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HIGH SCHOOL CONCERT

BAND
FULL YEAR CURRICULUM

Abby Giles
Kansas State University
October 26, 2018
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Course Description and Goals…………………………………………………………………….………..……...….3

Scope and Sequence………………..………....…………………………………………………………………...….4-5


Musical Elements (pg. 4)
Musical Topics (pg. 5)

Performance #1-Fall………………………...……………………………………….………....………………….....6-8
Repertoire (pg. 6)
Skills and Elements (pg. 6)
S/G, H, C, NS Addressed (pg. 6-7)
Rationale/ Skill Development (pg. 7-8)

Performance #1 Sample Lesson Plan………………………………..………….…………………………………..9

Performance #2-Holiday…………………………………………………..…...……………....…………….….10-13
Repertoire (pg. 10)
Skills and Elements (pg. 10)
S/G, H, C, NS Addressed (pg. 10-11)
Rationale/ Skill Development (pg. 12-13)

Performance #2 Sample Lesson Plan…………………………………………………...…………….....……....14

Performance #3-Spring…………………………………………………………….………………………….…...15-18
Repertoire (pg. 15)
Skills and Elements (pg. 15)
S/G, H, C, NS Addressed (pg. 15-16)
Rationale/ Skill Development (pg. 17-18)

Performance #3 Sample Lesson


Plan…………………………………………………………………………………………..................................…….19

Performance #4-Contest……………………………………………………………….…………………….……20-22
Repertoire (pg. 20)
Skills and Elements (pg. 20)
S/G, H, C, NS Addressed (pg. 20-21)
Rationale/ Skill Development (pg. 21-22)

Performance #4 Sample Lesson Plan……………….…………………………….…………………………...….23

Assessment…………………………………………………………...……………….……………………………….24-25

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COURSE DESCRIPTION AND GOALS

Description:
This ensemble is the school’s concert band. Chair auditions are held at the beginning of
each quarter. Students are expected to maintain a high level of musical technique,
expression, literacy, and skill in the many musical experiences provided to students.
This course is designed to not only to foster and develop the skills needed to create
well-rounded musicians, but also lifelong consumers of music. It will also help students
develop life skills that will help prepare them for any area of life.

Goals:
● Students should be able to use the tools of the discipline, i.e., vocabulary,
elements, concepts, and principles in context. They will develop music literacy
and apply it on a daily basis in the classroom.
● Students should listen to and participate in music as audience members and
learn to make informed choices about music and musical performances.
● The expressive qualities of the music should be a primary focus of the music
program.
● This classroom will be equally subject-centered and student centered where
musical demands and student needs determine decisions being made.
● The process for learning music will include problem-solving and critical thinking.
● Students will be able to consider and clearly articulate the reasoning behind their
musical opinions.
● Students will come away from the program being able to utilize musical
knowledge and skills in their work and/or advocations of life after school.
● Students should be able to improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments.
● Students should understand relationships between music, the other arts, and
disciplines outside the arts.
● Students will be provided with a strong foundation in music history, music
theory, expression, culture, and the knowledge and technical skills of musical
performance.
● This course will be fun and exciting while approached with an academic mindset
that combines excellence in performance with clear expectations for learning.
● The quality of the experience is not determined by the success of the
performance.
● Students have a basic understanding of tone, balance, blend, and other basic
musical characteristics.

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SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

Fall Holiday Spring Contest


Arabian Hark! The Rhythm Fanfare and
Dances, Herald Angels Machine, Flourishes,
Drums of the Swing Fanfare for the Rough Riders
Rhythm Saamis, Third Planet,
Exaltation The
Washington
Post March
Arabian Canon for Fanfare for the Fanfare and
Dances, Air for Christmas, Third Planet, Flourishes,
Melody Band C’est Noel On a Little English
Hymnsong of Suite
Philip Bliss
Air for Band, C’est Noel, The On a Afterlife
Musical
Harmony Arabian Eighth Candle Hymnsong of
Elements Dances Philip Bliss
Drums of the The Eighth Fanfare for the Fanfare and
Saamis Candle Third Planet, Flourishes,
Texture On a Afterlife
Hymnsong of
Philip Bliss
Arabian Hark! The Rhythm Little English
Timbre Dances Herald Angels Machine Suite
Swing
Exaltation The Eighth Rhythm Little English
Form Candle Machine Suite, Rough
Riders
Air for Band Canon for On a Afterlife
Musical Christmas, Hymnsong of
Expression The Eighth Philip Bliss
Candle

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Fall Holiday Spring Contest
Ballad,
Novelty, Jazz, March,
Styles/ Ballad, Canon, Ballad,
Fanfare,
Genres Circus 20th
Overture Medley Fanfare
March
Musical
Topics Historical Baroque, 20th Century,
20th Century 20th Century
Period 20th Century Late Romantic

Middle East, Jewish,


First Nation, German, American
Cultures Modern English,
American
Albertan American

