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Running Head: TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN

KINDERGARTEN

Teacher Work Sample for Learning Coin Names in Kindergarten

Sarah K. Dennison

University of Alaska Southeast


TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 2

Abstract

The author taught a unit on learning coin names to 26 kindergarteners at Glacier

Valley Elementary School. Findings are based on pre- and post-assessments,

observations, and formative assessments made from work produced during the

week of the lesson.


TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 3

Table of Contents

1. Contextual Factors…………………………………………………………………………… 4

2. Learning Goals ………………………………………………………………………………… 9

3. Assessment Plan ……………………………………………………………………………… 9

4. Design for Instruction ……………………………………………………………………. 11

5. Instructional Decision Making ………………………………………………………… 22

6. Analysis of Student Learning ………………………………………………………….. 25

7. Reflection and Self-evaluation ……………………………………………………….... 28


TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 4

1. Contextual Factors

Knowledge of Community

Glacier Valley Elementary is located in the Mendenhall Valley in Juneau, Alaska. The

Mendenhall Valley has a population of 10,706 with a higher population of families

than the rest of Juneau due to affordable housing options and higher housing

density. Juneau has a total of six elementary schools; three of them are located in the

Mendenhall Valley. The majority of the neighborhood is Caucasian and speaks

English, but a wide range of diversity remains in the minority. In Juneau, 32.1% of

students qualify for the National School Lunch Program, compared to 52.3% of

students at Glacier Valley. Within the Mendenhall Valley there is a range of

economic wellbeing; Glacier Valley is a school that educates some of the less

economically advantaged students in Juneau.

It has been my experience that Juneau’s population is very transitional. The Coast

Guard Sector in town accounts for much of the population of young families. It

remains relatively stable in number even though families rotate out and in as they

transfer to their new assignments. Juneau can seem to have opportunities for

employment but the cost of living is higher than the national average in all regards.

The greatest increases in cost compared to the national average are housing (+45%)

and healthcare (+50%). In the three years I have lived here, I have known several

families move out of town to locations that are more affordable.

References

Cost of Living Calculator - Juneau, AK. (n.d.). Retrieved January 28, 2018, from

https://www.payscale.com/cost-of-living-calculator/Alaska-Juneau
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 5

Glacier Valley Elementary in Juneau, Alaska. (n.d.). Retrieved January 28, 2018, from

http://public-schools.startclass.com/l/1830/Glacier-Valley-Elementary-in-

Juneau-Alaska

Knowledge of Glacier Valley Elementary

The school building is set back in a community off the main road. In the mornings

you can see several kids walking to school. The Breakfast Club is where all students

can receive a free breakfast to start their day. The walls of the hallways show

student artwork and another area of walls is a collection of articles about Glacier

Valley Elementary or its students from the local newspaper. Behavioral cues are

found in lunchrooms and on doorways to remind students what is expected of them

and their bodies while they are in a learning environment. A common language is

used among all teachers to describe expectations. I have witnessed conversations

with students to remind them their words are powerful. Students are encouraged to

speak up for themselves when offended or their needs are not being met. Teachers

are also trained to use language that encourages intrinsic desires to learn; not to

please their teacher but so students can be successful citizens. The principal, Lucy

Potter, is approachable and kind. A counselor is on-site and there is a pro-active

program to teach students how to deal with their feelings and/or trauma. Students

are also taught how to act when someone around them is having a hard time

controlling themselves; leave if safety is an issue and always have compassion. The

Juneau Community Foundation monetarily supports two programs at the school;

Juneau Alaska Music Matters (JAMM), and Collaborative Learning for Educational

Achievement and Resilience (CLEAR). Principal Potter reports that CLEAR has
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 6

brought a positive change for the students and staff. Students are working through

their emotions and the staff has increased empathy for why students suffering from

trauma act out. JAMM is a tuition-free music program that supports youth

development through the practice of making music as an ensemble.

Knowledge of Classroom

Mrs. Wyatt’s kindergarten classroom is full of fun, age-appropriate learning

activities. Social skills are explicitly taught and expectations are reviewed regularly.

Imaginative play is interspersed with opportunities for concrete thinking.

