Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 17

Wayne, Ziser 2009

Urinalysis and Acid/Base Balance

I. PURPOSE
This exercise is designed to familiarize the student with some of the physiological factors that are 
involved in kidney function.

II. PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES
At the end of this exercise the student should be able to:
1. Describe the effects that drinking large volumes of water has on urine production.
2. Describe the effects that caffeine has on urine production.
3. Describe the normal color, odor and  pH of urine.
4. Describe the main functions of the kidneys.
5. Describe the physical characteristics of normal urine.
6. Describe the role the kidneys have  in the regulation of pH.

III. INTRODUCTION
The kidneys are the most important organs responsible for homeostatic control of blood and other  
body fluids.  They move water and a variety of other substances out of the blood into the 
environment and in so doing establish a balance between removal and retention of essential and 
harmful materials.  To this end, they help maintain osmotic pressure, electrolyte balance, pH and 
minimize nitrogenous wastes produced as a result of protein metabolism.
The human kidneys contain more than two million nephrons, the functional units of the kidney, 
that are responsible for the performance of these functions.  Glomerular filtration, tubular 
reabsorption, and tubular secretion are involved in this process of urine formation.  As the filtrate 
passes through the tubule segments of the nephron, the fluid is modified both in volume and 
composition as a result of these processes.

Water reabsorption is regulated by antidiurectic hormone (ADH) which is released from the 
posterior pituitary.  Changes in the amount of fluid intake causes osmoreceptors to respond which 
results in a change in the production of ADH depending on the amount of fluid intake.  The ADH 
has an effect upon kidney tubules to change urine output.  For example, an increase in osmotic 
pressure brought about by a decrease in fluid intake stimulates the production of ADH with 
resultant retention of fluid and decreases in urine output.

Sodium and potassium regulation is taken care of by the kidneys through the secretion of 
aldosterone produced by the adrenal glands.  Sodium passes in and out of the body and is 

1
Wayne, Ziser 2009

maintained in the blood at constant levels.  If the level becomes high, the kidney can excrete 
excess sodium.  Regulation of sodium is closely related to fluid volume since retention of 
increased amounts of sodium will result in the retention of additional water.  With increasing 
aldosterone, increased sodium, chloride, and water are retained.
To maintain acid­base balance, the kidneys can eliminate more hydrogen ions if the pH of the 
extracellular fluid goes down.  If the pH goes up, the kidney will eliminate more bicarbonate ions 
to maintain this proper balance.  Even with changing acidity or alkalinity of intake loads, the pH of
the blood will remain 7.4 but urine pH will change to maintain this value.
In this experiment, some of the physiological principles mentioned will be demonstrated using 
your own kidneys as the subject for this investigation.

Part I (all students except for those participating in part II)

Safety Precautions:

In this lab you will be using your own urine as one of the specimens that you will be analyzing.  You 
must follow the usual safety precautions for working with body fluids:

1.   Wear gloves for the entire lab

2.   For student specimens, test and handle only your own urine

3.   Follow proper disposal procedures as described below

4.   After you finish the lab, make sure all supplies are returned to their proper places and wipe
down your lab bench with disinfectant

Activity 1:  Analyzing Your Own Urine Sample

Use the materials available to analyze your own urine sample.
Record your results in the table on your data sheet.

For physical characteristics:  use terms from the table below to describe urine color & odor:

Normal Values Abnormal Values
Colorless Milky
Pale Straw Reddish Amber
Color Straw Brownish Yellow
Amber Green
Smoky Brown

2
Wayne, Ziser 2009

Odor Aromatic
Musty
Maple Syrupy
Sweet
Ammonia­like (old) Malt
Acetone­like

*Do not analyze for inorganic components
*Use the urine test strip and pH paper to determine pH of your urine sample; 

 DO NOT USE THE PH METER

Activity 2:  Analyzing ‘Unknown’ Urine Samples
Analyze each of the unknown urine samples by using the urine test strips (dipsticks), record the results 
in the table below; Do not use the urinometers or pH meters to analyze the unknown urine samples then  
suggest a diagnosis that might explain any of the abnormal results that you obtained.  

