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Report on the Staffing and Workload Study

FORT WORTH, TEXAS

FINAL REPORT

matrix
consulting group
February 22, 2019
Table of Contents

1. Introduction and Executive Summary 1

2. Patrol Bureau 15

3. Support Bureau 93

4. Finance and Personnel Bureau 178

5. Projected Service and Staffing Needs 220


Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

1 Introduction and Executive Summary


Matrix Consulting Group was retained by the City of Fort Worth to conduct a Police

Department Staffing and Workload Study, with the core objectives to determine current

and projected staffing needs, to evaluate organizational and management systems.

1 Background and Scope of the Study

The study has been conducted during a period for major growth in recent as well

as projected in the next few years. To maintain service commitments to the City and to

anticipate this growth, the City commissioned this study to evaluate the current

organization’s approach to services and to project workloads and impacts on staffing

needs.

The scope of the study encompasses the entire department, and is focused around

three areas of analysis in particular in order to provide the department with strategies to

plan for and adapt to the city’s growth:

• Current operations and services for all police department functions, including
analysis of workloads, staffing needs, scheduling, and deployment.

• Operations management, which examines current management techniques, and


identifies opportunities for improvement based on best practices.

• Projected service demands and personnel needs based on estimated growth


and development in Fort Worth over the next ten years, including recommended
staffing levels for every position in the department, as well as forecasts for key
workload drivers, such as crime, population, and calls for service levels.

This study, then, ensures that the current organization is an effective base upon

which to build upon in the near future.

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

2 Methodologies Used to Conduct the Study

The project team utilized a number of approaches in order to fully understand the

service environment and issues relevant to the study, including the following:

• On-site interviews with FWPD leadership, other managers, and unit supervisors
and many staff throughout the department.

• Data Collection across a every service area in order to enable extensive and
objective analysis.

• Iterative and Interactive Process in which the consultants first understood the
current organization and service delivery system, identified issues and current
staffing needs. Throughout the process, the consultants reviewed findings with the
department.

The final report represents the culmination of this process, presenting the results

of our analysis, including specific recommendations for the department on staffing,

deployment, and other relevant issues, including projected service demands and

personnel needs for the next decade.

3 Summary of Recommendations

The Fort Worth Police Department continues to evolve to meet the challenges of

a rapidly growing City while improving its ability to provide services in partnership with the

community. Independent of this study, for example, the Police Department has made

organizational changes just this year to provide patrol commanders with the staff

resources needed to enable a more flexible approach to address emerging problems.

This comprehensive study effort has provided focus on how each functional area

of the Police Department can improve its effectiveness and efficiency in this rapidly

growing environment. The following table provides a comprehensive list of every

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

recommendation made in the report.

Summary of Recommendations Made in the Report

Patrol Bureau Patrol Divisions

Do not rely on proactive and specialized enforcement units to


supplement core patrol services at the detriment of their assigned scope
of work.

Establish a process of obtaining the input of the community on service


levels and focused priorities.

Create more specific categories for the use of self-initiated activity,


particularly for those that are currently categorized as “Other” in CAD
data. Sergeants should also hold officers accountable for accurately
tracking their use of proactive time to generate self-initiated activity.

Adopt new minimum staffing levels as detailed in the report and define
minimum staffing as the threshold by which overtime is typically, but not
required, to be used to meet a basic level of service and to provide for
officer safety.

Add additional patrol officers and sergeants and reallocate positions to


balance capabilities, as detailed in the Projections Analysis section of
the report.

Add 42 additional patrol officer positions in order to maintain service


levels, bringing the total number of authorized (budgeted) positions in
patrol officer roles to 614.

Reallocate officer positions to balance service levels among the six


patrol divisions, as detailed in the Projections Analysis chapter of the
report.

Increase the number of sergeant positions allocated to patrol by 16,


increasing the total number of authorized (budgeted) FTEs to 88.

Take steps to ensure that field supervisors and watch commanders are
controlling the potential for over-responding to calls for service.

By 2023, add an additional 59 officers and 9 sergeant positions to regular


patrol roles, and allocate the personnel as indicated in the Patrol Bureau
projection analysis.

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

By 2028, add 60 officers and 8 sergeant positions to regular patrol roles


in addition to the number need five years previously, and allocate the
personnel as indicated in the Patrol Bureau projection analysis.

By 2023, increase NPO staffing by three (3) officers, assigning the


positions in areas where NPOs cover two beats.

By 2028, increase NPO staffing by an additional two (2) officers,


assigning the positions in all remaining areas where NPOs cover two
beats.

In accordance with the staffing and organizational changes to SRT


outlined within the Tactical Command analysis, SRT units should cease
its involvement in and any associated training for completing high-risk
warrant service, freeing the units up to fulfill its other roles more
effectively.

SRT should continue to be part of the Mobile Field Force, and training
and equipment needed to perform in this capacity should be prioritized.

Create the Quartermaster classification, a civilian classification that


functions with approximately same roles and responsibilities currently
handled by the equipment officers assigned to each patrol division.

Add six (6) Quartermaster positions, assigning four to North Command


and two to South Command, with each Quartermaster being responsible
for one patrol division.

Reallocate the six (6) Officer positions assigned as equipment officers in


the six patrol divisions.

Conduct a review of the Tactical Medic Unit at the conclusion of this fiscal
year, providing analysis on the unit’s activity, operating and capital costs,
and efficacy in achieving differential medical outcomes.

Transfer the Auto Pound Unit to the Police Records Management


Section.

Reallocate the lieutenant position over the Auto/Pound Fleet Services


Section to elsewhere within the organization.

Dissolve the Auto/Pound Fleet Services Section organizational unit,


placing the Fleet Services Unit directly under the administration of South
Command.

Continue efforts and seek additional areas of cooperation and


coordination of services between the Police Department and Coder
Compliance Department.

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

Traffic Division

Develop a plan to moderately increase the utilization of traffic


enforcement units in each of the functional areas of the Section.
Establish reasonable shift or unit targets to achieve this.

Develop a plan, where appropriate in the City, to reasonably allocate


some of the proactive time available patrol to traffic enforcement
activities.

Develop a staggered shift approach to staffing Traffic Investigations in


which 2 staff are deployed on a swing shift and 2 on weekend days to
reduce callouts and resulting overtime.

Create a Traffic Control Supervisor position, a civilian, to provide


oversight to staff working in the Abandoned Vehicle Enforcement Unit.

Support Bureau Tactical Command

In the next one to two years (by July 2020) add one additional SWAT
team of one sergeant, one corporal and 10 officers.

Develop a plan for the office assistant position to also assist with other
necessary tasks needed to be accomplished in stocking / maintenance
for the facility and the horses.

Modify the “Barn Technician” classification to a new job title that includes
horse training as a primary work task.

Work with other city officials to remove barricade set up tasks from police
officers and transfer them to a more appropriate city department (i.e.,
Transportation & Public Works) to coordinate with the police department.

Increase K9 Unit staffing by two positions – a Sergeant and an Officer to


provide needed supervision and also provide adequate coverage for the
new north command area; this will reduce OT and also field four K9s on
duty more frequently.

Some of the dogs should be trained in bomb detection as this is a


frequent type of call where the use of a dog is needed. Currently, a Fire
Department K9 unit must be called back to respond to these types of
calls.

All responsibility for the Special Response Teams should be transferred


to the Patrol Bureau – all needed policy, procedures or directives should
be developed by Patrol Bureau staff and approved by the Chief.

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

The Special Response Lieutenant should be designated as a backup to


the Special Operations Lieutenant (for special events/operations only)
and also the SWAT Lieutenant.

The Mobile Field Force should continue to be managed and supervised


by Tactical Command; funding needs to be budgeted for necessary
expenses.

Responsibility for the coordination of the Hostage Negotiation Unit


should be transferred to the Special Response Lieutenant.

Add four Crime Analyst positions to the Crime Analysis Unit to provide
an assigned Analyst to each Patrol Division, back-up staffing and
allowing the Senior Crime Analysts dedicated time for supervision of the
unit.

Merge the Criminal Intelligence Analysis Unit into the Crime Analysis unit
to provide a coordinated crime analysis work group and reducing “silo”
units within the organization. The two Criminal Intelligence Analysts
would retain their current job functions and salary structure (this has
been implemented)

Add three positions to the RTCC to be able to provide 24/7 staffing –


these positions should be civilians to evaluate the feasibility of using
lower cost civilian staff rather than sworn officers.

Add one Sergeant position to provide a second supervisor for the RTCC
and a reasonable supervisory / staff ratio.

The new Criminal Tracking Unit (formed in the summer of 2018 with
Officers out of the SRTs) should be expanded to a total of 2 Sergeants,
1 Corporal and 16 Officers.

Evaluate the adjusted staffing level in the SRTs for the first year following
this change; also evaluate the effectiveness of the new CTU in providing
needed field support.

Develop several performance measures for the Narcotics Section


Interdiction Unit to be used to evaluate workload and effectiveness.

If the volume of ‘game rooms’ cases continues to remain unabated for


the remainder of 2018 then the Vice Unit should be expanded by one
Sergeant and four Officers to focus on other vice crimes.

Investigative and Support Command

Identify a single-point Detective or the Unit Sergeant in each


investigative Unit to screen cases on a specialized assignment. Such

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

personnel should have a reduced caseload requirement. This


assignment could be rotational for 12+ months.

Throughout FWPD, at the centralized CID and decentralized CIU levels,


formalize the case screening process using a documented solvability
factor methodology that includes a 12-point criteria checklist on all
assigned detective cases.

Formalize a detective caseload prioritization system based on best


practice approaches discussed in this report.

Based on a new case management philosophy to be finalized by FWPD,


eliminate assigning certain “lower priority” case types such as
‘Information Only’ and other kinds of low solvability, misdemeanor
reports.

Include in the Department’s existing policy all important investigative


work-related protocols discussed herein including the further
formalization of the case management process.

Devise first-line supervision staffing assignments in investigations units


that approximate no higher than a 1:10 sergeant-to-staff supervisory
ratio.

Assign 13 detectives to the Homicide Unit dedicated exclusively to


homicide investigations. This is two (2) positions above existing staffing
levels.

Maintain one (1) Cold Case detective. As resources allow, assign


various cold cases to the Homicide detective contingent. The second
temporarily assigned detective to CACU should remain in that Unit.

Assign three (3) officers to the Homicide Unit to follow-up on deceased


persons, mental app, and other cases assigned the unit.

Assign two (2) sergeants to the Homicide Unit; this is one (1) position
above existing staffing levels.

Assign 18 detectives to the Robbery Unit. This is five (5) positions above
existing staffing levels.

Assign two (2) sergeants to the Robbery Unit; this is one (1) position
above existing staffing levels.

Assign three (3) Major Crime detectives to the Major Crimes Unit. This
is three (3) positions below existing staffing levels.

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

Relocate the two (2) Human Trafficking detectives and two (2) Human
Trafficking Officers to the Vice Unit in Tactical Command.

Assign 18 detectives to the Crimes Against Children Unit dedicated


exclusively to assaultive and sexual offenses and related. This is seven
(7) CACU positions above existing staffing levels.

Maintain one (1) Internet Crimes Against Children detective and one (1)
ICAC officer. As resources allow, assign various high-profile ICAC
cases to the other detective contingents.

Assign three (3) detectives dedicated exclusively to child-based family


offenses and have them specialize in these crime types. These are new
dedicated positions.

Assign two (2) sergeants to the CACU; this is one (1) more position
above existing staffing levels.

Add one (1) new Office Assistant to CACU.

Assign eight (8) detectives to the Sex Crimes Unit. This is two (2) more
positions above existing staffing levels.

Maintain one (1) Cold Case Detective. Medium Priority.

Maintain eight (8) Officers designed to provide field supporting services


to Sex Crimes.

Assign two (2) sergeants to the Sex Crimes Unit.

Maintain one (1) Office Assistant in Sex Crimes.

Assign a total of 22 detectives to the Domestic Violence Unit. This is 10


DV positions above existing staffing levels. Maintain specializations
such as the two (2) High Risk Detectives.

Maintain one (1) Officer in DV supporting services, and one (1) Customer
Services Representative.

Assign two (2) sergeants to the DV.

Assign a total of 11 detectives to the Fraud Unit. This is four (4) Fraud
Detective positions above existing staffing levels. Maintain one (1) FBI
Task Force Detective.

Maintain one (1) Sergeant in Fraud.

Maintain one (1) Office Assistant in Fraud.

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

Assign a total of five (5) detectives and one (1) Officer to the Commercial
Auto Theft Unit; this is the same existing staffing levels. Maintain one
(1) Auto Theft Task Force Detective.

Maintain one (1) Sergeant in Commercial Auto Theft.

Maintain one (1) Office Assistant in Commercial Auto Theft.

Assign two (2) sergeants and 18 investigative staff to the West Criminal
Investigations Unit. This is one (1) additional sergeant and one (1) fewer
detectives above existing staffing levels.

Assign two (2) sergeants and 15 investigative staff to the Central


Criminal Investigations Unit. This is one (1) additional sergeant and two
(2) fewer detective compared to existing staffing levels.

Assign two (2) sergeants and 17 investigative staff to the East Criminal
Investigations Unit. This is one (1) additional sergeant and two (2)
additional detectives above existing staffing levels.

Assign one (1) sergeant and 13 investigative staff to the North Criminal
Investigations Unit. This is the same sergeant staffing level and three (3)
additional detectives above existing staffing levels.

Assign one (1) sergeant and 13 investigative staff to the Northwest


Criminal Investigations Unit. This is the same sergeant staffing level and
nine (9) fewer detectives compared to existing staffing levels.

Assign two (2) sergeants and 18 investigative staff to South Criminal


Investigations Unit. This is one (1) additional sergeant and three (3)
fewer detectives above existing staffing levels.

Maintain three (3) officer burglary teams in all CIUs.

Maintain existing civilian support staffing in all CIUs.

Increase monitoring staff in the Sex Offender Registration Unit by one


(1) Officer to six (6) personnel to better align with the six-region FWPD
system.

In the future as the Crime Scene Unit expands, consider augmenting


sworn staffing levels with civilian Crime Scene Investigators (CSI) to
provide additional support services.

Increase Data Reporting Technician staffing levels from current 19


positions to 21 positions, an increase of two (2) positions and consistent
with budgeted staffing levels.

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

With the relocation of Auto Pound to the Property and Records


Management Division, re-organize spans of control and add one (1)
Assistant Public Safety Support Manager position, increasing the
number of middle-managers to three positions.

Increase the School Resource Officer Rover contingent from 3 to 6


Officers, resulting in an SRO staffing contingent of 69 personnel.

Increase sergeant staffing in the School Resource Unit by one (1)


supervisor to six (6) sergeant personnel to better align with the six-region
FWPD system. Re-organize the SRO program along these new
boundaries.

Fill the vacant Administrative Technician position. Maintain remaining


staffing levels for a total of eight (8) personnel in the Youth Services Unit.

Continue the SRO rotational assignment in the Youth Services Unit.

Centralize all FWPD volunteer programs under the Community


Programs Division leadership.

Add one (1) sergeant position in the Community Programs Division to


act as the Captain’s Adjutant to oversee all sworn officers managing
various individual volunteer programs.

Reduce one of two Property Control Specialist positions to half-time,


resulting in 1.5 Property Control Specialists in the Evidence Unit.

Increase staffing by one (1) Forensic Scientist in the Biology Unit


increasing total Unit staffing to five (5) positions.

Increase staffing by one (1) Firearms Technician in the Firearms Unit to


expedite NIBINs entry, increasing total Unit staffing to five (5) positions.

Increase staffing by one (1) Latent Print Examiner in the Latent Print Unit
increasing total Unit staffing to six (6) positions.

Finance / Personnel Operations Support Command


Bureau
Career Development Section – Convert the body worn camera system
administrator sworn position to a full time non-sworn position.

Career Development Section – Add back the non-sworn position that


was lost in a previous staff reduction to handle clerical duties and to
assist with training asset scheduling.

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

Enhanced Skills Section – Add back the non-sworn position that was lost
in a previous staff reduction to handle clerical duties and to assist with
training asset scheduling.

Enhanced Skills Section – Purchase electric forklift to move ammunition


pallets.

Enhanced Skills Section – Establish a training asset cost neutral rental


program.

Enhanced Skills Section– Make the 6 officers currently on loan to the


Training Division part of permanent authorized staff.

Considering adding explorer posts to each of the patrol divisions as the


program is expanded.

Reduce staffing by one detective in Internal Affairs.

Once launched, move the early warning system coordination to the


Internal Affairs Division.

Consider using SWAT team members on a rotating basis to provide


security for the chief when needed or adding that function to adjutant
instead of using officers assigned to special investigations.

Add one additional open records administrative clerk in the Open


Records Unit.

Convert Detective positions in Internal Affairs to Sergeant positions.

Increase authorized staffing by 23 dispatcher/call taker positions to


account to account for normal attrition of 20%.

Initiate option of part time positions for call takers and dispatchers.

Administrative Support Command

Move the Payroll Unit from Bureau Administration to the Financial


Management Division.

Establish criteria for which grants the department will apply.

Projections Over the next 10 years, the projections estimate that population will
increase by approximately 21.6%, calls for service by 19.3%, and index
crimes by 0.5%.

In total for 2018, the staffing analysis recommends a total addition of 157
sworn and 51 civilian positions.

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

Beyond that, over the next 10 years, an additional 181 sworn and 41
civilian positions will be needed to maintain the same level of service.

The following table provides a summary of the staffing projections, including a 10-

year summary of 2028 forecasted needs versus 2017 authorized base year (not including

staffing analysis recommendations for 2018):

Summary of Staffing Projections

Bureau Type Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028 10YR


Civ. 69.5 74.0 81.0 81.0 82.0 8.0
Patrol Bureau
Sworn 1,143.0 1,129.0 1,190.0 1,269.0 1,342.0 213.0

Civ. 145.5 153.5 168.0 170.0 176.0 22.5


Support Bureau
Sworn 457.0 452.0 540.0 557.0 561.0 109.0

Finance / Personnel Civ. 200.5 228.5 257.8 272.8 289.3 60.8


Bureau Sworn 94.0 89.0 97.0 100.0 105.0 16.0

Total Civ. 415.5 456.0 506.8 523.8 547.3 91.3


Sworn 1,694.0 1,670.0 1,827.0 1,926.0 2,008.0 338.0

It is important to note that the total staffing numbers are at the Bureau level and

exclude other staff (for instance, the Chief of Police and any personnel in the Office of the

Chief). The 10YR column shows the cumulative effects of recommendations (“Auth.” to

“2018” columns, plus the change from “2018” to “2028” columns, which represent the

projected needs over the next decade).

4 Impact of Staffing Recommendations

An important question to be answered after reviewing the recommendations is

what impacts the City will see from implementing them. The following points summarize

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

this, outlining the expected impacts that can be expecting from implementing the major

staffing related recommendations:

Area Recommendation Expected Outcomes

Patrol Bureau Increase patrol staffing levels in the Keep up with the impacts of
upcoming budget cycles. expected growth and be able to
maintain the current level of
service.

Reallocate officer positions among the six Achieve equity in patrol service
divisions based on workload. levels throughout the city.

Add additional sergeant positions to patrol. Improved span of control in,


allowing for more control over
responses and more effective use
of proactive time.

Reorganize the roles of Special Response Streamline tactical response


Team (SRT) units. capabilities, and allow for SRT
units to spend more time focusing
on problems specific to individual
divisions.

Create a civilian quartermaster position to fill Ensure that sworn positions are
the equipment officer role. deployed where they are most
needed.

Support Bureau Addition of a SWAT Unit. To provide coverage with the


– Tactical repurposing of SRT and
controlling for potential increase in
callouts.

Addition of K9 units. Improved coverage in an


expanding city.

Additional crime analysts Assignment of analysts to each


Division will provide ready access
for data to target proactive time in
the field.

Consolidation of crime analysis and Improved coordination of analysis


intelligence functions. and reduction of potential
duplications.

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

Area Recommendation Expected Outcomes

Support Bureau Additional sergeant positions. Improved span of control over


– Investigations detectives and more effective
management of cases.

Reorganization of detective units and Better match of caseloads to


additional detectives. detectives by specialty will result
in workable cases being worked
an appropriate amount of time.

Additional School Resources Officers. Improved coverage of high


schools.

Additional forensics staff and future Improved support to detectives


civilianization of new crime scene staff. working cases with reduced
processing time for evidence.

Finance / Civilianization of body worn camera Returning officers to the field and
Personnel administration. having these roles performed by a
Bureau – more appropriate classification.
Operations
Restoring previously lost positions
Additional civilian positions in training and
with appropriate civilian-level
career development.
support to the Department.

Additional communications personnel. Improved coverage for call taking


and dispatch without excessive
use of overtime, especially
mandated overtime. Higher
authorized levels also needed for
higher levels of turnover.

The City should expect that the implementation of these positions will enable the

Department to effectively handle existing workloads in a timely and appropriate manner.

Future staffing increases are tied directly to projected workload increases from

development and population growth and known service expansions.

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

2 Patrol Bureau

1 Analysis of Patrol Workload

The following sections provide analysis of patrol workload and other issues relating

to the effectiveness of field services.

(1) CAD Analysis Methodology

Our project team has calculated the community-generated workload of the

department by analyzing incident records in the computer aided dispatch (CAD)

database, covering the entirety of calendar year 2017.

For incidents to be identified as community-generated calls for service and

included in our analysis of patrol, each of the following conditions needed to be met:

• The incident must have been unique.

• The incident must have first been first created in calendar year 2017.

• The incident must have involved at least one officer assigned to patrol, as identified
by the individual unit codes of each response to the call.

– Two sets of unit codes were used to verify whether the response was by a
patrol officer, corporal, or bike unit, with one pertaining to the codes before
the reorganization on August 17, 2017, as well as the new (current) codes
implemented on that date.

– The filter used for the first period of time (pre-8/17/17) examined the syntax
of the unit code, checking the letter of the first digit, whether the second digit
corresponded to the ranges used for patrol officers, corporals, and bike
units, and that the last two digits did not match a lieutenant or sergeant.

– The second filter (8/17/17 and beyond) checked if the unit code matched
any entries in a list of all possible unit codes that would correspond to a
patrol officer, corporal, or bike unit.

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

• The incident must have been originally initiated by the community, as identified
using the following methods:

– The incident response must have had a time stamp unit for the unit being
dispatched.

– The source of the call could not from radio, and instead must have been
generated from 911, telephone, or another source corresponding to a
community-generated incident. The project team received two datasets,
with one corresponding to community-generated call sources, and the other
for self-initiated events.

– Additionally, the incident type of the event must have sufficiently


corresponded to a community-generated event. Call types that could be
identified with a high level of certainty as being either self-initiated (e.g.,
traffic stops) or other kinds of activity generated by the department (e.g.,
directed patrol) have not been counted as community-generated calls for
service.

• There must have been no major irregularities or issues with the data recorded for
the incident that would prevent sufficient analysis, such as having no unit code or
time stamp for the call closure.

After filtering through the data using the methodology outlined above, the

remaining incidents represent the community-generated calls for service handled by

FWPD patrol units.

(2) Calls for Service by Hour and Weekday

The following table displays the total number of calls for service handled by patrol

units by each hour and day of the week:

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Calls for Service by Hour and Weekday

Hour Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Total


12am 2,419 1,440 1,352 1,285 1,304 1,382 1,870 11,052
1am 1,985 1,151 985 1,038 994 1,140 1,543 8,836
2am 1,830 1,023 914 980 863 964 1,395 7,969
3am 1,370 767 777 739 708 754 1,133 6,248
4am 1,055 651 637 650 624 709 870 5,196
5am 850 728 746 657 687 711 723 5,102
6am 781 978 996 1,015 897 910 765 6,342
7am 843 1,269 1,285 1,370 1,337 1,330 1,003 8,437
8am 1,038 1,469 1,530 1,479 1,558 1,519 1,181 9,774
9am 1,237 1,516 1,504 1,421 1,471 1,495 1,421 10,065
10am 1,443 1,528 1,453 1,553 1,543 1,604 1,574 10,698
11am 1,539 1,562 1,572 1,619 1,587 1,689 1,597 11,165
12pm 1,601 1,663 1,614 1,618 1,709 1,733 1,838 11,776
1pm 1,727 1,732 1,742 1,687 1,650 1,782 1,902 12,222
2pm 1,782 1,773 1,732 1,671 1,775 1,925 1,838 12,496
3pm 1,825 1,999 1,950 1,967 1,934 2,079 1,921 13,675
4pm 1,847 2,167 2,112 2,091 2,251 2,299 1,947 14,714
5pm 2,017 2,338 2,314 2,263 2,273 2,358 2,071 15,634
6pm 2,164 2,153 2,252 2,158 2,178 2,289 2,050 15,244
7pm 2,085 2,072 2,032 2,004 1,947 2,144 2,072 14,356
8pm 2,134 2,113 2,088 2,002 2,020 2,115 2,241 14,713
9pm 2,266 2,091 2,126 2,121 2,111 2,335 2,462 15,512
10pm 2,211 1,942 1,937 1,839 1,995 2,301 2,701 14,926
11pm 1,979 1,580 1,681 1,608 1,618 2,186 2,534 13,186
Total 40,028 37,705 37,331 36,835 37,034 39,753 40,652 269,338

Call activity begins picking up around 7:00AM, and continues a general upward

increase until around midnight, where activity begins diminishing. On Friday and Saturday

nights, call activity can be as much as 30-40% greater than a typical weeknight, with the

period of increased call volume lasting until around 3:00AM.

The hourly trends in call for service volume can also be viewed as a bar chart:

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Final Report on Police Department Staffing and Workload Study FORT WORTH, TEXAS

Call for Service Activity by Hour

In general, the core portion of the day where workload is greatest lasts from about

1:30PM to 11:30PM.

(3) Calls for Service by Month

The following table displays calls for service totals by month, showing seasonal

variation as a percentage difference from the quarterly average:

Calls for Service by Month

Month # of CFS Seasonal +/-


Jan 21,807
Feb 19,439 -6.0%
Mar 22,023
Apr 21,789
May 23,472 +0.5%
Jun 22,431
Jul 22,771
Aug 23,085 +3.8%
Sep 24,070
Oct 23,802
Nov 22,464 +1.7%
Dec 22,185
Total 269,338
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Other than a sharp decline in the month of February, call for service activity

displays relatively little seasonal variability compared to many agencies around the

county.

(4) Most Common Types of Calls for Service

The following table provides the ten most common incident categories of calls for

service handled by patrol units over the last year, as well as the average call handling

time (HT)1 for each, which is defined as the time from the primary unit being assigned to

the call to the unit clearing from the call:

Most Common Call for Service Categories

Incident Type # CFS HT 12a 4a 8a 12p 4p 8p

DISTURBANCE 39,071 52.5

DOMESTIC DIST. 29,555 79.3

INVESTIGATION 15,158 65.4

SUSP PERSON/VEH. 14,349 44.0

BURG. ALARM-COMM 12,633 35.5

OTHER-TRAF. HAZARD 9,335 40.2

MINOR ACC. BLOCKING 8,308 81.5

LOUD MUSIC/PARTY 7,877 27.1

MAJOR ACCIDENT 7,087 104.3

BURG. ALARM-RES 7,047 32.9

All Other Types 118,918 71.7


Total 269,338 64.0

1 Handling time is defined as the total time in which a patrol unit was assigned to an incident. It is
calculated as the difference between the recorded time stamps the unit being dispatched and
cleared from the incident.
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The total number of occurrences and average handling times for motor vehicle

accidents are much higher than is typically the case. Even Minor Accident – Non-Blocking

(not shown in the table) incidents carry an average handling time of over 60 minutes.

These findings indicate that the time spent writing the accident report could potentially be

included within the time recorded in CAD for the unit being assigned to the call.

(5) Calls for Service and Response Time by Priority Level

The following chart displays call for service statistics by priority level, including the

proportion of each priority level and handling times (“Avg. HT”). Additionally, the chart

provides a distribution of response time performance by priority level, showing the number

of incidents within at each two-minute interval from 0 to 60 minutes. The red lines show

the median response time for each priority level.

Response time is defined as the elapsed time between the time stamp listed for

the field “Time_Call_Entered_Queue” and the time stamp listed for “Time_Unit_Arrived”

for the first patrol officer2 or bike unit to arrive on the scene of the call for incidents that

met all other criteria to be considered a call for service. Calls with response times higher

than 10 hours were excluded altogether.

2 Response time statistics were also calculated in scenarios where the first unit was not
necessarily a patrol officer or bike unit, but could instead be any type of unit or rank/classification.
This had a negligible effect on response time statistics, with the overall average moving only from
29.61 to 2.39 minutes – a 0.7% difference.
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Response Time Distribution by Priority Level

The red lines (median response times) reflect that an equal number of incidents

exist where response times were higher or lower than that value. Because the chart only

goes from 0 to 60 for clarity, if the red line appears to be to the right of a clear majority of

the calls, this indicates that there are many incidents where the response time was in

excess of 90 minutes.

