]

PA Environmental Council: In Case You Missed It In November Now Available

The In Case You Missed It In November newsletter


is now available from the ​PA Environmental
Council​ featuring stories on--
-- ​PA River Of The Year Voting - May The Best
River Win
-- ​PEC Podcast On Last Year’s PA River Of The
Year - Loyalsock Creek
-- ​Standing Up For The Delaware River Basin
-- ​Volunteers Move Mountains (Of Tires) In
Susquehanna County
-- ​Statewide Reforestation Partnership Takes Root
-- ​PEC Podcast: Cities Of The Future
-- ​PEC Podcast: Teaming Up To Save The Wissahickon
-- ​Click Here​ to sign up for your own copy
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA
Environmental Council​ website, visit the ​PEC Blog​, follow ​PEC on Twitter​ or ​Like PEC on

47
Facebook​. Visit PEC’s ​Audio Room​ for the latest podcasts.
[Posted: Dec. 6, 2018]

PA Solar Center Invites Responses To RFP To Assist Nonprofit Groups In Converting To


Solar Energy

The ​Pennsylvania Solar Center​ of ​New Sun Rising​ based in


Millvale, Allegheny County are inviting nonprofit groups in
Western Pennsylvania to respond to the ​G.E.T. Solar
Initiative RFP ​on assisting them to make the process of
converting to solar energy straightforward and simple.
The deadline for responses is January 11.
The assistance the Center will provide includes--
-- A solar feasibility study by Dr. Jeffrey Brownson’s Penn
State engineering solar analysis class.
-- Assistance in selecting a qualified solar contractor; and
-- Detailed financial saving projections and connection to
our investment partner Sunvestment who can provide financing, including options that require
minimal or no-money down by the nonprofit.
Click Here​ to read the RFP.
This project is funded by the ​West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund​.
The ​Pennsylvania Solar Center​ is a statewide solar energy resource hub and assistance
center that provides unbiased information and catalytic organizing in an effort to transform the
Commonwealth into a leading solar state.
PSC will provide technical assistance to nonprofits and small businesses-- shepherding
them through the solar purchase process and connecting them to qualified installers and
financing.
Related Stories:
AP: Gov. Wolf: Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan May Be Something PA Should Adopt
Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update
LancasterOnline Editorial: We Must Act Aggressively And Immediately On Climate Change
Natural Gas Distribution Companies Expect Little Change In Natural Gas Use During Winter
Heating Season, Slight Increase In Cost
PJM Electric Grid Operator Says Members Prepared To Meet Winter Electricity Demand
IFO Reports Natural Gas Production Increased 18.5% Over The 3rd Quarter 2017
Exelon To Retire 3 Landfill Gas Generation Facilities In Pennsylvania
[Posted: Dec. 6, 2018]

Exelon To Retire 3 Landfill Gas Generation Facilities In Pennsylvania

On November 30, ​Exelon Generation​ announced it would retire 9 smaller electric generation
facilities by June 2020 due to economic challenges, including 3 landfill gas generation facilities
in Pennsylvania.
The landfill gas facilities include ​Fairless Hills​ (60 MW), ​Pennsbury​ (7 MW) and
Bethlehem​ (5 MW).

48
“This is a tough, but necessary decision to better position our fleet for the future, given
this prolonged period of flat electricity demand and historically low electricity prices,” said
Exelon Power President John Barnes. “We appreciate the professionalism of our employees who
continue to safely operate these facilities, as well as the support of the local communities where
these plants are located, and we will continue to openly communicate with them throughout this
transition.”
Exelon Generation could change the retirement timeline for one or more of these
facilities once PJM has assessed reliability impacts.
Click Here​ for the full announcement.
For more information on landfill gas projects in Pennsylvania, visit DEP’s ​PA Landfill
Methane Projects​ webpage.
Related Stories:
LancasterOnline Editorial: We Must Act Aggressively And Immediately On Climate Change
Natural Gas Distribution Companies Expect Little Change In Natural Gas Use During Winter
Heating Season, Slight Increase In Cost
PJM Electric Grid Operator Says Members Prepared To Meet Winter Electricity Demand
IFO Reports Natural Gas Production Increased 18.5% Over The 3rd Quarter 2017
Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update
PA Solar Center Invites Responses To RFP To Assist Nonprofit Groups In Converting To Solar
Energy
[Posted: Dec. 3, 2018]

Natural Gas Distribution Companies Expect Little Change In Natural Gas Use In PA
During Winter Heating Season, Slight Increase In Cost

On December 4, the Public Utility Commission released 2018 ​Winter Reliability Overview
Reports​ from the state’s major natural gas distribution companies, along with a ​related Readiness
Report​ from the Energy Association of Pennsylvania.
The reports provide insights regarding preparations for conditions that may affect service
reliability, supply and prices for the winter months, including topics such as system readiness;
employee safety/readiness; communications outreach; gas supply and planning; and natural gas
demand for electric generators.
Among other things, the reports project little change in natural gas usage across the state
compared to last year’s heating season, and a modest increase in home heating costs – driven by
increasing energy prices.
According to the ​report submitted by the Energy Association of Pennsylvania​, the
average natural gas heating customer may see their total winter season heating costs increase by
about $30.
In October, the U.S. Energy Information Administration ​Winter Fuels Outlook​ projected
a base case forecast increase of 20 percent increase in heating oil cost, 5 percent for natural gas,
3 percent for electricity and a 1 percent reduction for propane.
The winter readiness overviews are posted on the ​Reliability section​ of the PUC website,
and can be viewed using the following links:
-- ​Columbia Gas of PA
-- ​National Fuel Gas

49
-- ​PECO Energy
-- ​Peoples Natural Gas & Peoples Gas
-- ​Philadelphia Gas Works
-- ​UGI Utilities/UGI Penn Natural Gas/UGI Central Penn Gas
-- ​Energy Association of PA
In addition to promoting preparedness by utilities, the Commission also encourages
consumers to take steps now to ready themselves for colder temperatures and higher energy
demands.
The ​PUC’s Prepare Now​ campaign educates consumers about the availability of
low-income programs; increases consumer awareness of ways to reduce winter heating costs;
and educates consumers on energy conservation.
The PUC also encourages consumers to check electric and natural gas bills and supplier
contracts, and use the PUC’s ​PAPowerSwitch.com​ and ​PAGasSwitch.com​ websites as resources
to shop for services and learn more about conservation and energy efficiency.
For more information, visit the ​PUC’s Reliability​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Cold Snap Raises Questions About Columbia Gas Heating Bills In Washington County
PUC Cuts Columbia Gas Rate Hike In Half
UGI North Customers Will See Slightly Higher Gas Bills
UGI Customers In Lehigh Valley To See 11% Drop In Gas Bills
U.S. EIA: November U.S. Natural Gas Prices Increased Beyond Previous Market Expectations
Related Stories:
PJM Electric Grid Operator Says Members Prepared To Meet Winter Electricity Demand
Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update
IFO Reports Natural Gas Production Increased 18.5% Over The 3rd Quarter 2017
Exelon To Retire 3 Landfill Gas Generation Facilities In Pennsylvania
PA Solar Center Invites Responses To RFP To Assist Nonprofit Groups In Converting To Solar
Energy
[Posted: Dec. 4, 2018]

PJM Electric Grid Operator Says Members Prepared To Meet Winter Electricity Demand

On December 5, the ​PJM Interconnection​ announced its members are prepared to meet the
forecasted winter electricity demand in the nation's largest high-voltage power grid.
"Because of our members' preparation efforts and history of reliable performance,
improved coordination with gas pipeline operators, and the market's ability and flexibility to call
on a variety of resources, we're confident that we will be able to meet customer demand this
winter," said Michael E. Bryson, vice president – Operations.
PJM, which operates the grid serving 65 million people in 13 states and the District of
Columbia, expects to have 185,611 megawatts of resources available to meet the forecasted peak
demand of 135,506 MW. PJM's all-time winter peak is 143,295 MW, set on Feb. 20, 2015.
PJM analyzes the anticipated demand for electricity, weather predictions and other
factors to develop its forecast for winter operations. As part of its regular winter preparations,
PJM also analyzes potential pipeline service disruptions and the effect on generators, and has
found that there are no associated reliability concerns for the coming winter.

50
PJM is prepared to meet electricity needs amid a less-certain winter weather forecast.
While climate models suggest a warmer season, studies of similar seasons suggest near- to
below-average temperatures.
Additionally, the arctic air mass known as the "polar vortex" may weaken later in the
season, which could lead to short periods of arctic cold. A weaker polar vortex allows arctic air
to travel farther south than it normally would.
In addition, PJM continues to work with members to prepare for cold weather by testing
resources, conducting emergency procedure drills and surveying generators for fuel inventory.
PJM has also worked to better align market deadlines with those of natural gas pipelines;
a proposal before FERC would provide additional time, and thus more certainty, for generators
purchasing fuel.
Last winter, the peak of 137,522 MW occurred on Jan. 5, 2018, during an 11-day cold
snap. ​PJM reported (PDF)​ that generation and transmission performed well under adverse
conditions during that period.
Even during peak demand, PJM had adequate reserves and capacity available, and
Capacity Performance market rules resulted in more efficient and dependable generator
performance.
For more information on electricity grid issues, visit the ​PJM Interconnection​ website.
NewsClip:
U.S. Electric Power Outages In 2017 Doubled In Duration: EIA Faults Large Storms
Related Stories:
Natural Gas Distribution Companies Expect Little Change In Natural Gas Use In PA During
Winter Heating Season, Slight Increase In Cost
Exelon To Retire 3 Landfill Gas Generation Facilities In Pennsylvania
Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update
PA Solar Center Invites Responses To RFP To Assist Nonprofit Groups In Converting To Solar
Energy
[Posted: Dec. 6, 2018]

Williams To Hold Public Meetings On Proposed Leidy South Natural Gas Pipeline Dec. 11
Lycoming County, Dec. 12 Clinton County, More