*Place an asterisk next to any “abnormal” values in these samples

Activity 3:  Analyzing Urine Sediment Microscopically

1.   Place 10 ml of urine in the centrifuge tube and screw on cap; centrifuge for 5 minutes

2.   The instructor will centrifuge your urine sample 

3.  Prepare a slide: 

a. pour out all but the last ml of urine from the centrifuge tube

b. add a drop of sedi stain to the centrifuge tube, replace the lid and mix use a disposable 
pipette to collect ONE drop of stained urine from the centrifuge tube and place 
this drop  on a clean slide

4.   Place a coverslip over the drop on the slide 

5.   Draw and attempt to identify some of the different kinds of sediment in your sample.  Use 
illustrations in the handout provided

II.  Acid /Base Balance

Activity 4:  Determining the pH of biological solutions using pH paper

3
Wayne, Ziser 2009
1.  Take a small amount of each of the following solutions and use the pH paper provided to 
determine their pH:

a. Saliva
b. Urine (take average value of pH from Urinalysis lab
c. Plasma (sample provided)

2.   Record your results in the table on your data sheet

Activity 5:  Effects of buffers on acidic and alkaline solutions:

a.  Hydrochloric Acid (HCl) in  deionized water

1.   Rinse all glassware with deionized water

2.   Fill a 125ml Flask to the 50 ml mark with deionized water

3.   Use the pH meter to record the initial pH of the solution by immersing the electrode and stirring
 it in the solution

4.   Record the pH on the table on your data sheet.

5.   Immediately add HCl solution drop by drop while stirring with the pH electrode continuously.  
Continue to slowly add and count the drops of HCl until the pH changes by one complete unit. 
 
6.  Record the final pH of the solution and the number of drops of HCl in the table on your data 
sheet.

7.  Remove the pH electrodes and rinse them with deionized water

b. Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) in deionized water  

1.   Repeat the procedure a above, but this time adding the NaOH solution drop by drop and record 
your results in the table on your data sheet.

c.   HCl in Sodium Carbonate

1.   Fill another 125ml Flask to the 50 ml mark with 0.05M NaHCO3 (sodium carbonate) solution

2.   Use the pH meter to record the initial pH of the solution by immersing the electrode and stirring
 it in the solution.
4
Wayne, Ziser 2009
 
3.   Add HCl drop by drop, counting the drops while stirring with the pH electrode, until the pH 
changes one complete unit.

4.   Record the final pH of the sodium carbonate and the number of drops of HCl used in the table 
on your data sheet.

5.  Remove and rinse the electrode with deionized water.

d.   NaOH in Sodium Carbonate

1.   Repeat the procedure c above, but this time adding the NaOH solution drop by drop and record 
your results in the table on your data sheet.

e.   HCl in Plasma

1.   Place 50 ml of dilute plasma into a clean 150 ml flask, and record its initial pH with the pH 
meter. Ask your instructor what the dilution factor is.

2.   Add HCl drop by drop, counting the drops while continuously stirring with the pH electrode, 
until the pH changes one complete unit.

3.   Record the final pH of the plasma and the number of drops of HCl used in the table on your data 
sheet.

4.   Remove and rinse the electrode with deionized water.

f.    NaOH Plasma

1.   Repeat procedure e above this time using the NaOH solution and record your results in the table 
on your data sheet.

Part II (Student Volunteers)

V. PROCEDURE

5
Wayne, Ziser 2009

Food and water intake should be restricted for approximately two hours before starting this 
exercise.  Persons with kidney abnormalities or problems should be eliminated from the ingestion 
of test solutions but should aid their group members in the analysis of urine samples.

1. Before drinking any of the test solutions each student should urinate and keep this sample for
further analysis.

2. The students should work in groups of 3 or 4 depending on class size.  All students in the 
group should be drinking the same experimental solution.

3. Students should drink all solutions quickly but without discomfort and should be divided up 
into the following groups:

Group  A  ­ drinks 800­1000 ml of water
Group  B  ­ drinks 300 ml of a 2.5% sodium bicarbonate
Group  C  ­ drinks 800­1000 ml of coffee or tea (without sugar)

4. Each student should urinate at 30 minute intervals , collect the urine and measure its pH, 
specific gravity, sodium chloride content, and glucosecontent using methods described in 
this exercise.  If you are unable to void, a urine sample is taken at the next 30 minute interval.