Movement breaks are held regularly and students are encouraged to enjoy their

time in school but also recognize that successful students engage with whatever

learning opportunity is being presented. Classroom rules are reviewed when

necessary and the students help discuss why each rule is important. Mrs. Wyatt does

a wonderful job of guiding students so they understand why rules and social

expectations exist; it’s not to please the teacher or person in charge. They exist so

students can be successful in their relationships with one another and as growing

learners. Effort is celebrated. Tablets are available for work or play but are used

rarely. A large screen is available for projecting to the whole group when the images

in a book are small or connecting to a computer screen.

Student Characteristics

The first noticeable need is for movement. While all students need movement, there

are a few that need exceptional external physical input. One student does not seem

mean-spirited but he goes full-boar into everything in such a way that other

students sometimes get hurt. This student does not control his body and movement
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 7

well yet. A few students seem unable to focus. They can look directly at me while I’m

speaking but stay a bit vacant or distracted. This shows in their work and ability to

work with the rest of the class. Only one student has a paraeducator. She helps him

with academics and behavior management. This student tries really hard to be a

“good” student and it shows, even though his behavior can be distracting for the

whole class. There are about six emotionally needy kids. This manifests itself in a

few ways. Three of them want to visit the nurse everyday or the counselor. Another

two have trouble controlling big emotions and need one-on-one time with the

teacher to feel heard. Another one has a very unstable home-life but he feels most

secure with Mrs. Wyatt. He does best when she gives him an abundance of specific

praise and allows him to stay physically close to her. One student is a slow

responder. She is very intelligent but needs a long pause between asking the

question and her answering. Many students are happy to show how well they can

listen and follow directions. Like many kinder-aged kids, they can be distracted by

other students so expectations need to be stated again as a reminder. There are two

big talkers. One girl does well-enough in her work but could do much better if she

paid attention to her learning instead of looking for ways to speak to her neighbor.

She has a loud voice and is exceptional at getting everyone’s attention for silly

reasons. The other big talker is only different in that he can execute high-quality

work quickly. One student seems grumpy and sad all the time. He wants to be at the

beginning of the line and has no qualms telling me how talented and smart he is

(rightly), but he only does the work he is in the mood to do. He will write well-

executed letters for his writing opportunities but they will not spell anything. He’s
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 8

showing what he likes to do, not what is asked of him to do. Food scarcity is an issue

for many kids. Two of the kids are the definition of “frenemies.” They tattle on each

other for silly reasons but also camp out in the bathroom giggling or in the hallway

when they should be at recess. They gravitate toward one another any chance they

have. One of these girls has a real problem with constipation so we have to check on

her to make sure she’s actually in a stall using the restroom. She will go in the

bathroom to play for a long time and usually “has to go” during instructional time.

It’s very difficult to know what’s a genuine need for her. Another student has

Aspergers. She has headphones and manages herself really well. She has Speech

services. The last student I will mention is very quiet and manages to go unnoticed

most days. He is polite, quiet, and follows the rules. He never asks for help but his

work is below level. I notice he mimics what the other students are doing so there’s

always something to turn in but his work indicates that he’s not learning at the pace

of the other kids.

Instructional Implications

A big goal of mine is to know what interests these students. I am presently working

on gaining their trust and asking about their personal interests. My hope is that

some of the distracted students will check back into the learning if the delivery and

material appeal to them personally. I’m not sure how to address the student that

gets overly-physical but I am brainstorming ways he can engage his body while

learning and keeping other students safe. Because I was a high-energy kid, I know

the importance of movement breaks and high-energy spurts during the day but I
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 9

struggle with knowing how to balance the high-energy activities so that students

can get back to a place of calm and ready to learn.

2. Learning Goals

Standard Goal Bloom’s Level Discussion


I can identify coins by Goal 1: Compare Level 4 – Compare In an age of credit
name. - Juneau School coins and describe cards, I am not sure
District Mathematics them. Level 1 – Label how much exposure
standards Goal 2: Learn names students have had
of each coin. with coins. First I
would like to
compare the coins,
so they can explore
the images,
differences in size,
and color. Next
students can learn
the names of each
coin so they can
identify them
correctly. Knowing
their value isn’t part
of the standard but
identifying the coins
will make learning
about their values in
our money system
easier.

3. Assessment Plan

Learning Goal Assessments Format Adaptations


Goal 1: Compare Pre-Assessment Introduce the 4 Offer many
coins and describe coins, have opportunities to handle
them. students handle actual coins. Work on
them, and attempt comparing 2 coins at
to describe them. one time so
comparisons are kept
Formative Have students simple and not
Assessment compare 2 overwhelming. Offer
separate coins at a vocabulary that is
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 10

time and switch helpful: bigger, smaller,


coins up. thinner thicker.