The Williams Pipeline Company will hold a


series of 4 Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission-required public meetings starting
December 11 on the proposed ​Leidy South
Natural Gas Pipeline​ and related compressor
station projects in Clinton, Columbia, Luzerne,
Lycoming and Schuylkill counties.
The first two meetings have been scheduled
for--
-- December 11: Lycoming County Open
House​​, 6-8 p.m., Hughesville Volunteer Fire
Company, 26 N Railroad St, Hughesville, PA 17737; and
-- December 12: Clinton County Open House​​, 6-8 p.m., Chapman Township Volunteer Fire

51
Company, 79 Park Ave, North Bend, PA 17760.
The company said public meetings will also be scheduled in Luzerne and Schuylkill
counties.
The meetings will formally introduce the proposal to the public and solicit feedback.
Williams anticipates starting construction on the pipeline in early 2021 with a projected
in-service date during the winter of 2021-22.
For more information, visit the ​Leidy South Natural Gas Pipeline​ webpage, the ​Leidy
South Facebook​ page, the ​Leidy South Twitter​ feed or send email to:
PipelineExpansion@Williams.com​.
NewsClips:
Dec. 12 FERC Public Meeting On Transco Pipeline In Clinton County
Delaware County Pipelines Risk Study Finds Risk Less Than Fatal Car Crash, House Fire
Hurdle: Delaware County Study: Pipeline Blast Could Be Devastating, But Risk Is Low
PA Supreme Court Denies Appeal Of Case Challenging Mariner East Pipeline Eminent Domain,
But A Challenge Remains
PA Supreme Court Upholds Mariner East 2 Pipeline Right To Use Eminent Domain
Upper Bucks Residents Lob Adelphia Pipeline Complaints At DEP Hearing
$500M Project To Expand Leidy South Pipeline Project Proposed
Crable: Homeowners Along Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Route Shocked To Find Threats Of Liens
In Mail As A Result Of Bankruptcy Case
Crable: Landowners Along Mariner East 2 Pipeline Route No Longer Facing Liens
Opposition Growing Against Natural Gas Pipeline To Supply Beaver Ethane Plant
Lebanon County Gets $700,000 From Mariner East 2 Pipeline Fines To Help With Stormwater
Projects
U.S. Senate Confirms McNamee To FERC On Party Line Vote
Related Stories:
PA Supreme Court Denies Appeal Of Case Challenging Use Of Eminent Domain By Mariner
East 2 Pipeline, But A Challenge Remains
Natural Gas Distribution Companies Expect Little Change In Natural Gas Use During Winter
Heating Season, Slight Increase In Cost
IFO Reports Natural Gas Production Increased 18.5% Over The 3rd Quarter 2017
Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update
Exelon To Retire 3 Landfill Gas Generation Facilities In Pennsylvania
[Posted: Dec. 4, 2018]

IFO Reports Natural Gas Production Increased 18.5% Over The 3rd Quarter 2017

On December 4, the ​Independent Fiscal Office


reported natural gas production in the third
quarter​ increased 18.5 percent over the third
quarter of 2017 and year-to-date production
increased 12.9 percent.
IFO also reported there was an 8.1 percent
growth in the number of producing and
non-producing wells so far in 2018 totaling

52
10,505 wells and a 10.4 percent increase in producing wells in the third quarter.
Since the third quarter of 2016, there has been a 20.7 percent increase in producing wells.
Susquehanna, Washington, Greene, Bradford, Wyoming, Lycoming, Tioga, Butler,
Sullivan, Allegheny counties are the top 10 producing counties.
2018 production in the first three quarters totaled 4,471.5 billion cubic feet (compared to
3,961.6 bcf in 2017) -- horizontal 4,465 bcf (3,953 bcf in 2017) and vertical 6.4 bcf (7.6 bcf in
2017).
Third quarter production was 1,570.1 billion cubic feet compared to 1,325.3 bcf in 2017.
Horizontal production was 1,567.5 bcf in 2018 and 1,323 bcf in 2017. Vertical production was
2.6 bcf in 2018 and 2.3 bcf in 2017.
Click Here​ for a copy of the complete report.
NewsClips:
Cold Snap Raises Questions About Columbia Gas Heating Bills In Washington County
PUC Cuts Columbia Gas Rate Hike In Half
UGI North Customers Will See Slightly Higher Gas Bills
UGI Customers In Lehigh Valley To See 11% Drop In Gas Bills
U.S. EIA: November U.S. Natural Gas Prices Increased Beyond Previous Market Expectations
Related Stories:
PA Supreme Court Denies Appeal Of Case Challenging Use Of Eminent Domain By Mariner
East 2 Pipeline, But A Challenge Remains
Natural Gas Distribution Companies Expect Little Change In Natural Gas Use During Winter
Heating Season, Slight Increase In Cost
Exelon To Retire 3 Landfill Gas Generation Facilities In Pennsylvania
Williams To Hold Public Meetings On Proposed Leidy South Natural Gas Pipeline Dec. 11
Lycoming County, Dec. 12 Clinton County, More
[Posted: Dec. 4, 2018]

PUC To Livestream Dec. 11 PA One Call Pipeline, Utility Damage Prevention Committee
Meeting

On December 7, the Public Utility Commission announced it will ​livestream the December 11
meeting of the PA One Call Pipeline & Utility ​Damage Prevention Committee​ starting at 9 a.m.
in Hearing Room 1 of the Commonwealth Keystone Building, Harrisburg.
The agenda​ for the meeting includes proposed enforcement actions for violations of PA
One Call requirements.
The creation of the committee was authorized by ​Act 50 of 2017​, which enhances
Pennsylvania’s Underground Utility Line Protection Act-- also known as the “One Call Law.”
Modeled after successful programs in other states, the focus of the committee is a
reduction in the number of “hits” on underground utilities.
The DPC meets regularly to review alleged violations of the Act and makes
determinations as to the appropriate response including, but not limited to, the issuance of
warning letters or administrative penalties.
Click Here​ to watch the meeting online. ​Click Here​ for the meeting agenda.
For more information, visit the PUC’s ​PA One Call Enforcement​ webpage.
Related Story:

53
PUC Announces PA One Call Enforcement Actions For Hitting Pipelines, Utilities During
Construction
[Posted: Dec. 7, 2018]

Pocono Heritage Land Trust Hosts Dec. 9 Pomeroy McMichaels Creek Nature Preserve
Hike In Monroe County

The ​Pocono Heritage Land Trust​ will host a ​hike


on December 9 in the Pomeroy McMichaels Creek
Nature Preserve​ near Stroudsburg, Monroe County
from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.
The new ​Pomeroy McMichael's Creek Nature
Preserve​ is located along the McMichaels Creek
and encompasses eighty acres of beautiful forested
wild calcareous (limestone influenced) landscape.
Located on both sides of the McMichaels Creek and Hickory Valley Road from the upper
boundary of Stroud Township’s Glenbrook Golf Course and Hickory Valley Park Greenway to
just below the Turkey Hill Road bridge to Quiet Valley, the preserve is a treasure trove of
interesting calciphyte plant communities, evidence of glacier and geologic influences and
riparian floodplain and wild trout stream habitats.
This free walk will be held rain or shine. Pre-registration is suggested by calling
570-424-1514 ​or online​.
For more information on programs, initiatives, other upcoming events and how you can
become involved, visit the ​Pocono Heritage Land Trust​ website.
NewsClip:
Pocono Heritage Land Trust Adds New Pomeroy McMichaels Creek Nature Preserve In Monroe
County
[Posted: Dec. 4, 2018]

Feature: Making Connections - Trailblazers In Monroe County

By Carol Hillestad, ​Brodhead Watershed Association

Miles and miles of walking, hiking, and biking


trails crisscross public land throughout Monroe
County.
Our trails lead to creeks, ravines and
waterfalls, long mountain views, and
world-class fishing spots on pristine waters.
Keep your eyes peeled and you may see
eagles, evidence of possums, raccoons or
turkeys. You’ll pass ancient evergreens, fields
of blueberries, wetlands teeming with life, and
red rock pine barrens.
The time you spend in the natural world can take you on an inner journey, too — from

54
stressed, anxious, or worried to a place of calm, even contentment.
But with trails scattered throughout the county, many would-be walkers don’t know
where to start.
What if existing trails could be linked, with access and parking at clearly marked
trailheads in every township?
More-- what if our trail system could be linked to networks of trails beyond? What if you
could bike, say, from ​Delaware Water Gap​ to the Portland footbridge-- even all the way to the
Statue of Liberty?
That’s not a pipe dream.
“Most of the Liberty to Water Gap trail already exists, and the Pennsylvania Extension is
well on its way,” says Fallon Horan, community planner for Monroe County Planning
Commission. “The trails also align with the ​September 11 National Memorial Trail​ and create
the link from the Statue of Liberty to the Tower of Voices ​Flight 93 National Memorial​ in
Shanksville [Somerset County] and the Pentagon.”
Horan is pulling together decades of trail plans and maps, updating them, and identifying
opportunities for connections. A big focus is signage and parking for trails on public land.
“Most people live near several community trails,” she says. “We want it to be easy for
them to find these amazing properties.”
The ultimate goal of her work is mapping a county-wide system of public trails — and
working with townships, land trusts, individuals, and nonprofits to pinpoint gaps and ways to
work around them.
One piece of the puzzle is falling into place in Tobyhanna Township.
Julia Heilakka, Tobyhanna’s community engagement coordinator, says, “When the
project is completed, we’ll have 28 miles of walking and biking for locals and visitors — a trail
from one end of the township to the other.”
A bike lane will connect an old Wilkes Barre & Eastern railroad bed and the western
boundary of Pocono Mountain West High School to the ​Austin T. Blakeslee Natural Area​-- with
its glorious 130 acres of woodland. Situated along Tobyhanna Creek, it’s a popular spot for
picnicking, fishing and waterfall-watching.
Autumn Canfield, the township’s assistant manager, says the project will encourage
walking and biking for health-- and for getting around without getting in a car.
Grantmakers like the idea: “Funding is in place for the bike trail, paralleling Route 940.
Grants are ready for trailheads and signage, too,” she says.
According to Horan, other townships and boroughs have similar plans. “Interest in trails
is booming not just here, but everywhere in the region. Trails create opportunities for businesses
and outfitters, as well,” she says.
Brodhead Watershed Association is studying potential ways to link existing trails in the
watershed-- with the ultimate goal of connecting major natural areas and waterways to each
other.
As Heilakka and Canfield say, “Trails make our area a better place to live. Why not make
that happen?”
Hmmm. Why not, indeed?
Learn More About Trails--
-- Find maps for dozens of local trails at the ​Get Outdoors Poconos​ webpage
-- Visit the ​interactive map​ of public parks and trails in Monroe County

55
-- ​Click Here​ for a conceptual map of Tobyhanna Township’s Pocono Bike and Hike Trail
-- ​Click Here​ for a list of historical markers planned by Historical Assn. of Tobyhanna Twp.
-- ​Click Here​ for a map of the Sept. 11 National Memorial Trail
-- ​Click Here​ for trail maps and information on Delaware State Forest and state parks
-- Statewide information on trails is available a the ​Explore PA Trails​ website.