Another consideration that should be made when viewing the data is that the

statistics shown in the chart reflect the final priority level assigned to the call. Calls for

service may initially be assigned low priority levels, but as additional information is learned

about the nature and circumstances of the incident, priority level may be reclassified to a

higher level (and vice versa).

A number of findings can be made from the response distribution chart:

• Response times to Priority 1 (emergency incidents) are effective – particularly


within the context of the previous note – and have a median time of approximately
6 minutes.

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• Emergency incidents, which represent only one-tenth of all calls for service, take
significantly longer for patrol units to handle. On average, the average handling
time of primary units (defined as the patrol officer that spent the most time assigned
to a call) to Priority 1 incidents was approximately 77 minutes, which is only
moderately higher than the average for the next two priority levels.

• Responses to Priority 3 (non-emergency) incidents take much longer, with a


median response time of around 33 minutes, indicating that half of the calls for
service in that category take more than a half hour for a unit to arrive on scene.

2 Analysis of Patrol Proactivity and Resource Needs

Analysis of the community-generated workload handled by patrol units is at the

core of analyzing field staffing needs. Developing an understanding of where, when, and

what types of calls are received is able to provide a detailed account of the service needs

of the community, and by measuring the time used in responding and handling these

calls, the staffing requirements for meeting the community’s service needs can then be

determined.

To provide a high level of service, it is not enough for patrol units to function as call

responders. Instead, officers must have sufficient time outside of community-driven

workload to proactively address community issues, conduct problem-oriented policing,

and perform other self-directed engagement activities within the community. As a result,

patrol staffing needs are calculated not only from a standpoint of the capacity of current

resources to handle workloads, but also their ability to provide a certain level of service

beyond responding to calls.

With this focus in mind, the following sections examine process used by the project

team to determine the patrol resource needs of the Fort Worth Police Department based

on current workloads, staff availability, and service level objectives.

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(1) Overview of the Resource Needs Analysis

An objective and accurate assessment of patrol staffing requires analysis of the

following three factors:

i. The number of community-generated workload hours handled by patrol.

ii. The total number of hours that patrol is on-duty and able to handle those
workloads, based on current staffing numbers and net availability factors (e.g.,
leave, administrative time, etc.).

iii. The remaining amount of time that patrol has to be proactive, which can also be
referred to as “uncommitted” time.

This study defines the result of this process as, patrol proactivity, or the

percentage of patrol officers’ time in which they are available and on-duty that is not spent

responding to community-generated calls for service. This calculation can also be

expressed visually as an equation:

Total Net Available Hours – Total CFS Workload Hours


= % Proactivity
Total Net Available Hours

The result of this equation is the overall level of proactivity in patrol, which in

turn provides a model for the ability of patrol units to be proactive given current resources

and community-generated workloads. There are some qualifications to this, which include

the following:

• Optimal proactivity levels are a generalized target, and a single percentage should
be applied to every agency. The actual needs of an individual department vary
based on a number of factors, including:

– Other resources the department has to proactively engage with the


community and address issues, such as a dedicated proactive unit.

– Community expectations and ability to support a certain level of service.

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– Whether fluctuations in the workload levels throughout the day require


additional or fewer resources to be staffed to provide adequate coverage.

• Sufficient proactivity at an overall level does not guarantee, based on workload


patterns, and deployment schedules, that resources are sufficient throughout all
times of the day and week.

There is no prescribed level of proactivity that is appropriate for every community.

However, research and the practice of communities which value and use proactivity

effectively suggests that a range of 35% – 45% be targeted. The project team’s

assessment of the Police Department has shown that Fort Worth is such a community.

However, the Fort Worth Police Department has numerous specialized units, such as

SRT, bike units, NPOs, and many others that operate in the field proactively. As a result,

patrol proactivity can be targeted at a slightly lower overall level than a department without

those resources. Given these considerations, FWPD should maintain a patrol proactivity

(uncommitted time outside of handling calls and net availability factors) at an overall level

of at least 40% of net available time.

(2) Patrol Unit Staffing and Net Availability

Before determining availability and staffing needs, it is important to first review the

current patrol staffing levels and deployment schedules.

The Fort Worth Police Department follows a 10-hour shift configuration that

assigns personnel to one of three watches. The following table outlines this schedule,

showing the number of positions that are assigned to each shift team (including those on

long-term and injury leave, but excluding vacancies):

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Patrol Shift Configuration


(Current Staffing Levels)3

Shift Start End Sgt. Cpl. Ofc.

1st 0530 1530 22 1 159


2nd 1400 0000 23 0 225
3rd 2000 0600 23 5 193
Total 68 6 568

While the table provides the scheduled staffing levels, it does not reflect the

numbers that are actually on-duty and available to work on at any given time. Out of the

2,080 hours per year that officers are scheduled to work in a year (excluding overtime), a

large percentage of are not actually spent on-duty and available in the field.

As a result, it is critical to understand the amount of time that officers are on leave

– including vacation, sick, injury, military, or any other type of leave – as well as any hours

dedicated to on-duty court or training time, and all time spent on administrative tasks such

as attending shift briefings. The impact of each of these factors is determined through a

combination of calculations made from FWPD data and estimates based on the

experience of the project team, which are then subtracted from the base number of annual

work hours per position. The result represents the total net available hours of patrol

officers, or the time in which they are both on-duty and available to complete workloads

and other activities in the field.

The table below outlines this process in detail, outlining how each contributing

factor is calculated:

3Figures displayed in the table also include those in injury and long-term leave, but exclude
permanent vacancies in which the position slot is actually open.
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Factors Used to Calculate Patrol Net Availability

Work Hours Per Year

The total number of scheduled work hours for patrol officers, without factoring in leave,
training, or anything else that takes officers away from normal on-duty work. This factor
forms the base number from which other availability factors are subtracted from.
Base number: 2,080 scheduled work hours per year

Total Leave Hours (subtracted from total work hours per year)

Includes all types of leave, as well as injuries and military leave – anything that would
cause officers that are normally scheduled to work on a specific day to instead not be on
duty. As a result, this category excludes on-duty training, administrative time, and on-duty
court time.

Total leave is broken down as follows, with each factor calculated using FWPD data:
• 235.4 hours of leave (including sick, vacation, military, etc.) per officer
• 61.6 hours of workers’ comp time per officer.
• 47.3 hours of light duty (occupational) per officer.
• 18.5 hours of light duty (non-occupational) per officer.
Calculated from FWPD data: 363 hours of leave per year

On-Duty Court Time (subtracted from total work hours per year)

The total number of hours that each spends per year attending court while on duty,
including transit time. Court attendance while on overtime is not included in the figure.
Without any data recording court time for patrol officers specifically while they are on duty
and not on overtime, the number of hours is estimated based on the experience of the
project team.
Estimated: 20 hours of on-duty court time per year

On-Duty Training Time (subtracted from total work hours per year)

The total number of hours spent per year in training that are completed while on-duty and
not on overtime.

Without any data recording on-duty training time hours specifically for patrol officers, the
number of hours is estimated based on the experience of the project team.
Estimated: 54 hours of on-duty training time per year
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Administrative Time (subtracted from total work hours per year)

The total number of hours per year spent completing administrative tasks while on-duty,
including briefing, meal breaks, and various other activities.

The number is calculated as an estimate by multiplying 90 minutes of time per shift times
the number of shifts actually worked by officers in a year after factoring out the shifts that
are not worked as a result of leave being taken. For instance, additional workers’ comp
and light duty time (under the leave category) will decrease this number, as officers are
working fewer shifts on average.
Estimated: 258 hours of administrative time per year

Total Net Available Hours

After subtracting the previous factors from the total work hours per year, the remaining
hours comprise the total net available hours for officers – the time in which they are
available to work after accounting for all leave, on-duty training and court time, and
administrative time. Net availability can also be expressed as a percentage of the base
number of work hours per year.
Calculated by subtracting the previously listed factors from the base number:
1,386 net available hours per officer

The following table summarizes this calculation process, displaying how each net

factor contributes to the overall net availability of patrol officers:

Calculation of Patrol Unit Net Availability

Base Annual Work Hours 2,080

Total Leave Hours – 363


On-Duty Training Hours – 54
On-Duty Court Time Hours – 20
Administrative Hours – 258

Net Available Hours Per Officer = 1,386

Number of Officer Positions x 568

Total Net Available Hours = 787,076

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Overall, officers combine for 787,076 net available hours per year, representing

the total time in which they are on duty and able to respond to community-generated

incidents and be proactive.

(3) Overview of Call for Service Workload Factors

The previous chapter of the report examined various trends in patrol workloads,

including variations by time of day and of week, common incident types, as well as a

number of other methods. The following section advances this analysis, detailing the full

extent of the resource demands that these incidents create for responding patrol

personnel. Each call for service represents a certain amount of workload, much of which

is not captured within the handling time of the primary unit. Some of these factors can be

calculated directly from data provided by the department, while others must be estimated

due to limitations in their measurability.

The following table outlines the factors that must be considered in order to capture

the full scope of community-generated workload, providing an explanation of the process

used to calculate each factor:

Factors Used to Calculate Total Patrol Workload

Number of Community-Generated Calls for Service

Data obtained from an export of CAD data covering a period of an entire year that has
been analyzed and filtered in order to determine the number and characteristics of all
community-generated activity handled by patrol officers.

The calculation process used to develop this number has been summarized in previous
sections.
Calculated from FWPD data: 269,338 community-generated calls for service

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Primary Unit Handling Time (multiplied by the rate)

The time used by the primary unit to handle a community-generated call for service,
including time spent traveling to the scene of the incident and the duration of on-scene
time. For each incident, this number is calculated as the difference between ‘call cleared’
time stamp and the ‘unit dispatched’ time stamp.

In the experience of the project team, the average handling time is typically between 30
and 42 minutes in agencies where time spent writing reports and transporting/booking
prisoners is not included within the recorded CAD data time stamps. Large metropolitan
police departments are generally at the higher end of the range.

At 64.0 minutes per call, FWPD’s average handling time is significantly higher than the
typical amount. In examining the handling times by incident type, average handling times
for most types of calls that can be compared from department to department were
relatively similar. However, both the total number and average handling times for motor
vehicle accidents were much higher than is typically the case, and may be the primary
contributing factors in the overall average being significantly greater.

It may also be true that a relatively high percentage of reports are written by officers while
they are attached to the call in the CAD system. This may be particularly true for accident
reports, which have handling times of over 60 minutes for minor non-blocking accidents
and more than 90 minutes for major
Calculated from FWPD data: 64.0 minutes of handling time per call for service

Number of Backup Unit Responses

The total number of backup unit responses to community-generated calls for service. This
number often varies based on the severity of the call, as well as the geographical density
of the area being served.

This number can also be expressed as the rate of backup unit responses to calls for
service and is inclusive of any additional backup units beyond the first.
Calculated from FWPD data: 0.73 backup units per call for service

Backup Unit Handling Time (multiplied by the rate)

The handling time for backup units responding to calls for service is calculated using the
same process that was used for primary units, representing the time from the unit being
dispatched to the unit clearing the call.
Calculated from FWPD data: 37.1 minutes of handling time per backup unit

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Number of Reports Written

The total number of reports and other assignments relating to calls for service that have
been completed by patrol units, estimated at one report written for every three calls for
service. This includes any supporting work completed by backup units.

In this case, the number has been calculated from FWPD data at 66,576 reports written
in calendar year 2017, reflecting the total number of incident and accident reports written
by officers assigned to patrol.
Calculated from FWPD data: 0.25 reports written per call for service

Report Writing Time (multiplied by the report writing rate)

The average amount of time it takes to complete a report or other assignment in relation
to a call for service. Without any data detailing this specifically, report writing time must
be estimated based on the experience of the project team. It is assumed that 45 minutes
are spent per written report, including the time spent by backup units on supporting work
assignments.
Estimated: 45 minutes per written report

Total Workload Per Call for Service

The total time involved in handling a community-generated call for service, including the
factors calculated for primary and backup unit handling time, reporting writing time, and
jail transport/booking time.

The product of multiplying this value by the calls for service total at each hour and day of
the week is the number of hours of community-generated workload handled by patrol units
– equating to approximately 459,500 total hours in 2017.
Calculated from previously listed factors: 102.4 total minutes of workload per call for
service

Jail transport and booking time is not included as a separate workload factor, as

the transports are completed either while attached the main call for service or are listed

as a separate call type such as “Prisoner Pickup”, which accounted for 1,711 incidents in

2017, with an average handling time of 120.9 minutes.

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Each of the factors summarized in this section contribute to the overall picture of

patrol workload – the total number of hours required for patrol units to handle community-

generated calls for service, including primary and backup unit handling times, report

writing time, and jail transport time. These factors are summarized in the following table:

Summary of CFS Workload Factors

Value %
Total Number of Calls for Service 269,338
62%
Avg. Primary Unit Handling Time (min.) 64.0

Backup Units Per CFS 0.73


27%
Avg. Backup Unit Handling Time (min.) 37.1

Reports Written Per CFS 0.25


11%
Time Per Report (min.) 45.0

Avg. Workload Per Call (min.) 102.4


Total Workload Hours 459,500

In total, each call for service represents an average combined workload of 102.4

minutes, including all time spent by the primary unit handling the call, the time spent by

any backup units attached to the call, as well as any reports or other assignments

completed in relation to the incident.

(4) Calculation of Overall Patrol Proactivity

Using the results of the analysis of both patrol workloads and staff availability, it is

now possible to determine the remaining time in which patrol units can function

proactively. The result can then function as a barometer from which to gauge the capacity

of current resources to handle call workload demands, given objectives for meeting a

certain service level.

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The following table details the calculation process used by the project team to

determine overall proactivity levels – the proportion of time that patrol officers have

available outside of handling community-generated workloads:

Calculation of Overall Patrol Proactivity

Total Patrol Net Available Hours 787,076


Total Patrol Workload Hours – 459,500

Resulting # of Uncommitted Hours = 327,576

Divided by total net available hours ÷ 787,076

Overall Proactivity Level = 41.6%

Overall, patrol units operate with a proactivity level of 41.6%, which represents the

percentage of time that they are not committed to handling community-generated calls

for service. This is slightly above the 35-40% threshold range that large agencies with

other proactive capabilities should reach at a minimum. As a result, this finding in itself –

without considering any other factors, such as geographic deployment, shift schedule

effectiveness, and others – indicates that adequate resources exist at an overall level.

It is important to note that the number of filled officer positions in regular patrol

roles was unusually high at the time of the study, and does not necessarily indicate that

authorized staffing resources are adequate, as this analysis examines.

When resource capacity is examined at a more detailed level using patrol

proactivity as the metric, there are clear deficiencies at certain times of the day:

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Proactivity by Hour and Weekday

As indicated by the cells in the chart that are not shaded green, patrol proactivity

begins to decline in the 6:00AM to 10:00AM range, before falling further in the next four

hours to the single digits on most days of the week.

Clearly, while resources may appear sufficient at an overall level, severe

deficiencies remain at certain times of the day. During these times, the experience of the

patrol officer on duty is vastly different, as calls will frequently queue and virtually no time

exists to engage with the community or conduct proactive policing. It is during this time

that the percentage of calls that patrol units respond to in under 30 minutes begins to

drop significantly:

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Percentage of Calls4 Responded to Within 30 Minutes by Time of Day

Time % Under 30 min.

12am 80.6%
1am 79.9%
2am 80.8%
3am 83.0%
4am 81.6%
5am 60.7%
6am 83.7%
7am 83.4%
8am 77.9%
9am 77.2%
10am 77.0%
11am 75.4%
12pm 73.2%
1pm 70.1%
2pm 69.2%
3pm 68.5%
4pm 73.9%
5pm 72.1%
6pm 71.2%
7pm 64.8%
8pm 76.2%
9pm 85.7%
10pm 86.0%
11pm 83.7%

It is evident that while the decline begins during the 10:00AM to 2:00PM period, it

extends further, reaching its lowest level from 7:00PM to 8:00PM. These issues are

exacerbated in areas where workload is higher and proactivity is lesser to begin with,

often ensuring that the areas that could benefit the most from proactive policing receive

less of it. These issues are explored further in the analysis of patrol geographic

deployment.

4Includes only community-generated calls for service that patrol units responded to. Statistics for
are shown for all priority levels aggregated together.
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Finally, overall proactivity needs to be evaluated within the context of the totality of

resources available to handle field workloads. Especially during the daytime but at other

times as well, other units are available to assist patrol in not only proactive activities but

to assist on calls as well. Other resources include:

• Neighboring Policing Officers

• Traffic enforcement

• Special Response Teams

• K-9 Units

• Other sworn personnel when in the field (e.g., detectives).

These proactive and specialized units are not included in the assessment of

proactivity and any support they provide to patrol is supplemental to field personnel.

These resources are common in larger jurisdictions and results in higher levels of ‘total

community proactivity’ than is provided by patrol alone. However, the assumed use of

proactive and other specialized units in support of patrol’s proactive activities and on calls

for service cannot be taken for granted – the primary purpose of these units is to focus

on their assignments and not to augment or even to supplement proactive time for patrol

units in the field. Agencies that take this approach tend to find that the specialized

assignments suffer to support patrol. As a result, proactive and specialized unit support

for patrol should be supplemental and focused on high priority needs.

Recommendation:

Do not rely on proactive and specialized enforcement units to supplement core


patrol services at the detriment of their assigned scope of work.

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The issue of the level of proactivity and the number of units assigned to patrol to

achieve that level versus other department assignments is critical too. The project team

examined this for this assignment. The level of proactivity in Fort Worth falls in the middle

range of other agencies the project team has worked for in the past two years as shown

in the following table:

The fact that the Department achieves this with a somewhat lower percentage of

the force assigned to patrol will be the subject of later sections and chapters of this report.

The issue for the evaluation of other units will be the scope of work in the context of the

workloads for those units.

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The targeted level and use of proactive time in the City should not be assumed or

left to the Police Department to determine unilaterally. The City should establish a process

that involves the community in some way (e.g., ‘town hall’ meetings) to obtain feedback

on the level of service and focused priorities.

Recommendation:

Establish a process of obtaining the input of the community on service levels and
focused priorities.

(5) Patrol Self-Initiated Activity

The following subsections examine patrol self-initiated activity, focusing on

incidents that are generated by patrol officers during their proactive time. Whereas the

remainder of the patrol analysis includes bike units and responses from other similar units

as being part of patrol workload, the self-initiated activity analysis does not. It is important

to note that none of these incidents have been counted already in the analysis of

community-generated patrol workload.

(5.1) Patrol Self-Initiated Activity by Hour and Weekday

The following table provides the number of self-initiated incidents generated by

hour and weekday, shading each cell according their relative frequency:

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Self-Initiated Activity by Hour and Weekday

Hour Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Total


12am 1,025 1,013 1,044 940 1,051 1,066 1,030 7,169
1am 677 738 783 643 718 757 709 5,025
2am 439 539 580 458 534 563 495 3,608
3am 359 589 531 452 510 505 449 3,395
4am 386 707 637 584 621 578 543 4,056
5am 779 1,029 1,058 1,004 986 962 831 6,649
6am 518 678 631 636 547 648 582 4,240
7am 437 477 510 494 494 533 503 3,448
8am 412 428 443 454 451 455 471 3,114
9am 427 472 473 455 456 494 433 3,210
10am 426 560 585 546 601 491 451 3,660
11am 355 489 483 473 507 472 356 3,135
12pm 313 506 513 567 595 467 373 3,334
1pm 504 649 640 742 802 708 509 4,554
2pm 1,051 1,173 1,158 1,336 1,271 1,173 986 8,148
3pm 819 939 947 1,086 1,070 995 891 6,747
4pm 594 607 630 732 732 647 610 4,552
5pm 512 516 516 627 610 542 611 3,934
6pm 546 551 550 587 648 598 660 4,140
7pm 898 918 876 957 995 988 941 6,573
8pm 1,092 1,062 947 1,098 1,152 1,125 1,189 7,665
9pm 1,565 1,400 1,301 1,307 1,487 1,629 1,452 10,141
10pm 1,766 1,564 1,375 1,492 1,654 1,791 1,788 11,430
11pm 1,861 1,674 1,433 1,439 1,576 1,598 1,681 11,262
Total 17,761 19,278 18,644 19,109 20,068 19,785 18,544 133,189

It should be noted that categories pertaining to activity is administrative or non-

incident related have been excluded from this analysis, such as coffee and meal breaks.

Despite these efforts, given that self-initiated activity picks up sharply around shift change

times, it is likely that additional categories may remain that represent administrative tasks.

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(5.2) Most Common Types of Self-Initiated Activity

The following table provides the most common types of self-initiated activity,

including the hours in which they are most likely to be generated:

Most Common Types of Self-Initiated Activity

Incident Type # CFS HT 12a 4a 8a 12p 4p 8p

OTHER 38,716 65.8

TRAFFIC VIOLATION 33,705 30.5

INVESTIGATION 25,697 46.0

MARKOUT – S. DETAIL 20,719 57.5

BUSN/RESD CHECK 4,614 29.6

SUSP PERSON/VEH. 1,145 40.7

PARKING VIOLATION 804 21.4

MEET OFC./AGENCY 442 56.2

HOSPITAL GUARD 431 144.1

DISTURBANCE 408 49.1

All Other Types 6,508 88.3


Total 133,189 51.3

Although they occupy a relatively minor share of all self-initiated activity, the nature

of “Disturbance” and “Hospital Guard” categories are unclear, and whether they represent

true self-initiated activity or another workload. By contrast, the “Other” category includes

about 29% of all self-initiated incidents generated by patrol in 2017. In total, the top four

categories comprise more than 89% of officer-initiated activity. Given how large of a share

of self-initiated activity that these incidents represent, it is more difficult to analyze how

and when officers prioritize their time when they are able to be proactive. Consequently,
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the department should take steps to better delineate these incidents, particularly those in

the “Other” category, in order to provide for better accountability and analytical capabilities

within the department.

In total, the 133,189 self-initiated incidents reflect a total of 113,876 hours of

workload, or approximately 14.5% of all net available time of patrol officers. With workload

taking up approximately 58.4% of net available hours, the remaining amount of time,

27.3%, represents the amount of time that is not accounted for either self-initiated or

community-generated call for service workloads. It is important not to extrapolate too

much from this finding, however, as the vast majority of the time is spent in gaps in

between responding to calls and other activity. Additionally, not all self-initiated activity

may be tracked in CAD data, and so the figures may underreport the true amount of time

patrol officers spend conducting proactive policing activities.

Recommendation:

Create more specific categories for the use of self-initiated activity, particularly for
those that are currently categorized as “Other” in CAD data. Sergeants should also
hold officers accountable for accurately tracking their use of proactive time to
generate self-initiated activity.

(6) Analysis of Patrol Staffing Needs

The analysis of patrol resource availability, to this point, has focused on resource

capacity given the current number of filled positions. As a result of the personnel ‘overhire’

situation, however, patrol officer positions are currently filled at a highly abnormal rate. In

large metropolitan police departments, patrol forces often carry a significant portion of the

organization’s vacancies, partly due to resignations and terminations, but also as a result

of promotions and reassignment of officers to other units.


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Before staffing needs can be examined, it is important to first define what is, and

what is not, counted as part of the terminology and staffing totals used in the analysis.

(6.1) Definitions and Notes on Staffing Counts

The number of filled patrol officer positions assigned to regular patrol

divisions used to this point in the analysis of patrol reflects a point-in-time

snapshot of resources on May 19th, 2018. Across all six patrol divisions, there was a

total of 568 officer positions in regular patrol roles, excluding all officers assigned to

specialized roles (e.g., SRT, property crimes/BAT teams, West 7th Rapid Response

Team, bike units, academy recruits, those in the FTO program etc.). Using the same

definition of patrol officer positions (i.e., no-specialized roles), but for authorized strength

(actual positions plus vacancies, minus overhired positions), the total number of patrol

officers was 572. In effect, after subtracting overhires, there were 4 ‘vacant’ officer

positions. In other words, 568 of 572 officer positions were filled and assigned to regular

patrol roles when the point-in-time snapshot was taken.

In the time since then, 17 officer positions were ‘returned’ to the city as a result of

the overhire positions, retirements and resignations have been announced,

reassignments have been made, and a newly graduated class of 40 recruits moves closer

(but still months away) from completing the FTO program. Because overhires,

retirements, resignations, and recruits, and FTO program participants do not affect

authorized/budgeted strength, the only change to the number of authorized/budgeted

positions assigned to patrol roles are the 17 positions that were returned to the city,

resulting in fewer actual and filled positions assigned to patrol. As mentioned previously,

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whereas the patrol analysis to this point has focused on actual/filled patrol resource needs

using the staffing levels from the May 19 point-in-time snapshot, the analysis that follows

focuses on the number of authorized positions that should be budgeted for to provide the

targeted level of service.

Accounting for the expected rate of turnover5 is a critical step in this analysis,

particularly given that the point-in-time snapshot showed (minus overhires) 568 of 572

positions being filled – a highly atypical. For the purposes of budgeted, as well as for

planning police recruiting activities and academy class scheduling, it should be assumed

that it is a temporary state that will correct itself within a given timeframe.

(6.2) Accounting for Turnover

In the process of calculating staffing needs, the turnover rate represents a ‘buffer’

that must be staffed for in order to provide the targeted level of service as vacancies occur

for any reason. As a result, it is important consider turnover and attrition as a rate of

change, as opposed to a vacancy factor. At a turnover rate of 5.0%, patrol unit positions

should be staffed at least 5.0% higher than they would otherwise if position slots were

always filled and never became vacant. Regardless of whether 0% or 10% of the position

slots are vacant at any particular point in time, accounting for a turnover rate 5% provides

for a stable target level of staffing over the long run.

(6.3) Implication of Short-Term Projections on the Patrol Staffing Analysis

‘Current’ resource capacity has been evaluated using 2017 data, and the results

of the proactivity analysis take into account any ‘borrowed’ positions and overhires that

5 Turnover, or attrition, is defined as the rate at which patrol officer positions become vacant
through attrition.
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existed within the snapshot of patrol staffing on May 19, 2018. Furthermore, Fort Worth

is also rapidly growing, and the number of calls for service are projected to increase

significantly in 2018, as evidenced in the projections' analysis chapter of this report.

The analysis of patrol resource capacity on an hour and weekday basis

demonstrates that, while proactivity is above the 40% threshold on an overall basis, there

are periods of the day with under 10% proactivity, which signifies that calls are frequently

queueing. Response times have also been shown to increase during this time, as units

are tied up on calls as new incidents occur. It is clear that service levels should not fall

lower than this point. Consequently, the analysis of current staffing needs will use the

current (at the time of the 5/18/18 staffing snapshot) overall proactivity level of 41.6%.

Given that the point-in-time staffing snapshot included a number of overhires that

existed at the time, any staffing allocations and return of overhires that reduced the

number of filled patrol officer positions would have caused the service level to fall below

this threshold already.

The following table calculates patrol officer staffing needs based on the current6

41.6% overall level of proactivity and after accounting for 5% annual turnover:

Calculation of Patrol Officer Staffing Needs (2017/Current Needs)

Net Available Work Hours Per Officer 1,386


Total Workload Hours 459,500

Proactivity Target 41.6%


Turnover 5.0%
Patrol Officers Needed 597

6“Current” refers to patrol workload derived from CAD data covering calendar year 2017 workload
and patrol officer staffing levels on 5/18/18.
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597 patrol officer positions represent an increase of 25 FTEs from authorized

(budgeted) strength. These figures do not include patrol officers in specialized roles. It is

also worth noting that these calculations, and the resulting number of officers

needed, are not affected by the number of overhire positions.

Because the CAD data used by the project team to determine patrol workload

covers calendar year 2017, and given the pace of growth in Fort Worth, the staffing needs

shown in the table are already outdated by increases to patrol workload. The projections

chapter details the process used to project growth, including the anticipated changes to

patrol workload and staffing needs by the end of 2018.

In order to provide clarity on what Fort Worth’s staffing needs are in planning for

the upcoming budget year, the recommended changes to staffing levels are instead

based on the 2018 projections.

The following table provides the results of that analysis, calculating patrol officer

staffing needs using the same process as before, but instead using the projected 2018

workload levels:

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2018 Patrol Officer Staffing Needs

Total Workload Per CFS 102.4 min


# of Calls for Service* 277,223
Total Workload Hours 472,952

Annual Work Hours 2,080


% Net Availability (NA) 66.6%
Total NA Hours Per Officer 1,386

Overall Proactivity Target 41.6%


% Turnover Per Year 5.0%

Patrol Units Required 614


+/– Ofc. Positions +42

Recommendation:

Add 42 additional patrol officer positions in order to maintain service levels,


bringing the total number of authorized (budgeted) positions in patrol officer roles
to 614.

Reallocate officer positions to balance service levels among the six patrol
divisions, as detailed in the Projections Analysis chapter of the report.