Post-Assessment Have students Keep teaching moments


describe each coin short but teach often.
as it compares to
others; Quarter is
biggest, penny is
brown, etc.
Goal 2: Learn Pre-Assessment Ask students which Always use the name of
names of each coin. coin is the dime, the coins when speaking
etc. and handling them.
Explore ways to use
Formative As students student vocabulary to
Assessment compare coins, see describe coins in order
if they can use to create mnemonic for
correct names of coin names. Create
each coin with help visual graph with
of visual aid. pictures of coins with
names.
Post-Assessment Individual
assessments that Keep teaching moments
ask each student to short but teach often.
name each coin.

Assessment Checklist

Penny Nickel Dime Quarter


Student A
Student B
Student C
Student D

The assessment is straight-forward. The goal of comparing coins is tied to

differentiating them enough to name them.


TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 11

3. Design for Instruction

Charts

Quarter

Dime

Correct
Incorrect
Nickel

Penny

0 5 10 15 20 25 30

3.1 Pre-assessment results for each coin.

Correct coin naming spread


7

Correct coin naming spread


3

0
4 correct 3 correct 2 correct 1 correct 0 correct

3.2 The spread of correct answers in the pre-assessment. Approximately 6 students


could label at least 3 of the coins correctly.
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 12

Three students knew their coin names. Another three knew 3 of the 4 coin names.

The penny is the most well known coin. All the coins need to be taught but it seems

the silver coins will need the most attention in instruction.

Unit Overview

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday


Morning Morning Morning Morning
Meeting: Meeting: Dime. Meeting: Meeting:
Penny. Describe the Nickel. Quarter.
Describe the dime. I will Describe the Describe the
penny. I will record 5 nickel. I will penny. I will
record 5 observations record 5 record 5
observations on special observations observations
on special dime poster. on special on special
penny poster. (G1, G2) nickel poster. Penny poster.
(G1, G2) (G1, G2) (G1, G2)
Math time: Math time: Math time: Math time: Make pattern
Draw large Draw large Draw large Draw large using coins.
picture of picture of picture of picture of After making
penny. There dime. There nickel. There quarter. There pattern, turn
are 2 sides! are 2 sides! are 2 sides! are 2 sides! to neighbor to
Phonetically Phonetically Phonetically Phonetically tell them your
spell penny to spell dime to spell nickel to spell quarter pattern using
label your label your label your to label your name of coin.
picture. (G1, picture. (G1, picture. (G1, picture. (G1, (G1, G2)
G2) G2) G2) G2)

(G1) Goal 1: Compare coins and describe them.


(G2) Goal 2: Learn names of each coin.
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 13

1. Morning Meeting Lesson.

This plan will be used for 4 days using a new coin each day. The example below is

specifically for the penny.

This lesson will help students associate the coin name with the specific coin and be a

low-pressure way for students to explore the coin and share something they notice

about it. I think comparison will be a natural by-product of this lesson as the week

continues. In my pre-assessment, there were some students that did not know any

of the coin names so this will be a foundational introduction. Technology is not

needed for this lesson but we will be handling real money. I will need 26 coins each

day and a poster that we will be recording 5 unique observations. The poster will

have the coin name printed and a large picture of the coin in color. I will assess

students by having each one share one observation about the coin and having them

each say the coin’s name as they share. As an exit ticket to recess, I will ask students

to name the coin as I hold it before they leave the room.

Candidate Name: Sarah Dennison Host Teacher Name: Dana Wyatt


School: Glacier Valley School Grade Level: # of Students: 26
kinder
Date & Time of Lesson: 4/9 Length of Lesson: (day or days) 1 day
Topic of Lesson: naming coins Content Area: Math

Materials: Include all materials including types of technology used:


27 coins of the day (penny, dime, nickel, or quarter)
Prepared poster
Markers

Alaska Content Standard: Mathematic Standards


Measurement and Data
I can identify coins by name.
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 14

Speaking and Listening


SL.K.1.a-b Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about
kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups;
a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking
turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).

Transfer Goal(s) - Unpacked Standard (Transferability)


Standards for Mathematical Practice
A student can identify coins by name.
Speaking and Listening
A student can speak in a group following the rules of taking turns, listening to
others, and staying on topic.