Carol Hillestad​ is a hike leader and writer for ​Get Outdoors Poconos​, a grant-funded series
administered by ​Brodhead Watershed Association​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Brodhead Watershed Association​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the
Association. ​Click Here​ to become a member.
NewsClip:
Making Connections: Trailblazers In Monroe County
Related Stories:
Pocono Heritage Land Trust Hosts Dec. 9 Pomeroy McMichaels Creek Nature Preserve Hike In
Monroe County
PA Great Outdoors Visitors Bureau Now Accepting Entries To Winter Fun Photo Contest
Call For Proposals: 2019 Natural Areas Conference, Oct. 8-10 In Pittsburgh
[Posted: Dec. 6, 2018]

PA Land Trust Assn Increasing Grant Maximums For Conservation Easement Assistance
Program

On December 3, the ​PA Land Trust Association


announced it is increasing the maximum size of the
grants available through the ​Conservation Easement
Assistance Program​--
-- New conservation, trail and fishing access
easements: maximum of $7,500 per project, up from
the present $6,000 limit.
-- Amending and restating older easement
documents to improve resource protection:
maximum of $7,500 per project, up from the present
$6,000 limit.
-- Signs installed on eased properties: maximum of $800 per project, up from $700.
The Conservation Easement Assistance Program is administered by the PA Land Trust
Association with support from the ​Keystone Recreation, Park and Conservation Fund
administered by the Bureau of Conservation and Recreation of the PA Department of
Conservation and Natural Resources.
More Help
In addition, the ​Land Trust Reimbursement Program​ is available from the Department of
Agriculture reimburse land trusts for the incidental costs (survey, baseline documentation, title
work, legal, etc.) associated with acquiring conservation easements--
It reimburses up to $5,000 per agricultural conservation easement project.
Over 22,700 acres have been conserved with support from these programs.

56
Which program is the better choice will depend on the details of the project. For more
information, ​check out the guidelines​ for the Conservation Easement Assistance Program or call
the ​Bureau of Farmland Preservation​ by calling 717-783-3167.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​PA Land
Trust Association​ website, ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from PLTA, ​Like them on
Facebook​, and ​Follow them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
The ​2019 PA Land Conservation Conference​ will be held May 16-18 at Skytop Lodge in
Monroe County.
[Posted: Dec. 3, 2018]

PA Great Outdoors Visitors Bureau Now Accepting Entries To Winter Fun Photo Contest

On December 4, the ​PA Great Outdoors Visitors Bureau


announced it is now accepting entries to their new ​Winter Fun
Photo Contest​. The deadline for entries is February 28.
The only requirements are the photo meet the contest theme--
Winter Fun December Through February-- and must be taken
in Jefferson, Elk, Clarion, Forest, or Cameron Counties.
Finalists will be posted on ​VisitPAGO.com​ with the four entries
with the most votes receiving the following: 1st Place $100, 2nd
Place $75, 3rd Place $75, and 4th Place $25. Online voting will
be March 13-19, 2019.
“Winter in the Pennsylvania Great Outdoors region is a
stunningly beautiful time of year,” says John Straitiff, executive
director of the PA Great Outdoors Visitors Bureau. “There are many fun things to do during
winter here, and we want to share them through photos, so be sure to snap a few shots this winter
and enter the contest.”
To enter, complete the entry form and upload your photos to the ​Winter Fun Photo
Contest​ webpage.
The ​PA Great Outdoors Visitors Bureau​ is a membership-based travel promotion
organization serving five counties in northwestern Pennsylvania: Jefferson, Elk, Clarion, Forest,
and Cameron.
Related Story:
Delaware River Basin Commission Winter Photo Contest Begins Dec. 21
[Posted: Dec. 5, 2018]

Penn State Extension, Partners Offering Online Tree Tender Training Jan. 24 To March 7

Penn State Extension is offering a series of ​online


Tree Tender training sessions​ from January 24 to
March 7. One hour sessions will be held each week
at Noon or 7:00 p.m. The first session is January 24.
Tree Tenders® is a training program that empowers
concerned residents to make dramatic strides towards
restoring and caring for the tree canopy in their

57
communities. The course is designed for lay people and experts alike.
Instruction is provided by DCNR’s Bureau of Forestry, in partnership with Penn State
Extension, PHS, and other local urban forestry experts.
Tree Tenders training includes: Tree Biology; Urban Stresses on Trees; Tree
Identification; Tree Pruning and Root Care; Tree Planting Techniques; and Community
Organizing.
Instruction is provided by DCNR’s Bureau of Forestry, in partnership with Penn State
Extension, ​PA Horticultural Society​, and other local urban forestry experts.
Click Here​ to register or for more information. Questions should be directed to Vinnie
Cotrone by sending email to: ​vjc1@psu.edu​ or call 570-825-1701.
NewsClips:
Schneck: Which PA Counties Grow The Most Christmas Trees?
Westmoreland Recycling Sites Will Accept Live Christmas Trees
Forests - ​Wildfire
Up To 8 Million Tons Of Debris Needs To Be Dealt With After Northern CA Wildfire
Tale Of 2 Wildfires: Devastation Highlights California’s Stark Divide
AP: Residents Head Back Into California Town Leveled By Wildfire
Children Return To School 3 Weeks After California Wildfires
Related Stories:
Penn State Extension Offering Online Tree Tender Training Jan. 24 to March 7
NDAL Ecology Based Landscape Design: What Comes Next? Jan. 10-11 Montgomery County
Call For Proposals: 2019 Natural Areas Conference, Oct. 8-10 In Pittsburgh
[Posted: Dec. 7, 2018]

NDAL Ecology Based Landscape Design: What Comes Next? Jan. 10-11 Montgomery
County

New Directions in the American Landscape​ will hold


one of its two 2019 ​Ecology Based Landscape Design:
What Comes Next? Conferences​ January 10-11 at
Montgomery County Community College​ in Blue Bell.
When NDAL’s first symposium took place in 1990,
native plants were largely an afterthought in the
landscape professions. The changes since then have
been astounding, and NDAL is proud to have played a
part.
While “ecology into design” has and will remain
NDAL’s focus, we have increasingly understood that a
“real world ecology” must always consider the
influences of people past and present.
2019’s 30th anniversary program will illustrate how an expanded definition of
“ecological design”-- including contributions from garden history, agroecology, anthropology,
social justice, art, and of course the ecological sciences-- can yield environmentally sound, yet
culturally connected landscapes.
Featured speakers include:

58
-- Thomas Woltz,​​ owner of ​Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects​ (NBW) will show
examples of a variety of projects that illustrate how deep research into ecologies and cultures
shaping the land can be critical in developing site-specific narratives.
-- ​Teri Rueb​​, Professor at the University of Colorado will demonstrate how she blends sound
and environment using new mobile media that weave audio recordings into the landscape.
-- ​Rick Darke​​, consultant, author and photographer will illustrate and explain dynamic design
models informed by the art of observation and stewarded by strategic intervention.
-- William Cullina​​, President of the ​Coastal Maine Botanical Garden​ will show garden
compositions based on native plant communities and artistic inspiration.
Major sponsors include ​Morris Arboretum, University of Pennsylvania​ and Connecticut
College Arboretum.
Click Here​ to download a Conference brochure.
To register or for more information, visit the ​Ecology Based Landscape Design: What
Comes Next? Conferences​ webpage. Questions should be directed to Morris Arboretum by
calling 215-247-5777 x125.
Native Plant Resources
There are lots of resources available to help property owners landscape with native plants,
including--
-- ​DCNR Landscaping With Native Plants
-- Game Commission: ​Common Beneficial Plants Found In Wildlife Habitat
-- U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: ​Native Plants For Wildlife Habitat And Conservation
Landscaping
-- ​Chesapeake Bay Sustainable Landscape Professional Directory
-- Brandywine Conservancy: ​Forested Riparian Buffer Planting Guide
-- Audubon PA: ​Bird Habitat Recognition Program
-- National Audubon: ​Native Plants Database
-- ​Xerces Society For Invertebrate Conservation
-- ​Gardening For Butterflies: Penn State Extension
-- ​Planting For Pollinators: Penn State Extension
-- ​Center For Pollinator Research, Penn State
-- ​Pennsylvania Pollinator Protection Plan ​- Learn Why Pollinators Are At Risk In PA
-- ​Ernst Seeds - Pollinator Habitat Restoration
-- ​Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
You can also check with ​land trusts​, ​watershed groups​, ​PA Audubon​ and ​Trout Unlimited
Chapters, ​county conservation district​ or other groups near you to see how they can help.
Related Stories:
Senate Hearing: Non-Native, Invasive Plant Species Ecologically Castrating The Landscape, But
There Is A Solution
Manada Conservancy Offers Native Plant Landscape Design Service
Related Stories This Week:
Penn State Extension Offering Online Tree Tender Training Jan. 24 to March 7
Call For Proposals: 2019 Natural Areas Conference, Oct. 8-10 In Pittsburgh
[Posted: Dec. 7, 2018]