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PERFORMANCE #1-Fall

REPERTOIRE

● Arabian Dances b ​ y​ ​Roland Barrett


● Drums of the Saamis ​by Samuel R. Hazo
● Air for Band ​by Frank Erickson
● Exaltation ​by James Swearingen

SKILLS AND ELEMENTS


● Arabian Dances by Roland Barrett
○ Soloistic playing, balance between melody and counter melody,
chromatics, articulation, tempo, and rhythm
● Drums of the Saamis by Samuel R. Hazo
○ Rhythm, Texture, Timbre, pitch bending of the flute, balance between
melody and accompaniment lines
● Air for Band by Frank Erickson
○ Musical Expression, pulse, melody, dynamic contrast
● Exaltation by James Swearingen
○ Form, style, balance, changing tonalities, articulation, rhythm,
counterpoint

S/G, H, C, NS ADDRESSED
● Arabian Dances by Roland Barrett (2008)
○ Culture: Middle Eastern nomad culture
○ Style/Genre: Opener/ Novelty
○ Grade 2
○ National Standards:
MU:Pr6.1.E.8a Demonstrate attention to technical accuracy and
expressive qualities in prepared and improvised performances of a varied
repertoire of music representing diverse cultures and styles.
MU:Re7.2.E.5a Identify how knowledge of context and the use of
repetition, similarities, and contrasts inform the response to music.
MU:Cn10.0.H.5a Demonstrate how interests, knowledge, and skills relate
to personal choices and intent when creating, performing, and responding
to music.
● Drums of the Saamis (2014)
○ Culture: First Nation and modern Albertan cultures
○ History: This piece is meant to give the listener a glimpse into the
influence of modern day Alberta through the use of modern sounding
chords and rhythms. It represents a marriage of the old and new cultures
by the end of the piece.
○ Style/Genre: Feature Tune
○ Grade 3
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○ National Standards:
MU:Pr6.1.E.8a Demonstrate attention to technical accuracy and
expressive qualities in prepared and improvised performances of a varied
repertoire of music representing diverse cultures and styles.
MU:Re9.1.E.5a Identify and describe the effect of interest, experience,
analysis, and context on the evaluation of music.
MU:Cr3.2.E.5a Share personally developed melodic and rhythmic ideas or
motives – individually or as an ensemble – that demonstrate
understanding of characteristics of music or texts studied in rehearsal.
● Air for Band (1966)
○ Style/Genre: Quiet Tune/ Ballad
○ Grade 2
○ National Standards:
MU:Pr6.1.E.Ib Demonstrate an understanding of expressive intent by
connecting with an audience through prepared and improvised
performances.
MU:Pr4.3.E.8a Demonstrate understanding and application of expressive
qualities in a varied repertoire of music through prepared and improvised
performances.
MU:Re8.1.E.5a Identify interpretations of the expressive intent and
meaning of musical works, referring to the elements of music, contexts,
and (when appropriate) the setting of the text.
● Exaltation (1978)
○ Style/Genre: Overture, Concert Closer
○ Grade 3
○ National Standards:
MU:Pr4.2.E.Ia Demonstrate, using music reading skills where
appropriate, how compositional devices employed and theoretical and
structural aspects of musical works impact and inform prepared or
improvised performances.
MU:Pr5.3.E.8a Develop strategies to address technical challenges in a
varied repertoire of music and evaluate their success using feedback from
ensemble peers and other sources to refine performances.
MU:Re9.1.E.8a Explain the influence of experiences, analysis, and context
on interest in and evaluation of music.