(7) Analysis of Minimum Staffing Needs

Minimum staffing levels enable departments to establish guidelines for making staffing

decisions on a day-to-day basis. Actual usage and definition of minimum staffing varies

significantly from department to department, however. Some departments define

minimum staffing in policy as threshold by which officers will be called in on overtime and

all leave requests will be denied (excluding sick leave), while others use it as a targeted

or ideal level of staffing to fulfill service level objectives, with the minimum staffing level

sometimes being enshrined in labor contracts. Other departments set minimum staffing

at the number of beats, maintaining that all beats are staffed by an officer at all times.

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The most common usage of minimum staffing levels, however, is to define a level

of minimum coverage by which officer safety is maintained, and a basic level of service

is provided, particularly one in which calls will not frequently be queueing. It is usually

also the level at which officers will be called in on overtime. Typically, this is not enshrined

in policy to allow watch commanders to have flexibility. In best practice agencies, the

minimum staffing levels will vary at different times of the day as workload and staffing

needs fluctuate.

In summary, the minimum staffing levels of an agency should be determined at a

level that fulfills several key objectives:

• To provide for officer safety at all times.

• To maintain emergency incident response capabilities at all times, even while


others are being handled.

• To deploy the number of officers needed to handle community-generated calls for


service at a basic level without having severe queues of pending calls on a
consistent basis.

It is also important for minimum staffing levels to reflect the staffing constraints of

an agency. Needs for achieving service level targets in minimum staffing levels should

reflect that ideal on-duty deployment of staff may not be possible, and that minimum

staffing levels should not be set at levels that would generate consistently high overtime

usage.

As a result, several questions should be asked in relation to the minimum staffing

targets:

• Are there too many patrol beats for all beats to be filled on a constant, 24-7 basis?

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• What are the minimum staffing levels for each shift that would provide for both
officer safety and provide for adequate response times to emergency incidents?

• What are the minimum staffing levels that would prevent calls from frequently
queueing?

In order to answer these questions, the project team analyzed workload patterns

by division, seeking to examine the number of staff needed to meet these requirements

by shift. Additionally, it must also be considered that there are principally six different

periods that must be staffed for – one for each shift, and one for each overlap period. The

project team examined the total workload for each of these periods by division and found

that there is little variation from division to division relative to the total workload that each

division handles.

The following table provides these statistics, showing the percentage of each

division’s total workload that is handled in the six periods of time:

Call for Service Workload Variation by Shift and Division

Period Hours Central East North NW South West


3rd Shift Only 0000-0530 16% 17% 17% 19% 17% 17%
3rd/1st Overlap 0530-0600 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1%
1st Shift Only 0600-1300 31% 29% 29% 27% 28% 30%
1st/2nd Overlap 1400-1530 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7%
2nd Shift Only 1530-2000 24% 25% 24% 23% 25% 24%
2nd/3rd Shift Overlap 2000-0000 20% 22% 21% 22% 22% 21%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

The findings are particularly interesting given that the percentages in the table

depict the percentage of that division’s total workload hours – including backup units,

handling time factors, and report writing time. As demonstrated in the table, each division

follows approximately the same pattern in how workload varies from hour to hour. Early
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morning workloads are moderately higher in Central and West compared to Northwest,

but other than that, there are not major differences from division to division. The

implications of these results are that each division can follow roughly the same guidelines

for assigning its patrol personnel to different shifts, as roughly the same proportions of

workload occur at different times of the day.

The following table provides the number of officers that must be on duty for a 30%

proactivity levels to be achieved within each time period, as well as no four-hour blocks

with lower than 28% on any day of the week. The results apply net availability factors7

and the total workload by division during each time period, as well as account for the fact

that officers are only scheduled to work four out of seven days per week. This analysis

also does not include sergeants or corporals, who would also be on duty and

contribute toward basic minimum coverage. Lastly, the table excludes the three overlap

periods, where staffing would be high enough between the two shifts to meet the minimum

staffing levels.

Number of On-Duty Officers Needed to Maintain at Least a 30% Proactivity Level

Period Central East North NW South West Total

3rd Shift 14 16 8 11 17 16 82
1st Shift 14 15 8 11 16 13 77
2nd Shift 14 14 7 8 14 14 71

It is important to again note that the purpose of the analysis is not to examine or

recommended ideal staffing levels for high levels of services. Instead, it is intended to

show the lowest possible level of on-duty staffing on any particular day at which a

7 Administrative time is added back to net availability factors, as the question is focusing only on
resources that need to be on duty and in patrol roles.
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basic level of service can be provided, response time goals are met, and for officer

safety to be maintained. When on-duty staffing levels fall below these levels, officers

should generally be called in on overtime unless there are certain factors, which, up the

operational discretion of the commander/captain and/or shift lieutenant, indicate that the

level should be higher or lower for a particular shift.

For context, results should be compared against existing staff assignments after

applying net availability (relief) factors. For instance, the 2nd shift of South Division has 43

officer position slots assigned. After applying net availability factors (excluding

administrative time) and adjusting for officers being scheduled to work four out of five

days per week in a staggered configuration, the expected number of officers that would

be on-duty and available on a particular day is approximately 21.

For the 2nd/3rd shift overlap, the results should be considered as the number of

officers needed between 2nd and 3rd shifts (combined) to meet 30% proactivity, excluding

considerations for shift change time. Furthermore, given leave and other net availability

factors, the number of officers assigned to a particular shift should always be higher than

the minimum staffing level.

By maintaining a staffing level on any given shift or day of the week at these levels,

at least a basic level of service can be maintained, as well as with response times to

emergency incidents and, critically, officer safety.

Recommendation:

Adopt new minimum staffing levels as detailed in the report and define minimum
staffing as the threshold by which overtime is typically, but not required, to be used
to meet a basic level of service and to provide for officer safety.

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3 Analysis of Patrol Geographic Deployment

The following sections examine patrol workload and proactivity at the level of

individual divisions and beats in order to determine whether resources are allocated

effectively.

(1) Overview of the Patrol Geographic Deployment Structure

The following map provides an overview of the current geographic deployment

structure, outlining the boundaries of the six divisions:

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The patrol divisions are subdivided into a total of 90 beats, which form the primary

area of assignment and responsibility for patrol officers.

(2) Patrol Workload and Proactivity by Division

The following table provides the number of calls for service and other workload

factors by division, with calls that could not be geographically located within a division

included under the “Unknown” category:

Call for Service Primary and Backup Unit Statistics by Division

Primary Units Backup Units


# CFS Avg. HT8 # Resp. Avg. HT # Reports

CENTRAL 47,744 66.2 35,684 37.0 11,802


EAST 54,083 61.8 40,181 36.2 13,368
NORTH 25,849 70.0 14,576 40.3 6,389
NORTHWEST 30,657 70.4 19,862 41.3 7,578
SOUTH 57,926 61.1 43,339 36.1 14,318
WEST 50,544 60.5 42,423 36.1 12,494
Unknown 2,535 63.9 1,727 36.7 627
Total 269,338 44.9 197,792 33.7 66,576

The number of reports is based off of the same rate that is applied on an overall

basis, at approximately 0.25 reports and other related assignments completed per call for

service, matching the total number of 66,576 reports by patrol officers. Interestingly, the

primary unit handling time does not change significantly by division, while the rate of

backup unit responses occupies a wider range from as low as 0.56 units in North to 0.84

units per call in West.

8 HT: Average handing time, defined here as the time the time from the unit being dispatched to
the unit being cleared from the call for service.
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The total number of hours represented by each workload factor is then calculated

using the same assumptions that were used on an overall basis, such as 45 minutes per

written report. Before calculating proactivity for each division, however, the calls that could

not be geographically located within a division are proportionally allocated based on the

number of calls for service within each of the six divisions.

Total Patrol Workload Hours by Division

Primary Unit Backup Unit Unkn. Total


Hours Hours Report Hours Share Workload9

CENTRAL 52,683 22,005 8,851 +775 84,315


EAST 55,661 24,248 10,026 +835 90,770
NORTH 30,168 9,779 4,792 +415 45,154
NORTHWEST 35,992 13,686 5,683 +514 55,876
SOUTH 58,953 26,094 10,739 +889 96,674
WEST 50,932 25,545 9,370 +797 86,644
Unknown 2,699 1,056 470 4,225 –
Total 284,389 121,357 49,462 4,225 459,433

North and Northwest, which until recently were one division, together combine for

just over 100,000 calls for service – slightly higher than any of the other divisions.

Using the number of officers that are currently assigned to each division, net

availability totals may be calculated using the same rate as before (1,386 hours per

officer), to produce overall proactivity figures by division:

9 Total workload figures differ from the number calculated on an overall basis due to rounding
issues when proportionally allocating calls for service that could not be attributed to a division.
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Patrol Proactivity by Division

Total Workload # NA Hours Total NA %


Hours Officers Per Officer Hours Proactivity
CENTRAL 84,315 98 1,386 135,798 37.9%
EAST 90,770 100 1,386 138,570 34.5%
NORTH 45,154 68 1,386 94,227 52.1%
NORTHWEST 55,876 74 1,386 102,542 45.5%
SOUTH 96,674 105 1,386 145,498 33.6%
WEST 86,644 123 1,386 170,441 49.2%
Total 459,433 568 1,386 787,076 41.6%

Proactivity is moderately higher in North, West and Northwest compared to other

divisions. East and South have relatively lower proactivity levels, which in turn reflects

that fewer patrol staff are allocated relative to the workload that those divisions handle. It

is important to note that any deficiencies in proactivity at an overall level are typically

exacerbated at specific times and days of the week where workload is higher. Proactivity

levels dropping from 52.1% to 33.6% can cause operational issues, but the proactivity

during high activity times would be much lower than 33.6%, resulting in severe

deficiencies in service levels. During these periods, calls for service may often stack in

queues as officers tied up handling other incidents. As a result, addressing imbalances in

the number of patrol officers allocated to each division relative to their workload level in

many ways as much of a priority as the overall staffing level.

(3) Analysis of Geographic Call Activity Hot Spots

The following map provides a visualization of areas where calls for service are

more concentrated, with the silhouette of the city provided as a light gray background

layer:

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The most significant concentrations of calls for service appear to be E Lancaster

Ave, the I-35 corridor, and the Las Vegas Trail south of I-30. Other than that, most small

are either relatively small or not in as significant of a density of call for service

occurrences.

(4) Variation in Workload by Beat

The project team examined the number of calls for service by beat to determine if

the geographic deployment structure was effective in balancing workloads at the officer

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lev. Given that the division boundaries recently changed, calls were identified as having

occurred within a beat by using the current beat boundaries and geocoding the calls for

service locations into points.

The following map provides analysis of variations in call for service totals, shading

beats according to whether their call for service total was higher than the average (light

blue or blue), lower than the average (light red or red), or was around the average

(purple):

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Overall, among the 90 beats in the geographic deployment structure, less than half

vary significantly from the average:

• 38 beats have call for service totals that are greater or less than 20% of the
average.

• 15 beats have call for service totals that are greater or less than 40% of the
average.

These findings indicate that the beat structure is relatively effective in balancing

workload, despite the number of beats shown in the map with either red or blue shading.

In beat structures where significant issues exist, often the vast majority of beats will be in

these categories, with a number of beats falling extremely far (at least +/-60%) from the

average. Given how recently the beat boundaries were revised, this is not particularly

surprising, as the finding confirms the work done by the department to address any issues

that existed.

(5) Patrol Supervision and Spans of Control

For any patrol force to function effectively, it is critical that sergeants are able to

spend a significant portion of their time in the field supervising officers and managing field

operations. If spans of control become too high, often at ratios of at least 1:8 to 1:9 officers

per sergeant, (depending on workload factors), then sergeants will have too much

administrative work to actually be out in the field functioning as supervisors. As a result,

it is critical to assess and maintain spans of control to under maximum threshold levels.

Due to the current state of sworn positions being filled above authorized levels,

notable differences exist between the current actual (filled) number of positions in each

division and the number of authorized positions that are allocated. With this consideration
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in mind, the following table examines patrol supervisory spans of control by division using

both current (actual) and authorized numbers, with any ratios exceeding 8.0 being

highlighted in red text:

Patrol Supervisory Spans of Control by Division

Current (Actual) Staffing Levels Authorized Staffing Levels


Division # Sgt. # Ofc. Supv. Ratio # Sgt. # Ofc. Supv. Ratio

Central 13 98 7.5 13 109 8.4


East 12 100 8.3 12 110 9.2
North 9 68 7.6 9 66 7.3
Northwest 12 74 6.2 12 71 5.9
South 13 105 8.1 13 113 8.7
West 11 123 11.2 13 103 7.9

Total 70 568 8.1 72 572 7.9

Spans of control are higher than the effective range in three of six divisions,

although the divisions vary somewhat if current or authorized staffing levels are being

counted. In terms of authorized strength, no division is far beyond the threshold, although

it is clear that the number of sergeant positions that are allocated is inadequate. If current

strength is used, West Division has a supervisory span of control ratio that is exceedingly

above the effective threshold, with 11.2 officers for every sergeant.

Additional factors also play a role in supervisory staffing needs that are not present

in other departments. The pursuit policy that is currently in place for the department is

relatively broad for a large metropolitan police department, and consequently, pursuits

occur somewhat frequently. Each pursuit conducted requires the sergeant to compile a

review packet that includes a report and all body camera footage (including any videos

taken from bystanders) involved in the pursuit. The same is true for all uses of force, with
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sergeants being responsible for assembling these packets as well. As a result, the

average administrative workload involved for each officer that a sergeant supervises is

relatively high. This strains any existing marginal cases for supervisory spans of control,

and greatly exacerbates any significant span of control issues, such as in West Division.

The following table takes the recommended 2018 patrol staffing levels and

calculates sergeant staffing needs in each division based on a 1:7 supervisory span of

control ratio:

Calculation of Patrol Sergeant Staffing Needs


(Based on Projected 2018 Workload Levels)

Targeted Span of Control 1:7


# Officers 614

Sergeants Recommended 88
+/– Sgt. Positions +16
Officers Per Sergeant 7

Central Division 16
East Division 17
North Division 9
Northwest Division 10
South Division 19
West Division 17
Recommendation:

Increase the number of sergeant positions allocated to patrol by 16, increasing the
total number of authorized (budgeted) FTEs to 88.

(6) Supervisory Controls

A common issue in law enforcement agencies, especially larger ones, is the role

of field supervisors (i.e., sergeants) to control responses to incidents. The report of an

incident by someone in the community generates an initial response by emergency

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communications for field units based on priority, location and other factors. This initial

response is often modified by field sergeants or even individual officers based on other

factors:

• The proximity of other units.

• Additional (or fewer) response units based on subsequent information about the
call.

• Specialized resource requirements based on the type of incident.

The control of these resources to avoid over and/or under responding is critical to the

roles of sergeants and watch commanders (lieutenants).

In Fort Worth, the data indicates that over responding can be an issue. The

following table portrays priority and non-priority calls for service which 10 or more units

responding – field patrol and specialized units but excluding detectives:

Patrol Units
Number Avg. Avg. Non
Priority CFS Patrol Patrol 1–5 6 – 10 11 – 15 16+

Priority 1 472 7.7 14.6 26% 59% 10% 5%

Non-Priority 1 272 7.7 13.2 25% 61% 10% 4%

While this analysis is imperfect because it only shows the calls for service as

originally received at dispatch and, as a result, the need of the call cannot be determined,

there are potential issues especially with lower priority calls. The number of calls in which

more than 10 units responded last year is relatively small – 744 calls out of 269,338, or

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0.3%). However, over responding can be a poor use of resources and should be

monitored.

Recommendation:

Take steps to ensure that field supervisors and watch commanders are controlling
the potential for over-responding to calls for service.

3 Analysis of Specialized Patrol Division Units

(1) Neighborhood Police Officers

The following subsections examine the workload, staffing, and organization of

Neighborhood Policing Officers.

(1.1) NPO Staffing and Organization

NPOs are organized in each patrol division, with the number of officers assigned

to the role varying in proportion to the number of beats as shown in the following table:

NPO Staffing and Beat Assignments by Division

# NPOs
Beats Per
Division # Beats Curr. Auth. Auth. NPO

Northwest 11 11 11 1.0
North 12 9 9 1.3
West 18 17 18 1.0
Central 15 16 16 0.9
South 18 18 18 1.0
East 16 16 16 1.0

Total 90 87 88 1.0

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Central staffing includes one NPO that is assigned to focus on issues relating to

the homeless population within that division’s area, while another NPO officer position

focuses on homelessness issues for the city as a whole.

The only division where there are fewer NPOs than beats is North, where three

NPO officers are each assigned two beats to cover. This allocation was made given the

lesser workload involved in covering many of the North Division beats as an NPO, given

that significant land exists that has not yet been developed, as well as a significant portion

of land that has been recently developed, and as a result does not have the same density

of historical and compact communities that are represented by an association or

neighborhood group – a significant indicator of NPO workload.

(1.2) NPO Workload

NPO officers build relationships within the community, attend and speak at

community meetings and events, fix within the community as they arise, working from a

longer-term approach than patrol officers are able to. NPO officers may also respond to

calls for service as needed when patrol units are either tied up on other calls or when they

involve a nexus with their own work on community-specific issues.

A significant portion of NPO activity, however, is tracked in CAD data, including

community engagement activities, meetings, proactive traffic and parking enforcement,

and calls that would normally be handled by regular patrol personnel. The table below

provides these statistics, showing the most common incident types for NPO events

recorded in CAD, as well as the average handling time for each category:

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Most Common Types of NPO Incidents Recorded in CAD Data

Incident Type # Incidents Avg. HT

OTHER 22,673 154.9


INVESTIGATION 5,882 88.6
MARKOUT - COMMUNITY SERVICE 4,953 164.3
TRAFFIC VIOLATION 3,178 28.4
PARKING VIOLATION 2,062 54.3
DISTURBANCE 1,457 66.1
MARKOUT - SECTOR DETAIL 1,211 173.4
BUSN/RESD CHECK 1,073 67.7
MARKOUT – GARAGE 768 68.8
SUSP PERSON/VEHICLE 660 56.2
DOMESTIC DISTURBANCE 579 72.3
MEET COMPLAINANT 495 107.5
BURGLAR ALARM – RESD 394 36.1
DISTURBANCE – PANHANDLING 380 59.3
MINOR ACCIDENT BLOCKING 366 108.1
All Other Types 6,480 80.3

Total 52,611 118.0

Events categorized as “OTHER” represent by far the most common incident type,

comprising over 43% of all NPO officer activity and averaging over 2.5 hours for each

CAD event.

The map below provides a visualization of whether NPO activity recorded in CAD

is higher or lower than the average, similar to how it was displayed for patrol calls for

service:

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It is evident that very few beats have around the average number of CAD events,

and many are significantly higher or lower.

In total, the NPO activity recorded in CAD accounts for 103,468 hours over the

entirety of 2017, or approximately 397 hours per day (NPO workdays only – Monday

through Friday). With 87 NPO officer positions currently filled, after adjusting for net

availability factors (including administrative time), there are about 467 net available hours

of NPO time per workday. From these factors, it can be calculated that about 85.0% of

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NPO net available time is recorded in CAD events. This is an extraordinarily high rate of

utilization that demonstrates the productivity of officers assigned to the role in every patrol

division.

At a rate of one NPO officer for every beat, except in the beats where one is not

currently needed due to a lack of NPO-related workloads, staffing levels appear to be

sufficient. Within the projection timeframe, as the workload for NPO units covering two

beats increases along with growth and development in those areas, additional resources

will be needed. Overall, the effectiveness of the program is clearly established, and given

the high utilization rate of NPO officers, any reductions would severely reduce their ability

to accomplish their roles and responsibilities.

Recommendations:

By 2023, increase NPO staffing by three (3) officers, assigning the positions in
areas where NPOs cover two beats.

By 2028, increase NPO staffing by an additional two (2) officers, assigning the
positions in all remaining areas where NPOs cover two beats.

(2) Special Response Teams

The following subsections provide the background and context of Special

Response Team (SRT) units, as well as workload data and a discussion of current issues

relating to the units.

(2.1) Evolution of Special Response Team Roles

SRT units fill a number of different roles, functioning in both support capacities for

tactical incidents, as well as proactive, targeted enforcement units in the field. SRT units

are currently located within each of the six patrol divisions, reporting to lieutenant over

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non-patrol functions. The SRT positions (60 total) are funded through the Crime Control

Prevention District (CCPD), and as a result, vacancies are filled in a prioritized manner.

As with other units that have been established with CCPD funds, the position slots are a

part of a different resource pool and have restrictions on what purposes the funding can

be used.

The unit has evolved significantly over time since their creation in the early 1990s,

with their scope of work, organization and activities having undergone multiple iterations.

Originally, SRT units were formed under the name Zero Tolerance (ZT) and organized

under the patrol divisions. ZT units focused largely on targeted enforcement, as well as

mobile field force capabilities. Under a previous FWPD chief, they were organized

centrally under Special Operations and added an emphasis on tactical response

capabilities. At this point, the SRT units began training in dynamic entries and other

tactical roles that evolved over time. Their schedules were also staggered so as to provide

24-hour on-duty coverage, eliminating the need for on-call responses in most situations.

While most situations involving dynamic entry remain the responsibility of SWAT

teams, there are certain circumstances where SRT would complete the entry to a dwelling

with a barricaded suspect, such as when there is imminent danger to hostages. SRT

staffing levels of 1 sergeant, 1 corporal, and 8 officers are largely built around these

capabilities, as on-duty staffing levels after adjusting for leave, injury, and other availability

factors, is generally around 7 – generally the minimum number needed to complete

dynamic entries. Nonetheless, at barricaded suspect scenes, SRT units are primarily

tasked with setting up perimeters and relieving patrol units as necessary. More

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commonly, SRT units are heavily involved in supporting narcotics investigations and other

units on serving warrants, conducting surveillance, and other case support activities.

Since being reorganized back under the six patrol divisions, the focus has shifted

more toward addressing crime problems in each division. SRT units conduct various

types of targeted enforcement, focusing primarily on issues relating to violent crime in

most cases, although some divisions include a focus on other issues. Their schedules

have evolved as well to better focus on these roles, which has consequently resulted in

the 24-7 on-duty SRTT coverage no longer being met.

(2.2) SRT Unit Activity

SRT units respond to many of the audible gunshot and fight calls that occur while

they are on duty, as evidenced by their activity recorded in CAD. These statistics are

displayed in the following table, which includes the number of SRT units responding to

various types of calls for service and self-initiated incidents10:

10 Community-generated calls for service and self-initiated incidents have been aggregated
together in the table.
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SRT Activity Recorded in CAD

Incident Type # Incidents Avg. # Units

INVESTIGATION 1,496 2.6


TRAFFIC VIOLATION 2,039 1.4
OTHER 752 2.4
WARRANT SERVICE 231 4.7
OFF-DUTY OFFICER 395 1.1
DOMESTIC DISTURBANCE 148 2.5
DISTURBANCE 220 1.5
SUSP PERSON/VEHICLE 161 1.7
PERSON WITH WEAPON 87 2.9
STOLEN VEHICLE 74 2.8
BURGLAR ALARM - COMM 135 1.4
SHOTS FIRED IN AREA 75 2.2
MEET OFFICER/AGENCY 58 2.7
ROBBERY 38 3.3
MINOR ACCIDENT BLOCKING 97 1.3
All Other Types 1,314 1.7

Total 7,320 2.0

It should be considered that not all of SRT’s activity is recorded in CAD, and

so the data presented in the table represents only a partial snapshot of unit

workload. Backup rates to some of the major call types are also quite high, reflecting the

fact that SRT units often deploy as a team when responding to severe incidents.

The following map visualizes SRT activity by highlighting hot spot locations, or

concentrations of multiple incidents within close proximity of one another:

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Prominent hot spot areas reflected in the map include East Lancaster Avenue, the

Las Vegas Trail, and the downtown zone bounded by N Henderson St, I-30, I-35W

SRT units also provide support during special events as well, and although they

retain the mobile field force role, not all team members are trained in these capabilities.

Certain types of equipment and tactical roles that are sometimes part of the spectrum of

duties for mobile field force teams, such as gas canister launchers, remain exclusively

part of SWAT’s capabilities.


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(2.3) SRT Unit Issues and Challenges

It is evident that SRT has recently undergone a significant transition in its core

roles and responsibilities as a result of the organizational move back to the patrol divisions

and away from the centralized model. The shift toward decentralized teams has had a

number of positive consequences, as each commander now has a flexible proactive

resource to address crime trends, while maintaining the support they provide to

investigative units.

However, it is also clear that many elements of SRT unit roles and responsibilities

continue to be in a state of transition. The diverse set of roles played by SRT units can

sometimes be competing – for instance, the time needed to travel to a training class may

directly conflict with an enforcement initiative prioritized by a division commander.

Comparison of Special Response Team Roles and Training Needs

Role Training Requirements Workload/Frequency

Proactive enforcement N/A Significant; takes up most time not


allocated to other roles.

Investigative Moderate initial training Moderate; request-based and can


support/warrants vary extensively from unit to unit

Mobile field force Weeklong initial course (40 Infrequent, but significant when it
hrs.); low quarterly/annual occurs, is partially completed on
refresher training overtime (special events)

Tactical, incl. dynamic 16 hrs. monthly, in addition to Tactical support as needed when
entry 40 hrs. per year (total of 232 incidents occur; infrequent needs
hrs./yr.) for SRT to perform dynamic
entries

There are reasons for why each of these roles adds important functionality to the

department, ranging from localized targeted enforcement to tactical and investigative

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support capabilities. Each of these roles also has varying needs for training, frequency of

workload, and amount of workload involved.

Requests for each of these capabilities may come from four different sources:

Proactive enforcement from the division commander, investigative support from narcotics

investigations, and tactical needs, which are both self-deployed and called upon by patrol

and other field resources. Given that providing these capabilities is often priority for the

requesting source, fulfilling one need or request may require not fulfilling another. For

instance, an influx of investigative support work may delay both training needs and

proactive enforcement details. While this is not necessarily an issue, if it reaches the point

where one role cannot be fulfilled because the training it requires is unavailable, then it is

clear that too many tradeoffs are being made.

As a result, important questions must be asked to fully resolve the issue of defining

SRT units’ scope of responsibilities and roles, within the context of both the training and

workload required by each role:

• Should the SRT units continue to operate in mobile field force roles?
– If yes, is sufficient training provided to all new personnel assigned to the
unit for this role to be fulfilled?
– If no, can SWAT completely fulfill this role with current staffing resources?

• Should the SRT units continue to train with SWAT in dynamic entry and other
tactical capabilities?
– If yes, is sufficient training provided to all personnel in each unit for this role
to be fulfilled? Do current deployment configurations allow for sufficient
coverage and availability to respond to SWAT callout incidents?
– If no, can SWAT completely fulfill the roles provided by SRT (including rapid
responses when callouts are needed) with current staffing resources?

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• Are there opportunities to better manage the scheduling and prioritization of


investigative support workloads among the six SRT units in order to align with local
proactive enforcement needs?

• Given the answers to the previous questions, are adjustments needed to the
staffing levels and/or organization of SRT units?

As examined further in the analysis of Tactical Command units, there is a clear

need to fully shift responsibility for SRT units, including training, policies, and everything

else involved their operations, to the individual patrol divisions in order to fully integrate

decision making and priority setting within the organizational areas in which they report.

In order to resolve the issue of work priorities being generated from several different areas

of the organization, the department should expand the roles of the Criminal Intelligence

Unit and reallocate some SRT officers to provide support on warrants to specialized units

by pulling two officers from each SRT unit (additional detail can be found on this within

the Tactical Command chapter of the report). The change will transfer that responsibility

from SRT units, leaving them focused mainly on division-specific duties. This also

removes a large area of training needs from the unit, freeing up time as well.

Within an agency, there should be only one method and process for performing

high-risk warrant service. When SRT was under a single Bureau and Command with

SWAT, it was feasible for this to be maintained. With changes that will fully integrate the

SRTs within the six patrol divisions, as well as the reallocation of officers to the Criminal

Intelligence Unit and an expansion of that unit’s roles, SRT units will not be needed to

train for advanced SWAT techniques involved in performing high-risk warrant service.

Nonetheless, the SRT units should remain, within the Mobile Field Force model,

as this is a critical service for the department – particularly as Fort Worth continues to
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grow and expand as a large metropolitan city, likely surpassing one million residents

within the next decade. The training and equipment needed to perform this role effectively

should be prioritized, including any offsite training requirements.

Recommendations:

In accordance with the staffing and organizational changes to SRT outlined within
the Tactical Command analysis, SRT units should cease its involvement in and any
associated training for completing high-risk warrant service, freeing the units up
to fulfill its other roles more effectively.

SRT should continue to be part of the Mobile Field Force, and training and
equipment needed to perform in this capacity should be prioritized.

5 Analysis of the Patrol Support Functions

(1) Patrol Support Section

The following subsections examine the two functions included under the Patrol

Support Section, including the Tactical Medic Unit and Air Support Unit.

(1.1) Tactical Medic Unit

The Tactical Medic Unit is a relatively new program that provides emergency

medical services to high-risk scenes with personnel that are trained both as paramedics

and as sworn officers with tactical capabilities. The unit deploys to major scenes, as well

as SWAT callouts and narcotics warrant attempts. In the absence of the unit being

created, an ambulance would be stationed down the block from the tactical scene in order

to ensure the crew’s safety, and would not be able to complete entries into dangerous

environments, such as within the house of a barricaded suspect.