Call For Proposals: 2019 Natural Areas Conference, Oct. 8-10 In Pittsburgh

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The ​Natural Areas Association​ and its partners
will host the ​2019 Natural Areas Conference--
On The Water's Edge-Managing Our Land and
Water In A Changing Landscape​-- on October
8-10 in Pittsburgh.
The Conference is one of the nation’s premier
gatherings of conservation professionals. It is
focused on providing access to cutting-edge
information, emerging management techniques,
and science-based practices for natural areas practitioners.
The event also serves as an important venue for making connections and sharing
knowledge with professionals in conservation-related fields.
Click Here​ to watch a video invitation to the Conference.
Call For Proposals
Conference organizers are now accepting abstracts for Symposia, Oral Presentations,
Posters, Workshops, ID Workshops, and Field Workshops associated with the Conference.
The deadline for proposals is April 15.
Among the topics to be considered are: Best Management Practices on Land for
Freshwater Ecosystem Integrity; Mitigating the Impact of Energy Development; Advances in
State Forest Management; Identifying Natural Areas for Conservation; Management of Wildlife
Habitat; Invasive Species Management and Prevention; Using Data and Technology to advance
Conservation; Parcelization of Large Private Land – Opportunities for Conservation; Native
Plant Conservation Initiatives; Pollinators in Natural Areas Management; Management Planning
to Advance the Conservation of Special Species/Natural Communities; Urban Natural Areas and
Green Infrastructure; Wetlands Conservation (for Rare Species); Climate Change – Species and
Natural Communities on the Move; and Restoration of Natural Areas Qualities.
Click Here​ to submit proposals or for more information.
Students, Young Professionals
The Natural Areas Conference offers robust programming and events for students and
young professionals.
Students are encouraged to submit proposals for presentations and posters and to compete
in the NAA student competition for cash prizes. Student scholarships are available and are
awarded on a competitive basis.
Conference Partners
Event Partners: ​Western Pennsylvania Conservancy​–​Pennsylvania Natural Heritage
Program​ and the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources
Event Sponsors: Richard King Mellon Foundation; FirstEnergy Foundation; Department
of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of Recreation and Conservation.
For more information, visit the ​2019 Natural Areas Conference-- On The Water's
Edge-Managing Our Land and Water In A Changing Landscape​ webpage.
About Natural Areas Assn​​.
The ​Natural Areas Association​ was founded more than 40 years ago, NAA is the only
national, non-profit membership organization dedicated to the support and advancement of the
community of natural areas professionals. We strive to provide them with the best scientific

60
Information to inform their work on the ground.
Related Stories:
Penn State Extension Offering Online Tree Tender Training Jan. 24 to March 7
NDAL Ecology Based Landscape Design: What Comes Next? Jan. 10-11 Montgomery County
[Posted: Dec. 4, 2018]

2019 Pennsylvania Fishing Licenses Are Now On Sale, Makes A Great Holiday Gift!

On December 1, the ​Fish and Boat Commission


announced 2019 fishing licenses are now available!
A license purchased now is valid for up to 13
months, from December 2018 through December 31,
2019. Licenses and related permits can be purchased
at the ​Gone Fishing PA​ website, at more than ​700
issuing agents​, county treasurers' offices and at all
PFBC regional offices​.
"Buying a fishing license this time of year
makes a lot of sense," said PFBC Executive Director
Tim Schaeffer. "Not only will you maximize its value
by being covered for all fishing seasons, but anglers who buy their license at a store can avoid
the long lines we often see at the start of trout season in the spring."
The price of a resident fishing license this year is still $22.90. The most popular add-ons,
a trout-salmon stamp and a Lake Erie permit cost $9.90 each, or $15.90 for a combination
permit.
In addition, fishing licenses can make a great holiday gift! Customers can purchase
vouchers that friends or loved ones can redeem for a license or related fishing privileges.
This year, customers will notice several changes and additions to the menu of license and
permit offerings.
Customers will no longer receive a complimentary printed copy of the annual Fishing
Summary book of laws and regulations. Instead, printed copies of the publication will be
available for $3 and can be purchased through issuing agents.
An identical, digital version of the Fishing Summary including advertisements and
coupons, can be viewed and printed for FREE at the ​Fishing In PA​ website.
Customers purchasing a license will also notice the addition of several new voluntary
permits available for purchase. Funds generated through these permits will be reinvested into
their respective program.
The list of voluntary permits and pricing is as follows (cost includes vendor processing
fees)--
-- Voluntary Habitat/Waterways Conservation Permit $11.90;
-- Voluntary Wild Trout and Enhanced Waters Permit $26.90;
-- Voluntary Bass Permit $11.90; and
-- Voluntary Musky Permit $11.90.
While the purchase supports individual programs, possession of a voluntary permit does
not entitle the holder to any additional privileges.
The Fish and Boat Commission is a user-funded agency that operates primarily on funds

61
generated through the sale of fishing licenses, boating registrations and associated fees. PFBC
receives no Pennsylvania General Fund tax revenue to support its programs.
NewsClips:
Outdoor Economy Is Shifting The Way We Think About Spending Time Outside
Op-Ed: The Politics Of Hunting And Fishing
Related Story:
Fish & Boat Commission Proposes Changes To Endangered, Candidate Species Lists
[Posted: Dec. 3, 2018]

Fish & Boat Commission Proposes Changes To Endangered, Candidate Species Lists

The Fish and Boat Commission ​published notice​ of a


proposed regulation for comment adding the pugnose
minnow and blacknose shiner and removing the banded
sunfish and gravel chub from the endangered species list;
and removing the central mudminnow and the eastern
mudminnow from the state’s list of candidate species that
could achieve endangered or threatened status in the
December 8 PA Bulletin.
Here’s some additional information from the ​PA Bulletin
notice​ on each of the species--
-- ​Pugnose Minnow​​ ​(Opsopoeodus emiliae)​ is a small
(40—55 mm), silver and olive colored, slender and
compressed minnow with a nearly vertical mouth it uses to
feed on microcrustaceans at the water's surface.
It inhabits sluggish streams, lakes, wetlands and oxbows, usually where dense vegetation
or coarse woody debris is present. It occurs in waters that are clear or turbid. In Pennsylvania it
occurs in a low gradient, turbid stream sections with limited submerged and emergent vegetation,
but with considerable downed, in-stream woody debris.
The Pugnose Minnow was first collected in the Commonwealth in 2000 and 2001. All
collections are from a short section of lower Cussewago Creek, Crawford County, totaling no
more than 2 kilometers (km) in length.
Although there are no older records for this species, experts consider it native here.
Cussewago Creek, particularly the lowermost section where this species was collected, is
difficult to sample, and the microhabitat occupied by the Pugnose Minnow is very limited.
The pugnose minnow is proposed to be added to the endangered species list. ​Click Here
for more.
-- ​Blacknose Shiner​​ ​(Notropis heterolepis)​ is a small olive to pale yellow minnow (40—65 mm)
found in clear lakes and streams, where it is often associated with aquatic vegetation. In
Pennsylvania, this species has been collected in pools, with rubble, gravel, and sand substrates,
and completely lacks submerged vegetation.
There are historic records from the Lake Erie drainage, Shenango River drainage and the
upper Allegheny River drainage. The only recent records are from two tributaries to the
Allegheny River in Erie and McKean Counties.
The blacknose shiner is proposed to be added to the endangered species list.

62
-- ​Banded Sunfish​​ ​(Enneacanthus obesus)​ are small sunfish (50—90 mm) with an olive colored
body having 5-8 dark vertical bars extending to its ventral side. It occupies sluggish, calm
sections of streams and rivers, as well as bogs, marshes, swamps, ponds and lakes.
It is closely associated with dense stands of rooted and suspended aquatic vegetation over
substrates of silt, sand, mud and detritus.
In Pennsylvania it has occurred historically in the tidal portion of Delaware River
drainage in Bucks, Delaware and Philadelphia Counties.
It has not been collected or verified in this Commonwealth since 1977, when 3 specimens
were taken from an impingement screen at a power plant on the Delaware River near
Philadelphia in Delaware County.
Enough information is available to make the determination that it no longer occurs within
this Commonwealth at present and to justify its removal from Commonwealth's list of
endangered fishes.
The banded sunfish is proposed to be removed from the endangered species list.
-- ​Gravel Chub​​ ​(Erimystax x-punctatus)​ is a slender, medium-sized (65—95 mm) yellow to
olive green chub that inhabits large creeks and rivers with clear to somewhat turbid water, over
substrate that includes significant amounts of clean sand, gravel and rock. It is essentially a
benthic fish that occurs in riffles and runs, in both shallow and deeper water.
The Commission is aware of 13 collections of the Gravel Chub from this Commonwealth
before 1956, but there are no occurrences reported after 1979.
Enough information is available to make the determination that it no longer occurs within
this Commonwealth at present and to justify its removal from Commonwealth's list of
endangered fishes.
-- ​Central Mudminnow​​ ​(Umbra limi)​ is a relatively small (54 mm), elongated fish that occurs
in marshes, swamps, springs, ditches, lake margins and the pools of smaller streams. It is usually
found in the presence of dense vegetation and soft substrates, but they have been collected in
shaded, stagnant, swampy areas that lack vegetation.
Historically, the Central Mudminnow was found to be rather widely distributed in
northwestern Pennsylvania during the period 1990—present, and is known to occur in Crawford,
Mercer, Erie, Venango and Warren Counties at present.
The Central Mudminnow is common to abundant in the Conneaut Marsh and wetlands in
the Pymatuning region; these rather extensive wetlands are the largest in Pennsylvania.
Enough information is available to make the determination that it is secure in this
Commonwealth at present and to justify its removal from the Commonwealth's list of candidate
fishes.
-- ​Eastern Mudminnow​​ ​(Umbra pygmaea) i​ s a larger mudminnow (107 mm) that inhabits
backwaters, braided creek mouths, wetlands, vegetated and soft-bottom lake margins, and
sluggish or still sections of streams. It occurs in clear to somewhat turbid water, usually where
dense aquatic vegetation or decaying organic material provides adequate cover.
In Pennsylvania, it is native to the Delaware River drainage (Stauffer et al. 2016). It has
recently been reported from the Susquehanna River basin at multiple sites, where the
Commission considers it to be introduced.
Within the last 25 years, the Eastern Mudminnow was found to be somewhat common in
the Bucks, Chester, Delaware and Philadelphia Counties area and some of the Pocono Mountains
region during the period 1990—present.