RATIONALE/SKILLS DEVELOPMENT
Arabian Dances:
This is an engaging piece to start the concert with. It travels to the Middle East to
explore the music of the nomad culture. This piece has both a clarinet solo and flute
solo, giving students an opportunity for soloist work. The piece opens with a dramatic
clarinet solo in a recitative style, accompanied by the percussion section with xylophone,
maracas, and rainstick. The opening concludes with the flute solo, and then the
ensemble breaks into the rhythmic and spirited dance section. The composer offers
program notes, but students would also have the opportunity to come up with their own
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story about the piece. In the middle of the piece, the woodwinds and brass each get to
clap and add a percussion/rhythmic element to the texture of the piece. Maracas, claves,
windchime, and rainstick all add the cultural element of the piece. Ranges are fairly
modest throughout. Teaching concepts throughout the piece include balance between
the melody and counter melody, chromatics, articulations, tempo, and rhythm. The
piece builds speed towards the final climax, and both the students and audience will be
captivated until the end.
Drums of the Saamis:
This piece contains an interesting take on tribal drums followed by a haunting melody
that tries to represent a traditional wooden flute. The flute part uses pitch bending to
represent an authentic traditional wooden flute. This piece offers a great way to teach
the piece through a historical context and use cross curricular resources to give students
context of the work. There is a tribal drum soli in the middle that percussionists will
love. This piece provides an opportunity to teach students and audiences about a culture
that is rarely discussed. With the different textures and timbres that the piece provides,
it is interesting for audiences and performers alike. It provides many teachable concepts
with rhythm and balance between melody and accompaniment lines while also
incorporating history and culture.
Air for Band:
This piece was composed with the idea of teaching phrasing and how to develop a
melodic line. It is considered a “staple” of wind band literature and can be performed by
both large and small bands, young and more mature bands alike. The melody is built on
4 measure phrases. The tempo is 68 beats per measure, and so phrases are long,
requiring attention to air support. This is essential to the development of the phrase and
pitch throughout. Exercises on long tones can be used to build the students endurance
for the piece. Development of phrases is key to this piece. The dynamic level of each
phrase should grow in intensity and relax in order to give this piece a feeling of motion.
This piece is starts in the key of C minor, but builds to a grand finish in C major. It is not
a rhythmically challenging piece, but focuses on musicality and ensemble playing.
Percussion parts are very limited using only a snare drum and crash cymbal. Even with
limited percussion parts, the percussionists have a larger load due to their features in
Drums of the Saamis, creating work that they could be practicing as an ensemble while
the band is rehearsing this piece. This piece requires the band to have to develop an
internal pulse as an ensemble.
Exaltation:
This is a dramatic overture with a lot of rhythmic drive and energy. It features an alto
saxophone solo. There are several tonalities within the piece, but the piece is centered
around the key of F minor. Counterpoint occurs often throughout with many staggered
entrances. This would be a great concept to teach students. The trumpets also have the
opportunity to show off their playing throughout the piece in solo and soli sections. The
piece has a repetitive nature as well as a beautiful slow section in the middle. Because of
this, it is a great way to show off the different styles of playing al in one piece. It is a
great song to close the concert with due to the thematic and rhythmical nature of the
piece.

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PERFORMANCE #1-Fall

SAMPLE LESSON PLAN

Drums of the Saamis

Objective:
Students will research the history of Alberta and apply this to analyzing the piece Drums
of the Saamis.

Students will analyze the piece Drums of the Saamis and identify the musical elements
used by the composer and how they portray the history of Alberta.

Materials:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXcbug06QIk

Sequence:
1. Students are divided up into groups of 4 or 5, and they do research on the history
of Alberta and how the history has influenced the culture there today. (15
minutes)
2. Students will listen to the recording of the song Drums of the Saamis.
3. Based on the research that students did on the history and culture of Alberta,
they will analyze the musical elements used by the composer and connect them to
how they portray the history of Alberta in the song, Drums of the Saamis.
4. Teacher will ask guiding questions as needed:
What musical elements does the composer use in this piece?
How do these elements apply to the historical and cultural elements of
Alberta?

Assessment:
In groups, students will share a 2-3 minute presentation with the rest of the class
on what they discovered through their research and analysis.

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PERFORMANCE #2-Holiday

REPERTOIRE

● Hark! The Herald Angels Swing b ​ y Chris Sharp


● Canon for Christmas b ​ y Larry Clark
● The Eighth Candle ​Arr. Steve Reisterter
● C’est Noel​ (It is Christmas) by Andre Jutras

SKILLS AND ELEMENTS


● Hark! The Herald Angels Swing by Chris Sharp
○ Style, rhythm, form, meter (5/4), balance, meter changes, tonality changes
● Canon for Christmas by Larry Clark
○ Balance, meter changes, tone, breath support, style, musicality
● The Eighth Candle arr. Steve Reisterter
○ Balance, blend, musicality, dynamic contrast, movement of the line, meter
changes, rhythm, soloistic as well as section playing, relation of melody to
counter melody and harmony
● C’est Noel (It is Christmas) by Andre Jutras
○ Tempo changes, vertical alignment, countermelody, articulation, balance,
blend

S/G, H, C, NS ADDRESSED
● Hark! The Herald Angels Swing by Chris Sharp (2013)
○ Culture/History: This piece is written in the style of big-band jazz
ensemble. It is reminiscent of the arrangements of Sammy Nestico as
performed by Count Basie Orchestra. The arranger also gives a nod to
Dave Brubeck’s Take Five, as he has the band playing the tune in 5/4. The
original Hark, the Herald Angels Sing was written in 1739.
○ Style/Genre: Jazz Big Band, Feature Tune/ Novelty
○ Grade 3.5
○ National Standards:
MU:Pr6.1.E.5b Demonstrate an understanding of the context of the music
through prepared and improvised performances.
MU:Re8.1.E.Ia Explain and support interpretations of the expressive
intent and meaning of musical works, citing as evidence the treatment of
the elements of music, contexts, (when appropriate) the setting of the text,
and personal research.
MU:Pr6.1.E.Ia Demonstrate attention to technical accuracy and expressive
qualities in prepared and improvised performances of a varied repertoire
of music representing diverse cultures, styles, and genres.
● Canon for Christmas by Larry Clark (2015)