FWPD has 8 officers and 2 sergeants assigned to the unit with an additional officer

position from Tarrant County Sheriff’s Office attached to the unit in exchange for mutual
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aid. At least 2 Tactical Medic Unit officers are on duty and deployed from 2:00PM until

12:00AM every day.

In addition to callouts to the scenes of major incidents and warrant services, the

unit trains every sworn officer in the department on tactical law enforcement training,

which takes 8 hours for the initial training and 4 hours every two years of refresher

training. All personnel assigned to the unit have completed training as EMTs and

paramedics, which takes about one full year to complete. In order to maintain certification,

144 hours of continuing education are required every four years. The unit is licensed

through MedStar Health, which requires 75-100 hours of training every year (including

the 144/yr. mandate). Three Ford F-250 pickup trucks are assigned to the unit and

specially outfitted for emergency medical responses, and the purchase of an ambulance

is planned.

The tactical medic program is a significant investment, given the 10 positions (2

sergeants and 8 officers) allocated to the unit, the cost of yearlong paramedic training,

and vehicle purchase and replacement expenditures, in addition to all other equipment

used by the unit. In most larger communities (including formerly in Fort Worth) the more

common practice is for fire or private paramedics to train along side SWAT units.

Because this is a new approach, it is critical that the City and the Police

Department review the decision to establish this unit in balance with all other

priorities – as it should with any other non-core service provided by the organization.

This review should use quantitative metrics in this evaluation and study the effects that

the unit has had on achieving medical outcomes versus outcomes in comparable

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situations prior to the unit being established. For instance, this review could examine the

mortality of suspects in SWAT callouts and warrant services before and after the Tactical

Medic Unit was fully established and trained as paramedics. Another metric could be the

time from the SWAT callout or warrant service being started to hospital arrival for anyone

transported from the scene.

At the time of this analysis, the unit has only been in operation for a limited amount

of time, some personnel were training and not yet field ready, and additional equipment

needs were in the process of being fulfilled. Once the unit has been stable and fully

operating for an entire fiscal year, the review should be conducted, providing greater

clarity on both the costs and differential medical outcomes achieved by the unit.

Recommendation:

Conduct a review of the Tactical Medic Unit at the conclusion of this fiscal year,
providing analysis on the unit’s activity, operating and capital costs, and efficacy
in achieving differential medical outcomes.

(1.2) Mental Health Intervention/Crisis Unit

The Mental Health Intervention/Crisis Unit consists of 1 sergeant and 6 officers,

and Tarrant County MHMR (My Health My Resources) to provide services to persons

currently experiencing or have recently experienced a mental health crisis. Officers often

partner directly with case workers, working Monday through Friday from 8:00AM to

4:00PM. The unit deploys on a citywide basis, and when partnering with the MHMR case

works, seeks to locate and check up on frequent contacts. The unit will also be requested

to respond, as well as be self-dispatch, to calls that have a nexus with mental health crisis.

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In addition to informal training they provide during shift briefings, the officers assigned to

the Mental Health Intervention/Crisis Unit, teach a 40-hour crisis intervention/mental

health class to other FWPD officer.

Because the unit is newly established, there is limited data to evaluate the

effectiveness of the unit. However, it is clear that the services they provide are critical,

particularly at a time when issues relating to mental health crisis increasingly share a

nexus with patrol calls for service. As Fort Worth continues to grow exponentially, the

unit’s staffing will need to increase in order to provide the same level of service that is

now provided by the unit, as examined later in the projections' analysis.

(1.3) Air Support Unit

The Air Support Unit consists of 4 officers, 5 civilian pilots (1 of which is the chief

pilot), and 2 mechanic positions, one of which is currently vacant. The unit operates out

of Fort Worth Meacham International Airport, and maintains a fleet of 2 Bell helicopters,

built in 1996 and 2003. The former of these is not currently operational in all capacities

and lacks certain features such as air conditioning. As a result, the department is in the

process of acquiring a new helicopter. Maintenance is provided both by the mechanics

assigned to the unit, as well as through multiple contracts with outside vendors.

The unit normally works from noon to midnight, with overtime work being

completed as needed. The current practice of civilianized pilots is effective, as it allows

for greater predictability and minimization of training costs, as civilians can be hired that

are already licensed and cannot be transferred/promote to another law enforcement

function as long as they remain in the job. Next steps in the study include an analysis of

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maintenance and operations, including an examination of current coverage versus

deployment needs based on callout trends.

(2) Auto Pound / Fleet Services Section

The section is comprised of two units, Auto Pound and Fleet Services, and is

managed by a sergeant and a corporal.

(2.1) Fleet Services

Fleet Services consists of 1 civilian supervisor, 1 lead mechanic, 1 office

administrative aide, and 7 technicians. Of the 7 technicians, 2 are assigned to drive-

through maintenance duties, and 5 are assigned to building out vehicles.

Aside from the roles handled by either fleet service, City of Fort Worth IT services

handle almost all software support, and exclusively provide 24-7 help desk capabilities.

The following table provides a summary of the delineation between Fort Worth Police

Department and City of Fort Worth responsibilities for handled different types of fleet-

related workloads:

Fort Worth PD Fleet City of Fort Worth Fleet

• Mobile digital computer (MDC) • Motor oil changes


installation and hardware maintenance • Most routine vehicle maintenance
• Decal installation services
• Basic electrical work, primarily entails • Mechanical work and maintenance
wiring electronic components • Software help desk (handled by City IT)
• Radar installation and maintenance
• Light bar installation
• Other unit buildout tasks

Buildout tasks are handled by the 5 mechanics that are assigned to the role in a

dedicated capacity, whereas the 2 assigned to the drive-through handle all non-buildout

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roles, which are predominantly related to MDC and network card connectivity issues. The

following table provides an 8-month snapshot of the volume handled by both the drive-

through service and vehicle buildout work:

FWPD Fleet Services Workload, 09/17 – 04/18

Month Drive-Thru Build Total

Sep 2017 226 95 321


Oct 2017 256 95 351
Nov 2017 211 43 254
Dec 2017 200 43 243
Jan 2018 263 56 319
Feb 2018 234 50 284
Mar 2018 312 68 380
Apr 2018 225 42 267

Average 241 62 302


Annualized Est. 2,891 738 3,629

The drive-through service handles significant traffic, with a monthly intake of over

around 241 cars, while buildout workload varies more significantly, ranging from 42 to 95

cars per month.

(2.2) Auto Pound Unit

Auto Pound is comprised entirely by civilian personnel, with 25 positions in total

allocated to the unit. Functioning as a 24-7 operating, the unit is responsible for

processing the intake and release of all impounded vehicles brought to the police

department facility and lot at 2500 Brennan Ave. There is no overhead covering for

vehicles, which has in a few historical instances resulted in weather-related damage from

hail.

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The following map provides a satellite view of the auto pound lot, with spaces for

police department vehicles (mostly marked units) occluded within semitransparent boxes:

Imagery and map data ©2018 Google.

At one point, the inventory of the lot peaked at around 1,600 vehicles. After

extensive auctioning and destruction efforts, the quantity has been reduced to

approximately 700 cars, about 50 of which are currently eligible to be auctioned.

Functionally, Auto Pound functions as a system of intake, processing, inventory

maintenance, and release for property. In this capacity, it is analogous to the functionality

of Property Control, which also involves a controlled inventory, as well as system of intake

and release of items processed as property and evidence. Likewise, the personal

assigned to the unit are entirely comprised of civilian employees, who also share many

of the same job classifications – Property Control Supervisor, Senior Property Control

Specialist, and Property Control Specialist. Given these factors, there are certain

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advantages – though none of which are significant or high priority – to place these

functions together under the organizational section.

Using the same line of analysis, the Auto Pound Unit is functionally different from

the only other unit in the Patrol Support Section, Fleet Services, excluding the fact that all

personnel are civilians. Fleet Services generally does not maintain an inventory outside

of its work queue or have controlled intake/release processes.

The Police Records Management Section, which contains the Property Control

Unit, is managed by a civilian Assistant Public Safety Manager, and has two other units

organized within it. Given that both of these units have supervisors with adequate spans

of control for those functions, the role of the section manager has sufficient capacity to

handle an additional function, particularly one that is similar in nature to the Property

Control Unit. As a result, it is organizationally feasible to transfer the Auto Pound Unit to

the Police Records Management Section.

In summary, there is not a structural or organizational reason for the Auto Pound

Unit to be organized within its section, but there are advantages and potential efficiencies

gained by organizing the unit under the Police Records Management Section, placing it

with the functionally and positionally similar Property Control Unit.

The change would leave both a sergeant and lieutenant over the section, which

would at that point only contain the Fleet Services Unit, which also has a civilian

supervisor. It is evident that both positions would not be needed to fulfill all managerial

duties relating to Fleet Services. Given that there is only a single unit being managed, the

lieutenant classification is not necessarily required over a sergeant position. As a result,

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the lieutenant position should be reallocated elsewhere within the department, keeping

the sergeant over Fleet Services. Another implication of this change is that the

organizational level of “section” is no longer needed and should instead be dissolved. The

Fleet Services Unit should then directly report under the administration of South

Command.

Recommendations:

Transfer the Auto Pound Unit to the Police Records Management Section.

Reallocate the lieutenant position over the Auto/Pound Fleet Services Section to
elsewhere within the organization.

Dissolve the Auto/Pound Fleet Services Section organizational unit, placing the
Fleet Services Unit directly under the administration of South Command.

(2.3) Equipment Officers and Interaction with Fleet Services

Each patrol division has one officer assigned to coordinate equipment and vehicle

maintenance, totaling six officers assigned to the role across the department. The position

functions as both a liaison with department and city fleet, as well as a quartermaster for

all personnel assigned to the division. When repairs and other maintenance are needed,

the officer is able to drive the unit to the service location.

Other than driving, the roles and responsibility handled by the position are largely

administrative or involve coordination between division personnel and fleet maintenance

services. This consideration, combined with the fact that knowledge about police vehicles,

maintenance, buildout needs are not exclusive to sworn law enforcement officers, create

the possibility of transition the role to a civilian position. Along with freeing up a total of 6

officers to handle law enforcement roles in other areas of the department, may potentially

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provide additional stability as those in the job would be applying for that role specifically,

and would not be transferred to other functions.

Recommendations:

Reallocate the six (6) Officer positions assigned as equipment officers in the six
patrol divisions.

Create the Quartermaster classification, a civilian classification that functions with


approximately same roles and responsibilities currently handled by the equipment
officers assigned to each patrol division.

Add six (6) Quartermaster positions, assigning four to North Command and two to
South Command, with each Quartermaster being responsible for one patrol
division.

6 Recent Efforts to Coordinate Serves with the Police Department


Should Be Continued.

“Code Enforcement” can be a grey area in government services – the enforcement

of local, state and often federal laws and codes intersects with quality of life and

community identity issues. In many jurisdictions, this overlap is ignored and service

delivery and public support is siloed between police and code enforcement functions.

Fort Worth has had a more collaborative effort than many jurisdictions with the

Police Department and Code Compliance Department. For example, Police and Code

Compliance have worked together on enforcement of gaming rooms; special enforcement

issues; and barking dog complaints are handled by Codes staff).

Cooperative and coordinated efforts should continue in existing areas and the two

Departments should seek additional opportunities to work together. This study has

identified many potential areas where a cross-department approach could be beneficial

– for example in the enforcement of illegal dumping ordinances and laws.

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Recommendation:

Continue efforts and seek additional areas of cooperation and coordination of


services between the Police Department and Coder Compliance Department.

7 Traffic Division

The Traffic Division is a Citywide field operations function organized, in the Fort

Worth Police Department, in the East Division within South Command. Headed by a

Captain, the Traffic Division is organized as follows:

• Enforcement Section – Headed by a Lieutenant, the Enforcement Section


includes:

– Motor units which primarily provide proactive enforcement which includes


four team of seven units each, or 28 officers plus supervisors. Five (5) of
these staff work as Section trainers.

– Sedan units which primarily work accidents in the City which includes 20
police officers and sergeants.

– Commercial enforcement units which includes a sergeant and four (4) police
officers.

• Traffic Investigations – Headed by a Lieutenant, the Traffic Investigations


Section provides:

– Follow ups primarily on fatal and serious injury accidents in the City staffed
with a sergeants and currently ten (10) corporals.

– DWI Units are also organized in this section which is staffed by a sergeants
and ten (10) police officers.

– Abandoned vehicle enforcement unit (civilian units which also support


sworn field units) which is currently comprised of seven (7) Traffic Control
Technicians who are supervised by an Enforcement sergeants.

The next section evaluates workloads in the Enforcement Section.

(1) Evaluation of Enforcement Section Workloads

As noted above, the Enforcement Section is comprised of proactive motor units,


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sedans which are primarily tasked with accident response and commercial vehicle unit

charged with inspections and enforcement of heavy trucks. The project team requested

and received workload data for the past 18 months from the Enforcement Section. The

following subsections summarize these data and implications for staffing.

(1.1) Motor Units

Motor units play an important role in a community’s overall traffic safety program –

they are mobile in heavy traffic and they are less visible. Motor officers work in

neighborhoods and other roads on a complaint or recurring problem basis. Key elements

of staffing and operations for motor units include the following:

• Four (4) motor teams (2 on days, 2 on swings) with seven (7) staff on each team
for a total of 28 motor officers. Staff work 10-hour shifts

• Motor Officers are not assigned to Patrol Districts, rather, informally based on
complaints and assessments of needs.

• Motor officers work in neighborhoods and other roads on a complaint or recurring


problem basis.

• Five (5) of the motor officers’ function as trainers.

• The sergeants assigned to the unit supervise the officers and manage proactive
work priorities.

• Recently added an off-road capability.

The Enforcement Section compiles detailed monthly statistics of various

performance indicators, both counts of activities and time dedicated. Primary roles are

included in the monthly performance statistics as well as support (e.g., training) and

secondary roles (e.g., assists to other units). The table, below, summarizes several of

these indicators with findings described after the table.

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Motor Vehicles

Category Total 2017 Per Officer


Total Arrests 24 1.04
Accidents Worked 215 9.35
Accidents Assists 101 4.39
Traffic Calls 2,221 96.57
Patrol Calls 68 2.96
Total Calls 2,289 99.52
Court Time 670 hrs. 30 hrs.
Warnings 3,278 142.52
Parking Citations 100 4.35
Total Citations 30,179 1,312.13
Total Stops 20,896 908.52

Before summarizing key findings, it is important to stress that the counts, below,

do not encapsulate everything that Traffic Enforcement units do. In addition to enforcing

traffic laws through stops of violators and assisting patrol and other traffic units, traffic

enforcement staff are involved in school safety, off road responsibilities recently, escorts

and constriction and other details. However, in spite of these other duties, the principal

purpose of traffic enforcement units is enforcement of traffic laws and focusing on these

roles are important in the assessment of the utilization of these units as well as the overall

traffic safety program.

• A key indicator for a proactive traffic enforcement unit is the ‘stop’. It represents a
suspected violation and it gives the officer the choice of citing, warning, or no action
at all. In 2017, there were an average of 908.5 stops per motor officer. At 150 net
shifts (after leaves, training, court, administrative duties, etc.) this represents about
6 stops per shift. The results of stops break down as follows:

– 16% of stops result in verbal warnings.

– Stops that in citations result in 1.7 cites per stop.

• Motor officer involvement covering patrol calls as a primary unit or a back-up unit
is not great, averaging about 100 calls per officer per year or less than two every
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three shifts.

• Moreover, motor officer involvement covering traffic accidents is an insignificant


workload, a little over once per month.

• At 30 hours per motor officer per year, court time is not a significant impediment to
enforcement roles.

At about 6 enforcement activities per shift, the average motor officer is moderately

less involved in enforcement efforts that lead to a performance activity than reasonable

benchmark targets of 1 per hour (or 10 per shift). This suggests that there are

opportunities to improve the utilization of motor officers in enforcement.

(1.2) Traffic Enforcement Units (Sedans)

General traffic enforcement units also play an important role in a community’s

overall traffic safety program. In Fort Worth they play a variety of roles including accident

response and proactive enforcement. Key elements of staffing and operations for motor

units include the following:

• Approximately 20 Traffic Enforcement Officers (in vehicles) conduct proactive


traffic enforcement throughout the city and play a lead role in responding to traffic
accidents. Most days the emphasis is on highways and interstates where more
serious accidents occur.

• Staff are generally assigned one per patrol Division, though not formally.

• Staff work a day shift (0600–1400) and an evening shift (1200–2000). Coverage
five days each week.

The Enforcement Section also compiles detailed monthly statistics for Traffic

Enforcement Units too. As is the case with motors, these performance statistics and

activity counts are exhaustive, but not comprehensive of all traffic-related roles. The table,

below, summarizes several of these indicators with findings described after the table.

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Traffic Enforcement (Sedans)

Category Total Hrs. 2017 % of Total Duty Time


Accident Time 3014 26.05%
Response Time 558 4.82%
Enforcement Time 1953 16.88%
Admin Time 3048 26.34%
Court Time 533 4.61%
Training Time 363 3.13%
Other 2101 18.16%
Sub Total of Accident/
Response/Enforcement 5525 47.76%
Total(Minus Sub Total) 11569 100.00%

• Accident response consumes, on average, about one-quarter (26.1%) of these


staffs’ time.

• Response and enforcement time consume, on average, another 21% of traffic


enforcement units’ time.

At about 47% of their time per shift, the there are opportunities to improve the

utilization of traffic enforcement officers in support of the City’s overall traffic safety.

(2) Evaluation of Patrol in the Comprehensive Traffic Enforcement Effort in the


City.

A city’s overall traffic enforcement program does not consist only dedicated traffic

enforcement officers; patrol is an integral part of this important effort in a community. The

reasons for this are clear:

• Patrol units are typically deployed to provide a rapid response to a call for service,
generally in the 2 – 5 minute range for higher priority calls.

• Patrol units generally have time to be dedicated to proactive activities

• In many communities and neighborhoods, traffic is one of the more important


proactive activities.

Traffic units, on the other hand, are deployed in more of a triaged approach toward

more serious traffic enforcement issues.


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In many communities, the involvement of patrol units in traffic enforcement

activities is low, often under the assumption that dedicated units handle this or that

insufficient time is available for the use of proactive time. This conclusion is true in Fort

Worth. The table, below, shows traffic citations written by patrol units, by Division, in 2017.

Category Traffic Citations Per Officer


Central Division 8,217 83.85
East Division 9,111 91.11
North Division 3,788 55.71
Northwest Division 1,949 26.34
South Division 8,662 82.50
West Division 5,725 46.54

As the table demonstrates, on an annual and per officer basis, traffic citations

range from about 0.2 per shift (Northwest Division), or less than once every two weeks to

about 0.6 per shift (East Division), or almost twice per week. While patrol personnel

generate about 20% of the proactive traffic enforcement activities in the City, on a per

officer basis, these roles do not consume a large amount of the proactive time available.

Since overtime is used for patrol personnel through STEP, this conclusion is even more

significant.

Patrol units, however, are substantially involved in other activities in the City as the

table below demonstrates.

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Handling
Type Count Time
Other - Traffic Hazard 9,335 40.2
Minor Accident Blocking 8,308 81.5
Hit & Run Accident 5,659 80.6
Other - Stranded Motorist 5,179 45.4
Minor Accident Not Blocking 5,065 63.6
Minor Accident - Commercial Vehicle 1,196 94.1
DWI 666 174.7
Abandoned Vehicle 634 54.9
Hit & Run Report 622 76.6
Major Accident - Auto Ped 299 108.7
Deceased Person 278 192.7
Investigation Wrong Way Driver 262 31.1
Parking Violation 122 34.2
Hit and Run - Commercial Vehicle 121 83.5
Hit and Run Accident Auto/Ped 93 97.5
Major Accident - Commercial Vehicle 52 135.0
Minor Accident Auto/Ped 30 109.6
Abandoned Vehicle Priority 23 61.8
Abandoned Vehicle Routine 8 52.3
Traffic Violation 1 3.9

Apart from undefined ‘hazardous conditions’, patrol units are involved in accident

responses (in bold), entailing about two-thirds of the traffic activities captured in the CAD

/ RMS system.

While patrol units are counted on to assist in accident response, there are still

opportunities to improve the utilization of these officers in enforcement.

(3) Evaluation of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement

Commercial vehicle enforcement (CVE) units proactively to enforce commercial

vehicles laws and regulations, conducting traffic stops and performing inspections on the

equipment as well as on allowed cargoes. Most of this work is on highways and interstates

where heavier truck traffic is greatest and the risks associated with such traffic is greatest

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too. Commercial enforcement units work with the Texas Department of Public Safety on

hazardous materials transport enforcement issues.

The table, below, portrays CVE workloads for 2017. It breaks down activities and

time for commercial enforcement activities versus other activities.

Category Total % of Total Duty Time


Enforcement/Inspection Time 2,295 hrs. 51.82%
Accident Time 106 hrs. 2.40%
Admin Time 1,340 hrs. 30.26%
Total Time 4,429 hrs.
Accidents Worked 26 N/A

The table shows that just over half of commercial enforcement unit time is

dedicated to commercial enforcement and inspections. Commercial enforcement is not

unlike patrol in which a mix of reactive and proactive time is necessary to be involved in

these services. Fort Worth has shown that proactive time has generated results through

stops and inspections that have resulted in violations that present safety issues for the

community.

Recommendations:

Develop a plan to moderately increase the utilization of traffic enforcement units in


each of the functional areas of the Section. Establish reasonable shift or unit
targets to achieve this.

Develop a plan, where appropriate in the City, to reasonably allocate some of the
proactive time available patrol to traffic enforcement activities.

(4) Evaluation of Traffic Investigations

Traffic Investigations is responsible for investigating fatal and serious injury traffic

accidents throughout the City, including hit and runs with fatalities and serious injuries. A

Sergeant is the unit supervisor who handles assignments, case reviews and assists in

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more complex / serious cases. Descriptive elements of Traffic Investigations include:

• Staff (corporals) work weekdays.

• Investigators work with Tarrant County district attorneys in case prosecutions.

• Staff are available for callouts for after hour responses to fatal and serious injury
accidents as well as hit and runs involving deaths and serious injuries.

• Staff also work special events.

While investigators are all trained in accident investigations and reconstruction,

forensic mapping, etc., many have an informal specialty for which additional training has

been received. There is a close working relationship with specialist district attorneys for

the prosecution of cases.

Caseloads appear appropriate.

Staff are called out on all fatal and serious injury accidents, including hit and runs.

Responsibility for after hour and weekend serious accidents are rotated on a five week

rotation, two staff at a time. For a fatality, the sergeant is called out too. The issue with

callouts is that while approximately 90% of fatal and serious injury accidents occur on

nights and weekends (drug and alcohol as well as sleep deprivation causes), all staff work

weekday business hours. This results in high levels of overtime for over 900 events

annually. Many callouts receive minimal follow up.

Traffic Investigations should change their shift structure to allow at least some

evening and weekend hours to be covered on straight time rather than overtime.

Recommendation:

Develop a staggered shift approach to staffing Traffic Investigations in which 2


staff are deployed on a swing shift and 2 on weekend days to reduce callouts and
resulting overtime.
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(5) Evaluation of Abandoned Vehicle Enforcement

The Abandoned Vehicle Enforcement Unit is comprised of non-sworn employees

who enforce abandoned vehicle ordinances and tows in the right of way, principally on

highways and interstates. However, they also provide support to traffic enforcement

officers in the field with accident scenes, assist with traffic control and parking and other

issues at special events. Staff are divided between day and early evening overlapping

shifts.

This unit was recently re-organized to operationally report to Traffic Enforcement

sergeants and have lost their own supervisor. This is an issue for several reasons:

• Traffic enforcement sergeants’ spans of control are already large and cover the
City. Abandoned Vehicle Enforcement responsibilities, while supportive and
complementary, are different.

• Abandoned Vehicle Enforcement increases that span of control greatly – even with
two AVE positions down, adding seven (7) staff to a span of control already that
broad is untenable for an effective supervisory relationship.

• Moreover, there is not one enforcement supervisor over AVE – it is shared by on-
duty sergeants, risking priority, focus and consistency.

• The best use of Traffic Control Technicians should be determined who focuses on
their prioritized and varied responsibilities on a day to day basis that crosses over
the needs of other traffic enforcement units.

• As non-sworn employees, the personnel needs of Traffic Control Technicians are


different than police officers.

The Fort Worth Police Department should recreate the Traffic Control Supervisor

position. A span of control of 7 – 9 to one supervisor will still be large and citywide in

scope but would be more effective for the AVE program.

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Recommendation:

Create a Traffic Control Supervisor position, a civilian, to provide oversight to staff


working in the Abandoned Vehicle Enforcement Unit.

(5) Support Needs in Traffic

Analysis to direct special enforcement units in a community is at least as important

as it is for patrol. This is because one of the points of special enforcement is to dedicate

the scarce time of highly trained specialists to the more significant problems for which

they are trained.

Fort Worth has over 70 police officers and sergeants dedicated to enforcement

roles in the City. In spite of that, there are no staff available to assist in the analysis of

where problems or complaints occur, where accidents occur, how response is affected,

etc. At present, when possible, senior staff perform these duties (Lieutenants and

Captain). This is not a good use of senior staff time and it results in inconsistent dedication

to analysis.

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4 Analysis of the Support Bureau


The Support Bureau is managed by an Assistant Chief and is comprised of two

major organizational units – the Tactical Command and the Investigative and Support

Command. Each Command is managed by a Deputy Chief.

The first section below will review and analyze the Tactical Command group

followed by the Investigative and Support Command.

Analysis of Tactical Command


The following graph shows the organization structure of Tactical Command:

Tactical Command

Operations Division Intelligence Division Investigations Division

Information Narcotics
SWAT Section Mgmt. Section Section

Special
Operations Intelligence Gang Section
Section
Section

Special
Response
Section

Within Tactical Command, detailed below, there are three Divisions, each

managed by a Captain. They are the Tactical Operations Division, the Tactical

Intelligence Division and the Tactical Investigations Division. Each Division and most

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Sections (except the SWAT Section and Gang Section) have civilian staff (Administrative

Technician or Office Assistant) that provide administrative support.

1 Tactical Operations Division – SWAT Section

The authorized staffing in the unit is one Lieutenant, two Sergeants, three

Corporals and 20 Officers – organized into two teams or groups. The SWAT Team

provides the Department’s tactical response to critical incidents such as an active shooter

but also conduct other tasks such as serving high risk warrants. The primary tasks

performed by this unit include:

• Response to active shooter incidents, hostage incidents, barricaded suspects and


serving high risk search warrants. Additional assignments include special events
(e.g. Texas Motor Speedway races).

• SWAT Officers teach tactical classes to the basic academy and also for in-service
training to current officers. They also teach a “Patrol Response to Tactical
Situations” class for patrol officers twice a month and also put on five or more 40
hour Officer Survival Schools annually.

• SWAT Officers maintain vehicles and equipment, including their rescue vehicles,
rifles, trackers, throw phones, ammunition and “simunitions”.

SWAT tracks various incidents responded and services performed, including 26

full team responses to critical incidents in 2015, 24 in 2016 and 31 in 2017. The list below

provides the breakdown for operations for the last three years.

Type of Incident 2015 2016 2017


Barricaded Person 19 14 23
Hostage Incident 3 4 6
Suicidal Person 2 5 2
Other Incident Type 2 1 0
Narcotics Warrants / Operations 191 295 218
Total 215 318 249

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The SWAT members also spend a significant number of hours performing training

functions (appropriately) to maintain and improve their skills. New officers to the team are

scheduled to complete 120 hours of skills training courses (Basic SWAT Officer and

Advanced SWAT Officer) in their first few months in the assignment.

The current number of SWAT officers is a minimum number to handle one critical

incident response in the city. If a second incident of any type were to occur FWPD would

need to rely on other internal resources or mutual aid for another SWAT team to handle

the second incident. In 2017 the SWAT team responded to approximately 1.5 ‘call-out’

incidents and approximately 20 high risk warrant service cases per month. The call outs

typically require both SWAT teams to respond and a routine warrant service requires 4 –

8 officers and a supervisor. In addition to this field work there is also the necessary weekly

training, equipment maintenance and administrative tasks. SWAT supervisors and

officers also teach a significant number of hours – this included twice monthly “Response

to Tactical Situations” class and scenario training to patrol officers as part of their in-

service training; basic academy tactical training classes, and up to six 40 hour Officer

Survival courses annually. SWAT is also used to assist with public events or rallies,

protests and other large scale events in Fort Worth. This combined workload keeps this

group very busy.

The SWAT team is well managed and able to handle the current level of critical

incidents but stretches them when other tasks and activities are also required at the same

time. The workload level also requires SWAT members to be on call most weeks of the

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year (team members get a minimum of four weeks when they are not on call but according

to supervisors this has not been a significant issue).