63
Enough information is available to make the determination that it is secure in this
Commonwealth at present and to justify its removal from the Commonwealth's list of candidate
fishes.
Comments are due January 7. Read the entire ​PA Bulletin notice​ for more information.
(​Photo:​ Pugnose Shiner (top), Blacknose shiner.)
NewsClips:
AP: Hunt For Hellbenders Is Part Of Broader Plan To Protect Them
Outdoor Economy Is Shifting The Way We Think About Spending Time Outside
Op-Ed: The Politics Of Hunting And Fishing
Related Story:
2019 Pennsylvania Fishing Licenses Are Now On Sale, Makes A Great Holiday Gift!
[Posted: Dec. 7, 2018]

Game Commission: Now You Can Binge Watch The York County Bald Eagle Cam's New
Season

The livestream from a bald-eagle nest near ​Codorus State Park


in Hanover, York County has launched for a fifth season, with
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary​ joining ​HDOnTap​ and ​Comcast
Business​ as a partner in the project.
The Game Commission in November awarded a permit to
HDOnTap to manage the cameras at the nest and livestream the
action.
In the livestream’s first four seasons, the Game Commission
had secured permission for audio and video equipment and
components to be installed at the Hanover nest, and the 24-7
livestream was made possible through services donated by HDOnTap and Comcast Business.
This year, HDOnTap secured the permit after the Game Commission decided it would
explore a new livestream opportunity envisioned to launch early next year.
It’s the second time a Game Commission livestream from a bald-eagle nest was adopted
by a private partnership.
The Game Commission’s first EagleCam in Pittsburgh was continued in its second and
subsequent years by PixController and the Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania.
In the inaugural run of the Pittsburgh livestream and the first four seasons of the Hanover
livestream, the Game Commission had provided the project’s primary educational component,
with the agency working to explain wildlife behavior viewers see while watching, and answer
their questions.
This season, Hawk Mountain has taken over that role. Hawk Mountain and HDOnTap
will work together to help educate livestream viewers through a blog to be updated and posted
bi-weekly during peak nesting season.
“HDOnTap is thrilled to be partnering with Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, leaders in raptor
conservation science and education, on the new Hanover Bald Eagle Blog,” said HDOnTap
Co-Founder Tiffany Sears. “We hope this adds to the live cam viewing experience.”
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary shares that excitement.
“When you can show close-up footage of nesting bald eagles and their young, you’re

64
going to get people hooked on raptors,” said Hawk Mountain President Sean Grace. “That’s
exactly what we’re doing: HDonTap provides the footage and Hawk Mountain shares the science
and expertise behind what the eagles are doing and why.
“This is yet another wonderful partnership,” Grace said. “Learning and sharing about
raptors is exactly what we do best, so this is a win-win.”
The Hanover livestream can be found on ​HDOnTap’s​ website.
Meanwhile, the Game Commission still is finalizing plans for its next livestream, which
it hopes to announce in the coming weeks.
NewsClips:
Allegheny County’s North Park Could Be Latest Home For Bald Eagles
2 Bald Eagle Nests In Pittsburgh Collapsed, But Birds Are Rebuilding
Schneck: Prime Season For Backyard Birder Takes Flight
Schneck: Northern Birds Rarely Seen In PA Are Showing Up Here
Erie: Since Snow, Bird Feeders Have Been Active With Uncommon Winter Birds
[Posted: Dec. 7, 2018]

PA Environmental Council Welcomes Tali MacArthur As Watersheds Program Manager

On December 4, the ​PA Environmental Council​ welcomed Tali MacArthur as the Watersheds
Program Manager and will serve a leadership role in PEC's related entity the ​PA Organization
For Watersheds and Rivers​.
"Tali will be building on the great work that POWR has been doing with river sojourns
and mini-grants, training events and workshops, insurance assistance, and other initiatives,” PEC
President Davitt Woodwell said. “The goal is to take that work to the next level and provide real
value to the hundreds of watershed organizations across Pennsylvania.”
The immediate focus for POWR’s statewide outreach in 2019 will be the second
Watershed Connections Conference​, to be held February 24-25 in State College.
First held in 2017, the conference brings together local watershed advocates from all over
the Commonwealth to network, learn from one another, and take advantage of training
opportunities and other information resources.
“Water is one of nature’s most powerful yet most vulnerable resources,” MacArthur said.
“By facilitating programs that encourage water-related stewardship, action, communication and
outreach, I hope to ensure that PEC and POWR continue their critical roles in protecting
Pennsylvania’s mighty and beautiful waterways.”
MacArthur comes to PEC from the ​Susquehanna Greenway Partnership​, where she
served as Executive Director, and previously the ​PA Council of Trout Unlimited​.
She also has project and grant management experience with the New Jersey Department
of Environmental Protection and has done work on water quality for the Louisiana Department
of Natural Resources and the University of Washington School of Marine Affairs.
MacArthur holds a Bachelor’s degree in Marine Science from the University of South
Carolina and a Master’s degree in Marine Affairs from the University of Washington. She will
be based in Lewisburg, traveling regularly around the state to meet with watershed organizations
and other partners.
You can contact MacArthur by sending email to: ​tmacarthur@pecpa.org​ or call
570-718-6507.

65
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA
Environmental Council​ website, visit the ​PEC Blog​, follow ​PEC on Twitter​ or ​Like PEC on
Facebook​. Visit PEC’s ​Audio Room​ for the latest podcasts. ​Click Here​ to receive regular
updates from PEC.
[Posted: Dec. 4, 2018]

Help Wanted: Wildlife Leadership Academy Development/Operations Coordinator

The Union County-based ​Wildlife Leadership Academy​ is seeking qualified candidates for a
part-time Development/ Operations Coordinator position. The deadline for applications is
January 1.
Reporting to the Executive Director, the Development/Operations Coordinator will be an
integral part of the Academy team, providing essential support for fundraising and development,
accounting, field school administration and field school logistics. We are seeking an energetic,
positive professional to join our team in educating and empowering the next generation of
conservation leaders.
Click Here​ for more information and how to apply.
[Posted: Dec. 5, 2018]

Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.

The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the ​PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog​, ​Twitter Feed​ and ​add ​PaEnviroDigest Google+​ to your Circle.

In Memoriam: Donald M. Hoskins, PA State Geologist 1987 - 2001


Politics
Micek: 4 Questions With New House Republican Leader Bryan Cutler​ ​[Regulatory “Reform” ]
Click Here for a Week’s Worth Of Political NewsClips
Air
AP: Gov. Wolf Eyes Greenhouse Gas Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan
Cusick: Wolf On Climate Change: We Are Having Real Problems
Frazier: U.S. Steel Claims Air Pollution Order Could Cost It $400M In Allegheny County
Hopey: Testimony Begins In U.S. Steel Appeal Of Coal Coking Works Enforcement Order
EQB To Consider Proposes Increases In Air Quality NPDES, Water Quality Permit Fees Dec. 18
Editorial: Use Nuclear Power Plant Issue For Clean Air Push
Op-Ed: We Can Breathe Easier-- Literally-- Thanks To President George H.W. Bush
Alternative Fuels
Westmoreland Transit To Roll Out 2 New Natural Gas-Powered Buses
Trump’s GM Threats Put Electric Vehicles At Risk
EPA Finalizes RFS Volumes For 2019, Biomass-Based Diesel Volumes For 2020
EPA Boosts RFS Volumes, Industry Concerned About More Refinery Waivers
Awards & Recognition
66
Lackawanna River Nominated For 2019 River Of The Year
Editorial: Vote For Lackawanna River Of The Year For Rebirth
Biodiversity/Invasive Species
Spotted Lanternfly Causing Havoc In PA, Why It Will Be In Centre County Eventually
Call For Proposals: 2019 Natural Areas Conference, Oct. 8-10 In Pittsburgh
AP: Hunt For Hellbenders Is Part Of Broader Plan To Protect Them
Budget
Lancaster Farming: Can PA Meet Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Goals?
EQB To Consider Proposes Increases In Air Quality NPDES, Water Quality Permit Fees Dec. 18
November State Revenue Collections $95.5 Million Above Estimate; $333.6M Above Estimates
Year-To-Date
Fayette, Somerset Counties Benefit From Federal Water Infrastructure Loans
Op-Ed: Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund, Greatest Conservation Program No One Ever
Heard Of
Editorial: Congress Must Fix Our Decaying National Parks
Chesapeake Bay
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
Lancaster Farming: Can PA Meet Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Goals?
Bay Journal: Multifunction Stream Buffers Offer Food For Thought For PA Farms
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Receives NFWF Grant To Expand Rotational Grazing
Crable: New Round Of Inspections Show Two-Thirds Of Chesapeake Bay Watershed Farmers
Have Runoff Plans
Thompson: Project To Limit Harmful Run-Off From Turkey Hill Supplier Farms Gets Boost
Crable: Farmers, Groups, Turkey Hill To Get $6.5M In Water Quality Funding
Stream Buffer Project Completed In Blair County By Trout Unlimited, Conservation District
Volunteers
Lancaster Farming: Stream Buffers Make Financial Sense
Alliance For The Chesapeake Bay, Partners Plant 14.81 Acres Of Forest Buffer In PA
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County’s Watershed Planning
Who’s Responsible For Plastic Tree Tubes Along Lancaster County Creek?
Months After Storms, Chesapeake Bay Debris Cleanup Presses On
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Citizen Action
PEC, Blue Ridge High School Team Up To Cleanup Milford Dumpsite In Susquehanna County
Wilkes U. Students Help Clean Susquehanna Warrior Trail
Stonehedge Marks New Chapter With Earthship Greenhouse In Tamaqua
Climate
AP: Gov. Wolf: Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan May Be Something PA Should Adopt
AP: Gov. Wolf Eyes Greenhouse Gas Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan
Cusick: Wolf On Climate Change: We Are Having Real Problems