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○ Culture/History:Pachelbel’s (German composer) Canon in D (written in
1680, the baroque period) , is combined with Hark, the Herald Angels Sing
and The First Noel. The First Noel was written in 1833 (Early Romantic),
and Hark, the Herald Angels Sing was written in 1739 (Baroque).
○ Style/Genre: Ballad, Canon
○ Grade 2
○ National Standards:
MU:Pr4.3.E.5a Identify expressive qualities in a varied repertoire of music
that can be demonstrated through prepared and improvised
performances.
MU:Re9.1.E.5a Identify and describe the effect of interest, experience,
analysis, and context on the evaluation of music.
MU:Pr6.1.E.5c Demonstrate understanding and application of expressive
qualities in a varied repertoire of music through prepared and improvised
performances.
● The Eighth Candle arr. Steve Reisterter (1997)
○ Culture: Melody based on a traditional Jewish folk song
○ Style/Genre: Biggie/ Feature Piece
○ Grade 3.5
○ National Standards:
MU:Pr4.1.E.IIa Develop and apply criteria to select a varied repertoire to
study and perform based on an understanding of theoretical and structural
characteristics and expressive challenges in the music, the technical skills
of the individual or ensemble, and the purpose and context of the
performance.
MU:Re9.1.E.8a Explain the influence of experiences, analysis, and context
on interest in and evaluation of music.
MU:Pr6.1.E.Ia Demonstrate attention to technical accuracy and expressive
qualities in prepared and improvised performances of a varied repertoire
of music representing diverse cultures, styles, and genres.
● C’est Noel (It is Christmas) by Andre Jutras (1985)
○ Style/Genre: Medley, Concert Closer
○ Grade 3
○ National Standards:
MU:Pr5.3.E.5a Use self-reflection and peer feedback to refine individual
and ensemble performances of a varied repertoire of music.
MU:Pr6.1.E.5a Demonstrate attention to technical accuracy and expressive
qualities in prepared and improvised performances of a varied repertoire
of music.
MU:Re7.2.E.5a Identify how knowledge of context and the use of
repetition, similarities, and contrasts inform the response to music.

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RATIONALE/SKILLS DEVELOPMENT
Hark! The Herald Angels Swing:
This piece is written for concert band in the style of big-band jazz ensemble, reminiscent
of the arrangements of Sammy Nestico as performed by the Count Basie Orchestra. It
involves lots of block-scoring, and the majority of the piece calls for swung eighth notes.
The harmonies are extended, rhythms complex, and it is assisted by a drum set and
electric bass part. There are several key changes and time signature shifts. This piece
provides an opportunity for the ensemble to learn how to play in a different style and
gives a different take on a well-known melody. This piece gives students the chance to be
in a good proximal development- some students may be outside of their comfort zone,
but the difficulty level is attainable. A good drum set player is needed to lay down the
rhythmic groundwork for the rest of the band.
Canon for Christmas:
This piece is based on Pachelbel’s Canon in D and combined with popular Christmas
carols such as ​Hark, the Herald Angels Sing​ and ​The First Noel.​ It gives a new take on
popular melodies. The piece starts out with the typical harmonic progression of the
canon in the bass clarinet only. Percussion parts include bells, timpani, snare drum,
bass drum, triangle, suspended cymbal, sleigh bells, and wind chimes. This provides
opportunities to work on playing with good tone and style. There are also sixteenth note
passages for upper winds. Balance is another skill that can be developed throughout this
piece. To be done really well, players need to understand what it takes to produce a good
sound concept consistently throughout the different style changes and meter changes of
this piece.
The Eighth Candle:
This piece is written in binary form, and the opening melody is played by clarinet choir
and is reminiscent of a traditional Jewish folk song. The melody is characterized by
pitches repeated in an eighth note pulse followed by stepwise motion with a narrow
tessitura. This provides many teachable moments about how the piece is composed and
made up. The theme is repeated several times with varying countermelodies to
accompany it. Then, the music returns to the main theme, played by solo english horn
with clarinet choir accompaniment before metrically modulating to ⅝ using a timpani
solo. The second half of the piece is an uptempo lilting dance that again is reminiscent of
a traditional Jewish folk song. The melody is passed throughout the band, weaving new
countermelodies to provide contrast. It ends with a strong brass theme featuring
woodwind scalar runs and percussion. The different melodies and countermelodies
require confidence on individual parts while also being aware of how each part fits into
the piece as a whole.
C’est Noel (It is Christmas):
This piece is a medley of Christmas carols and opens in a fanfare to the tune of “He is
Born.” This piece incorporates basic rhythmic patterns containing mostly quarter notes
and eighth notes. The woodwinds do have several sixteenth note runs and the use of
dotted eighth-sixteenth notes are used sparingly. Percussion parts serve mostly as a
supportive role through the piece. The melody passes through different sections
throughout, and a knowledge of how the harmony and melody fit together is needed.
After the opening fanfare, a slower restatement of this melody is performed by solo oboe

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before returning to the fanfare like setting. The second melody is the traditional
Christmas hymn “Silent Night.” This melody opens in a brass choir like setting with the
trumpets carrying the melody. The horns and trombones have significant harmonic
lines. The final melody is “Angels We Have Heard on High.” The woodwinds have the
melody of Joy to the World that serves as a counter melody to the main theme. Because
of the medley of tunes and upbeat tempo of this piece, it would serve as a great concert
closer. Vertical alignment, balance, blend, and tempo changes are skills that can be
worked on throughout this piece.