Fort Worth is still a growing city and part of one of the largest metroplexes in the

United States. A SWAT team of 20 officers is common for SWAT teams in medium size

cities in the U.S. (cities of 100,000 to 500,000 residents) but small for a large city

approaching one million residents. It is reasonable for Fort Worth to plan to add an

additional team of one sergeant, one corporal and 10 officers in the next one to two years

to be able to keep up with the current and anticipated increased workload of incidents,

training and other functions.

Recommendation:

In the next one to two years (by July 2020) add one additional SWAT team of one
sergeant, one corporal and 10 officers.

2 Tactical Operations Division – Special Operations Section

This Section is comprised of the Mounted Unit and the Special Event & Emergency

Response Unit (SEER).

(1) Mounted Unit

This unit is staffed with one sergeant, nine officers, a barn technician and an office

assistant. The Mounted Unit is well supported by the community, demonstrated by

providing all 18 horses to the PD and also raising money to pay for the construction of the

barn facility and office building on North Las Vegas Trail – where the unit operates.

Additionally, the facility is only a few years old and has 24 stalls in addition to an outdoor

ring for training riders and the horses.

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The Mounted Unit’s Sergeant oversees the staff, horses, facility, maintenance and

operations. He is assisted by an Office Assistant and Barn Technician with the horses,

facility and administrative functions. The Office Assistant schedules and coordinates

officers patrol hours and special event appearances and the Barn Technician assists in

training and maintaining the houses and the facility.

The primary tasks of this unit are:

• Regular patrol – the regular schedule has groups of two to four officers providing
3 – 4 hours of patrol in designated areas of the city – this includes the downtown
area, Stockyard area, Trinity Park and other parks. The horses must be trailered
from the horse barn to the patrol location each day.

• Crowd control at protests and large special events (e.g. Texas Motor Speedway),
public demonstrations and search & rescue of missing persons in large parks or
remote areas.

• Assist other work units – they were called out for two incidents in 2017 to look for
a missing person and the second incident was to search for a felony suspect that
had eluded patrol officers.

• Large and special events: in 2017 the Mounted Unit worked four days at the Texas
Motor Speedway, provided security at TCU football games, participated in four
parades, gave barn tours, attended several National Night Out events and gave
72 demonstrations at various fairs and events.

• Parades / Demonstrations / Fairs – in 2017 the unit participated in seven parades,


72 demonstrations, National Night Out and also a number of barn tours of their
facility.

There are some suggested changes that would increase the efficiency of the

Mounted Unit:

• The Office Assistant position is necessary to answer the phones, receive requests
from the public for events and tours and the various other administrative and
clerical functions so that sworn staff does not have to do them. However, the work
tasks assigned do not require a full time position. It is necessary to have the Office
Assistant on site but the Lieutenant and Sergeant should determine other work
tasks to accomplish.
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• The civilian Barn Technician is intended to be a full time maintenance position that
takes care of and works the horses and facility. However, the current employee is
also skilled in training horses and splits her time with the training and maintenance
tasks. Is logical and efficient to have a civilian horse and rider trainer rather than
using a sworn officer and the current Barn Technician has “grown” into this position
when the officer doing the new rider training left the Mounted Unit. This has filled
an important need and resulted in more hours for officers to work patrol but it has
also resulted in less time for the Barn Technician to accomplish other tasks. A
reasonable solution would be for the Office Assistant job specifications to be
modified to include facility maintenance tasks.

Mounted units are a large expense for a city and department but in Fort Worth the

equestrian lifestyle is a long tradition going back over 150 years. The value to a

community such as Fort Worth is not only in the daily patrol hours, assistance in searches

and large events but also in developing positive public relations, good will and fostering

the history of a ‘cowboy town’ to the many visitors who come to Fort Worth annually. The

significant level of support this unit has in Fort Worth shows that it is important to the

community and should be maintained.

Recommendations:

Develop a plan for the office assistant position to also assist with other necessary
tasks needed to be accomplished in stocking / maintenance for the facility and the
horses.

Modify the “Barn Technician” classification to a new job title that includes horse
training as a primary work task.

(2) Special Events and Emergency Response Unit (SEER)

This unit is staffed with one sergeant and five officers and one officer is assigned

fulltime as the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT). The primary tasks of

SEER and CERT are:

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• Overall planning, coordination and logistics for large special events in Fort Worth
– these include the Texas Motor Speedway races and concerts, TCU football
games, Arts Festival and July 4 festivities, Christmas Parade and the Spring Break
Zoo Detail.

• Review and approval of permit requests for neighborhood block parties, provides
appropriate signage and/or cones; coordinates with Neighborhood Police Officers
(NPOs) for their events and requests.

• Staffing the Command Vehicle and provide on-site communication services for the
involved FWPD units at large scale police incidents and special events.

• Maintains and stores the Command Vehicle, other vehicles and trailers (e.g. box
truck, trailer grills, flatbed truck) cones, barricades and signs. Stores barricades
and cones used for special events and sets them out prior to the events.

• Provides mutual aid assistance to other police departments for coordination of


major emergencies (e.g. Hurricane Harvey).

• CERT provides disaster preparedness training to members of the community and


coordinates with these groups with the goal of working in their neighborhood to be
self-sustaining for 3 days after a disaster. CERT groups may also assist FWPD at
special events.

SEER is an important planning and operational unit that is involved in most of the

special events in Fort Worth. For each event an officer creates an Incident Action Plan

(IAP) detailing the type of event, the involved units, tasks and plans. It is an important

planning function to ensure that all aspects of the event and city involvement are

addressed. SEER coordinates with the Office of Emergency Management and other

involved FWPD units (e.g. Downtown Bikes, SRT, CIU, ESU, Mounted Patrol, Homeland

Security and CERT) to ensure appropriate planning and staffing of the large special

events. RTCC staffs one Officer for these events.

The number of events handled/coordinated by SEER over the last three years is

provided below:

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• 2015: 210 equipment deployments, 1 event demobilization

• 2016: 348 equipment deployments, 3 event demobilizations

• 2017: 890 equipment deployments

• 2018 (thru 6/30/18): over 1,150 equipment deployments, 14 event


demobilizations11

There are some unusual set up tasks assigned to SEER that are not normally the

responsibility of the police department: officers are tasked with setting out barricades and

cones for special events – this task should be performed by the Transportation & Public

Works Department. Transferring this task and the storage of this equipment will save

Officers time that can be used for more appropriate work.

Recommendations:

Work with other city officials to remove barricade set up tasks from police officers
and transfer them to a more appropriate city department (i.e., Transportation &
Public Works) to coordinate with the police department.

3 Tactical Operations Division – Special Response Section

This Section is comprised of the Canine Unit and oversight management tasks for

the Special Response Teams.

(1) Canine Unit

This unit is staffed with one Sergeant and 10 Officers. The unit is centrally

coordinated and managed – the primary tasks are to provide routine assistance to Patrol

Officers in addition to location, tracking and protection services. They also conduct

demonstrations and participate in other community outreach events.

11 Based on annualizing the 1st six months stats of 586 equipment deployments and 7 event demobilizations
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All of the dogs are patrol trained and over half are cross trained in narcotics

detection. Regular training is conducted on weekly and to maintain the dog’s skill and

obedience.

The Canine Sergeant works Sunday through Wednesday, leaving the other three

days without a dedicated supervisor on duty. The Canine Officers are assigned during

the nighttime hours and provide services seven days a week. Additionally, the current

staffing level sometimes only allows deployment of three K9 units in the city – and

sometimes OT must be paid to staff three positions.

Currently all apprehension reports, bite reports and training records are hand

written but are scheduled to be automated in 2018. The following table shows some K9

units’ tasks and activities for calendar year 2017.

Type of Activity 2017


Calls for service 3,325
K9 related calls for service 934
Businesses checked for open doors, etc. 4,201
Burglaries discovered by K9 unit 3
Building searches 182
Field or area searches 145
Vehicles sniffed for narcotics 238
Felony arrests where a K9 was used 71
Misdemeanor arrests where a K9 was used 38
Self-initiated incidents 1,451

The current staffing level does not allow for coverage of all Patrol Divisions

throughout the week and it is reasonable to provide daily coverage with four K9 units on

duty which will increase the ability to support to patrol operations in each Division. To

accomplish this an additional two positions are needed – one Sergeant and one Officer.

Additionally, at least two dogs should be trained in bomb detection. The project team

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recommends that all dogs be trained in general patrol functions and only one other skill –

either bomb detection or narcotics detection.

The additional Sergeant is needed to provide relief to the current Sergeant, regular

street coverage each day of the week and to maintain the effective span of control (1

Sergeant: 5-7 Officers). It is important to note that some agencies have changed from a

centralized deployment of K9 units and re-assigned them to be managed and deployed

out of patrol operations – one of the reasons is to reduce the need for dedicated K9

Sergeants as supervision is provided by on duty patrol supervisors. However, the project

team believes this arrangement is not as effective in coordination of services city-wide,

canine training, administrative tasks and overall management of the program. Therefore,

it is recommended to maintain centralized coordination of the canine program.

Recommendations:

Increase K9 Unit staffing by two positions – a Sergeant and an Officer to provide


needed supervision and also provide adequate coverage for the new north
command area; this will reduce OT and also field four K9s on duty more frequently.

Some of the dogs should be trained in bomb detection as this is a frequent type of
call where the use of a dog is needed. Currently, a Fire Department K9 unit must
be called back to respond to these types of calls.

(2) Special Response Teams – All Management and Oversight Should be


Assigned to Patrol Bureau while Responsibility for the Canine Unit and the
Mobile Field Force Retained in Tactical Command.

There is one Lieutenant position in this work unit who is responsible for oversight

of the Canine Unit, including oversight of the field operations. Recent responsibility for

the West 7th Unit Rapid Response Team (out of Patrol Command) has also been given

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to this Lieutenant. Additionally, he has responsibility for some management tasks of the

Special Response Teams.

This is a hybrid approach and resulted from the re-assignment of the six SRTs to

the Patrol Divisions in November 2017. In addition to field operations supervision duties,

the Lieutenant is responsible for four other specific areas: SRT training, equipment and

personnel assessments (for applicants to SRT), and the Mobile Field Force (no one is

assigned full time to the Mobile Field Force but it is rather an ancillary duty for Officers

assigned to this group – mobilized as needed).

There are several problems with this approach – the primary one is that the

Lieutenant has designated areas of responsibility but not the authority to accomplish the

task. One example is training – this Lieutenant has responsibility for SRT training but does

not have control of the training budget – all of the funding for the SRTs was re-distributed

to the Patrol Commands. Additionally, the work hours of the six SRTs is scheduled by

their assigned Patrol Division and are not necessarily coordinated with the Special

Response Lieutenant’s work hours.

The Mobile Field Force needs to select and train more officers. The normal

complement of 60 training officers is down to approximately 25 officers but, again, the

Lieutenant does not have sufficient authority and funding to recruit, select and deploy the

Mobile Field Force.

The project team believes the transfer of the SRTs to the Patrol Divisions should

have not only included the personnel and budget but also every other aspect of their

functions – selection, training, deployment and supervision. It is realistic and practical to

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centrally develop program guidelines and directives for SRT (ones that all six Teams

follow) but it is not realistic to split the responsibility for management and supervision to

two Bureaus. This approach most often results in overlaps and gaps in operations and

administration. All responsibility for the Special Response Teams should be transferred

to the Patrol Bureau – all needed policy, procedures or directives should be developed

by Patrol Bureau staff and approved by the Chief.

It is reasonable to retain the management and supervision of the Mobile Field

Force under the umbrella of the Special Response Lieutenant as transferring this function

to Patrol (where most of the MFF Officers are assigned) is problematic as FWPD has

organizationally separated routine patrol functions and special operations. Training and

deployment of the MFF is clearly a special operation resulting from planning for, or

response to, a protest or special event. Assigning this function to the Patrol Bureau would

require a significant new task of the existing managers.

The Special Response Lieutenant should continue to maintain knowledge and

skills in crowd control and management of the MFF and department response to protests

and large crowd events. The project team also recommends that he/she be designated

as a backup to the Special Operations Lieutenant (for special events/operations only) and

also backup to the SWAT Lieutenant. This will require training in SWAT operations but

provide a valuable backup to the SWAT Lieutenant as necessary.

Currently there is no funding for MFF training, equipment or incidents. In the next

budget cycle funding should be budgeted for necessary expenses.

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One other current issue is the need for uniformed field support for undercover and

other specialty units’ operations. Prior to the move of the SRTs to Patrol Bureau all of the

SRTs worked evening hours and provided support (e.g. vehicle stops) to undercover and

street operations to the Department’s specialty units (e.g. Criminal Intelligence, Homeland

Security, narcotics and gang units). This is an important function as undercover officers

may not be able to make a vehicle or pedestrian stop because of several factors – their

undercover operations require that they do not make enforcement stops, it could

compromise an investigation and that it is better for a marked police unit to make a vehicle

stop as they are readily identified as police officers. Most of these type stops were made

by SRT Officers prior to their transfer to the Patrol Bureau. One of the results from moving

the SRTs to Patrol Bureau is that their role and function changed to be more oriented with

the needs in their assigned Patrol Division. This included changes in work hours that did

not align with the evening hours that specialty units commonly work and also a change in

their duties that resulted in SRTs being less available for their support role to the specialty

units. This is a logical but unintended consequence of the new roles for the Special

Response Teams in the Patrol Divisions. Since the transfer to Patrol there has been a

reduction in the ability of SRT to provide assistance to these specialty units and there is

a current need for a marked unit to make a vehicle stop – beat patrol officers are often

not available to assist. In the last several months managers in Tactical Command have

discussed options to provide this type of field assistance to specialty units. The option

implemented by FWPD command staff in the summer of 2018 was to staff a newly formed

unit called the Criminal Tracking Unit, assigned out of the Tactical Intelligence Division.

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This will be further discussed later in this report in the Tactical Intelligence Division

analysis.

One other recommendation that will be further addressed in the Homeland Security

Unit evaluation is the project team recommends that the responsibility for coordinating

the Hostage Negotiation Unit be transferred to the Special Response Section as it is a

more appropriate location for this group as most of their work is related to crisis incidents

and response with the SWAT team.

In the last several months the Special Response Lieutenant has been given

responsibility for a significant work unit – managing the West Patrol Division “West 7th

Special Response Team”. This unit had been in operation but in the summer of 2018 its

staffing was increased to reduce the level of overtime required to adequately address the

large entertainment crowds coming to the W. 7th Street area during the week (also

addressed in the analysis of West Patrol Division).

This significantly increased the work tasks and responsibilities of the Special

Response Lieutenant and requires that he takes direction from and has responsibility to

two different Commands. In this type of arrangement, it is important that one Command

has clear responsibility for this position and closely cooperates with the other Command

in accomplishing the needed tasks.

Recommendations:

All responsibility for the Special Response Teams should be transferred to the
Patrol Bureau – all needed policy, procedures or directives should be developed
by Patrol Bureau staff and approved by the Chief.

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The Special Response Lieutenant should be designated as a backup to the Special


Operations Lieutenant (for special events/operations only) and also the SWAT
Lieutenant.

The Mobile Field Force should continue to be managed and supervised by Tactical
Command; funding needs to be budgeted for necessary expenses.

Responsibility for the coordination of the Hostage Negotiation Unit should be


transferred to the Special Response Lieutenant.

4 Tactical Intelligence Division – Information Management Section

This group is comprised of the Crime Analysis Unit and the Real Time Crime

Center (RTCC).

(1) Crime Analysis Unit

This unit is staffed with two Senior Crime Analysts (supervisors) and five Crime

Analysts. This unit is centralized in command but six staff (two Senior Crime Analysts and

four Crime Analysts) are assigned to one of the six Patrol Divisions to provide local and

individual services. One Crime Analyst is assigned full time to the Violent Personal Crimes

Unit. The two Senior Crime Analysts also conduct regular crime analysis functions and

tasks for the PD – the same as the other five Crime Analysts.

One of the major tasks is to review crime and incident reports (over 78,000 NIBRS

reports in 2017) to ensure that relevant crime, suspect and other data is entered. This is

to determine ‘modus operandi’ and the identification of crime patterns, crime trends and

possible suspects responsible for the crime(s). This task is also a quality control review

of the written reports, ensuring the proper code sections have been charged and that the

required details have been included by the officer(s) who wrote the reports. Analysts

frequently find reports (all of them already reviewed/approved by a supervisor) frequently

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have common errors such as not reporting the day/time of the offense, not completing the

suspect information sheet and not providing required M.O. information; sometimes

skipping a whole “tab” (report section) of the electronic report writing form.

Analysts also provide analysis of crime and crime trends, creating graphs and

charts of basic statistical information for quarterly reports, CompStat meetings and

specific requests from an Officer or Detective.

The six personnel assigned are not able to keep up with the daily flow of incoming

reports to read/review and the other tasks of providing crime charts/graphs as well as the

individual requests from the officers and detectives for various types of information or

assistance. Approximately 40% - 50% of Crime Analysts’ time is spent on responding to

requests from detectives and patrol officers in their patrol area.

The current volume of work does not allow very much time to do analysis of crime

patterns and predictive policing information – which is one of the most important reasons

to staff a crime analysis unit. Using the available data systems to provide predictive

policing information for use by patrol and other units is very valuable for a police

department but staff must not only have the training, software and time to provide this

service.

The two Senior Crime Analysts should not have the primary responsibility for one

of the Patrol Divisions but should only function in a back-up role. At least 50% of their

time should be dedicated for supervision of staff, coordination of the unit’s workload,

coordination with patrol and detectives. The remainder of their time can be allocated to

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proactive analysis for the city, filling in when gaps occur, completing needed CompStat

reports and special reports that are regularly requested.

Currently the Senior Crime Analysts are only able to spend approximately 5% of

their time on proactive analysis but it should be about 40% - 50% of their work hours; the

Crime Analysts should also have 25% - 30% of their time available for proactive analysis

(involving database searches such as CJIS / LEED, link analysis, searching social media,

the “Street Cred” system).

To accomplish this four more Crime Analysts are needed – two to be assigned in

place of the Senior Crime Analysts that are currently assigned to a Patrol Division and

one to provide necessary back-up for the seven Analysts (six in Patrol Divisions and one

Analyst assigned to the Violent Personal Crimes Unit) and one to be the “headquarters”

Analyst that would complete the variety of regular (e.g. CompStat) and special requests

from the Chief’s office and other headquarters staff. This is a reasonable increase to the

Crime Analysis Unit and would result in a total of 11 staff and be better able to meet the

work goals of providing current statistical analysis but also have dedicated time to provide

predictive analysis for the city and police department.

In addition to the internal focus of this unit the Lieutenant is working with other

agencies and the North Texas Fusion Center to develop an information sharing protocol

for the benefit of both agencies. Coordination with other regional, state and national

agencies is important to ensure information is being shared which is beneficial to meeting

the crime suppression goals of FWPD.

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The “Crime Analysis Unit” is the primary analysis unit in the PD but is separate

from the “Criminal Intelligence Analysis Unit” in the Intelligence Section, discussed in the

next section of this report. The project team believes these two units should be merged

and this is discussed in the following “Tactical Intelligence Division – Intelligence Section”.

Recommendations:

Add four Crime Analyst positions to the Crime Analysis Unit to provide an assigned
Analyst to each Patrol Division, back-up staffing and allowing the Senior Crime
Analysts dedicated time for supervision of the unit.

Merge the Criminal Intelligence Analysis Unit into the Crime Analysis unit to
provide a coordinated crime analysis work group and reducing “silo” units within
the organization. The two Criminal Intelligence Analysts would retain their current
job functions and salary structure.

(2) The Real Time Crime Center (RTCC) Provides Immediate Research and
Information to Officers in the Field.

This unit is staffed with one Sergeant and 11 Officers. The RTCC works out of a

centralized location and exists to provide assistance to and research for patrol officers

when they are responding to calls and at the scene of calls. RTCC Staff monitor incoming

calls for service, monitor cameras in public places to observe activity and initiate reports

of possible crime occurring. When officers are responding to calls RTCC staff initiated

query computer systems to obtain background information of the location, involved

parties, vehicles, etc. They provide as much information as possible on the people and

locations to responding officers. The RTCC is still a fairly new operation of FWPD and

adjustments are being made to provide reasonable and necessary services for the

officers responding to calls and initiating activity.

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The RTCC is staffed 20 hours daily and should be staffed all 24 hours – the staffing

can vary throughout the day to match the volume of work on the streets. It is not necessary

to always have a supervisor on duty but there is one additional Sergeant needed for

supervision as the unit grows (currently a sergeant to officer ratio of 1:11 which is higher

than a best practice of 1:6-9 – ratio depending on the function). To meet the 24 hour

staffing of two persons on duty an additional three positions are needed (total of 14) in

addition to a second Sergeant’s position. It is helpful, but not necessary for the staff to be

sworn officers, light duty officers may also be able to be utilized in the RTCC. If new

positions are staffed the project team recommends that they be designated civilian staff.

It is reasonable to target a 50% civilian staff for the RTCC. Using civilians would require

some additional in-house training but in the long term is more cost effective.

Recommendations:

Add three positions to the RTCC to be able to provide 24/7 staffing – these
positions should be civilians to evaluate the feasibility of using lower cost civilian
staff rather than sworn officers.

Add one Sergeant position to provide a second supervisor for the RTCC and a
reasonable supervisory / staff ratio.

5 Tactical Intelligence Division – Intelligence Section

This group is comprised of the Homeland Security – Intel Unit, Criminal Intelligence

Unit, Criminal Intelligence Analysis Unit, Electronic Surveillance Unit and the Dignitary

Protection Unit. Each of these units will be analyzed in the following sections.

(1) Homeland Security / Intel Unit

This unit is staffed with one Sergeant, one Detective and six Officers.

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The primary functions are to provide risk and threat assessments for events

coming to Fort Worth and people that will be visiting Fort Worth. These assessments

based on information received regarding possible or probable threats to a person or site.

As necessary, Homeland Security conducts surveillance and uses information developed

from sources to evaluate the risk potential and detect possible criminal acts or threats to

the safety of the Fort Worth community. Routine risk assessments are completed for large

scale events to determine the appropriate response by FWPD to handle the event (e.g.

dignitary visits, planned protest, TMS concert, July 4, TCU football game). Assessments

are also completed for known protests and demonstrations.

This unit is also tasked with coordinating the work of the hostage the Hostage

Negotiation Unit (negotiators are ancillary assignments for officers). The coordination of

the Hostage Negotiators is more of a fit and reasonable to be the responsibility of the

SWAT operations as most of their work is in conjunction with and emergency SWAT

incident/operation. The project team recommends this responsibility be moved to the

Tactical Operations Division – Special Response Section.

Additional coordination between separate work units and functions (sometimes

overlapping functions) is needed. For example, both the Homeland Security Unit and

Criminal Intelligence Unit try to develop information on potential problems / threats in Fort

Worth and also on known criminal suspects; they also look at specific areas in Fort Worth

where there may be a crime problem.

Recommendation:

Responsibility for coordination of the Hostage Negotiation Unit should be


transferred to the Tactical Operations Division – Special Response Section.
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(2) Criminal Intelligence Unit

This work group is staffed with one Sergeant, one Detective and nine Officers.

Their primary tasks are to conduct research on crime, crime patterns and try to develop

evidence and information to link possible suspects to a crime or crimes. They develop

and use informants to discover crimes that have occurred and persons responsible for

the crime. They also assist Patrol Officers and Detectives and coordinate with them on

investigative follow-up and research to solve the crime.

CIUs focus is to develop intelligence information on criminal suspects for all non-

gang related crimes (as the Gang Unit has intelligence officers that gather information on

criminal gang members).

This type of unit could ‘always’ use more staff as there is not a defined reactive

workload to measure what needs to be accomplished. Being regularly busy does not

necessarily mean that additional staffing is needed. Often it is speculative if additional

valuable work could be accomplished if there were additional staff.

A large text section moved to CTU below

(2) Criminal Tracking Unit

This is a new work unit staffed in the summer of 2018 to meet the need for field

support of undercover specialty units has developed. As mentioned in the “Special

Response Section” analysis, with the transfer of the SRTs to the Patrol Bureau the need

for field support (e.g. commonly investigative vehicle or pedestrian stops) is not being

met. Several Tactical Command uniformed units (e.g. Gang Enforcement Teams) have

filled this gap but it has taken time away from their primary work tasks and functions.
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Additionally, the Criminal Intelligence Unit (undercover officers) had been trying to assist

in this area prior to the creation of the CTU.

To perform these necessary field support functions the CTU reasonably requires

two Sergeants one Corporal and 16 Officers that could be deployed in areas where

undercover operations were active. The project team concurs with the re-assignment of

one Officer from each of the six SRTs (6 authorized Officer positions) to the CTU to meet

this need. This has left nine Officers remaining in each SRT assigned to the Patrol

Divisions which is still a very viable work unit to accomplish the tasks and goals assigned

to them by the Patrol Commander. The 6 Officers from the SRTs are funded positions

but the additional 10 Officer positions would have to be obtained from somewhere else in

the PD or newly funded positions. The ideal solution, if funding were available, would be

to fund the new positions but another practical and viable solution is to re-assign existing

staff (which has been done as the CTU is currently staffed with six other Officers ‘on loan’

from other work units).

The first year of the adjusted staffing level should be used to document any

negative consequences experienced in the SRTs ability to accomplish their tasks as well

as the sufficiency of the new uniformed CIU to provide field support to the specialty units.

Recommendations:

In addition to the Officers transferred from the SRTs to the newly formed Criminal
Tracking Unit, fully staff the CTU with 10 additional authorized Officer positions, a
total of 16 Officers, to provide field support to specialty units.

Evaluate the adjusted staffing level in the SRTs for the first year following this
change; also evaluate the effectiveness of the new field CIU group in providing
needed field support.

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(4) The Criminal Intelligence Analysis Unit Should be Merged with the Crime
Analysis Unit.

This work group conducts analysis for the Criminal Intelligence Unit and other

special requests for information on crime suspects, conducting analysis to determine

potential suspects in criminal cases. The unit is staffed with two Criminal Intelligence

Crime Analyst positions and this is a higher position classification than the Crime Analyst

or Senior Crime Analyst positions that work in the Crime Analysis Unit. The Criminal

Intelligence Crime Analysts are tasked with similar analysis functions but also works with

groups that require security clearances to have access to restricted information.

Although some analysis tasks are different the two work groups must be trained in

similar analysis tasks, use the same computer systems and generally work on similar

types of analysis. There are not solid reasons to have two separate groups. It does not

mean that the services / analysis performed by the Criminal Intelligence Crime Analysts

is not necessary or require additional training or clearances but that these needs can

easily be accomplished by one work unit rather than two separate work units. The project

team recommends that the Criminal Intelligence Analysis Unit be merged into the Crime

Analysis Unit – the two positions are to increase the staffing of the Crime Analysis Unit

and not take the place of the additional positions recommended by the project team.

One of the issues related to the separate assignments is that the Criminal

Intelligence Crime Analysts have a significantly higher salary than the Crime Analyst and

Senior Crime Analyst positions. This disparity is often best addressed by reviewing the

separate position classifications, determining the specific work tasks, if separate position

classifications are needed, and the appropriate salary for each position.
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Recommendation:

The Criminal Intelligence Analysis Unit should be merged into the Crime Analysis
Unit – the two Criminal Intelligence Crime Analysts and their job functions should
be transferred and be supervised within the Information Management Section.

(5) Electronic Surveillance Unit

The ESU is staffed with one Sergeant, one Detective and five Officers. Their

primary tasks are to:

• Set up, install and maintain the approximately 130 fixed public security cameras in
Fort Worth.

• Install tracking devices on vehicles in the investigation of criminal cases.

• Install and maintain the mobile cameras and drones.

• Operate the mobile command unit for incidents and special events.

The work assigned to this unit can vary throughout the year depending on the

number of criminal investigations and special events in Fort Worth. No changes are

recommended and the current staffing level is sufficient at this time.

(6) Dignitary Protection Unit

This unit is staffed with one Sergeant and five Officers. They are assigned to and

work out of the Mayor’s office. Their primary task is to provide security to the Mayor –

locally and also when the Mayor travels out of town. This unit also assists other FWPD

units when VIPs come to Fort Worth for meetings and special events.

The work of this unit is primarily separate from most FWPD daily operations as the

staff is assigned to work directly with the Mayor. The current staffing level is sufficient.

6 Tactical Investigations Division – Narcotics Section

This Division is comprised of the following seven work units:


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• Narcotics Detectives

• Narcotics Complaint Teams

• Interdiction Team

• Permits / Pawn / ABC / Asset Forfeiture (Team 4)

• North Texas High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Task Force

• DEA / DFW Task Force (drug investigations)

• Vice Unit

Each of these units will be analyzed in the following sections.

In 2017 the combined effort of all of these work units resulted in over 600 arrests

and seized narcotics with a street value of over $57 million.