67
Legere: Draft PA Climate Plan Update Envisions Dramatic Shift In PA’s Energy Mix
Role Of Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power Questioned In DEP Climate Plan Update
Cusick: Auditor General To Look At State Response To Climate Change
Auditor General On Climate Change: Future Generations Will Ask Did They Do Something?
Auditor General To Review Climate Change’s Likely Impact In PA
Hopey: Paris To Pittsburgh Documentary Puts Pittsburgh In Leading Role In Climate Change
Efforts
Philly Affirms Commitment To Reduce Climate-Changing Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Crable: 2018 Could Become Wettest In 104 Years
Here’s What Made 2018 Wettest Year On Record In State College Area
Letter: Are Local Governments Ready For Floods From A Warming Climate?
Letter: Is It Time To Sell The Beach House?
Op-Ed: Why It’s Important To Curtail Methane Leaks From Oil & Gas Facilities
Editorial: We Must Act Aggressively And Immediately On Climate Change
WVU Climate Conference: Switch From Coal To Gas To Reduce Emissions
Portrait Of A Planet On The Verge Of Climate Catastrophe
High Stakes As International Climate Conference Begins
Climate Diaspora Trying To Save Paris Climate Agreement From Trump
UN Chief: Climate Change Is Most Important Issue We Face
Coal Looms Large As Climate Change Talks Begin In Poland
Climate Talks Shift To Nitty-Gritty Details Of Paris Accord
Global Carbon Emissions Jump To All-Time High In 2018
Climate Reality Check: Global Carbon Pollution Up In 2019
Why The Climate Change Problem Is Starting To Look Too Big To Solve
[2015 Article] ​Holding Warming Under 2 Degrees C - It May Already Be Too Late
EIA: U.S. Coal Consumption Lowest In 29 Years
U.S. Clean Coal Program Fails To Deliver On Promised Smog Cuts
EPA Outlines Rule Change To Encourage New Coal-Fired Power Plants
EPA Announces Plan To Weaken Greenhouse Gas Rule
Coal Mining
Picric Acid Discovered In Old Mining Medical Kits In Hazleton
Eckley Miners’ Village Museum Invites Visitors To See A Coal Miner’s Christmas
Preservation Society Seeks To Secure Historic Mine Lokie In Wilkes Barre
UMW To Observe Robena Mine Disaster Of 1962
Coal Looms Large As Climate Change Talks Begin In Poland
Compliance Actions
Frazier: U.S. Steel Claims Air Pollution Order Could Cost It $400M In Allegheny County
Hopey: Testimony Begins In U.S. Steel Appeal Of Coal Coking Works Enforcement Order
Compliance Assistance
Widener/DEP Partnership Aimed At Helping Small Businesses
Delaware River
Delaware River Basin Commission Winter Photo Contest Begins Dec. 21
Dec. 7 Delaware RiverKeeper RiverWatch Video Report
Drinking Water
DEP: New Water System Completed For 700 Residents Affected By Industrial Pollution In

68
Lackawanna County
Allegheny Front: PFAS-What Is This Stuff? And Why Should You Care?
Boil Water Advisory Lifted In Part Of Bucks County
Maykuth: Pennsbury School To Reopen Monday In Bucks, But Boil Water Remains In Force
Mechanical Issues Blamed For Boil Water Advisory In Bucks County
University Of Scranton Classes Resume After Water Main Break
Longtime King’s College Prof Who Helped Curb 1980s Giardiasis Outbreak To Retire
Fayette, Somerset Counties Benefit From Federal Water Infrastructure Loans
Economic Development
Opposition Growing Against Natural Gas Pipeline To Supply Beaver Ethane Plant
Education
PEC, Blue Ridge High School Team Up To Cleanup Milford Dumpsite In Susquehanna County
Wilkes U. Students Help Clean Susquehanna Warrior Trail
Schneck: Active, Bright Meteor Shower Will Peak Dec. 13-14
Environmental Charter School Teachers Call For Union Representation
PA Environmental Educators Call For Workshop Proposals For 2019 Conference March 18-19
Emergency Response
Picric Acid Discovered In Old Mining Medical Kits In Hazleton
Energy
Editorial: Use Nuclear Power Plant Issue For Clean Air Push
Crable: Some Still Cut, Split, Stack Firewood To Have Real Fires In Their Homes
PJM Electric Grid Operator Says Members Prepared To Meet Winter Electricity Demand
Trump’s GM Threats Put Electric Vehicles At Risk
U.S. EIA: November U.S. Natural Gas Prices Increased Beyond Previous Market Expectations
U.S. Electric Power Outages In 2017 Doubled In Duration: EIA Faults Large Storms
U.S. Senate Confirms McNamee To FERC On Party Line Vote
Energy Conservation
Agencies Help Heat Homes In Blair County
Environmental Heritage
Preservation Society Seeks To Secure Historic Mine Lokie In Wilkes Barre
UMW To Observe Robena Mine Disaster Of 1962
Farming
Wolf: Luzerne County Farmers May Be Eligible For Federal Disaster Funding
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
Lancaster Farming: Stream Buffers Make Financial Sense
EDF Blog: New Resource Available To Help Dairy Industry Clean Up Local Watersheds
Thompson: Project To Limit Harmful Run-Off From Turkey Hill Supplier Farms Gets Boost
Crable: Farmers, Groups, Turkey Hill To Get $6.5M In Water Quality Funding
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County’s Watershed Planning
Westmoreland Farmer Grows Ag Legacy As State Industry Leader
PASA: Exploring Connections Between Soil Health & Nutrition At Blackberry Meadows Farm
PASA: Too Much Of A Good Thing: Compost Brings Phosphorus Challenges To Red Earth
Farm
PASA: Stuck In A Rut: Stagnant Organic Matter Levels At Bending Bridge Farm

69
Flooding
Wolf: Luzerne County Farmers May Be Eligible For Federal Disaster Funding
Lancaster Farming: Stream Buffers Make Financial Sense
Can Pittsburgh Region’s Infrastructure Handle All The Precipitation?
Crable: 2018 Could Become Wettest In 104 Years
Here’s What Made 2018 Wettest Year On Record In State College Area
Solomon Creek Flood Wall Ahead Of Schedule In Luzerne
Forests
Schneck: Which PA Counties Grow The Most Christmas Trees?
Westmoreland Recycling Sites Will Accept Live Christmas Trees
Forests - ​Wildfire
Up To 8 Million Tons Of Debris Needs To Be Dealt With After Northern CA Wildfire
Tale Of 2 Wildfires: Devastation Highlights California’s Stark Divide
AP: Residents Head Back Into California Town Leveled By Wildfire
Children Return To School 3 Weeks After California Wildfires
Green Infrastructure
Crable: New Round Of Inspections Show Two-Thirds Of Chesapeake Bay Watershed Farmers
Have Runoff Plans
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
Lancaster Farming: Stream Buffers Make Financial Sense
Stream Buffer Project Completed In Blair County By Trout Unlimited, Conservation District
Volunteers
EPCAMR NFWF Grant To Help Develop Green Infrastructure Space Plans In Wilkes-Barre
Alliance For The Chesapeake Bay, Partners Plant 14.81 Acres Of Forest Buffer In PA
EDF Blog: New Resource Available To Help Dairy Industry Clean Up Local Watersheds
Thompson: Project To Limit Harmful Run-Off From Turkey Hill Supplier Farms Gets Boost
Crable: Farmers, Groups, Turkey Hill To Get $6.5M In Water Quality Funding
DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County’s Watershed Planning
Who’s Responsible For Plastic Tree Tubes Along Lancaster County Creek?
Can Pittsburgh Region’s Infrastructure Handle All The Precipitation?
PASA: Exploring Connections Between Soil Health & Nutrition At Blackberry Meadows Farm
PASA: Too Much Of A Good Thing: Compost Brings Phosphorus Challenges To Red Earth
Farm
PASA: Stuck In A Rut: Stagnant Organic Matter Levels At Bending Bridge Farm
Hazardous Sites Cleanup
DEP: New Water System Completed For 700 Residents Affected By Industrial Pollution In
Lackawanna County
Allegheny Front: PFAS-What Is This Stuff? And Why Should You Care?
Hazardous Substances
Op-Ed: Philly Should Avoid Lead Paint Litigation That Will Devastate Property Values
U.S. Office Of Lead Hazard Control & Healthy Homes Has Additional Funding Available
Allegheny Front: PFAS-What Is This Stuff? And Why Should You Care?
Land Conservation
Pocono Heritage Land Trust Adds New Pomeroy McMichaels Creek Nature Preserve In Monroe