STAGE ONE: Essential Questions and Enduring Understandings (Meaning)


Enduring Understanding(s) : (1 or 2 Essential Questions to be Considered:
are sufficient) (As related to Enduring
Students will understand that: Understandings…) (1 or 2 are sufficient)
 Coins have specific names.  What is the name of today’s coin?

STAGE ONE: STAGE TWO:


Objectives/Learning Targets (Acquisition) Assessments/Acceptable
Evidence Of Learning
Knowledge and Skills: What Sources of Evidence: Formative,
knowledge and skills related to content Summative, and/or Performance?
and/or content language should
students know and be able to do by the Formative: Can students see the
end of the lesson? characteristics of the penny? Color, images,
size, etc?
A student can make observations
and share them with the group. Performance: Can students make a
statement about the coin that can be
recorded? Ex: The penny is _______.

STAGE THREE: Learning for Understanding: Instructional Activities, Products,


and Strategies
Pre-Requisites: What is the prior knowledge/learning students have to have before
starting this lesson?
Make observations and share with the group using the prompt “The penny is
__________.
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 15

Overview/Introduction/Main Hook (Make a connection with students’


backgrounds and/or prior learning using an authentic situation to start them
thinking about the objectives and the essential question the lesson addresses.)
Look at the coin in your hand. Have you ever seen one of these before?

Process: Teacher Product(s): Specific Strategies for


Does/Student Does… Assessment/Evidence of supporting diverse
Learning. learner skills and
abilities throughout the
lesson
I model making an Model expectation.
observation and explain what
an observation is: something I Define observation.
notice.
Thinking time.
Give thinking time to find
something to share that you
notice. Model and offer prompt
that is a clear way to
Ask students to use the share an observation.
prompt when sharing: The Ability to use prompt
penny is _______. when speaking and find Example of observations
an observation. Does will be up next to each
I will record about 5 unique not have to be unique other so students will
observations on poster with but must be an naturally start to
penny image on it. The poster observation directly compare coins.
will stay up in the room for from coin.
the week while we learn Writing words that we
about other coins. are speaking in a
repetitive pattern will
I record observations using help with site word
the pattern: The penny is recognition; specifically
________, said _________. “said.”
Closure: One final look for this morning before we put pennies back in bag. Later
today we will get them out again for some art time.
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 16

2. Close Observation Lesson

Lesson will be repeated every day for 4 days with coin that is introduced in morning.

This lesson will help students associate the coin name with the specific coin and be

an opportunity to look closely at the artwork on the specific coins. In my pre-

assessment, there were some students that were not familiar with handling money

so this will be a fun way to increase curiosity about money. Technology is not

needed for this lesson. I will need the coloring sheets for the day’s coin and crayons

that will work for that coin. For the penny day, I will have only brown crayons

available. On the other days, I will have only silver available. As an exit ticket to

recess, I will ask students to name the coin as I hold it before they leave the room.

Candidate Name: Sarah Dennison Host Teacher Name: Dana Wyatt


School: Glacier Valley School Grade Level: # of Students: 26
kinder
Date & Time of Lesson: 4/9 Length of Lesson: (day or days) 1 day
Topic of Lesson: Naming coins Content Area: Math

Materials: Include all materials including types of technology used:


Coloring sheets (penny example artwork included below)
Crayons

Alaska Content Standard: Mathematic Standards


Measurement and Data
I can identify coins by name.
Speaking and Listening
SL.K.1.a-b Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about
kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups;
a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking
turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).

Transfer Goal(s) - Unpacked Standard (Transferability)


Standards for Mathematical Practice
A student can identify coins by name.
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 17

STAGE ONE: Essential Questions and Enduring Understandings (Meaning)


Enduring Understanding(s) : (1 or 2 Essential Questions to be Considered:
are sufficient) (As related to Enduring
Students will understand that: Understandings…) (1 or 2 are sufficient)
 Coins have specific names.  What is the name of today’s coin?

STAGE ONE: STAGE TWO:


Objectives/Learning Targets (Acquisition) Assessments/Acceptable
Evidence Of Learning
Knowledge and Skills: What Sources of Evidence: Formative,
knowledge and skills related to content Summative, and/or Performance?
and/or content language should
students know and be able to do by the Formative: Can students see the
end of the lesson? characteristics of the penny? Color, images,
type on coin, etc?
A student can make observations
about specific coins. Performance: Can the student color and
label a picture of the specific coin?