5. Your urine sample from step 1 and those taken at 30 minute intervals shouldbe evaluated 
using the following procedures for urinalysis.  All data should  be recorded in the chart at the
end of this laboratory exercise.

Color ­ Normal urine is straw to amber color.  Observe the color of urine before ingestion of 
test solutions and note any changes that occur during the course of this experiment.

Volume ­ Measure the volume of the urine specimen by pouring it into a graduated cylinder.

Specific Gravity ­ The normal range for specific gravity is between 1.015 and  1.030.  It is a 
measure of the relative amounts of solids in the urine.  If possible,  use a refractometer.

6
Wayne, Ziser 2009

Directions for Refractometer

1. Calibrate the refractometer by placing distilled water on the glass as the sample, and 
adjusting the scale to read 1.000. 

2. Open up the flap at the end of the refractometer. Clean by rinsing with distilled water while 
the end of  the refractometer is held over a large beaker labeled "Urine Waste" .  Dry the 
glass tip of the refractometer with a Kimwipe.   Place a drop of urine on the glass plate and 
gently close the flap. Hold the refractometer up towards an area of natural light, look though 
the eye piece and read the specific gravity level off the scale ­ the point where the contrast 
line (difference between light and dark areas) crosses the scale. After each use,  clean with 
distilled water and dry with a Kimwipe as described above.  The Kimwipes should then be 
placed in one of the biohazard bags.  The presence of glucose and some medicines may cause
the urine specific gravity to change and give incorrect readings.  If any of these situations are 
possible, the glass urinometer will have to be used.

Directions for Urinometer (if refractometer unavailable)

To measure specific gravity, place the hydrometer (urinometer) in its cylinder filled 3/4 full 
of urine.  Remove any bubbles on the surface of the urine by rotating the urinometer.  Also make 
sure that the urinometer does not cling to the sides of the urinometer cylinder.  Observe where the 
urine meniscus lines up with the lines engraved on the urinometer for the value of specific gravity. 
Specific gravity changes with temperature and should be corrected.  Add .001 for every 3o C 
above 15o C. Use the same urinometer for all tests during the course of the experiment and make 
sure that it is washed, rinsed and dried after each use.

Glucose­ 
Use the test strips available to determine glucose

pH
Record the pH using a pH meter and  follow procedures that your instructor will provide for 
sample testing .   Clean the probe each time you take a reading.  To clean the probe, hold the probe
over one of the beakers labeled "Urine Waste" and  using the squeeze bottle filled with distilled 

7
Wayne, Ziser 2009

water,  squeeze gently and produce a light stream of  water to clean the probe.  Blot the probe  dry 
with a Kimwipe.  The Kimwipes should be discarded in the trash.

Sodium Chloride Determination

a. Measure 10 drops of urine into a small test tube
b. Add 1 drop of 10% potassium chromate
c. Add 2.9% silver nitrate 1 drop at a time and shake after each drop 
d. Count the number of drops required to turn the solution from yellow to brown
e. Calculate the sodium chloride content as follows:
Na Cl (gm)   =   volume of specimen in ml     x    drops silver nitrate
1

1000 ml

Proteins, ketones, blood, bilirubin
With your urine and a pathological urine if available, use multistix to determine protein, ketones, blood, 
and bilirubin.

Microscopic Examination
1. Obtain 10 ml of freshly voided urine from the first voided control sample.
2. Centrifuge for 10 minutes at 1600 rpm.
3. Place one drop of sediment on a clean glass slide.
4. Add one drop of sedi­stain and place a cover glass over specimen.

1 Amount of urine produced at each test period


8
Wayne, Ziser 2009

5. Under low power look for the presence of blood cells, salt crystals, epithelial cells,  bacteria, yeast 
cells, parasites and casts (Figure 1).
6. Under high power (40x) count five fields and average the number of red and white cells found.
7. Enter your observations and data in the chart at the end of this laboratory exercise.