70
County
$1.5 Million Secured For Open Space Preservation In Chester County
Call For Proposals: 2019 Natural Areas Conference, Oct. 8-10 In Pittsburgh
Op-Ed: Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund, Greatest Conservation Program No One Ever
Heard Of
Littering/Illegal Dumping
PEC, Blue Ridge High School Team Up To Cleanup Milford Dumpsite In Susquehanna County
Philly Litter Czar Says New Street Sweeping Program Coming In 2019
Mine Reclamation
Swoyersville Residents Concerned About Impact Of Trucks Hauling Coal Waste For
Reclamation Project
Oil & Gas
Public Not Notified Of 4,200 Gallon Drilling Brine Spill In Lycoming County
Dallas Twp Approves New Zoning Limiting Natural Gas Operations
Op-Ed: Why It’s Important To Curtail Methane Leaks From Oil & Gas Facilities
Op-Ed: Time To Tighten Reporting On How Local Governments Spend Act 13 Drilling Fees
Editorial: Regulations, Ruling On Gas Drilling Are Encouraging Developments
StateImpact Podcast: Saudi America, What You Might Not Know About The Fracking Industry
Westmoreland Transit To Roll Out 2 New Natural Gas-Powered Buses
Cold Snap Raises Questions About Columbia Gas Heating Bills In Washington County
PUC Cuts Columbia Gas Rate Hike In Half
UGI North Customers Will See Slightly Higher Gas Bills
UGI Customers In Lehigh Valley To See 11% Drop In Gas Bills
Philly Gas Commission OKs PGW’s LNG Plant Venture
Litvak: Diversified’s Deal With WV To Plug Abandoned Conventional Oil & Gas Wells Shows
Rules Need To Change
U.S. Dept. Of Energy Supports Ethane Storage Hub In Appalachian Region
U.S. EIA: November U.S. Natural Gas Prices Increased Beyond Previous Market Expectations
Delaware Opposes U.S. Effort To Search For Oil Beneath Ocean Surface
Fmr Worley & Obetz Executives To Stand Trial
Permitting
EQB To Consider Proposes Increases In Air Quality NPDES, Water Quality Permit Fees Dec. 18
Pipelines
Delaware County Pipelines Risk Study Finds Risk Less Than Fatal Car Crash, House Fire
Hurdle: Delaware County Study: Pipeline Blast Could Be Devastating, But Risk Is Low
PA Supreme Court Denies Appeal Of Case Challenging Mariner East Pipeline Eminent Domain,
But A Challenge Remains
PA Supreme Court Upholds Mariner East 2 Pipeline Right To Use Eminent Domain
Upper Bucks Residents Lob Adelphia Pipeline Complaints At DEP Hearing
$500M Project To Expand Leidy South Pipeline Project Proposed
Crable: Homeowners Along Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline Route Shocked To Find Threats Of Liens
In Mail As A Result Of Bankruptcy Case
Crable: Landowners Along Mariner East 2 Pipeline Route No Longer Facing Liens
Opposition Growing Against Natural Gas Pipeline To Supply Beaver Ethane Plant
Dec. 12 FERC Public Meeting On Transco Pipeline In Clinton County

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Lebanon County Gets $700,000 From Mariner East 2 Pipeline Fines To Help With Stormwater
Projects
U.S. Senate Confirms McNamee To FERC On Party Line Vote
Radiation Protection
AP: Gov. Wolf Eyes Greenhouse Gas Cap-And-Trade Climate Plan
Editorial: Use Nuclear Power Plant Issue For Clean Air Push
Three Mile Island, Peach Bottom Nuclear Plants To Test Sirens This Week
Recreation
Op-Ed: Recreation And Parks’ Internet Of Things
Wilkes U. Students Help Clean Susquehanna Warrior Trail
Greenfield Twp., Blair County Receives Grant To Upgrade Park Facilities
Study Lays Foundation For Centre County Bike Trail
Pittsburgh’s Healthy Ride Bike-Sharing Expanding After Rough Stretch
DCNR Gives $650K To Improve Parks, Trails Around York County
RiverLife, Pittsburgh, DCNR Open Riverfront Trail Network
Lackawanna River Nominated For 2019 River Of The Year
Editorial: Vote For Lackawanna River Of The Year For Rebirth
Dec. 7 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Op-Ed: Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund, Greatest Conservation Program No One Ever
Heard Of
Editorial: Congress Must Fix Our Decaying National Parks
Recycling/Waste
City of HBG Close To Signing Renegotiated Penn Waste Recycling Contract
Westmoreland Recycling Sites Will Accept Live Christmas Trees
Wilkes-Barre To Extend Yard Waste Pickup
Renewable Energy
PA Solar Center Invites Responses To FRP To Assist Nonprofit Groups In Converting To Solar
Energy
Sustainability
Stonehedge Marks New Chapter With Earthship Greenhouse In Tamaqua
Watershed Protection
Save The Date! Statewide Watershed Connections Conference Feb. 24-25 In State College
CBF-PA: Farm Conservation Plans Are Important, But Farmers Struggle To Implement Those
Plans
Lancaster Farming: Can PA Meet Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Goals?
Crable: New Round Of Inspections Show Two-Thirds Of Chesapeake Bay Watershed Farmers
Have Runoff Plans
Stream Buffer Project Completed In Blair County By Trout Unlimited, Conservation District
Volunteers
Lancaster Farming: Stream Buffers Make Financial Sense
EPCAMR NFWF Grant To Help Develop Green Infrastructure Space Plans In Wilkes-Barre
Alliance For The Chesapeake Bay, Partners Plant 14.81 Acres Of Forest Buffer In PA
EDF Blog: New Resource Available To Help Dairy Industry Clean Up Local Watersheds
Thompson: Project To Limit Harmful Run-Off From Turkey Hill Supplier Farms Gets Boost
Crable: Farmers, Groups, Turkey Hill To Get $6.5M In Water Quality Funding

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DEP Blog: Healthy Waters, Healthy Communities: Lancaster County’s Watershed Planning
Who’s Responsible For Plastic Tree Tubes Along Lancaster County Creek?
Months After Storms, Chesapeake Bay Debris Cleanup Presses On
Lackawanna River Nominated For 2019 River Of The Year
Editorial: Vote For Lackawanna River Of The Year For Rebirth
Can Pittsburgh Region’s Infrastructure Handle All The Precipitation?
AP: Hunt For Hellbenders Is Part Of Broader Plan To Protect Them
EQB To Consider Proposes Increases In Air Quality NPDES, Water Quality Permit Fees Dec. 18
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
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Wildlife
2019 Pennsylvania Fishing Licenses Now On Sale
AP: Hunt For Hellbenders Is Part Of Broader Plan To Protect Them
Deer Program Helps Feed The Hungry
Deer Processors, Hunters Adjust To Chronic Wasting Disease Rules
Lewonczyk: Times Have Changed In Hunting Community
Western PA Taxidermists Busy Creating Works Of Art
Game Warden Attacked While Probing Hunting Violation Report
2 Charged With Attacking Game Commission Officer
Now You Can Binge Watch The York County Bald Eagle Cam’s New Season
Allegheny County’s North Park Could Be Latest Home For Bald Eagles
2 Bald Eagle Nests In Pittsburgh Collapsed, But Birds Are Rebuilding
Schneck: Prime Season For Backyard Birder Takes Flight
Schneck: Northern Birds Rarely Seen In PA Are Showing Up Here
Erie: Since Snow, Bird Feeders Have Been Active With Uncommon Winter Birds
Outdoor Economy Is Shifting The Way We Think About Spending Time Outside
Op-Ed: The Politics Of Hunting And Fishing
AP: Dept. Of Interior To Ease Oil Drilling Controls Protecting Imperiled Bird

Click Here For This Week's Allegheny Front Radio Program

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events

This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and
meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW​ means new from last week. Go to the ​online Calendar​ webpage for updates.

December 9--​​ ​NEW​. ​Pocono Heritage Land Trust​. ​Pomeroy McMichaels Creek Nature Preserve
Hike, Monroe County​. 1:00 to 4:00.

December 10--​​ ​PA Highlands Coalition Webinar: What Is Nature Worth? Return On
Environmental Studies, Economic Value Of The Outdoors​. 10:00 to 11:30.

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December 11--​​ ​NEW​. Mid-Year Budget Briefing By Department of Revenue. 11:00.

December 11--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On RACT II Air Quality Plan For Monroe Energy
Facility, Delaware County​. DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main Street, Norristown.
10:00.

December 11--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On RACT II Air Quality Plan For Exelon Croydon
Power Plant, Bucks County​. DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main Street, Norristown.
2:00.

December 11--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On RACT II Air Quality Plan For Arcelormittal Plate
Company, Montgomery County​. DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main Street,
Norristown. 8:00 a.m.

December 11-- ​PUC PA One Call Damage Prevention Committee​. ​Hearing Room 1, Keystone
Building, Harrisburg. 9:00? ​Online livestream available​.

December 11-- ​NEW​. ​West Branch Susquehanna Restoration Coalition Meeting/Holiday Party​.
Clinton County Conservation District Environmental Learning Center​, 45 Cooperation Lane,
Mill Hall. 6:00 to 8:30.

December 11--​​ ​NEW​. ​Williams Pipeline Public Meeting On Proposed Leidy South Natural Gas
Pipeline, Compressor Stations, Lycoming County​. Hughesville Volunteer Fire Company, 26 N
Railroad St, Hughesville, Lycoming County. 6:00 to 8:00.

December 12--​​ ​Agenda Posted​. ​DEP State Board for Certification of Water and Wastewater
Systems Operators​ meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP
Contact: Edgar Chescattie, 717-772-2814, ​eshescattie@pa.gov​.

December 12--​​ ​Agenda Posted​. ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ & Recycling Fund
Advisory Committee meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Laura
Henry, 717-772-5713, ​lahenry@pa.gov​. ​Click Here​ for background on agenda items.

December 12-- ​DEP Information Session/Hearing On Amerikohl Revtai Mining, Reclamation


Project Water Quality Permit In Fayette County​. Saltlick Township Municipal Building, 147
Municipal Building Road, Melcroft. 1:00 to 3:00.

December 12--​​ ​DEP Holds Dec. 12 Hearing [If Needed] On Delaware County Nonattainment
Maintenance Plan For Fine Particulate​. ​DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main Street in
Norristown, Montgomery County. 10:00.

December 12--​​ ​DCNR State Forest District Management Plan Meetings​ - ​Bald Eagle State
Forest​, District Office, 18865 Old Turnpike Road, Millmont, Union County. 6:00 to 8:00.

December 12--​​ ​Delaware River Basin Commission​ business meeting. ​Washington Crossing

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Historic Park Visitor Center​, 1112 River Road, Washington Crossing, PA.10:30. ​ Click Here​ for
an agenda. ​(​formal notice​)

December 12--​​ ​NEW​. ​Williams Pipeline Public Meeting On Proposed Leidy South Natural Gas
Pipeline, Compressor Stations, Clinton County​. Chapman Township Volunteer Fire Company,
79 Park Ave, North Bend, Clinton County. 6:00 to 8:00.