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PERFORMANCE #2-Holiday

SAMPLE LESSON PLAN

The Eighth Candle

Objective:
Students will complete individual research on Jewish Christmas traditions and apply
that knowledge to analyzing the different musical elements in the song, The Eighth
Candle.

Materials:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrTwzsYZDLY

Sequence:
1. Students will do research prior to class time on Jewish Christmas traditions.
2. At the beginning of class, students will be given 2 minutes to journal about what
they learned in their research.
3. As a class, students will listen to the song, The Eighth Candle.
4. Using a think pair share method, students will discuss with their neighbor for 2-3
minutes about the following discussion topics:
How did the song make you feel?
What musical elements did the composer use in this song? Think about
rhythm, instrumentation, texture, melody, and harmony as a few examples.
How did you feel the composer incorporated the history of the traditions
of Jewish Christmas through these musical elements?
5. The class will start playing through the piece, dividing the piece up in sections.
6. At the end of class, students will be given a few minutes to journal about what
they learned.

Assessment:
Students will journal about what they learned from their research on Jewish
Christmas traditions and about 2 different things they learned in class today.

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PERFORMANCE #3- Spring

REPERTOIRE

● ​ y Richard L. Saucedo
Fanfare for the Third Planet b
● On a Hymnsong of Philip Bliss b ​ y David Holsinger
● Rhythm Machine ​by Timothy Broege
● The Washington Post March ​by John Philip Sousa, arr. Balent

SKILLS AND ELEMENTS

● Fanfare for the Third Planet by Richard L. Saucedo


○ Vertical Alignment, style, internal pulse, melody, harmony, balance,
syncopation, articulation
● On a Hymnsong of Philip Bliss by David Holsinger
○ Musical Expression, dynamic Contrast, blend, balance, melody and
harmony, lyrical style, confidence in individual lines
● Rhythm Machine by Timothy Broege
○ Rhythm, vertical Alignment, pulse, style, dynamic contrast, balance, form
(ABACADA rondo form)
● The Washington Post March by John Philip Sousa, arr. Balent
○ Style, vertical Alignment, articulation, dynamics

S/G, H, C, NS ADDRESSED

● Fanfare for the Third Planet by Richard L. Saucedo (2005)


○ History: This piece is dedicated to the third planet, planet Earth.
○ Style/ Genre: Fanfare, Concert Opener
○ Grade Level 2.5
○ National Standards:
MU:Pr4.3.E.Ia Demonstrate an understanding of context in a varied
repertoire of music through prepared and improvised performances.
MU:Pr5.3.E.8a Develop strategies to address technical challenges in a
varied repertoire of music and evaluate their success using feedback from
ensemble peers and other sources to refine performances.
MU:Re7.1.E.Ia Apply criteria to select music for specified purposes,
supporting choices by citing characteristics found in the music and
connections to interest, purpose, and context.
● On a Hymnsong of Philip Bliss by David Holsinger (1989)
○ History: The melody is based on the Hymn, It is Well with My Soul,” which
is written in 1873 by Horatio Spafford and was set to music by Philip Bliss.
○ Style/ Genre: Quiet Tune, Ballad, Lyrical
○ Grade Level 3

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○ National Standards:
MU:Re7.2.E.8a Describe how understanding context and the way the
elements of music are manipulated inform the response to music.
MU:Pr6.1.E.IIa Demonstrate mastery of the technical demands and an
understanding of expressive qualities of the music in prepared and
improvised performances of a varied repertoire representing diverse
cultures, styles, genres, and historical periods.
MU:Pr5.3.E.Ia Develop strategies to address expressive challenges in a
varied repertoire of music, and evaluate their success using feedback from
ensemble peers and other sources to refine performances.
● Rhythm Machine by Timothy Broege (1986)
○ History: Incorporates the French rondeau
○ Style/ Genre: Major Work/ Novelty
○ Grade Level 3
○ National Standards:
MU:Pr4.3.E.IIa Demonstrate how understanding the style, genre, and
context of a varied repertoire of music influences prepared and improvised
performances as well as performers’ technical skill to connect with the
audience.
MU:Pr6.1.E.5a Demonstrate attention to technical accuracy and expressive
qualities in prepared and improvised performances of a varied repertoire
of music.
MU:Re7.2.E.IIa Explain how the analysis of structures and contexts
inform the response to music.
● The Washington Post March by John Philip Sousa, arr. Balent
○ Culture/History: The owners of The Washington Post newspaper
requested that John Philip Sousa, the leader of the United States Marine
Band, compose a march for the newspaper’s essay contest awards
ceremony. Sousa obliged; “The Washington Post March” was introduced at
the ceremony on June 15, 1880, and it became quite popular. It led to a
british journalist dubbing Sousa “The March King.” Sousa is honored in
the Washington Post building for his contribution to the newspaper and
his country.
○ Style/ Genre: March, Concert Closer
○ Grade Level 3
○ National Standards:
MU:Re7.2.E.5a Identify how knowledge of context and the use of
repetition, similarities, and contrasts inform the response to music.
MU:Pr6.1.E.IIa Demonstrate mastery of the technical demands and an
understanding of expressive qualities of the music in prepared and
improvised performances of a varied repertoire representing diverse
cultures, styles, genres, and historical periods.
MU:Pr5.3.E.5a Use self-reflection and peer feedback to refine individual
and ensemble performances of a varied repertoire of music.