STAGE THREE: Learning for Understanding: Instructional Activities, Products,


and Strategies
Pre-Requisites: What is the prior knowledge/learning students have to have before
starting this lesson?
Stretching words for spelling, coloring

Overview/Introduction/Main Hook (Make a connection with students’


backgrounds and/or prior learning using an authentic situation to start them
thinking about the objectives and the essential question the lesson addresses.)
Let’s look really close at the penny!

Process: Teacher Product(s): Specific Strategies for


Does/Student Does… Assessment/Evidence of supporting diverse
Learning. learner skills and
abilities throughout the
lesson
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 18

It’s difficult to see all the Students give ideas Discussion


details in the penny because about why it’s not easy
_______? to see all the details.

Review, connect to
Here is a picture of today’s morning meeting lesson
coin. about observations.
 What’s the name of the
coin? Connecting name of coin
 What is the color of the See if students attempt by saying name and
coin? to write name of coin writing name using
and how they phonetic skills.
First thing I we will do is phonetically work it out.
write your name on your
picture. The next thing we
will do is write the name of Listen in. What are they Social learning
the coin on the picture. Now noticing? Are they
we can color the picture. attempting to read the
Latin?
It’s okay to talk to your
neighbor during this time as
long as you are talking about
things you are finding on the
coin. They have some
interesting pictures and
words!
Closure: class discussion: What did you notice on the coin? Who else noticed this?
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 19

3. Coin Pattern Lesson

This lesson will be taught only once at end of week.

This lesson will help students associate the coin name with the specific coin and

showcase their pattern-making skills. Using my informal assessments from earlier

this week, I will work with specific students that need the extra explicit help.

Students will be encouraged to share their pattern using coin names with their

neighbor. This will be practice for their gallery walk and reinforce their knowledge.

Technology is not needed for this lesson. We will be using plastic coins that are

available in the classroom and paper for recording the coin names. I will assess

students informally by looking at their work as they build patterns and during the

gallery walk as they share. I want to do my best to make sure every student is

prepared to share with their classmates successfully.

Candidate Name: Sarah Dennison Host Teacher Name: Dana Wyatt


School: Glacier Valley School Grade Level: # of Students: 26
kinder
Date & Time of Lesson: 4/13 Length of Lesson: (day or days) 1 day
Topic of Lesson: Pattern with Content Area: Math
coins
Materials: Include all materials including types of technology used:
All 4 Coins
Paper
Pencil

Alaska Content Standard: Mathematic Standards


Measurement and Data
I can identify coins by name.
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
I can recognize, identify, and continue simple patterns of color, shape, and size.
Speaking and Listening
SL.K.1.a-b Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about
kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups;
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 20

a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking
turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).

Transfer Goal(s) - Unpacked Standard (Transferability)


Standards for Mathematical Practice
A student can identify coins by name.
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
A student can make and recognize patterns.
Speaking and Listening
A student can speak to the class about their work.

STAGE ONE: Essential Questions and Enduring Understandings (Meaning)


Enduring Understanding(s) : (1 or 2 Essential Questions to be Considered:
are sufficient) (As related to Enduring
Students will understand that: Understandings…) (1 or 2 are sufficient)
 Coins have specific names.  What are the names of the
 Patterns are a predictable way of different coins?
organizing objects based on color,  How can I create a pattern with
size, shape, or some other obvious the coins?
trait.

STAGE ONE: STAGE TWO:


Objectives/Learning Targets (Acquisition) Assessments/Acceptable
Evidence Of Learning
Knowledge and Skills: What Sources of Evidence: Formative,
knowledge and skills related to content Summative, and/or Performance?
and/or content language should
students know and be able to do by the Formative: Can students make a patter?
end of the lesson? Can they name the coins in their pattern?

A student can make a pattern using Performance: Can the student tell their
the 4 coins we have studied this pattern to the whole class during a gallery
week. walk?

A student can speak about their


pattern to the class.

STAGE THREE: Learning for Understanding: Instructional Activities, Products,


and Strategies
Pre-Requisites: What is the prior knowledge/learning students have to have before
starting this lesson?
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 21

Stretching words for spelling, name of coins, ability to make a pattern

Overview/Introduction/Main Hook (Make a connection with students’


backgrounds and/or prior learning using an authentic situation to start them
thinking about the objectives and the essential question the lesson addresses.)
Examples of patterns on board. As a class finish the patterns. Talk about how we
knew what came next.