December 13--​​ ​Agenda Posted​. ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting.
Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:15. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email
to: ​kdalal@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​) ​Click Here​ for more background on agenda items.
-- Draft regulations setting methane emission limits for oil and gas operations

December 13--​​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Sewage Advisory Committee​ meeting. DEP Contact: Janice
Vollero 717-772-5157 or send email to: ​jvollero@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice)​

December 13--​​ ​Penn State Extension Webinar: Unconventional Oil & Gas - Bringing Trusted
Science To Decision-Making​. 1:00 to 2:00.

December 17--​​ ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee​ meeting. Room
105 Rachel Carson Building. 1:00. ​Click Here​ to register to join the meeting by webinar.
Participants also need to call in 1-650-479-3208, PASSCODE 644 895 237.

December 17--​​ ​Penn State Extension Farm Soil Health & Cover Crop Workshop​. York County
Annex Building, Room 1, 112 Pleasant Acres Rd., York. 9:00 to Noon.

December 18-- ​Agenda Posted. ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

December 18-- ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On RACT II Air Quality Plan For East Penn
Manufacturing In Berks County​. DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Avenue,
Harrisburg. 10:00.

December 18--​​ ​NEW​. ​U.S. Office Of Lead Hazard Control & Healthy Homes Webinar On
Upcoming Funding Opportunities​. 2:30.

December 28--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed[ On Lebanon County Fine Particulate Standard Plan​.
DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Avenue, Harrisburg. 1:00.

January 1--​​ First Day Of New 2019-2020 Legislative Session

January 10--​​ ​Penn State Extension Farm Soil Health & Cover Crop Workshop​. Penn State
Extension Mercer County, 463 North Perry Highway, Mercer. 10:00 to 1:00.

January 10-11--​​ ​NEW​. ​NDAL Ecology Based Landscape Design: What Comes Next?
Montgomery County Community College.

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January 12--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Bus Tour​. 10:00 to 1:00,​ ​Click
Here​ for more.

January 15--​​ Inauguration Day For Gov. Wolf, Lt. Gov. Fetterman

January 16--​​ ​NEW​. ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee​ meeting.
Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 1:00. ​Click Here​ to register to join the meeting by webinar.
Participants also need to call in ​1-650-479-3208, PASSCODE: 642 304 985​.

January 24--​​ ​NEW​. ​Penn State Extension, Partners Online Tree Tender Training​. First of
weekly sessions through March 7. Noon, 7:00.

January 26--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Bus Tour​. Noon to 1:00.​ ​Click
Here​ for more.

January 27-30--​​ ​Partnership For The Delaware Estuary​. ​2019 Delaware Estuary Science &
Environmental Summit​. Cape May, NJ.

February 2--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Bus Tour​. 10:00 to 1:00.​ ​Click
Here​ for more.

February 5- ​Governor’s Budget Address.

February 6--​​ ​Penn State Extension Woods In Your Backyard Webinar Series Starts​. 7:00 to
8:00 p.m.

February 6-9--​​ ​PA Association For Sustainable Agriculture​. ​Pennsylvania Sustainable


Agriculture Conference​. ​Lancaster County Convention Center​, Lancaster.

February 12-13--​​ ​Advanced Watershed Educator Workshops For Non-Formal Educators​.


Dauphin County Agriculture & Natural Resources Center​, 1451 Peters Mountain Road, Dauphin,
Dauphin County.​ ​Click Here to register​.

February 20-21--​​ ​DCNR, Western PA Conservancy. PA Riparian Forest Buffer Summit​. Best
Western Premier Conference Center, 800 East Park Drive, Harrisburg.

February 24-25--​​ ​NEW​. ​PA Environmental Council​, ​PA Organization For Watersheds &
Rivers​. ​Statewide Watershed Connections Conference​. State College.

March 2--​​ ​PA Wilds.​ ​Retailers, Producers, Public 3rd Annual PA Wilds Buyer’s Market​.
Gemmell Student Complex Multi-Purpose Room​, Clarion University.

March 5-- ​DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety​ meeting. DEP Ebensburg Office, 286 Industrial
Park Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. DEP Contact: Margaret Scheloske, 724-404-3143,

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mscheloske@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

March 5-6--​​ ​Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance​. ​Healthcare Industry Forum On Energy
Efficiency​. Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center, State College, Centre County.

March 9--​​ ​2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill River​. Montgomery County
Community College​ ​campus in Pottstown​.

March 18-19-- ​NEW​. ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Educators​. ​2019 Cityscapes & Greenscapes
Conference​. Philadelphia.

March 21-- ​DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace, 717-783-9438, ​twallace@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal
notice)​

March 27-28--​​ ​Advanced Watershed Educator Workshops For Non-Formal Educators​. ​Jennings
Environmental Education Center​, 2951 Prospect Road, Slippery Rock, Butler County.​ ​Click
Here to register​.

April 5-- ​Wildlife For Everyone We Love Wild Things & Wild Places Gala​.

April 7-9--​​ ​CMU Mascaro Center For Sustainable Innovation. 2019 Engineering Sustainability
Conference​. ​David L. Lawrence Convention Center​, Pittsburgh.

April 29 to May 2--​​ ​Center for Watershed Protection​. ​2019 National Watershed and Stormwater
Conference​. South Carolina.

May 8-10--​​ ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals​. ​2019 Annual Conference - Growth
Through Collaboration​. State College.

May 16-18--​​ ​PA Land Trust Association​. ​Land Conservation Conference​. Monroe County.

July 24-26-- ​Professional Recyclers Of PA​. ​Annual Recycling & Organics Conference​.
Harrisburg.

October 8-10--​​ ​NEW​. ​Natural Areas Association Natural Areas Conference​. Pittsburgh.

Related Tools ----------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.


Click Here​ for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages.
Visit ​DEP Connects​ for opportunities to interact with DEP staff at field offices.
Click Here​ to sign up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.
DEP Facebook Page​ ​DEP Twitter Feed​ ​DEP YouTube Channel
DEP Calendar of Events​ ​DCNR Calendar of Events
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Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and
Flickr.
Senate Committee Schedule​ ​House Committee Schedule
You can watch the ​Senate Floor Session​ and ​House Floor Session​ live online.

Grants & Awards

This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. ​NEW​ means new from last week.

December 14--​​ ​DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates​ ​(First-Come)


December 14--​​ ​DEP Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
December 14--​​ ​FEMA/PEMA Pre-Disaster & Flood Mitigation Grants
December 15--​​ ​Coldwater Heritage Partnership Grants
December 17--​​ ​Governor’s Awards For Environmental Excellence
December 17--​​ ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation 2019 Awards
December 21--​​ ​ORSANCO Ohio River Sweep Student Poster Contest
December 21-​​- ​NRCS-PA Farm, Forest Conservation Grants, Central, SE PA
December 28--​​ ​Western PA Conservancy/Dominion Energy Watershed Mini Grants
December 30--​​ ​Coca-Cola, Keep America Beautiful Public Spaces Recycling Bin Grants
December 31--​​ ​DEP County Act 101 Waste Planning, HHW, Education Grants
January 4--​​ ​Voting Ends For 2019 Pennsylvania River Of The Year
January 11-- ​DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
January 11-- ​PennDOT Green Light-Go Program, LED Light Upgrades
January 11-​​- ​DEP Environmental Education Grants
January 11--​​ ​NEW​. ​PA Solar Center Assistance To Nonprofits Converting To Solar Energy
January 16--​​ ​West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund Project Funding
January 18--​​ ​South Mountain Partnership Spirit Of South Mountain Award
January 18--​​ ​PA Land Trust Assn. Lifetime Achievement Award
January 25--​​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
January 31--​​ ​NFWF Five Star & Urban Waters Restoration Grants
January 31--​​ ​EPA Brownfields Assessment, Cleanup and Multipurpose Grants
February 4-- ​PA Environmental Professionals College Scholarships
February 8--​​ ​DEP FAST Act Alternative Fuels Corridor Infrastructure Grants
February 8-- ​Wildlife Leadership Academy Youth Conservation Ambassador
February 11--​​ ​PA Land Trust Assn. Government Leadership Award
February 15--​​ ​EPA Environmental Justice Small Grants
February 15--​​ ​NEW​. ​Delaware River Basin Commission Winter Photo Contest
February 28--​​ ​NEW​. ​PA Great Outdoors Visitors Bureau Winter Photo Contest
March 1--​​ ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation Wilderness Wheels Grants​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
March 1--​​ ​West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Investment Funding​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
March 4-- ​DCNR PA Outdoor Corps Young Adult Crews​ ​(At The Very Latest!)
March 31--​​ ​DEP Level 2 Electric Charging Station Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
May 10-- ​DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
July 15--​​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
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December 16--​​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
March 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
March 22--​​ ​DEP Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
June 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 23-- ​DEP Class 8 Truck/Transit Bus Clean Vehicle Grants
December 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants

-- Visit the ​DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs​ webpage for more ideas on how to get
financial assistance for environmental projects.
-- Visit the DCNR ​Apply for Grants​ webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

Here are highlights of actions taken by agencies on environmental regulations, technical


guidance and permits.

Regulations -----------------------

The Fish and Boat Commission ​published notice​ of a proposed regulation for comment adding
the pugnose minnow and blacknose shiner and removing the banded sunfish and gravel chub
from the endangered species list; and removing the central mudminnow and the eastern
mudminnow from the state’s list of candidate species that could achieve endangered or
threatened status in the December 8 PA Bulletin. Comments are due January 7.

Pennsylvania Bulletin - December 8, 2018

Technical Guidance -------------------

The Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice​ in the December 8 PA Bulletin


the final Revised Total Coliform Rule Guidance is now available.

Permits ------------

The Department of Environmental Protection and PA Infrastructure Investment Authority


published notice​ in the December 8 PA Bulletin of environmental assessments approved for
PennVEST funding.

Note:​​ The Department of Environmental Protection published 50 pages of public notices related
to proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the December 8 PA Bulletin -
pages 7538 to 7588​.

Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​​ Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit

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applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. ​Click Here​ to sign up.

Related Tools ----------------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

DEP Proposals Out For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​ - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​ - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations​ - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update​ - DEP webpage
August 4, 2018 DEP Regulatory Agenda - ​PA Bulletin, Page 4733

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (July 2018)​- DEP webpage

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