(1) Narcotics Detectives

This unit is staffed with one Sergeant and seven Detectives. They are on call 24/7

and respond to the crime scene for more significant types of narcotics related crimes –

ones that will likely need immediate investigation to conduct a timely investigation of the

crime. The cases typically ones where the Narcotics Complaint Teams have developed

good investigative leads or made an arrest. The follow-up work often involves obtaining

detailed statements from suspects/witnessed, surveillance and obtaining search

warrants.

It also involves coordination with the District Attorney’s Office regarding seeking

complaints against crime suspects and during the court processes.

The unit is busy and functioning well – no recommendations at this time.

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(2) Narcotics Complaint Teams

This work unit is staffed with three Sergeants and 25 Officers – they are broken

down into three separate teams for most of their work tasks.

The primary responsibility is to respond to the complaints from citizens, elected

officials and community groups. All complaints are tracked, evaluated and responded to

by a Complaint Team. A response is also given to the reporting party to let them know

the outcome of their complaint.

When a search warrant or arrest warrant needs to be served the Narcotics units

are frequently assisted by the SWAT Team, SRT or the Gang Enforcement Team.

It is appropriate for a city the size of Fort Worth to staff and maintain complaint

investigation teams as it is the only way for complaints from residents, business owners

to be able to have their complaints investigated. Additionally, these Teams initiate

investigations into street drug trafficking based on their work in the field, informants and

referrals from other regional drug enforcement units.

The staffing is appropriate and the units are functioning well.

(3) Interdiction Team

This work unit is staffed with one Sergeant and eight Officers (two of the Officers

are currently on loan to the Criminal Tracking Unit). This unit became operational in

August 2017 when the dogs were purchased but not operational until November of 2017

until the completion of the basic training for the Officers and dogs. As of May 2018, six of

the Officers have narcotics detection trained dogs.

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The focus of this unit is the train station, storage units, UPS/FedEx facilities and

the DFW airport to try and detect drug trafficking. The Interdiction Unit provides additional

proactive services to stem the flow of drugs into Fort Worth and the region.

Recommendation:

Develop several performance measures for the Interdiction Unit to be used to


evaluate workload and effectiveness.

(4) Permits / Pawn / ABC / Asset Forfeiture (Team 4)

This is eclectic is staffed with five Officers and does not have a direct supervisor

but works under the office supervision of the Lieutenant. The unit is referred to as “Team

4” based on tradition and the lack of a short title/name to describe the eclectic work tasks

they perform.

Th primary focus is to respond to and work complaints and cases related to pawn

shops and 2nd hand dealers. They also work with the Texas ABC on permitting and

complaints related to licensed premises and ‘after hours’ nightclubs. An additional and

important responsibility for Team 4 is to process and track Asset Forfeiture cases and the

related paperwork and ongoing monitoring/reporting (one officer is dedicated to this task).

All of these tasks are important functions for a police department and the

organization of this unit is appropriate.

(5) North Texas High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Task Force

This work unit is staffed with one Sergeant and eight Officers. This regional unit

focuses on longer term drug related problems in Fort Worth and the surrounding area

that the FWPD Narcotics Complaint Teams have not been able to solve.

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Fort Worth provides the unit supervisor for this task force. No changes are

recommended.

(6) DEA / DFW Task Force

This work unit is staffed with one Sergeant and five Officers. This is a regional task

force that focuses on longer term investigations to target higher level dealers and crime

organizations. No changes are recommended.

(7) Vice Unit

This unit became operational in August 2017 and is staffed with one Sergeant and

10 Officers. Prior to the creation of this unit Fort Worth PD did not have dedicated vice

enforcement for many years.

The current primary focus of this unit is to address “game rooms” that are a

significant gambling problem in Fort Worth. As time allows the unit also works prostitution

crimes, lewdness crimes in parks and crimes occurring in strip clubs and massage

parlors. This unit is undercover and also assists other PD units with undercover work

when requested.

Work units in the Narcotics Section have made 107 arrests for prostitution (most

have been made by the Vice Unit after it became operational in the fall of 2017). The Vice

Unit has seized an average of 60+ gaming machines weekly and over $450,000 in cash

(from October 2017 - May 2018).

Since its initiation in 2017 the Vice Unit has been working “game rooms” almost

full time as it is a high priority issue for the City and the Police Department. Since the

initial interviews for this project in March 2018 these illegal operations have continued to

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be a major focus due to the volume of the game rooms and it is likely that the investigation

of these crimes will continue to dominate their work for the remainder of the year. If this

trend does continue and the volume of machines seized continues to remain in the 60 per

week range for the remainder of 2018 then it is clear that the current staff will need to

continue to focus on the game rooms and additional staffing of one Sergeant and four

Officers is recommended to focus on other ‘vice crimes’ such as prostitution, public

lewdness and indecent exposure.

Recommendation:

If the volume of ‘game rooms’ cases continues to remain unabated for the
remainder of 2018 then the Vice Unit should be expanded by one Sergeant and four
Officers to focus on other vice crimes.

7 Tactical Investigations Division – Gang Section

There are four work units in this Division – the Gang Detectives, the Enforcement

Teams, the Intervention/Prevention Unit and the Intel Unit. The primary mission of the

work units in this Section is to suppress criminal activity by targeting criminal street gang

members. Most work hours are focused on criminal investigations, intelligence gathering,

preventive efforts and proactive patrol and enforcement in the field.

Each of these units will be analyzed in the following sections.

(1) Gang Detectives

This unit is staffed with one Sergeant and five Detectives. One of the Detectives is

assigned full time to the FBI Safe Streets regional task force.

The primary tasks are to investigate gang related aggravated assaults not resulting

in a death. The Detectives are on call 24/7 and provide an initial response to the crime
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scene to coordinate the investigation. If the crime begins as an aggravated assault but

later the victim dies from his/her wounds it is likely that the Gang Detectives will still keep

the case since they began the initial investigation and are the ones that are most familiar

with the case. The Detectives conduct all follow-up investigation, surveillance, search

warrant preparation, cell phone searches, etc. Coordinate with DA’s office for follow up.

Gang investigators conduct investigations on all felony crimes that have a gang

nexus using specific criteria that is defined by statute. If a gang nexus can be proved

there may be a higher imposed sentence upon conviction. The four detectives

accomplished the following in calendar year 2017:

• 382 gang related cases assigned/investigated

• Cleared 193 cases

• 95.5 gang related cases per investigator assigned per year

• 7.9 average gang cases per investigator per month

• Served 89 search warrants

Gang Investigators can effectively investigate between 6 and 8 cases per month

as the lead investigator.

(2) Enforcement Teams

This work group consists of two Sergeants, one Detective and 20 Officers (one of

the Officers is currently on loan to the Criminal Tracking Unit). Their primary tasks are to

provide street patrol in identified areas with a goal of reducing gang related crimes.

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Teams spend most of their time on the streets providing proactive patrol,

contacting gang members, parole and probation “knock & talks”. They also respond to

calls for service that may be gang related and provide assistance to patrol as appropriate.

The Enforcement Teams accomplished the following in calendar year 2017:

• Made 390 arrests

• Conducted 749 field interviews

• Initiated 2,613 traffic stops

The work of this unit is valuable to the organization as gangs are responsible for a

significant number of violent crimes in Fort Worth. In a city the size of Fort Worth it is

valuable to have a dedicated work unit that identifies, tracks and attempts to prevent

crimes from being committed and quickly apprehend the responsible person(s) when

crimes are committed.

The unit is functioning well and the project team makes no recommendations.

(3) Intervention / Prevention Unit

This work unit is staffed with four Officers whose primary focus is to work to reduce

teenagers’ involvement in gangs and also to intervene when gang related problems occur

in the schools they are assigned to. These Officers work primarily in the elementary and

middle schools and also churches schools to teach appropriate gang education classes,

provide a positive role model for students and also provide 1 on 1 mentoring and

counseling.

The Prevention / Intervention Unit accomplished the following in 2017:

• Taught 44 GREAT (Gang Resistance Education & Training) classes

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• Conducted 35 interventions

• Made 21 gang awareness presentations

• Attended 35 career days / fairs / forums

They also teach a “Pathways for Justice” class in the five high schools with higher

“at risk” students.

It is appropriate and noteworthy that FWPD has specific officers dedicated to

reduce gang recruiting, peer pressure and also educate parents to education them about

gangs and strategies to reduce the risk of their child becoming involved in a gang.

(4) Intel Unit

This work unit is staffed with four Officers. They work in support of Gang Detectives

and the Enforcement Teams to assist with the investigation of crimes and identification of

possible suspects. These Officers are among the most knowledgeable people in the PD

about gang activity and gang members.

Gang Intelligence Officers proactively search social media to develop information

related to crime and criminal activity; provide information to patrol and other units. They

maintain files on over 3,600 people and are responsible to complete the “validation” steps

to enter a person into the gang database and also maintenance of this file to ensure its

accuracy. In 2017 the Intel Unit issued 138 information bulletins to the PD on information

related to a crime that had occurred, wanted suspect information and officer safety

information.

They are functioning effectively and are a valuable asset to this Section and the

Police Department.

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Overall, the work units in this Section have a clearly defined role and work tasks,

and they are well coordinated. The statistics show that these units are reactive and

proactive (the Enforcement Teams are out in the field 75% of the time) and also track

many of the tasks that they perform, indicating a focused approach to meeting their

objectives. These units are busy and if criminal activity increases the PD will need to staff

an additional Enforcement Team but not until the higher workload level is evident over a

6-12 month time period.

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Analysis of the Investigative and Support Command

The following graph shows the organization structure for the Investigative and

Support Command.

Investigative and Support


Command

Criminal Property and Records Community Programs Forensic Science


Investigations Management Division Division Division
Division

Data Jail
Violent Reporting Operations Admn. Unit
Personal Section Section
Crime

Police Youth Evidence


Records Section Unit
Special Management
Victims Section
Section Community Forensics
Volunteer Units
Programs
Forensic and
Economic
Crimes

These four divisions are overseen by either a Captain or civilian manager (Property

and Records Management). These divisions, and their respective units, are discussed in

the follow sections and sub-sections.

1 Criminal Investigations Division

The Criminal Investigations Division conducts efforts to include various Sections

and Units that perform a variety of investigative and support duties for the Fort Worth

Police Department. Four key organizational units include the Violent Personal Crimes
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Section, Special Victim Section, Forensics/Economic Section, and the Victim Assistance

Section. These Sections are further divided into many specialized units ranging from

Homicide to Crime Scene Unit.

Criminal Investigations Division

Forensic &
Violent Personal Crimes Special Victims Section Economic Crimes

Homicide Unit Crimes Against


Children Unit Fraud Unit

Major Case Unit Domestic Commerical Auto


Violence Unit Theft

Fugitive Unit Crime Scene Unit


Sex Crimes Unit

Robbery Unit Victims Digitial Forensics


Assistance Lab

Sex Offender
Registration

Fort Worth Police Department also de-centralizes some of their investigative

services (largely property-related) at each Patrol Division’s Criminal Investigations Unit

(CIU). For purposes of investigative assessment, these efforts are described here.

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1 The Criminal Investigations Division Effectiveness Is Evaluated Differently


Than the Patrol Bureau

A variety of factors impacting the investigative workloads must be considered when

evaluating staffing requirements and related operational strength and opportunities for

improvement. The workload and related information utilized in this chapter was obtained

from numerous one-on-one interviews with FWPD criminal investigations management

and supervisory staff and a variety of independent data collection efforts made by our

project team with the assistance of the Department personnel.

The evaluation of staffing levels required by criminal investigations and supporting

functions is more difficult than evaluating patrol staffing levels because, unlike field

services, subjective and qualitative determinants of workload and work practices are more

important. Patrol services have the benefit of several quantitative measures, such as calls

for service, response time and proactive time, to assist in the evaluation of staffing

requirements. Investigative services, given the nature of this work, have fewer such

reliable measures. Factors making investigative analyses difficult include:

• Approaches used to screen, assign, and monitor cases are different among law
enforcement agencies.

• What is actually investigated varies by agency. The extent to which agencies


assign misdemeanor level crime cases to detectives varies. Importantly, agencies
screen cases assigned to detectives differently; one agency may assign a case
perceived as “solvable” while another agency may not investigate such cases if
there is perceived limited solvability and arrest potential.

• The extent to which patrol performs preliminary investigation varies widely and
impacts detective caseloads.

• Work practices vary tremendously among agencies, relating to interviewing


techniques, mix of telephone and in-person interviews, use of computer
technologies, and the time devoted to clerical tasks.
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• The nature of the caseload is also a critical factor to consider when examining
quantitative factors relating to investigative activity. Each case is different in terms
of workable leads, suspect description, and other available information. The way
information in a single case combines with information on other cases (e.g. a case
belonging to a crime series or crime pattern) also impacts investigative actions.

• The nature of the community itself is a factor in evaluating investigative workload


and staffing needs. Citizen expectations translate into service levels impacting
detectives in terms of what is investigated and how investigations are conducted.

• Finally, additional duties and responsibilities performed by detectives beyond


caseload work are impactful to staffing and operations. Such activities may include
being a specialized trainer, assignment to support teams (e.g. SWAT) or various
other administrative duties detracting from casework.

Collectively, these factors portray a different type of workload compared to patrol

workload. Unlike patrol, investigative workload cannot consistently be converted into

quantitative methodologies to arrive at required staffing levels. Investigative staffing

requirements need to be examined from a variety of perspectives in order to obtain an

overall portrait of staffing issues, case handling issues and operational philosophies that

all have a notable impact on investigative-related staffing needs.

2 The Approach to Investigations Evaluations.

How business is uniquely conducted by FWPD must be considered in an analysis.

Investigative staffing requirements need to be examined from a variety of perspectives in

order to obtain an overall portrait of staffing issues, case handling issues, and operational

philosophies that have an impact on overall staffing needs. The project team performed

the following steps in the analysis of the Criminal Investigations Division to determine

resource requirements.

• Reviewed case management practices through interviews with unit supervisory


and management staff and obtained available caseload data.
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• Examined other qualitative measures of workload, as appropriate, to determine the


effectiveness of investigative services provided.

• Examined organizational and supervisory spans of control.

These efforts are framed by the following approaches to investigative analysis.

(1) Case Management Philosophies Have a Significant Impact on Staffing


Requirements.

The current approach by which FWPD manages cases has some uncommon

characteristics compared to their public safety counterparts. There are several key

characteristics of case management that will influence staffing. These include:

• The case screening process.

• The case assignment process.

• The case investigative process.

• The case closure process.

Most importantly with respect to case management is that the Criminal

Investigations Division readily admits minimal use of the current case management

software deployed at FWPD. Indeed, a report provided to the project team was the first

report developed of its kind. Moreover, case management philosophies are often driven

by the supervision and management of all centralized and de-centralized units. As a

consequence, case management philosophies are inconsistent throughout FWPD and

therefore impacts staffing level assessments.

The key impacts are summarized as follows for each key case management area.

• Case screening – Case screening is accomplished by different personnel in


different ways. Dependent upon the unit case screening will:

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- Be performed by a dedicated detective to this task with back-up help upon


absenteeism.

- Be performed by detectives on a rotational case screening assignment.

- Be performed (infrequently) by a civilian who has multiple roles but with this
activity as a major assignment.

- Be performed (infrequently) by the Unit Sergeant (e.g. Sex Crimes).

• Case assignment – Case assignment strategies are based upon the case
screeners personal philosophies on balancing workloads. Different approaches
are used to determine the caseloads of detective staff dependent upon the work
unit. In sum, there is no formalized and consistent approach in case assignment
strategy.

• Case investigations – What is being investigated, and how that is determined can
be better formalized to help manage caseloads. By example, there is no minimum
dollar-value established on the thefts to be investigated; case assignment between
centralized and de-centralized CIUs has some inconsistencies; case emphasis is
not formalized (e.g. “squeaky wheel” can get investigated).

Case progress tracking recorded within the case management software is


inconsistent and overall minimal. This results in an inability to effectively track case
progress through the software system. Overall, additional tools should be
employed to enhance what kinds of cases will be investigated, how they will be
tracked, and to whom they are assigned.

• Case closure – A formal process by which cases are effectively managed includes
a case closure component. To help facilitate manageable workloads, cases which
no longer require near-term investigative efforts should be “closed” in some
fashion. FWPD does a reasonable job of case closure tracking through appropriate
coding.

• Case Acceptance by District Attorney – Tracking how many cases are actually
accepted by the District Attorney’s Office can influence both the types of crimes
that are investigated and the level of effort applied to each case. Some DA’s
Offices refuse to prosecute certain case types, regardless of case quality.
Moreover, case quality (and the resultant time spent by detectives can impact
staffing). Currently no data is readily available regarding case acceptance by the
DA.

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In the absence of formalized case management, consistent, with the Commission

on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA), it is difficult to effectively

manage the case and other workloads of FWPD detectives. Such case management

difficulties impact staffing requirements, as do all key operational processes of a law

enforcement agency. In effect, the lack of a comprehensive and formal case management

approach will have an impact on perceived staffing needs as there is no obvious nexus

between what work should be done and what work is actually accomplished.

(2) FWPD should Address its Case Screening Approach and Identify a Single-
point Detective or Unit Sergeant to screen cases.

The method for the Criminal Investigations Division and de-centralized CIU

counterparts case screening is largely based on personnel judgment and different

philosophies executed by individual work units. As noted, different personnel and different

screening practices are executed throughout FWPD. This should be formalized to ensure

investigative consistency. To that end, each centralized investigative unit and each CIU

should designate a single-point detective (specialty assignment with minimized

caseloads) or a Unit Sergeant to screen cases. This is consistent with best practice.

Present case screening practices have no formal way to help prioritize workloads.

In order to ensure consistency throughout the FWPD and help prioritize work for

investigative follow-up, a formal case screening checklist with relevant solvability factors

should be adopted. This is consistent with progressive case management philosophies

as well as with the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA)

case-screening system criteria (Section 42.1.2). The use of solvability factors is

consistent with Section 42.1.2 which states, “The agency uses a case-screening system
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and specifies the criteria for continuing and/or suspending an investigative effort.” This

screening can take several forms. In the course of our research, the project team believes

the following twelve-point process is most practical. If a crime report has any one of the

solvability factors noted, it should be assigned for investigative follow-up. The twelve

points are:

• Witnesses to the crime;

• Knowledge of the suspect’s name;

• Knowledge of where the suspect can be located;

• Reasonable description of suspect;

• Identification of suspect possible;

• Property with traceable, identifiable characteristics, marks or numbers;

• Existence of a significant modus operandi;

• Presence of significant physical evidence;

• Reasonable description of the suspect’s vehicle;

• Positive results from a crime scene evidence search;

• Belief that crime may be solved with publicity and/or reasonable additional
investigative effort; and

• Strong possibility and/or opportunity for anyone, other than the suspect, to have
committed the crime.

Effective case screening allows for the bulk of investigative resources to be

dedicated to solvable cases deserving investigative resources. Solvability factors should

be incorporated into a formal case screening process whereby the above list, or some

derivative, is used as a “cover sheet” on all cases to determine whether it is an assignable

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case to a Detective for investigative follow-up. For those cases assigned, the suggested

prioritization, as discussed subsequently, should be noted on the cover sheet.

(3) The Department Should Formalize the Case Assignment Strategy.

Once a case has been screened for solvability, based on those solvability factors

checked, as well as a review of the qualitative case circumstances, the case should be

prioritized for work based on a consistent approach. Prioritization of workload has clearly

been widely adopted in patrol services throughout the nation through a call priority

classifications (e.g. Priority 1 “lights and sirens” rapid response), but the concept is used

much less frequently in other law enforcement arenas. The project team believes case

prioritization is an effective management tool to augment case screening and can be

based on a “dollar amount” for property-related crimes, eliminating certain crime types

from investigations by detectives (e.g. vandalisms), or other approaches.

The intent of case prioritization is to focus detective resources on the most

important cases. Once cases have been prioritized, any case not assigned to a detective

as workable (given its lower priority) should be dispensed with (e.g. closed) in the most

expeditious matter.

(4) FWPD Should Re-Visit the Types of Cases Detectives Investigate to


Potentially Allow for Investigative Focus on Higher Priority Crimes. This Can
Result in Revised Staffing Levels.

As noted earlier, there is not consistent solution with regard to the types of crimes

a law enforcement agency should investigate. While it is generally common practice for

law enforcement to investigate solvable Part I crimes, even this is not universal. When

considering Part II and other crime types, investigative efforts vary widely by agency. As

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discussed later in this report, FWPD investigates various crime types that might better be

suspended. While each agency is different with respect to the kinds of cases assigned

and under what circumstances, the following guidelines can facilitate further reducing

potential case workloads.

• Cases, regardless of type and with the exception of homicides, are not assigned
and immediately suspended during case screening due to lack of real leads
(solvability).

• The cases are not assigned as they are low priority and they do not elevate to a
level deemed sufficient for an expenditure of detective resources (e.g. low value
misdemeanor thefts).

• Misdemeanor cases will not be assigned unless there is a named suspect AND a
cooperative victim.

• Case types will not be assigned in which the prosecutors have little interest in
pursuing.

In sum, FWPD should revisit exactly what kinds of cases are to be assigned to

detectives at both the centralized and decentralized (CIU) levels in the context of a new

case management approach and expected service delivery to the community, with

emphasis on reducing the number of unnecessary cases assigned.

In conclusion, a revision to the case management approach—to include revisions

to case screening, case assignment, case investigation and case closure— can have a

dramatic impact on detective staffing levels. Once case management principles have

been revised, FWPD should revisit detective staffing needs based on the

recommendations provided in this report.

The following recommendations are made with regard to the case management

process.

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Recommendations:

Identify a single-point Detective or the Unit Sergeant in each investigative Unit to


screen cases on a specialized assignment. Such personnel should have a reduced
caseload requirement. This assignment could be rotational for 12+ months.

Throughout FWPD, at the centralized CID and decentralized CIU levels, formalize
the case screening process using a documented solvability factor methodology
that includes a 12-point criteria checklist on all assigned detective cases.

Formalize a detective caseload prioritization system based on best practice


approaches discussed in this report.

Based on a new case management philosophy to be finalized by FWPD, eliminate


assigning certain “lower priority” case types such as ‘Information Only’ and other
kinds of low solvability, misdemeanor reports.

Include in the Department’s existing policy all important investigative work-related


protocols discussed herein including the further formalization of the case
management process.

3 Case Workloads Are a Primary Determinant for Investigative Staffing


Levels.

Investigative workload can employ a series of indicators to determine the extent to

which core investigative staffing is adequate and general workload is appropriate.

Performance against these metrics can ultimately influence resulting staffing

requirements for detectives. Various research by our firm and others has been done with

respect to efficiency and effectiveness metrics for investigative services.

With respect to developed metrics, comparative measures used to help determine

investigative staffing, efficiency and effectiveness are summarized in the following table:

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Comparative Measures for Investigations

Comparative Measures Comparative Industry Patterns

Active cases assigned to 15 to 20 active cases per month based on a survey of dozens
“property” crimes Detectives (e.g., of law enforcement agencies performed by the Matrix
burglary/theft). Consulting Group over many years. Recent research in
California and elsewhere suggests this range has been
reduced to 12-15 cases as the complexity of evidence
collection and testing has increased the overall time required
to investigate a case.

Active cases assigned to “person” 8 to 12 active cases per month based on the same survey. 3
crimes Detectives. to 5 active cases for complex person crimes such as felony
assault (shootings) to include homicides. Domestic Violence
(DV) cases vary widely dependent upon State mandates that
result in varied workloads. Some DV Units can handle 20 to
30 cases per detective per month, whereas others can only
handle DV caseloads typically attributed to the “felonious
person crimes.” For the same evidentiary reasons noted
previously, person crime caseloads are often being lowered to
6-8 cases per month.

Active cases assigned to sex Because of the sophisticated and sensitive nature of sex
crimes. crimes, these specialized person crime cases have a lower
active case range of 5-7 cases per month.

Active cases assigned to White These have a broader range due to their varied complexity,
Collar Crimes Detectives (e.g., from 10 to 20 active cases per month unless they are
fraud). particularly difficult (e.g. embezzlement or high value) in which
case the range is closer to 8-12 per month.

Active cases assigned to 12 to 15 active cases per month based on the Matrix survey.
“generalist” crimes Detectives. Because of the sophisticated evidence-related processing
noted previously, a lower range can result in 9-12 cases per
month.

Average hours dedicated to crime Different studies over the past 30 years (Prummell; Gribble)
investigations by type of crime. have attempted to estimate an average number of hours
worked for each investigation per crime type. These include:
• Burglary: 6-12 hours. (PERF 0.5-40)
• Robbery: 9-30 hours. (PERF: 1-60)
• Aggravated Assault/Battery: 4-25 hours.
• Homicide: 147 hours (PERF: 2-220)

Maximum Investigations that Can Varied data from different sources has developed benchmarks
be Handled based on the sophistication of certain crime types and the
extensive time investment often required. A key example is
one benchmark suggesting a single detective could handle no
more relevant caseload than five (5) homicides annually.

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These different metrics are used to inform the analytical efforts described in the

following sections.

4 Analysis of Core Investigative Workload at the Criminal Investigations


Division.

Whereas the Criminal Investigations Division performs a variety of investigative

efforts, the following section is dedicated to core investigative workloads performed by

centralized and decentralized investigative units. These service types will be discussed

in this section.

(1) Investigative Unit Staffing

FWPD core detectives and officers are assigned to a variety of units as detailed in

the Profile deliverable. All person and property crimes are distributed, based upon type,

to the various operational units that are either specialized and centralized (e.g. Crimes

Against Children Unit—CACU) or decentralized at the Division-level CIUs.

The following graphic portrays actual staffing levels at the time of this report in the

various units. For clarities sake, detective and officer positions assigned cases will be

defined as “Investigators” for purposes of these sections.

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Actual Staffing of Centralized and De-centralized Detectives


and Officers Dedicated to in-house Investigations
CACU 13
Sex Assault 14
Dom. Viol. 12
Digital For. 6
Comm. Auto 6
Fraud 7
Major Case 10
Robbery 13
Homicide 12
East 15
South 24
Central 20
West 22
North 13
Northwest 17
0 5 10 15 20 25 30

There are 204 detectives and officers actually assigned to these units at the time

of this report. These do not include proactive units (e.g. gangs) or Task Force personnel.

(2) First line Supervision

The importance of first line supervision cannot be understated; the professional

literature on such staffing requirements is significant. Most law enforcement agencies,

such as Fort Worth, rely on the sergeant position to provide direct supervision, and

supporting administrative services, to personnel. Ratios of sergeants to staff typically run

from 1:6 to 1:9 with a maximum ratio of 1:12. In all investigative units shown in the graph

above, one sergeant supervisor is overseeing the number of detectives noted plus

supporting personnel. Obviously, FWPD in many instances is not meeting best practice

supervision standards given the ratios presented. These sergeant related issues will be

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discussed in each relevant section which follows. In sum, however, we will recommend

sergeant-to-staff ratios never exceed approximately 1:10.

Recommendation:

Devise first-line supervision staffing assignments in investigations units that


approximate no higher than a 1:10 sergeant-to-staff supervisory ratio.

5 Unit Caseloads

The following data reflect assigned caseload information for the noted units for

one-year from April 2017 through March 2018.

(1) Caseload Information – Homicide Unit

2,642 cases were assigned to Homicide personnel during the period, more than 9-

in-10 being Deceased Persons or Mental App which are closed quickly.

Homicide Unit Assigned Cases by Type - 1-year

3% 5%
35%
57%

Deceased Persons Mental App Homicide Other

74 homicides were classified in the period, with the remaining 5% other case types.

The following shows workloads excluding Deceased or Mental App.

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Avg. Key Cases Assigned / Month for Assigned


Investigators
5.0
4.4
4.5
4.0
3.5
3.0 3.1
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5 1.3
0.9 1.0
1.0 0.8 0.7 0.7
0.5 0.4
0.5 0.3
0.2 0.1 0.2
0.0
Inv 1 Inv 2 Inv 3 Inv 4 Inv 5 Inv 6 Inv 7 Inv 8 Inv 9 Inv 10Inv 11Inv 12Inv 13Inv 14Inv 15

The graph above shows the number of average cases per month assigned to

personnel dedicated to the Homicide Unit excluding deceased and mental app case

types. Monthly averages vary and this is likely an outcome of the case assignment

strategies discussed as well as complexity of workload.

With respect to core workload for Homicide, importantly, the FBI suggests each

investigator can handle a maximum of 5 homicides per year or an average of 0.4 cases

per month. As shown above, the staffing contingent in Homicide generally has more

average monthly work than 0.4 cases per month. Based exclusively on the FBI statistic,

and the number of homicide-related cases over the last three years, Homicide should

have 13 detectives dedicated exclusively to homicide investigations.

In addition to homicides, the Unit’s detectives investigated over 2,400 mental app

and deceased person cases distributed largely among all personnel. Such distribution

detracts from core investigative efforts and as such specialized and dedicated resources

should be used to focus on these case types exclusively.


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Perhaps most importantly, and a common theme noted earlier, sergeant

supervision in the homicide unit does not provide an adequate number of personnel to

provide sufficient oversight, particularly given the high profile of homicide and related

cases.