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RATIONALE/SKILLS DEVELOPMENT
Fanfare for the Third Planet:
This song maintains a steady tempo of a quarter note equals 148-158 for the entire
piece. It poses few technical challenges for winds and brass, while percussion remain
busy, as the piece requires a minimum of seven players in order to get all parts covered.
It written with fresh harmonies and skilled orchestrational devices. There are several
fanfare-like phrases with a brief calm section using woodwinds and a unique layering
effect before building to the dynamic ending. The steady tempo requires the ensemble to
internalize the pulse and focus on vertical alignment. This piece showcases the
percussion section. It is engaging and provides interesting parts for all sections. There
are a few style changes in between different sections of the piece, so students should be
aware of the form of the piece as well as what the important parts of each section are. It
is a great opener for the concert due to being upbeat, interesting, and engaging. It is also
only 2 minutes, 33 seconds long.
On a Hymnsong of Philip Bliss:
This is a quiet and lyrical piece that requires style and musicality throughout. It is based
on Horatio Spafford’s “It is Well With My Soul” which was set to music by Philip Bliss.
Holsinger gives the melodic material from this hymn a modern setting. It gives the band
the opportunity to play in the key of D-flat major. Although the piece requires great
attention towards balance, blend, and musical expression, the vast majority of parts are
written in a comfortable range. It requires students to be confident in all aspects of
lyrical playing. This is because scoring is delicate and sparse in many spots. It also
requires good balance between clarinet 1 and clarinet 2./3 as well as in the alto 1 and 2
parts. This piece also has an interesting and emotional backstory to the history of the
work that students can be engaged with. Overall, this piece provides a very musical
experience for performers and can challenge the to work on playing with musicality with
limited technical demands. This piece can provide a powerful moment during a concert
performance for audience members and students alike. It is very important that my
students are given opportunities to learn how to play musically, and this piece has the
incredible opportunity for developing players that have a strong sense of musical
expression.
Rhythm Machine:
This piece follows ABACADA rondo form, and is a great opportunity to incorporate a
music history lesson on the french rondeau. There are three clarinet parts-clarinet 1 and
2 play above the break, while clarinet 3 stays below the break. There is a trumpet solo
that is to be played very legato in a lyrical section. There are several different instrument
combinations throughout this piece. The constant change of melody between choirs of
instruments create a constant change of texture. This makes this piece worthy of being a
“major work” in the concert. Vertical alignment is required throughout. There are quick
dynamic changes and tempo changes between the two styles. The percussion is the glue
that holds the ensemble together. This piece is interesting and engaging for both
students and the audience.

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The Washington Post March:
Next to “The Stars and Stripes Forever,” “The Washington Post” has been Sousa’s most
widely known march. It was a standard at Sousa Band performances and was often
openly demanded when not scheduled for a program. This arrangement makes this
march standard playable for a younger band. Students should be exposed to the historic
and musical value of Sousa marches. This is a favorite for all ages, and it would be well
received as a closer to the concert.

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PERFORMANCE #3- Spring

SAMPLE LESSON PLAN

The Washington Post March

Objective:
Students will learn and apply the characteristics of what a march is while playing The
Washington Post March.

Materials:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mxrh1CrMmTY

Sequence:
1. Students will listen to a recording of The Washington Post March.
2. Through an in-class discussion, students will discuss the elements of a march and
how they heard these portrayed in the recording of The Washington Post March.
3. Students will play, The Washington Post March, and after playing it will
self-assess how they felt they applied these elements in their own playing.
4. After self-assessment, students will apply what they learned and can work on
throughout the rest of the rehearsal.

Assessment:
At the end of class, students will journal for 3 minutes about what they learned about
marches, what went well during rehearsal, and what they can improve on.