Process: Teacher Product(s): Specific Strategies for


Does/Student Does… Assessment/Evidence of supporting diverse
Learning. learner skills and
abilities throughout the
lesson
Look at patterns on board, Student engagement Review known skill.
finish sequence as a group.

Today we are going to make a Direct instruction.


pattern using the coins.

Point out that we have bowls Hands on / physical


of coins on each table. We also learning.
have strips of paper for Writing names of coins
writing pattern. next to the actual coin.

Show example of how I will Modeling expectations.


make a coin, write it on paper.

At end we will do a gallery Sharing end goal.


walk, so we want to be
prepared to share our pattern
using the names of the coins.

I model how I would share my Modeling expectations


pattern with the group. so all are prepared.

Dismiss to tables.
1-on-1 assessment and
Do work. I circulate to make teaching opportunity.
sure students are on-task,
understand pattern-making,
and are using correct names
for coins. Student sharing,
evidence of pattern
Gather class for gallery walk making skills, writing
to see everyone’s patterns skills, and name
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 22

and allow each student to associations with coins.


share their pattern using the
coin names.

Closure: Is there a coin that is really hard to remember? Does anyone have any
ideas about how to better remember this coin?

Technology

I will not be using technology because it does not lend itself to this kind of lesson.

Students need to handle the coins and look closely at them. I tried to find a YouTube

video or some other online activity that would help the students learn the names of

the coins but all the activities I found included the value of the coins. I don’t want to

introduce the values to the class because it is not one of our learning goals.

5. Instructional Decision Making

Modification One

The original intent was to have students handling more than one coin in the day. It

became apparent that the additional coin caused confusion. Monday we introduced

the penny so it stood alone. We handled the coin, made observations, and recorded

on a big sheet on the board using the prompt “The penny has ______, said _______.” The

intent was that on the second day we could handle a nickel, make observations,

record on the big sheet, then think about how the nickel compares to the penny. It

was too much. Even the presence of the big penny sheet next to the nickel sheet

seemed to throw the students off of their focus on the nickel. More than one student

was switching the names and had a general sense of being overwhelmed. In

response to this, I created a center that had a few real coins that the students could
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 23

handle, look at with a magnifying glass, draw, and/or arrange anyway. We only have

centers on Monday and Wednesday of the week but for interested students, they

could handle and compare the coins. Students could move closer to the learning

goals because comparison would occur naturally when the coins are next to each

other and students are exploring them in their own ways.

4.1 Penny observations collected from students

Modification Two

There are coloring sheets for each coin that students would color and write the

name of the coin for the day. I did not explicitly tell students to keep the coins

“realistic” when they colored them but I did lead the conversation with looking at

the coin and asking students to label what color it was (brown or gray), and then
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 24

asking them to color and label it. Students that colored the coins whatever colors

they wanted, seemed to engage with the image more. The “house” on the nickel

would be a bright color, the branches and flame on the dime would be differentiated

and correctly identified/colored. The students that made brown pennies were just

scribbling brown over the coin just to be finished. I stopped introducing the coin by

labeling what color it was and praised some of the coins that were colored with

more literal or imaginative ways. Students naturally started paying more attention

to what was in the picture and engaging with it more. Students could move closer to

the learning goals because they were noticing the nuances of the artwork on the

coins.

4.2 Student work that shows student noticing the leaves and the flame on back of

dime.
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 25

6. Analysis of Learning

2 Pre-test
Post-test

0
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

6.1 Analysis of scores showing pre-assessment scores compared to post-assessment

scores for 19 students.

Pre- and post-assessment were the same; students were asked to name the four

coins. The overall learning gain score was 35%. Some students did not know coins

have a name so there was a great opportunity for gains in the unit.
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 26

Learning Gain % Score

Whole Class

10 girls
Learning Gain Score

9 boys

0 20 40 60 80 100

6.2 Learning gain score percentage that compares boys and girls.

For my sub-groups, I choose to use boys vs. girls. This is an easy way to compare

subgroups and I was curious to see if money is presented differently to the sexes by

their parents. I am pleased to see that the difference is minimal. The girls had a

learning gain of 36%. The boys had a learning gain of 34%. The similarity in learning

gain scores also informs me that I do not teach with a bias toward one sex over

another. Both groups had room to grow and responded to the lesson, which was

more about exposure than explicit memorization.