Recommendations:

Assign 13 detectives to the Homicide Unit dedicated exclusively to homicide


investigations. This is two (2) positions above existing staffing levels.

Maintain one (1) Cold Case detective. As resources allow, assign various cold
cases to the Homicide detective contingent. The second temporarily assigned
detective to CACU should remain in that Unit.

Assign three (3) officers to the Homicide Unit to follow-up on deceased persons,
mental app, and other cases assigned the unit.

Assign two (2) sergeants to the Homicide Unit; this is one (1) position above
existing staffing levels.

Maintain one (1) Office Assistant in Homicide.

(2) Caseload Information – Robbery Unit

1,542 cases were assigned to Robbery personnel during the period, nearly 9-in-

10 being robberies.

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Robbery Unit Assigned Cases by Type - 1-year


3%
9%
23%

66%

Robbery(29.02) Robbery(29.03) Info. Only Other

The graph below shows the number of average cases per month assigned to

personnel dedicated to the Robbery Unit. Monthly averages vary widely, and through

improved case management practices this should be better balanced.

Avg. Cases Assigned / Month for Assigned Investigators


14.0

11.9
12.0 11.4
10.5 10.3 10.8
10.4
9.5 9.8 9.5
10.0
8.3
8.0
6.2
6.0 5.0 5.2
3.9
4.0 3.0
2.6
2.0 1.4 1.2
0.8
0.3
0.0
Inv 1 Inv 2 Inv 3 Inv 4 Inv 5 Inv 6 Inv 7 Inv 8 Inv 9 Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Despite variations, workloads are on the higher-end of caseloads for such

detectives as the ten (10) detectives assigned to the Robbery Unit throughout the entire

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year averaged 10.25 cases per month. Based on an active desirable caseload of 6-8

cases per month, and the desire on the part of FWPD to serve the community, staffing

levels should be based on a workload level at the midpoint of the spectrum. Therefore, to

accomplish caseload work within this framework, 18 detectives should be assigned to the

Robbery Unit.

Recommendations:

Assign 18 detectives to the Robbery Unit. This is five (5) positions above existing
staffing levels.

Maintain two (2) FBI Violent Crime Street Task Force detectives.

Assign two (2) sergeants to the Robbery Unit; this is one (1) position above existing
staffing levels.

Maintain one (1) Office Assistant in Robbery.

(3) Caseload Information – Major Case Unit

278 cases were assigned to Major Case personnel during the period; these are

somewhat evenly distributed although various assaults represent the largest investigative

category.

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Major Case Unit Assigned Cases by Type - 1-year.

37% 21%

23%
18%

Kidnap-related(PC20x) Assaultive Info. Only Other

The graph below shows the number of average cases per month assigned to

personnel dedicated to the Major Case Unit.

Avg. Cases Assigned / Month for Assigned Investigators

12.0

10.0 9.6

8.0

6.0

4.0
2.3 2.6
1.9
2.0 1.5 1.4 1.3 1.2
0.8
0.3 0.3
0.0
Inv 1 Inv 2 Inv 3 Inv 4 Inv 5 Inv 6 Inv 7 Inv 8 Inv 9 Inv 10 Inv 11

With one exception, monthly average caseloads are generally consistent.

Caseload averages are low for such workloads with Investigator #1 setting a reasonable

bar for performance. Moreover, such cases have similarities to person crimes and the

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previously noted benchmark range of 6-8 cases per detective per month can be used. As

such, staffing can be reduced in the core detectives by three (3) positions.

Recommendations:

Assign three (3) Major Crime detectives to the Major Crimes Unit. This is three (3)
positions below existing staffing levels.

Maintain two (2) officers dedicated to missing persons investigations, and one (1)
program coordinator dedicated to runaways.

Relocate the two (2) Human Trafficking detectives and two (2) Human Trafficking
Officers to the Vice Unit in Tactical Command.

Maintain one (1) Office Assistant in Major Crimes.

(4) Caseload Information – Crimes Against Children Unit (CACU)

3,330 cases were assigned to CACU personnel during the period. Family and

Assaultive Offenses represent nearly 2-in-3 cases.

CACU Unit Assigned Cases by Type - 1-year


8%
17%
30%

34%
10%

Family Off. (PC25x) Sexual Off.(PC21x) Assaultive Off. (PC22x)


Info. Only Other

With respect to cases assigned to individuals, CACU caseload information showed

nearly 30 personnel allocated such cases—well beyond the number of detective and

other staff assigned to this unit. Based on further review, many detectives assigned had

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less than a year of service. Identifying and maintaining a consistent core of detectives in

such a high-profile investigative area should be considered best practice. For the seven

detectives assigned for the entire year they average nearly 14.8 cases per month—this

is far too high an average for sex-related crimes and reflects a need for additional staffing

for monthly benchmarks that should range from 5-7 cases per month.

These detectives handle family violence as well, which can have a larger caseload

ranging from 20-30 cases monthly. Ideally, detectives should fully specialize with

appropriate caseloads as recommended below.

Recommendations:

Assign 18 detectives to the Crimes Against Children Unit dedicated exclusively to


assaultive and sexual offenses and related. This is seven (7) CACU positions above
existing staffing levels.

Maintain one (1) Internet Crimes Against Children detective and one (1) ICAC
officer. As resources allow, assign various high-profile ICAC cases to the other
detective contingents.

Assign three (3) detectives dedicated exclusively to child-based family offenses


and have them specialize in these crime types. These are new dedicated positions.

Assign two (2) sergeants to the CACU; this is one (1) more position above existing
staffing levels.

Add one (1) new Office Assistant to CACU.

(5) Caseload Information – Sex Crimes Unit

985 cases were assigned to Sexual Assault personnel during the period.

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Sex Assault Unit Assigned Cases by Type - 1-year


5%
18% 16%
13%

48%

CCP 62 Sexual Off. (PC21x) Assaultive Off.(PC22x) Info. Only Other

Approximately one-half of cases are assaultive penal codes, and one-in-six are

sexual assaults.

Avg. Cases Assigned / Month for Assigned


Investigators
16.0
13.7
14.0
11.8 11.9
12.0 11.2
10.2
10.0
7.6
8.0 6.8
6.0
4.0 2.8 2.3
2.0 0.9
0.0
Inv 1 Inv 2 Inv 3 Inv 4 Inv 5 Inv 6 Inv 7 Inv 8 Inv 9 Inv 10Inv 11Inv 12Inv 13Inv 14

With respect to cases assigned to individuals, Sexual Assault caseload is nearly

bifurcated, with several detectives having significant monthly caseloads and others

ranging from 2-12 cases. This is as a result of the kinds of cases assigned to various

detective and officer staff. Irrespective of these case fluctuations, the Sex Crimes Unit is

an illustration of how case management strategies can strongly influence caseloads. By

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example, 159 cases are sex offender registrants, 180 cases are Information Only, and

350 cases are assaultive cases often not prosecuted/solved. These potential issues, if

addressed through revised case management, could reduce recommended staffing

levels below.

Recommendations:

Assign eight (8) detectives to the Sex Crimes Unit. This is two (2) more positions
above existing staffing levels.

Maintain one (1) Cold Case Detective.

Maintain eight (8) Officers designed to provide field supporting services to Sex
Crimes.

Assign two (2) sergeants to the Sex Crimes Unit.

Maintain one (1) Office Assistant in Sex Crimes.

(6) Caseload Information – Domestic Violence

8,105 cases were assigned to Domestic Violence personnel during the period.

Domestic Violence Unit Assigned Cases by Type - 1-


year

2% 9%
3%
86%

Assaultive Off.(PC22x) Family Off.(PC25x) Info. Only Other

The vast majority, 86%, are assaultive offenses of both misdemeanor and felony.

Of particular interest, there is a reasonable proportion of family violence offenses similar

to cases involving CACU.


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Moreover, and in reference to CACU, caseload information showed over 30

personnel allocated such cases—well beyond the number of detective and other staff

assigned to domestic violence efforts. As with CACU, stability in detective assignments

would prove valuable.

Average Cases Assigned / Mo. for Assigned


Investigators
60.0 54.3 54.5
50.3 52.4 50.4
50.0 43.9
40.2
40.0 36.1 37.4 39.5 35.8
34.6
30.6 28.8
30.0 27.3

20.0 13.9
10.8
10.0

0.0
Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv Inv
#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17

Based on the above chart, several detectives exceed 50 cases monthly; this is

untenable as a maximum of 30 cases per month should be considered the benchmark.

As a consequence of this workload, the following recommendations are made.

Recommendations:

Assign a total of 22 detectives to the Domestic Violence Unit. This is 10 DV


positions above existing staffing levels. Maintain specializations such as the two
(2) High Risk Detectives.

Maintain one (1) Officer in DV supporting services, and one (1) Customer Services
Representative.

Assign two (2) sergeants to the Domestic Violence Unit.

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(7) Caseload Information – Fraud Unit

4,632 cases were assigned to Fraud personnel during the period. Over three-

quarters are forgery and fraud cases.

Fraud Unit Assigned Cases by Type - 1-year


8%
15%
76%

Forgery/Fraud (PC32x) Info. Only Other

With respect to cases assigned to individuals, Fraud fluctuates widely with cases

per month typically ranging in the twenties to the fifties; this should be normalized among

all assigned detective staff.

Avg. Cases Assigned / Month for Assigned Investigators


70.0

60.0 58.1
53.5
50.0 46.9 46.4
42.2
40.0
31.8
29.3
30.0
23.8 23.2
19.0
20.0

9.3
10.0

0.0
Inv 1 Inv 2 Inv 3 Inv 4 Inv 5 Inv 6 Inv 7 Inv 8 Inv 9 Inv 10 Inv 11

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Given existing workload metrics above, in conjunction with benchmark

information, these detectives should have a case assignment expectation of 30 cases

monthly under existing case management protocols. If advanced cases management

protocols are implemented to include screening by amount or other approach, caseloads

per detective can be adjusted. New caseload expectations result in the following

recommendations.

Recommendations:

Assign a total of 11 detectives to the Fraud Unit. This is four (4) Fraud Detective
positions above existing staffing levels. Maintain one (1) FBI Task Force Detective.

Maintain one (1) Sergeant in Fraud.

Maintain one (1) Office Assistant in Fraud.

(8) Caseload Information – Commercial Auto Theft Unit

4,632 cases were assigned to Commercial Auto Theft personnel during the period.

Nearly three-quarters are defined as a “PD Pull” which is an examination of auto theft-

related records and not typically an “investigative case.”

The Commercial Auto Theft Unit is a proactive unit at its core. It is composed of

several key duties to include:

• Three (3) detectives investigate commercial auto theft cases throughout the City
to include cargo, commercial, chop shop activities, etc.

• Staff performs 68A title inspections every Tuesday.

• Two (2) detectives operate the Bait Car program with support provided by the one
(1) Officer.

Because of the specialized nature of the Commercial Auto Theft Unit, its proactive

nature allows it to largely expand or contract to fulfill needs. Consequently, this proactive
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unit should remain at its existing size unless further specialized efforts are warranted by

the community.

Recommendations:

Assign a total of five (5) detectives and one (1) Officer to the Commercial Auto Theft
Unit; this is the same existing staffing levels. Maintain one (1) Auto Theft Task
Force Detective.

Maintain one (1) Sergeant in Commercial Auto Theft.

Maintain one (1) Office Assistant in Commercial Auto Theft.

(9) Division-level Criminal Investigations Units.

The Division-level Criminal Investigations Units (CIUs) investigate tens of

thousands of cases in total largely focused on property crimes. Staff dedicated to such

efforts include core detectives. Some CIU investigations have specialists (e.g. Nuisance

Abatement) and all have 3-officer “burglary support teams.” Workloads for the core

detectives are different among the various Divisions, ultimately requiring different staffing

level requirements.

Annual Cases Assigned to Each CIU Division (April 2017-March 2018)

1-year Annual
Division Cases Inv. Staff Cases/Staff
West-CIU 13,808 19 727
Central-CIU 11,122 17 654
East-CIU 13,096 15 873
North-CIU 9,438 10 944
Northwest-CIU12 10,000 12 833
South-CIU 13,189 21 628

12Due to the recent creation of the Northwest CIU, the caseload presented is an estimated annual amount based
upon January 2018 through April 2018 data.
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Based on the benchmarks noted earlier in the chapter, property crime detectives

can effectively handle approximately 15 cases per month or 180 cases per year. The

metrics noted above indicate assigned cases far exceeds this benchmark in each division.

Such workloads are untenable and demonstrate a case management approach that

should definitively be improved. Differentiation in the Annual Cases/Staff further

demonstrates a need for enhanced case management to better balance workload across

all divisions.

Staffing levels must be better managed internally. The project team does not at

this time recommend more detective staffing in CIUs pending revised case management

approaches, but does recommend a reorganization of detectives among the various

divisions based on average workload of 780 cases per core detective—which reflects

existing performance—the following chart reflects new detective deployments for the 94

core detective staff assigned at the time of this report.

CIU Divisions’ Line Staffing Changes

Increase (+)
or Decrease Annual
Division Inv. Staff (-) Cases/Staff
West-CIU 18 -1 767
Central-CIU 15 -2 741
East-CIU 17 2 770
North-CIU 13 3 726
Northwest-CIU 13 1 769
South-CIU 18 -3 733

As shown, notable changes occur in several CIU divisions based upon re-balanced

workloads. Additionally, as with the Criminal Investigations Unit staffing, sergeant

supervision should increase in nearly all CIU Divisions.

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Recommendations:

Reorganize the 94 core detective investigative staff in the six divisions’ CIUs as
described.

Assign two (2) sergeants and 18 investigative staff to the West Criminal
Investigations Unit. This is one (1) additional sergeant and one (1) fewer detectives
above existing staffing levels.

Assign two (2) sergeants and 15 investigative staff to the Central Criminal
Investigations Unit. This is one (1) additional sergeant and two (2) fewer detective
compared to existing staffing levels.

Assign two (2) sergeants and 17 investigative staff to the East Criminal
Investigations Unit. This is one (1) additional sergeant and two (2) additional
detectives above existing staffing levels.

Assign one (1) sergeant and 13 investigative staff to the North Criminal
Investigations Unit. This is the same sergeant staffing level and three (3) additional
detectives above existing staffing levels.

Assign one (1) sergeant and 13 investigative staff to the Northwest Criminal
Investigations Unit. This is the same sergeant staffing level and nine (9) fewer
detectives compared to existing staffing levels.

Assign two (2) sergeants and 18 investigative staff to South Criminal Investigations
Unit. This is one (1) additional sergeant and three (3) fewer detectives above
existing staffing levels.

Maintain three (3) officer burglary teams in all CIUs.

Maintain existing civilian support staffing in all CIUs.

(10) Assignment of Night Detectives

Some large policing organizations deploy multiple shifts for detectives, including

night detectives. Fort Worth PD can consider such a new deployment strategy; however,

this should re-allocate recommended detective staffing levels among two or more shifts,

as opposed to a further increase in investigative personnel.

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5. Assessment of Criminal Investigations Supporting Services

In addition to the core investigative workloads provided by specialized Criminal

Investigation Division staff, there are other supporting units dedicated to the Criminal

Investigations Division. These include the following units.

(1) Fugitive Unit

The Fugitive Unit has nine (9) officers deputized as US Marshalls and assigned to the US

Marshalls Task Force. These staff are to identify and recover higher-risk repeat offenders

through the warrant process. Given its proactive and specialized nature, the Fugitive Unit

can alter its size based upon need. There is no recommendation to alter its current staff

contingent.

Recommendation:

Maintain existing sergeant and officer staffing levels of 10 personnel in the Fugitive
Unit.

(2) Victims Assistance Unit

The Victims Assistance Unit is a civilianized unit providing services to victims of

crime ranging from Harassment to Homicide to include intake, counseling, identification

of services, coordination with One Safe Place, etc. Various Specialists provide letters to

victims, performs intakes, conducts triage and sets up appointments at the OSP. Staff will

identify services for victims and help facilitate service acquisition. Key workloads included

in 2017:

• 11,935 mailed letters

• 4,623 outreach calls

• 1,252 incoming calls


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• 202 in-office visits

• 9 field visits

These metrics could expand with additional dedicated resources. However, given

that the number of victims that could potentially be served by the Victims Assistance Unit

could be well beyond existing capacity, it would not be practical to recommend a different

staffing level than what current philosophy dictates.

Recommendation:

Maintain existing civilian supervision and line staffing levels of 9 personnel in the
Victim Assistance Unit.

(3) Sex Offender Registration Unit

This unit composed of largely sworn staff, registers and monitors sex offenders

located within the City. Dependent upon the crime, sex offenders must register quarterly

or annually. Monitoring officers perform site visits to confirm their home locale. Ultimately

staffing levels are linked to the frequency of registration and the desired number of

monitoring visits. Moreover, it is contingent upon the sexual offender population in the

City. Monitoring staffing levels are presently deployed along the old division boundaries

and should be altered to accommodate the new six divisions system.

Recommendations:

Increase monitoring staff in the Sex Offender Registration Unit by one (1) Officer
to six (6) personnel to better align with the six-region FWPD system.

Maintain other supporting staff positions in the Sex Offender Unit of five (5)
positions.

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(4) Digital Forensics Lab

The Digital Forensics Lab performs forensic analysis on various electronic and

computer devices for FWPD investigative staff and abstracts investigative materials for

requesting party or provides raw data based upon detective request. Our project team

took a tour of the newly designed Digital Forensics Lab and supporting equipment and

has identified it as a best-in-class operation. As such, our assessment is that the staffing

is appropriate for existing operations.

Recommendation:

Maintain existing staffing levels of 7.5 personnel in the Digital Forensics Lab.

(5) Crime Scene Unit

The CSSU, overseen by two (2) sergeants, is composed of 15 sworn officers.

There are five (5) officers deployed to each shift. The two Sergeants stagger start

times/days for maximum 24/7 coverage on a 10-hour shift. Personnel responds to crime

scenes to collect evidence, primarily for person crimes. Staff supports accident

reconstruction detectives, as required.

The CSSU was unable to provide workload metrics for their operation, and as such

development of alternative staffing levels for the Unit cannot be accomplished. The

Journal of Forensics Sciences and Criminal Investigations corroborates that it is

extremely difficult to determine such staffing levels in the absence of detailed information,

and concludes: “There is no doubt that how many people needed (staff) to provide a

reasonable CSI response will depend on the size of the population, tax base, and the

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amount of property and persons crimes that occur with the geographical area that is the

responsibility of a particular law enforcement agency.”13

At issue is the future staffing of the CSSU. While it is unreasonable to modify

existing sworn staffing levels based on MOU’s and other FWPD cultural realities,

augmenting CSSU with civilian crime scene investigators is practical in the future. As

such, this should be strongly considered as an option to increase the overall size of the

CSSU in the future.

Recommendation:

In the future as the Crime Scene Unit expands, consider augmenting sworn staffing
levels with civilian Crime Scene Investigators (CSI) to provide additional support
services.

6 Assessment of Management Positions

Our evaluation of the organizational structure of the Criminal Investigations

Division indicates that while there are several issues associated with first line supervision

(e.g. sergeants), there are sufficient personnel at the Lieutenant and Captain ranks. As

such, no staffing changes are warranted.

Recommendation:

Maintain existing Lieutenant and Captain staffing in the Criminal Investigations


Division.

13 Staffing a Crime Scene Unit, from Sworn to Civilian. Volume 4, Issue 2, August 2017.
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2 Property and Records Management Division

The Property and Records Management Division is comprised of units that provide

various key administrative, records, and warrant support to the Fort Worth Police

Department. The Division is fully civilianized.

Property and Records Management Division

Police Records Management


Data Reporting Section
Section

NIBRS Property Control Unit

Data Collection and Records


Reporting Unit

Warrants &
Identification

1 Analysis of Property and Records Management Division Data Reporting


Section

Metrics relevant to staffing requirements vary for the functional units noted above

Key information for the Property and Records Management Division’s Data Reporting

Section are included below.

(1) Data Collection and Reporting Unit

Through telephone contact, Data Reporting Unit staff take a variety of non-

emergency police reports on a 24/7 basis from citizens. These staff also manages online

reporting, and reviews and approves all report characteristics (to include officers) for
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NIBRS purposes. Illustrative workload is as follows which represents thousands of reports

taken in 2017, with the most calls experienced in June 2017.

Jan-Dec 2017 SRU Telephone Report Counts


6,000
5,295
5,000

4,000

3,000

2,000

1,000

0
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

This workload does not include, by example, reviewing CopLogic (online) reports

provided by citizenry. This workload is included below.

Jan-Dec 2017 SRU CopLogic Online Report Reviews


900
800 807
757
664 712 764
700 723
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

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Based on the total workloads for these major functions combined with the existing

staffing levels of 19 Data Reporting Technicians, each Technician must review/prepare

approximately 281 reports per month. Based on estimated work hours, this is about 2

reports per work hour or 30-minutes per report. This is reasonable (and relatively rapid)

productivity and reflects a staffing level that approximates need.

Recommendations:

Increase Data Reporting Technician staffing levels from current 19 positions to 21


positions, an increase of two (2) positions and consistent with budgeted staffing
levels.

Maintain existing supervision, lead and other supporting positions in the Data
Collection and Reporting Unit of eight (8) positions.

(2) NIBRS Unit

The National Incident-based Reporting System (NIBRS) for the FBI requires

consistent and regular input into a department’s Records Management System (RMS).

FWPD dedicates three (3) positions to this effort. These staff review and insert into RMS

appropriate case-related NIBRS statistics. Given these tasks are accomplished

successfully for the FBI, no staffing change is warranted.

Recommendation:

Maintain existing staffing levels of three (3) positions in the NIBRS Unit.

(3) Warrants and Identification Unit

The Unit maintains and distributes warrants, photocopies, scans records, deploys

warrants and emergency protective orders to dispatch for NCIC data entry, and processes

Jail paperwork on 24/7 basis. Maintaining hardcopy records of these warrants is a Texas

legislative directive, and cannot be fully automated through Dispatch. As such, staffing to
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manage these efforts are required. Staffing levels, based on our assessment, are

appropriate with one exception which requires a lead (senior) position to oversee a

working shift.

Recommendations:

Add one (1) Senior Warrant/ID Technician to lead a shift, increasing such staffing
to three (3) positions of this type. This is consistent with budgeted positions.

Maintain remaining Warrants and Identification Unit staffing composed of nine (9)
other positions.

2 Analysis of Property and Records Management Division Police Records


Management Section.

Metrics relevant to staffing requirements vary for the functional units noted above

Key information for the Property and Records Management Division’s Police Records

Management Section are included below.

(1) Records Management Unit

The Records Management Unit manages the records database, responds to public

information requests, ensures records retention and destruction of paper-based

documents kept in the PMRC, files records, and performs expungements and processing

of carrying concealed weapons. The following reflects key Records workloads for 2017.

2017 Records Data Processing

Requests
for
Incident Weapons Front Public
Reports Reports Licenses Counter Calls CPS Info. Accident
Processed Scanned Processed Contacts Handled Request Request Expungements Reports
25,200 3,219 1,560 31,200 54,600 1,534 1,178 507 41,000

Based on the above, Records Management Unit personnel processed nearly

160,000 transactions with 8 staff and one supervisor. This output is very reasonable for

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the types of workloads noted, and staffing levels are appropriate based upon this

performance.

Recommendation:

Maintain existing staffing levels of nine (9) total positions in the Records
Management Unit.

(2) Property Control Unit

This Unit manages the property warehouse to include intake, software update,

shelf management, disposal, telephone answering, front counter work, etc. Workload

metrics for 2017 and beginning 2018 data is as follows.

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As shown by the table above, the transactional history of items booked in versus

items disposed of illustrates a common problem with property room management. Our

tour of the facility suggests it operates under best management practices; however, the

delta between in-and-out whereby outgoing items reflect an average of approximately

10% of incoming items, demonstrates that staffing is not fully sufficient to manage the

property control operation.

Failure to dispose of property near equivalent to items booked results in an ever-

increasing problem of inventory expansion which becomes increasingly problematic. As

such, staffing levels should be developed to help mitigate these circumstances.

Recommendations:

Increase the Senior Property Control Technician from three (3) to four (4) positions.
This is consistent with budgeted staffing levels.

Increase the Property Control Specialist positions from 11 to 14 positions, and


increase of three (3) staff. This is consistent with the budgeted staffing levels.
Maintain other supervision and supporting positions.

3 Assessment of Management Positions

Our evaluation of the organizational structure of the Property and Records

Management Division indicates that there is an opportunity for an adjustment. With the

recommended transfer of the Auto Pound function to this division, span of control for

middle management can benefit from another Assistant Public Safety Support Manager.

Recommendation:

With the relocation of Auto Pound to the Property and Records Management
Division, re-organize spans of control and add one (1) Assistant Public Safety
Support Manager position, increasing the number of middle-managers to three
positions.

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3 Community Programs Division

The Community Programs Division is comprised of units that provide Jail, sworn

support services, and most volunteer services to the Fort Worth Police Department. The

Division is overseen by a Captain who has two Lieutenants and a Volunteer Coordinator,

as well as several officer direct reports, overseeing the two operating sections composed

of civilian and sworn personnel.

Community Programs Division

Jail Operations Community


Youth Section Volunteer
Section Programs

School Citizens On
Jail Operations Resource Unit Patrol

Youth
Services Unit
CAPA

MAC

Citizens Police
Academy

Hispanic CPA

1 Analysis of Jail Operations

The Jail is predominantly a contract operation with the City of Mansfield and

effectively operates as a holding facility for arrestees. Recent operational protocols have

changed as a consequence of a new Sheriff and additional use of the Sheriff’s Jail. Six
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(6) FWPD sergeants provide arrestee processing oversight and support of the jail

contract. These staff must manage the arrest process as summarized by the following

metrics.

2017 Number of Jail Arrest Incidents Processed by Type

Other Agency 7,002

Sergeant 244

Reserve Officer 3

Officer 23,605

Lieutenant 13

Corporal/Detective 1,841

0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000

As shown by the above, FWPD Jail sergeants oversee the processing of nearly

32,000 arrests annually through the approval of FWPD officer and Marshall paperwork as

well as ensuring Probable Cause for arrest. The sergeants are further supported by

FWPD civilian Intoxilyzer Operators composed of four (4) personnel. Given the totality of

work accomplished, under present contracting circumstances no staffing changes are

warranted.

2 Analysis of the Youth Section

The Youth Section is composed of both the School Resource Officer program and

the Youth Services Unit. These are further analyzed below.

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(1) School Resource Unit

The School Resource Unit is distributed across five (as opposed to six) geographic

areas encompassing numerous school districts and resulting in several contractual

arrangements with schools. The Districts pay 50% of dedicated officers’ wages and 100%

of supervisors and rovers. School-assigned staff are contractually obligated to “provide

the District with school security services for the purpose of creating a safe educational

environment, in partnership with the District.” In effect staff are largely dedicated to

maintaining law and order and all calls for service response in the school environment.

SROs function in all High Schools and some middle schools dependent upon the School

District. According to the contract, the following are the core requirements:

• Assigned officers shall have the SRO Program as their primary duty, and will not
be regularly assigned additional police duties. City reserves the right, however, to
reassign any or all officers temporarily in the event of an emergency or when the
City, in its sole discretion, deems necessary.

• City shall coordinate assignment and duty hours with District. If necessary, to
handle unplanned absences at schools, FWPD officers from other units may be
assigned temporarily to provide coverage. City shall not provide replacements for
officers who are on leave due to an occupational injury. Replacement officers,
when available, will be assigned to District when the assigned police officer's
absence is for an extended period of time.

• City shall provide to the officers assigned to the SRO Program all the law
enforcement training and certification, vehicles and police equipment, benefits,
and insurance (including liability coverage) that are provided to all City's police
officers. District shall provide any radio equipment necessary to allow the assigned
officers to communicate with District staff.

• The City shall maintain emergency response plans for every school within their
jurisdiction. To the extent allowed under Texas law, these plans shall be kept
confidential within the Fort Worth Police Department for security purposes, but
meetings shall be held with authorized representatives of District to provide
relevant information and excerpts from the plan necessary for implementation.
City's Chief of Police shall designate a commander to be responsible for
maintenance and dissemination of these plans.
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The program is composed of 66 Officers whereby 1-2 SROs are deployed in high

schools and some Districts having 1 SRO in middle school. 3 of 66 SROs are rovers, one

on rotation assignment to Youth Unit. This rover distribution is insufficient for coverage

given absenteeism resulting in net availability for each officer. While interview suggests

that much leave is taken during the summer when school is not in session, this approach

still does not compensate for probable absences resulting in less trained officers serving

as rovers to provide coverage at the schools. To that end, the rover contingent should be

doubled from 3 to 6 personnel.

As with the sexual offender program, SRO supervisory and SRO staffing levels are

presently deployed along the old division boundaries and should be altered to

accommodate the new six divisions system.

Recommendations:

Increase the School Resource Officer Rover contingent from 3 to 6 Officers,


resulting in an SRO staffing contingent of 69 personnel.