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PERFORMANCE #4-Contest

REPERTOIRE

● Fanfare and Flourishes b ​ y James Curnow


● Afterlife ​by Rossano Galante
● Little English Suite ​by Clare Grundman
● Rough Riders b ​ y Karl L. King, arr. James Swearingen

SKILLS AND ELEMENTS


● Fanfare and Flourishes by James Curnow
○ Articulation, vertical alignment, rhythm, balance, technicality, style
● Afterlife by Rossano Galante
○ Texture, balance, blend, musical expression, tone, tuning, lyrical style
● Little English Suite by Clare Grundman
○ Meter Changes, articulation, harmony, melody, tone color, style changes
● Rough Riders by Karl L. King, arr. James Swearingen
○ Articulation, dynamics, rhythm, tempo, style

S/G, H, C, NS ADDRESSED
● Fanfare and Flourishes by James Curnow (1991)
○ Culture/ History: There is a section with a melody based on a
Charpentier’s “Te Deum” largely played by the trombone. Te Deum is a
polyphonic motet that was composed between 1688 and 1689.
○ Style, Genre: Concert Opener, Fanfare
○ Grade Level 4
○ National Standards:
MU:Pr5.3.E.8a Develop strategies to address technical challenges in a
varied repertoire of music and evaluate their success using feedback from
ensemble peers and other sources to refine performances.
MU:Pr6.1.E.5a Demonstrate attention to technical accuracy and expressive
qualities in prepared and improvised performances of a varied repertoire
of music.
MU:Re7.2.E.8a Describe how understanding context and the way the
elements of music are manipulated inform the response to music.
● Afterlife by Rossano Galante (2015)
○ Style, Genre: Quiet Tune/ Ballad
○ Grade Level 4
○ National Standards:
MU:Re7.2.E.Ia Explain how the analysis of passages and understanding
the way the elements of music are manipulated inform the response to
music.

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MU:Cn10.0.H.IIa Demonstrate how interests, knowledge, and skills relate
to personal choices and intent when creating, performing, and responding
to music.
MU:Cn11.0.T.5a Demonstrate understanding of relationships between
music and the other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life.
● Little English Suite by Clare Grundman (1968)
○ Culture/ History: developed from four English folk songs- “The Leather
Bottel,” “Roving,” “We Met,” and “The Vicar of Bray.”
○ Style, Genre:Multi-movement, Feature Tune
○ Grade Level 3
○ National Standards:
MU:Re8.1.E.8a Identify and support interpretations of the expressive
intent and meaning of musical works, citing as evidence the treatment of
the elements of music, contexts, and (when appropriate) the setting of the
text.
MU:Pr6.1.E.5b Demonstrate an understanding of the context of the music
through prepared and improvised performances.
MU:Pr5.3.E.IIa Develop and apply appropriate rehearsal strategies to
address individual and ensemble challenges in a varied repertoire of
music, and evaluate their success.
● Rough Riders by Karl L. King, arr. James Swearingen (1943)
○ Culture/ History: It contains a patriotic title referencing the United States
Volunteer Cavalry that was formed in 1898. King would write marches and
leave them untitled when he sent them to his publisher; it was the
publisher who would add a title as they saw fit.
○ Style, Genre: Circus March, Concert Closer, Galop
○ Grade Level 3
○ National Standards:
MU:Pr6.1.E.IIa Demonstrate mastery of the technical demands and an
understanding of expressive qualities of the music in prepared and
improvised performances of a varied repertoire representing diverse
cultures, styles, genres, and historical periods.
MU:Pr5.3.E.IIIa Develop, apply, and refine appropriate rehearsal
strategies to address individual and ensemble challenges in a varied
repertoire of music.
MU:Pr4.2.E.IIIa Examine, evaluate, and critique, using music reading
skills where appropriate, how the structure and context impact and inform
prepared and improvised performances.

RATIONALE/SKILLS DEVELOPMENT
Fanfare and Flourishes:
This piece is exciting and engaging work with simple and balanced phrase structures. It
is a piece that sounds simple and slightly repetitive, but requires attention to detail that
will allow the piece to sparkle. There are some technically difficult elements to this song
including horn runs and glissandos and rapid articulations in the brass. It requires the

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brass sections to project through the texture of the accompaniment. It also features a
section with a melody based on a Charpentier’s “Te Deum” largely played by the
trombones. The technically challenging passages in this piece provide a chance to work
on technicality, articulation, and style.
Afterlife:
This piece incorporates texture, balance, and blend to make something that paints a
vivid picture for the listener. It begins with a four-note motive that returns throughout
the piece. There are solos for flute, oboe, trumpet, and alto saxophone. After a quiet
opening, the middle section has a slight increase in tempo and a chance in style to
lighter articulations. The A section returns and leads to a quiet ending. This is what the
composer says about the piece:
Since the beginning of time, man has pondered what happens when our physical body
dies. Some believe we go to Heaven. Others doubt its existence entirely. then there are
those who have had near-death experiences and live to tell their stories. For me, I have
always hoped that when we pass it will be a very peaceful experience. It is this belief
that has inspired me to compose Afterlife. This composition starts delicately as
peacefulness returns to the soul. It intensifies as we approach our new consciousness,
constantly modulating between the two as we gain knowledge of our new
surroundings. Could this be the paradise known as Heave? Perhaps. I will let the
listeners decide for themselves.
This piece gives lots of room for students to make musical decisions based on the
context and meaning of the piece. Students get the chance to connect to the piece and
decide what it means in each of their individual lives.
Little English Suite:
This composition is developed from four English folk songs. There are a variety of styles
and harmonic language used to bring the four folk songs to life. Each section of the band
gets a chance to play part of the melody. There are six percussion instruments used, and
rhythms, harmonies, range, and articulation are all fair and doable. The band will learn
about tone colors, appropriate articulation, and meter changes within this piece. The
work is very melodic, but knowledge about how the harmony fits with the melody is
crucial for an understanding of the piece. Meter changes from 6/8, to ¾, 4/4, and 2/2.
It has a historical perspective through the inclusion of English Folk Songs.
Rough Riders:
King was most known for his involvement in circus bands including Buffalo Bill and
Barnum & Bailey. This piece is considered a galop, which traditionally has a quick
tempo and is quick in duration. This galop is traditionally performed at quarter note
=126. King adds many accidentals to the trio section to create more interesting
harmonies. It is challenging to play this work stylistically correct. Precision of
articulation is crucial. To maintain this, it important to establish a tempo that is perfect
without creating a style that is too clipped and harsh. Appropriate articulations,
releases, and attention to dynamics will make this an engaging and exciting concert
closer.