Disposal:  slides, coverslips glass disposal box
gloves, towels, cups, urine test strips, straws  trash

MATERIALS (for part II)

2.5% sodium bicarbonate, 50% sucrose solution (Glucola) caffeinated coffee, tea, hot water, urine 
specimen containers, pH paper and pH meter, buffer (pH7), 500 ml graduated cylinders (100ml 
and 500 ml, urinometers, refractometers, thermometers, 10% potassium chromate, 2.9% silver 
nitrate, multistix, large test tubes, small test tubes, centrifuge tubes, 10 ml pipets, pipeting devices, 
test tube racks, test tube holders, microscopes, sedi­stain, cover slip, rubber gloves, centrifuge.

9
Wayne, Ziser 2009

10
Wayne, Ziser 2009

Urinalysis and Acid/Base Balance
Data Sheet Part I

I.  Urinalysis
Activity:  Your Own Urine Sample

Urinalysis Results
Physical Characteristics
Color
Transparency
Odor
pH  test paper)
Specific  “labstick”
Gravity refractometer
Organic  Components
Nitrite
Urobilinogen
Protein (albumin)
Blood
Ketone
Bilirubin
Glucose

Suggest an explanation for any abnormal components in your urine sample:

11
Wayne, Ziser 2009

Activity:  Analyzing Urine Sediment Microscopically

Sediment Analysis (diagram some examples then try to identify each)

Describe and try to identify some of the more common types of sediment

Activity: ‘Unknown’ Urine Samples

Urinalysis Results ­ Unknowns
Physical Characteristics
A B C D
Color

12
Wayne, Ziser 2009

Transparency
Odor
pH
Specific Gravity
Organic  Components (labsticks)
Nitrite
Urobilinogen
Protein (albumin)
Blood
Ketone
Bilirubin
Glucose

Diagnosis:

II.  Acid /Base Balance

Activity:  Determining the pH of biological solutions using pH paper

Biological Fluid pH
Saliva

Urine

Plasma

Which body fluid was the most acidic?  Which was the most alkaline? Explain.

13
Wayne, Ziser 2009

Compare your body fluids pH values with those of your class mates.  For which of the three body fluids 
do you think you obtained the most accurate pH reading from? The least accurate? Explain

Activity:  Effects of buffers on acidic and alkaline solutions:

Test initial pH final pH # drops of # drops


Solution HCl NaOH
Water xxxxxxxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxxxx
NaHCO3 xxxxxxxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxxxx
Plasma xxxxxxxxxxxx
dilution factor=____ xxxxxxxxxxx

Data Sheet PartII

General  Normal 0.5 hr 1.0 hr 1.5 hr 2.0 hr 2.5 hr 3.0 hr


Characteristic Urine Sample
s & Tests
Transparency clear

Color light yellow
or amber
Odor pungent
characteristic

14
Wayne, Ziser 2009
pH 4.5 ­ 8.0

Glucose Neg

Protein Neg

Volume 1 ­ 1.5 L/day

Specific  1.001 ­
Gravity 1.030
Sodium  present
Chloride
Bilirubin

Ketones neg

Sediment

WBC's neg

RBC's neg

Epithelial  present
Cells

Casts neg
Crystals neg
Bacteria neg
Parasites neg
Yeast Cells neg

Review Questions:

1.  If the specific gravity of the urine specimen is high, what color would you expect the sample to be?  
Explain.

15
Wayne, Ziser 2009

2.  What specific conditions would result in urine of high specific gravity?  Of low specific gravity?

3.   List five examples of abnormal constituents in a urine sample (other than those you found in 
your unknown samples above) and describe what problems each might indicate

4.   How do you account for the fact that saliva and urine may have a pH below 6.8 or above 7.8 in 
healthy individuals.

16
Wayne, Ziser 2009

5.  What exactly is a buffer?  Which of the three solutions (water, bicarbonate, plasma) acted as the 
least effective buffer? Explain.

6.   Compare the effects of acids and bases on the buffered and unbuffered solutions.  How does the 
buffering ability of plasma or albumin compare with that of sodium bicarbonate?

17

Centres d'intérêt liés