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Difference Between Red and Yellow Bone

Marrow
Definition
Red Bone Marrow: Red bone marrow is a mesh of networks that contain the
developmental stages of red blood cells, white blood cells, and megakaryocytes.

Yellow Bone Marrow: Yellow bone marrow is the bone marrow that primarily
contains fat and replaces the red bone marrow in the long bones during adolescence.

Red bone marrow is the bone marrow that contains the hematopoietic tissue. Red bone
marrow produces red blood cells, most of the white blood cells, and platelets. At birth,
all bone marrow is red. With age, red bone marrow is replaced by yellow bone marrow.
In adults, red bone marrow can be identified in the spongy bones of the skull, ribs, spine,
shoulder blades, sternum, and at the ends of the long bones in arms and legs. The spaces
of the trabeculae plates in the spongy bones are filled with the red bone marrow.

Yellow bone marrow is the bone marrow that is filled with fat. It mainly occurs in the
marrow cavity of the long bones. The red bone marrow in the marrow cavity is replaced
by the yellow bone marrow at the age of five years. The fat is stored in the adipocytes
and can be used in extreme hunger. The fat in the yellow bone marrow is the last source
of body’s energy. In situations like large blood loss, the yellow bone marrow is capable
of converting to the red bone marrow to produce blood cells. Yellow bone marrow can
also be converted into cartilage and compact bones.

Location in Bones
Red Bone Marrow: Red bone marrow occurs inside the spongy bones.Red marrow is
found mainly in the flat bones such as hip bone, breast bone, skull, ribs, vertebrae and
shoulder blades, and in the cancellous ("spongy") material at the proximal ends of the long
bones femur and humerus.

Yellow Bone Marrow: Yellow bone marrow occurs inside the compact bones.
Osteocytes are cells that form the bones themselves, osteoblasts are
responsible for the formation of new osteocytes, whereas osteoclasts
are responsible for the resorption of old bone matter.

Osteoblasts are formed from stem cells known as mesenchymal cells.


These stem cells can also form cartilage tissues, as well as numerous
other types of tissue. Osteoblasts are one of the end products of
mesenchymal stem cells.

Osteocytes are formed from osteoblasts, and become part of the


bone (and, as discussed above, 'become' osteocytes) when they
mature.

Osteoclast production is regulated mainly by the thyroid gland. They


are produced when more blood calcium is needed, and suppressed
when there is no deficiency of calcium in the body. They are also vital
in repairing mechanical breaks (fractures) to the bone.

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