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PERFORMANCE #4-Contest

SAMPLE LESSON PLAN

Afterlife

Objective:
Students will listen to a recording of them playing Afterlife in the previous rehearsal and
will identify and address what went well, what they can improve on, and how they can
fix what they need to improve on.

Materials:
Recording of students playing Afterlife from the previous rehearsal and a speaker
system to play this recording from.

Sequence:
1. Students will listen to the audio recording from the previous rehearsal of them
playing Afterlife.
2. While listening, students will write down two things that they think the ensemble
did well and two things that they could improve on in their journals.
3. After the piece is finished, students will be given one more minute to journal
before sharing their thoughts with the class.
4. The teacher will write down comments in a visual organizer on the whiteboard.
5. Students and Teacher will discuss ideas of how they can fix the things that they
need to improve on and will add those comments to the visual organizer.
6. Students will play the song and will discuss what worked as far as helping them
improve on what they needed to work on and what they could still improve on. If
needed, the teacher will break things apart and work on smaller parts of the
piece.
7. This format will continue on for the remainder of the time spent working on this
piece.

Assessment:
The teacher will assess the comments written in journals, class participation
during the in-class discussion, and will record the final time they play the song after
working on sections the students said that they needed to improve.

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ASSESSMENT

Presentations:
This is a great way to test student’s knowledge and understanding of a
topic. They become the expert when they present and teach topics to the
rest of the class. While doing this, they have the opportunity to lead
discussion and pass along important points of information to the rest of the
class. Topics of presentations can vary from history, theory, compositional
techniques, elements of the music, composers, or other background
information about pieces.

Journals:
Journals provide a way for students to reflect and write observations in. A
few minutes could be given for students to journal at the end of every class
period. Specific questions could be given, or it can also be treated more as a
free-write. Questions about individual performance, ensemble
performance, what they need to improve on, and what they are doing well
are just a few examples of what students could write about. They could also
journal about how the piece makes them feel or what it means to them. You
can assess both product and process. Multiple forms of data can be
collected, and students perceptions and feelings can be addressed.

Portfolios:
The data in Portfolios can represent process and product over time. they are
usually collections of evidence documenting each student's achievement in
music. Many forms of data can be stored in portfolios, whether that be
research, reflections, or videos of performances and practices. They can
include written, video, and audio evidence of student learning. They are
often used with other tools such as rubrics and rating scales. Because
portfolio contents are usually selected by the students, portfolios require
students to reflect on their work, assessing the work’s quality and
documenting their progress.

Rubrics:
Rubrics provide clear levels of accomplishment by defining tangible
measures of individual achievement. There are clear indications of what
students need to accomplish in the future to improve their individual
performance, and it provides a learner-centered approach to performing,

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learning, and assessing. This tool can also be used for peer and
self-assessment.

Observation/ Performance:
Students can self-assess their own performances through watching videos.
Teachers can observe and assess through analyzing performances or
playing tests. Students performance can be evaluated through playing tests,
and a rubric can be developed to assess this. Feedback must be given to
students on what they did well on and how they can improve. Data gained
from performance assessments can be used to improve future lessons.

Pencil & Paper Tests:


This is an efficient tool that teachers can use to collect data through both
selected response (fill-in-the-blank, multiple choice, matching) and created
response (short answer, essay). Written exams can assess terminology,
historical elements, and music theory concepts.

Checklist:
This allows students to peer-assess other students’ learning and provides
added assessment possibilities in the classroom. Providing feedback to the
learner from multiple perspectives and providing an opportunity for the
teacher to evaluate the quality of feedback given by peer-assessors is a
benefit to this assessment tool. A checklist notes specific elements or
criteria that should be present when the learner performs successfully. The
observer marks whether or not each element is present during the
performance. The criteria are clear and the tool is easy to use. This tool
could also be used by the learner to self-assess.

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