High Performance Student

This student does not engage in the classroom learning regularly. It has taken a

whole year for him to feel safe and cared for in the school environment. He is a quick

study when he attends to his learning, but as we know, no one can force anyone to

engage in learning. In the pre-assessment, he did not know any of the coins. He was

excited to handle money, though. During our lessons, he would stay away from the
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 27

group and I was not aware if he was listening or not. He was invited to join us and

we made sure he always had a coin to handle when it was time. There was a

struggle with giving back the coins. Many of the students wanted to keep the coins

but coins are a distraction from work and a tool for learning when it is time. I let

him know I expected to have the coin back and within the hour it would be sitting on

his desk forgotten and for me to collect. He did not engage in our class learning but

in the post-assessment, he named 3 out of 4 coins correctly. This is very pleasing!

This student did well with this lesson because he wanted to learn about the money.

He was intrinsically motivated and performed well due to the interest he has in

money.

Low Performance Student

Another student is having a difficult time personally. My host teacher and I are

working together to give her additional positive supports, predictability, and

praising her engagement with the class. She sat with the group and did the activities

but did not perform well. She could not label any of the coins in the pre-assessment.

During her post-assessment, she did not look at coins but looked at me directly and

said nickel or dime for every coin. The one answer she had correct was a lucky

guess. She is also a very sharp student when she is ready to learn. I do struggle with

this student regularly. If I am not giving her enough positive praise, she will do

things to receive negative attention. I cannot force anyone to engage in their

learning but I want to work on my relationship building with challenging students.

Generally speaking, I build relationships with students easily. The outliers are a
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 28

mystery to me that I am working to solve. This student has been a good experience

for me as I prepare to have my own classroom.

7. Reflection and Self-evaluation

Most Successful Goal

Goal 2: Learn names of each coin.

When the coin is introduced, we take time to quietly look at the coin. I pull names

from a bucket so there is an equal opportunity to share what each student notices

about the coin. As you can see in the picture below, there is a large image of the coin

with the name labeled next to it. When students share, they are asked to use a

prompt that included using the coin’s name. When students color the picture for the

day, they were also asked to write the name of the coin with the picture. I challenged

the students to use their phonetic skills to spell the name but they also had the

option to copy the name off the list of observations. I believe this goal was successful

because we looked at one coin at a time and matched it with the spoken and written

name.
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 29

7.1 Students practiced labeling the coins verbally when we made group

observations.
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 30

7.2 Students practiced labeling the coins in written form when we made patterns

with the coins.

7.3 Students practiced labeling the coins when they colored and labeled a coin on a

coloring sheet.

Least Successful Goal

Goal 1: Compare coins and describe them.

Comparison was difficult for the students because the material was too new for

them. We looked at the penny and nickel on Tuesday. I thought this would be the

easiest because the colors are different. Yet, it was obviously overwhelming at the

time. The time for the comparison component came during centers time when I set

up a coin station. This is an optional center and I am sure many students did not

make it to the station. The pattern-making activity at the end of the unit was another

time for comparisons and I think it was effective but only one activity for the week

that everyone was a part of. If I could plan this unit again, I would add another week
TEACHER WORK SAMPLE FOR LEARNING COIN NAMES IN KINDERGARTEN 31

for simple comparative activities like the pattern-making. I think it is very important

that the first week looks at one coin per day.

Professional Development

I struggle with knowing how to pace the material. My original plan had too much

going on for a week when I included the comparison piece. Sometimes I don’t realize

how much the students can handle at one time. This is a balance I have been

working on and I am getting a better feel for what is appropriate but there is still

much learning to do on my part. I am thankful for the input of the professionals

around me as I finish my student teaching. Once I have a classroom of my own, I

intend to spend time studying the specific age I will be working with. I want to

research that specific age’s development and how they best learn before I begin my

school year.

Glacier Valley is working to have a classroom and school culture that supports

students that have external forces in their lives that prevent their fully entering into

their learning. This is such a powerful program. Keeping students in the classroom

is another way of telling them that they belong with the group and they are capable

of learning. Not all needs can be met 100% in the classroom but there are strong

strategies to keep students a part of the class as much as possible. I have seen this

modeled and I am already looking into books and resources for my own personal

learning.