Increase sergeant staffing in the School Resource Unit by one (1) supervisor to six
(6) sergeant personnel to better align with the six-region FWPD system. Re-
organize the SRO program along these new boundaries.

(2) Youth Services Unit

The Youth Services Unit determines eligibility for First Offender Program,

interviewing juveniles and tracking progress on their 90-day FO program. Assigned staff

perform candidate background checks, reviews and files criminal cases with County

District Attorney, and oversees some specialized volunteer programs.

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Youth Services diversion metrics are not currently available and as such, staffing

alterations beyond the existing authorized personnel cannot be recommended. There is

an effective cross-training rotational practice underway with School Resource Officers;

This program should continue.

Recommendations:

Fill the vacant Administrative Technician position. Maintain remaining staffing


levels for a total of eight (8) personnel in the Youth Services Unit.

Continue the SRO rotational assignment in the Youth Services Unit.

3 Analysis of Community Volunteer Program

The Fort Worth Police Department has several robust community volunteer

programs with minimal paid oversight. Summary of programmatic efforts is as follows:

Volunteer Program Summary Description FT or PT Funds from Est. # of


Oversight Code Blue? Volunteers
Code Blue at the Volunteers patrol around elementary One (1) FT Yes 15
School schools keeping eyes and ears open for and Six (6)
suspicious activity PT
Citizens on Patrol Volunteers patrol their own One (1) FT Yes 648
communities keeping observant for and Six (6)
suspicious activity. A radio is given to PT
volunteers to be able to report
suspicious activities in an expeditious
manner.
Spanish-speaking This is a Spanish-speaking volunteer PT with Yes 75
Citizens on Patrol group that patrols around their assistance
communities, keeping their eyes and from another
ears open for suspicious activity. PT NPO

Citizens Police An educational 8-week program that FT Yes 40


Academy gives insight and a behind-the-scenes
look at the FWPD. The sessions are
held once a week from 6pm to 9pm.
Citizens Police A Spanish-speaking educational PT Yes 150
Academy in program that gives insight and a
Spanish behind-the-scenes look at the Fort
Worth Police Department.

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Volunteer Program Summary Description FT or PT Funds from Est. # of


Oversight Code Blue? Volunteers
Teen Academy An educational multi-week program that PT Yes Zero (0) -
Code Blue gives Fort Worth teens insight and a This program
behind-the-scenes look at the Fort is run by
Worth Police Department. Officers pick sworn
up the teens and bring them to a central personnel
location for the weekly sessions.

Clergy members who ride with officers FT Yes 150


Clergy and Police and volunteer in pastoral matters
Alliance
Ministers Against A group of ministers who assist the PT Yes 22
Crime FWPD in pastoral duties as well as
diffusing issues, especially as it relates
to the African American community
Community FT Yes 100
Emergency A group of volunteers who are trained
Response Team to assist the Fort FWPD in the event of
major catastrophes, such as but not
limited to, tornadoes, explosions, etc.
TOTAL NUMBERS 1 Full Time ~1,200
Civilian

6 Part Time
Civilian

3 Full Time
Sworn

5 Part Time
Sworn

While most of the volunteer programs are in the Community Programs Division,

some are not. These include reserves, explorers, etc. For consistency in service delivery,

all volunteer programs should be centralized under this command structure.

Recommendation:

Centralize all FWPD volunteer programs under the Community Programs Division
leadership.

4 Assessment of Management Positions

Our evaluation of the organizational structure of the Community Programs Division

indicates that the Captain has too many direct reports of both civilian and sworn at

different ranks. Civilians cannot supervise sworn in FWPD, and as such the Captain’s
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span of control is too broad. This should be rectified by assigning a sergeant “adjutant”

position oversee all sworn officers managing various individual volunteer programs.

Recommendation:

Add one (1) sergeant position in the Community Programs Division to act as the
Captain’s Adjutant to oversee all sworn officers managing various individual
volunteer programs.

4 Forensics Science Division

The Forensics Science Division is comprised of units that provide various key

laboratory support to the FWPD. The Division is overseen by a civilian forensics division

manager who has four (4) supervisors providing oversight for various functions as shown

in the following organizational structure. The Division is fully civilianized.

Forensic Science Division

Admn. Unit Evidence Unit

Latent Print Unit Firearms Unit Chemistry Unit Biology Unit

1 Analysis of Administrative Unit and Evidence Unit

The Administrative Unit and Evidence Unit are specialized supporting units to the

Forensics Science Division. For purposes of this narrative, the Administrative Unit

includes the Manager and Crime Lab Quality Assurance (QA) Coordinator; this latter

position performs accreditation compliance audits for the division and documents non-

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conformance and corrective actions. Moreover, an Administrative Technician and Senior

Forensic Scientist support the staff with the latter facilitating various communications (e.g.

evidence viewing) with attorneys, facilitates outsourcing, and performs case approvals for

evidence processing from detectives.

The Evidence Unit transports evidence to-and-from various locales, ensuring chain

of custody. This includes transports with the Medical Examiner, University of North Texas

Health Science Center, and various other contract laboratories.

With respect to the Evidence Unit, 2017 data suggested 365 evidence runs were

made. This level of workload does not require two full-time personnel as long as an

alternative staff were available for back-up or a part-time position was available.

Recommendations:

Maintain existing staffing levels of four (4) personnel in the Forensic Science
Division’s Administration.

Reduce one of two Property Control Specialist positions to half-time, resulting in


1.5 Property Control Specialists in the Evidence Unit.

2 Analysis of the Biology Unit

The Biology Unit performs various duties related to DNA evidence screening,

processing and testing and the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) administration.

Workload metrics are shown below.

Biology Unit Metrics

DNA Samples Processed in 2017 958


DNA Samples Processed Jan-Feb 2018 162
Average total TAT in 2017 (turnaround time) 399
Average total TAT Jan-Feb 2018 332
Average assignment TAT in 2017 100
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Average assignment TAT Jan-Feb 2018 93


Average DNA cases/month reported in 2017 34
Average DNA cases/month reported (Jan-Feb 2018) 28
Total Biology Unit case records reported in 2017 830
Total Biology Unit case records reported Jan-Mar 2018 161
Total Biology requests in 2018 309
Requests pending approval (mainly Biology) 410
Backlog as of 3-27-18 511

Based on the metrics above, the Biology Unit has an approximate 4-5 month

backlog. As with all forensics units, staffing levels, assuming adequate performance, is

based on the desired turnaround time. As such, staffing should be augmented if more

rapid turnaround time is desired. Based on the metrics, modest staffing increases in the

Biology Unit are warranted.

Recommendation:

Increase staffing by one (1) Forensic Scientist in the Biology Unit increasing total
Unit staffing to five (5) positions.

3 Analysis of the Chemistry Unit

The Chemistry Unit performs various duties related to chemical composition on

controlled substances (CS) and blood alcohol testing (BAC). Controlled substance testing

includes both felony and misdemeanor cases, as required. The following workload

metrics are noted for the Chemistry Unit.

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Chemistry Unit Metrics


2017 2017 2018 2018
TYPE: BAC CS BAC CS
number of requests 623 3822 187 1561
TAT (turnaround time) 16 44 5 38
completed 594 3543 187 900
BAC backlog 0 x 0 x
CS backlog x 268 x 348
Marijuana ONLY backlog x included in CS x 269
TCME out-sourced 29 x x x
terminated x 7 x 44

As noted with Biology, backlog is a staffing requirement driver. Interestingly, recent

information suggests that marijuana testing is becoming a lower priority necessity based

on the DA’s Office. As such, backlogs for Marijuana are minimized resulting in an

approximate backlog of 79 cases in 2018. Backlog is therefore not significant, and with

an improving 38-day turnaround time in 2018, staffing adjustments in the Chemistry Unit

are not warranted.

Recommendation:

Maintain staffing levels of seven (7) positions in the Chemistry Unit.

4 Analysis of the Firearms Unit

The Firearms Unit performs ballistics testing to include distance, serial restoration,

firearms examinations and enters various results into National Integrated Ballistic

Information Network (NIBIN). Workload metrics reflect the following:

Firearms Unit Metrics

2017 Cases Completed – 247 Firearms ID; 232 NIBIN entries.


2018 to-date Cases – 50 Firearms ID; 100 NIBIN entries.
Current Backlog – 113 Firearms ID; 741 NIBIN entry requirements.

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The backlog data show a significant issue, although performance has improved

since 2017. The current NIBIN backlog is untenable and if improved turnaround time is

desired, additional staff are warranted.

Recommendation:

Increase staffing by one (1) Firearms Technician in the Firearms Unit to expedite
NIBINs entry, increasing total Unit staffing to five (5) positions.

5 Analysis of the Latent Print Unit

The Latent Print Unit performs latent examinations, evidence processing and entry

into Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS).

Latent Print Unit Metrics

2017 Prints Completed – 856 processing and comparisons.


2018 to-date Prints – 145 processing and comparisons.
Current Backlog – 142 processing and comparisons.

Based on the workload noted, there is an approximate two-month backlog for latent

print processing and comparisons. Moreover, this backlog is still evident even though the

Latent Print Supervisor performs latent exams. This task should not be accomplished by

a first-line supervisor and instead allocated to dedicated staff.

Recommendation:

Increase staffing by one (1) Latent Print Examiner in the Latent Print Unit increasing
total Unit staffing to six (6) positions.

6 Assessment of Management Positions

Our evaluation of the organizational structure of the Forensic Science Division

indicates that there are sufficient management and supervisory positions within the

Division. No staffing changes are warranted.

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Recommendation:

Maintain existing management and supervisory positions in the Forensic Science


Division.

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5 Analysis of the Finance / Personnel Bureau


The Finance / Personnel Bureau is managed by an Assistant Chief and is

organized into two Commands – the Operational Command and the Administrative

Command. One Command is managed by a Deputy Chief and the other is managed by

an Assistant Director. Within the Finance / Personnel Bureau, detailed below, there are

two commands with five Divisions, each managed by a Captain, Lieutenant or a civilian

manager. The first section below will review and analyze the Finance / Personnel Bureau

followed by each command.

(1) Bureau Administration

This unit is staffed with Assistant Chief, one Lieutenant, two sergeants, four

officers, one payroll manager and four payroll clerks and two social media specialists.

The Assistant Chief is responsible for setting the overall direction of the bureau and

coordinating activities between other bureaus and within the Finance / Personnel Bureau.

The Lieutenant is responsible for supervising the public relations sergeant, payroll

supervisor, labor / management relations and special projects for the chief. One sergeant

is adjutant to the Assistant Chief while the other sergeant is over public relations. The

adjutant handles paperwork for the bureau and Assistant Chief, coordinates the Chaplain

program and the peer support program.

Recommendation:

Maintain current staffing and organization of the administration

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(2) Public Relations

This unit is staffed by a sergeant, four officers and two social media specialists.

The unit works primarily day shift hours but are on call for critical incidents and special

events.

The primary tasks of this unit are:

• Respond to critical events and enquiries from the media.

• Develop messaging for the chief and the department.

• Maintain social media platforms (Facebook and Twitter). Both are active with
215,791 Facebook followers and 167,000 Twitter followers. Both social media
accounts have almost daily postings and often multiple posts a day. The YouTube
channel has 2,500 subscribers.

• Maintain and improve community relations through liaisons to the community.


Each officer is designated a liaison to specific under-represented communities.

The Public relations unit is effective at communicating the department message

through the media and through social media. With a population of over 878,178 covering

350 square miles it is extremely important for the department to have an effective way to

communicate to the community it serves. The current structure of having both response

to critical incidents and media requests while having dedicated staff to maintain a social

media presence is effective. Additionally, having specific officers assigned as liaisons to

different under-represented communities is optimal.

Recommendations:

Maintain current staffing.

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(3) Payroll Unit

This unit consists of a payroll manager and four clerks. They process the payroll

for the entire department. The unit was originally located under the financial management

division but was moved to the Bureau Administration in 2010 after there were problems

with payroll software which resulted in officers not getting paid appropriately. The primary

task of this unit is to enter payroll information into the ERP program. Payroll works closely

with employment services as they track and enter promotions and other employee data

that can impact pay information. This is all done through the ERP software.

The activities of this unit are not closely aligned with any of the other functions

within the Bureau Administration. The initial reason for moving the unit from the financial

division no longer exists as the software issues have been resolved and the significant

pay issues are no longer present. The payroll manager reports to a sworn lieutenant

position that has no requirement of formal financial or payroll training. Though this is not

a current issue, having a supervisor that has training and responsibility of over like

functions is more likely to yield better support.

Recommendation:

Move the payroll unit to the Financial Management Division

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Analysis of the Operational Command

Within Operational Command, detailed below, there are three Divisions that are

each managed by a Captain or Lieutenant. The first section below will review and analyze

the Operational Command Administration followed by the Training Division, Professional

Standards Division and the Communications Division.

Operational Command

Policy Professional Standards Communications


Mananagement Training Division Division Division and Quality
and Safety Assurance

Career Internal
Development Affairs Communicati
ons

Enhanced Special
Skills Investigations Quality
Assurance

Background
and
Recruiting

The Operational Command Administration consists of the Deputy Chief and a

sergeant who serves as the adjutant. The deputy chief oversees the day to day operations

of the command, sets direction and coordinates the activities within the command with

other bureaus and within the command. The sergeant coordinates paperwork, handles

special projects and coordinates communication among units. The Administration for

Operational Command is able complete all required tasks and coordinate the activities

with the current level of staffing.

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Recommendation:

Maintain current organization and staffing.

1 Policy Management and Safety Unit

The Policy Management Unit is comprised of two separate functions: Policy

Management, which includes accreditation and Safety. The authorized staffing in the unit

is one Program Manager and one Safety Coordinator. The primary tasks performed by

the Policy Management Function include:

• Power DMS Administrator

• Developing, updating and issuing general orders.

• Coordinating infectious disease exposure response.

• Managing Texas Best Practices certification program.

• Scheduling and monitoring flu vaccinations.

• Teaching at Ins-service and new hire academies.

The primary tasks performed by the Safety Function include:

• Coordinating safety inspections for all PD properties and locations.

• Writing safety plans.

• Coordinating safety issue remediation.

• Coordinating employee health and safety testing for employees exposed to


potential building hazards.

The Policy Management and Safety unit recently completed the Texas Best

Practices certification process becoming the largest agency in Texas to attain the

recognition for the achievement. The process required numerous policy updates and

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coordination. The unit reported for the following performance metrics for 2018 (year to

date):

• Developed and issued 42 General Orders (New and Revised Orders) and one
entire Chapter.

• Answered a daily average of five enquiries from citizens regarding policy,


complaints and comments that are sent to the website.

• Entered over 58 documents along with tests onto Power DMS as Roll Call Training,

Directives, Informational Sheets, and General Orders.

• Created the 2018 Taser Course for on-line Power DMS instruction for Training
Division.

• Taught in-service course and one recruit classes in infectious disease prevention
and provided vaccinations for recruits.

• Scheduled and monitored flu vaccinations for all police and fire employees.

• Assisted with 28 possible infectious disease exposures involving officers.

• Continued with advance testing for employee health and safety concerns at the

Communications Division involving an odor issue.

• Continued to ensure proper asbestos remediation and abatement protocols were

followed during the renovation of the tactical location and cleaning of all air ducts

in the building due to mold.

The unit provides crucial services to support police operations. Maintaining up to

date policies assures officers are trained and working to current best practice and case

law. The units provides policy training and roll call training and serves as a resource on

policy issues. Building inspections are conducted on a routine basis and safety issues are

addressed in a timely manner. The project team evaluated the need for additional clerical

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support for the unit to alleviate clerical tasks from the program manager. Though there

is work that could be performed by clerical staff the unit is able to meet all assigned tasks

on schedule with current staffing levels.

Recommendations:

Maintain current authorized staffing level.

2 Training Division – Career Development Section

The authorized staffing in the unit is one lieutenant, two sergeants, one corporal,

25 officers and two administration technicians. The career development section is

responsible for curriculum development, teaching, organizing training resources and

planning for future classes. The primary tasks performed by this unit include:

• Developing curriculum to be used in future classes.

• Coordinating and teaching recruit academies.

• Coordinating and teaching in-service for 1705 sworn members.

• Issuing and training officers on the use of body worn cameras.

The Career Development Section recently completed running four straight 8.5

month recruit academies that averaged 45 officers per class. When the section is not

actively teaching in-service or recruit classes they attend classes to be cross trained in

multiple disciplines. Several of the disciplines that are taught require multiple instructors

and low student to instructor ratios to insure safety. The section had a recent shortage of

patrol vehicle instructors and officers were cross trained to meet the recent demand and

shortage. Additionally, the section instructors’ research training best practices and update

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curriculum to meet new standards as well as incorporating any TCOLE requirements.

There are no current academies planned this fiscal year.

The career development section has been able to successfully meet all training

obligations. Running four back to back to recruit academies is not typical for the

department and the need to do so is not anticipated in the immediate future, however with

an average attrition rate of approximately 72 sworn members a year there will be a

continued need to run at least one academy a year once the department is at authorized

strength. As the city population grows and the department grows the need to run back to

back recruit academies will increase. With the potential growth there will also be additional

need for instructors to instruct in-service, however the current instructor resources are

able to meet that demand.

The Career Development Section is able to meet the needs of the department with

the limited exceptions noted above. The section offered 778 classes (17,934 hours) and

7,829 training slots internally for TCOLE credit last year alone, however 8,066 training

slots went unused due to other patrol.

One officer was responsible for the roll out and training for the departments’ use

of body worn cameras, but is supported by two other personnel. This includes not only

teaching all of the classes, but also issuing each recruit the camera and coordinating

replacement cameras and parts to sworn patrol members. Now that the roll out of body

worn cameras is complete the workload for this position will decrease, however it will still

require a full-time position with and part time support from other positions within the

section. The department trained an administration technician to help with the work load

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as the need to teach classes on body worn camera operation to 1300 plus officers and

then supply and issue cameras is more than a full-time position. Fort Worth choose Axon

as its camera vendor and a typical Axon contract will include a second camera upgrade

in the next five years. This will impact the training division as it will require the division to

train (if there is a difference in the operation of the new cameras) and issue new cameras

to each patrol officer.

All cameras must be entered into the Evidence.com video management software

and the department quarter master program. These tasks are administrative in nature and

do not require law enforcement certification or specific law enforcement training. A civilian

position that has been background checked can view any CJIS material and can testify

in court if necessary.

Recommendations:

Convert the body camera worn system administrator sworn position to a full time
non-sworn position.

Maintain current authorized staffing level.

3 Training Division – Enhanced Skills Section

The authorized staffing in the unit is one Lieutenant, two Sergeants, one Corporal,

and 18 Officers. There are currently 6 officers on loan from patrol to the enhanced skills

to fulfill current needs of the section. The Enhanced Development Section is responsible

for curriculum that is for post recruit academy training though they provide the firearms

and other skills support for training portions of the recruit academy. Training classes are

selected by the chief’s office, TCOLE requirements and by employee input. The focus in
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2017 was De-escalation, Ethics, Cultural Awareness (LGBTQ) and Community Relations

(Procedural Justice). Over 900 officers received procedural justice training in 2017. All

officers received de-escalation training in 2017. The primary tasks performed by this unit

include:

• Developing and researching curriculum to be used in future classes.

• Providing all firearms training for the department, including providing 110 hours of
firearms training to each academy recruit.

• Providing monthly retiree qualifications.

• Providing carbine and shotgun qualifications.

• Providing active shooter training to twice a week for EMS.

• Providing patrol tactics instruction in scenario village training and the virtual reality
simulator.

• Providing patrol vehicle operations training.

• Researching and coordinating outside training opportunities.

• Scheduling the use of scenario village, firearms range, virtual reality training and
the vehicle operations Course.

• Purchasing ammunition and other supplies for training.

The Career Development Section recently completed training 900 sworn members

in the use of the new patrol vehicles. There were not enough instructors certified as patrol

vehicle instructors to run the number of classes needed to efficiently train the department

so the training division has cross trained more officers to assist with the training. Some of

the disciplines trained by the enhanced skills section requires limited student to teacher

ratios to insure safety e.g. 1 firearms’ instructors per 2 officers (students) minimum. Best

practice is to have a minimum of two range officers on the range during any firearms
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training. The reality-based simulator has a typical student –instructor ratio of one student

to one instructor or two students to one instructor. Patrol vehicle operations has similar

ratios while operating the vehicles.

Firearms instructors spend significant time preparing and ordering supplies and

ammunition as well as coordinating the use of ranges. Using a sworn position to perform

what is essentially a clerical function is not best practice. A non-sworn position that

supported these functions was eliminated several years ago. Additionally, sworn positions

are used to unload and stack ammunition by hand because the department does not have

a forklift or electric pallet jack to move pallets of ammunition. Every sworn member is

required to qualify annually and the department runs multiple training courses and

academies which requires sworn members have to hand stack and move pallets of

ammunition on a regular basis.

The Fort Worth Police Department hosts many classes some of which are open to

outside agencies. In some cases, by hosting classes the department is allowed to have

a portion of its own officers’ attend. Additionally, the department allows some other

agencies to use its ranges, patrol vehicle track and scenario village. The department does

not recuperate any revenue from other agencies for the use of these assets. Allowing

other agencies to use these assets to train increases the training of surrounding units but

has some financial impact to the department e.g. filters for the range, janitorial services

and scheduling. Several agencies around the country have built training centers with the

idea of renting out unused hours to other agencies to recuperate costs or to add to the

training budget. One notable example is the Portland Police Bureau in Portland, Oregon.

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That department has yet to break even financially on any shared use of the facility four

years after completion.

There are two significant impediments to recovering revenue or successfully

making money from renting out training facilities. Most departments schedule training in

blocks of hours and need these assets for several days in a row so scheduling in blocks

of time is often difficult if not impossible because the host department has similar needs

and the down time for these assets is not typically over large blocks of time. The second

issue is that police departments’ budgets for renting assets is limited so they tend to find

inexpensive or free alternatives e.g. using an abandoned building or school for free

instead of renting a scenario village. Police department training staffs have become very

adept at finding community supporters to arrange these training sites for free. An

immediate goal for the department would be to attain a cost neutral recovery of revenue

for the use of its training assets and to further study the market for renting out unused

available hours.

Recommendations:

Add back the non-sworn position that was lost in a previous staff reduction to
handle clerical duties and to assist with training asset scheduling.

Purchase electric forklift to move ammunition pallets.

Establish a training asset cost neutral rental program.

Make the 6 officers on loan to the Enhanced Skills Section permanent and add to
authorized staffing.

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4 Training Division – Background and Recruiting Section

The authorized staffing in the unit is one lieutenant, two sergeants, 13 officers and

administrative technician. The Background and Recruiting Section is responsible for the

recruiting, testing and background checks of police officers. There are currently 354

sworn members eligible to retire and with annual attrition rate of approximately 72 sworn

members per year. The hiring process takes four to six months on average. Currently the

background section is assisting with backgrounds for the communications division. The

background section also coordinates the approval process which includes auditing all

backgrounds that are submitted through the chain of command. The primary tasks

performed by this unit include:

• The Recruiting Section continually recruits laterals and new hires through social
media, presentations and recruiting trips. The section attended 55 recruitment
events in the last fiscal year.

• The Recruiting section also manages an explorer program and a teen academy.

• Processing applications and arranging testing.

• Processing backgrounds.

• During slow times the background section is getting cross trained as instructors to
assist other sections in the training division.

The Recruiting and Background Section recently completed testing on March 7th

and March 17 which yielded 1,616 applicants, but only 669 took the tests and 319 passed.

The section also recently completed an out of state recruiting trip to solicit a more diverse

candidate pool. As mentioned above there are no academies currently scheduled,

however there will be a need in the future due to normal attrition. The recruiting and hiring

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process can take several months and it often takes considerable effort and time to

process enough candidates to fill an academy class.

The unit is also responsible for explorer program and youth academies. These

academies have proven to be very successful for community outreach and in many

departments have introduced youth to law enforcement which resulted in future police

officers for the department. These programs take time to develop, but they are crucial to

effective community engagement. There is only one officer currently running both

programs with some support from others. The current program has about 40 youth

explorers, which represents a small fraction of the possible outreach. The project team

has seen larger explorer programs at much smaller departments. Many large jurisdictions

that have explorer programs have one central administrator who coordinates the activities

of other officers who assist with the program as a collateral duty. In some departments

each patrol division or portion of the city has their own explorer post. To grow the program,

it should be expanded to the patrol division while still being coordinated out of the training

division.

The Recruiting and Background Section is able to meet the needs of the

department as currently staffed. With the slowdown in sworn backgrounds due to no

planned academies the section has effectively used its resources to help other areas of

the department by cross training background officers as instructors and by assisting with

other backgrounds.

Recommendations:

Maintain current staffing level.

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Considering adding explorer posts to each of the patrol divisions as the program
is expanded.

5 Analysis Professional Standards Division

The authorized staffing in the unit is one Captain, two Lieutenants, three

Sergeants, 11 Detectives, three officers, five open records administrative clerks and 1.5

Administrative technicians. The Professional Standards is comprised of three separate

functions that all overseen by a Captain. The sections are Internal Affairs, Special

Investigations and the open Records Unit. These units are detailed below.

(1) Internal Affairs Unit

The internal affairs unit consists one lieutenant, one sergeant, seven detectives

and a shared administrative technician. The internal affairs unit conducts administrative

review of all use of force cases, investigates all misconduct complaints and coordinates

the internal affairs process. All complaints are investigated which is best practice. Low

level complaints are investigated at the individual command level, though all complaints

are entered into the IAPro, the complaint management software or Blue Team for tracking

purposes. The unit has a 30-day deadline to complete investigations unless there is a

criminal nexus in addition to the administrative investigation. The unit reported the

following performance metrics for 2017.

• The unit tracked and reviewed all use of force incidents in 2017.
- There were 341 Use of Force incidents in 2017
- 355 officers were involved in use of force.
- There was 16% decrease in use of force in 2017.
- There was average of 28 use of force incidents per month.

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- Officers with 5 years or less tenure represented 53% of all use of force
incidents.

• The unit investigated 77 Administrative cases in 2017.


- There were 209 minor complaints in 2017
- 355 officers were involved in use of force.
- There was 14% decrease in administrative complaints from 2016.
- There were 50 sustained administrative cases in 2017
- 2 cases were closed with no action.
- 3 cases were determined to be unfounded.
- 1 case was determined to be no violation.
- 15 cases were still pending.

• The outcome of complaints received in 2017 were:


- 15 of the sustained complaints resulted in suspensions.
- 12 of the sustained complaints resulted in written reprimands.
- 17 of the sustained complaints resulted in Command counseling.
- 28 of the sustained complaints resulted in supervisors counseling.
- 3 officers resigned.
- 1 member was demoted.
- 2 resulted in no action taken.

• There were a total of 231 crashes in 2017.


- 61 were determined to be preventable.
- 75 were determined to be non-preventable.
- 95 were still pending review.

• There were a total of 193 pursuits in 2017


- This represents a 5% decrease from 2016.
- 95 pursuits were initiated after the suspect fled a traffic stop.
- 53 pursuits were for felony offenses.
- 15 pursuits were for misdemeanor charges.
- 23 pursuits were aborted.

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The unit does not currently use early warning software to identify early trends from

officer behavior and complaints. The Deputy Chief’s adjutant is currently working to

implement that program. Early warning software works by identifying officers who exceed

certain pre-determined thresholds that warrant further intervention by supervisors. For

example, if an officer has statistically more use of force incidents than their peer group a

supervisor would be notified to enquire whether it is an anomaly or indicative of the need

for more training or other remedy. The idea behind early warning software is that it gives

management the ability to identify potential issues earlier and to intervene if necessary

before a larger issue arises. Early warning systems track the same information that

Internal Affairs already tracks so it would be a natural fit for Internal Affairs to administer

the program and manage sending out the notifications to supervisors and tracking the

results.

The Internal affairs unit is able to meet investigation timelines of 30 days (160 days

for total case age including finding from reporting unit) for all cases. Full investigative

caseloads for detectives are lower than we typically see at 1 per detective a month. During

interviews the project team was informed that these caseloads are 14% lower than the

previous year. Even with 14% more cases this year this would still represents only 1 cases

per Detective per month. If the same number of cases were investigated with just 6

detectives the caseload would be 1.3 cases per detective per month. In addition to their

caseloads detectives also conduct numerous investigative enquires. Enquiries involve

taking a statement from the complainant, reviewing reports, reviewing CAD reports,

locating body worn body camera video and determining whether a policy has been

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violated. Detectives also coordinate the process for low level complaints to insure

timelines are met. In addition to these tasks all use of force incidents, pursuits and traffic

crashes are reviewed.

Since the department has implemented body worn cameras many complaints can

be adjudicated early without the need for lengthy investigations. The project team was

informed that the body worn cameras exonerate the actions of the officer in over 90% of

the complaints which is consistent with what the team has seen in other departments

nationally. Reviewing video early in the process allows investigators to have better

knowledge of the case before any interviews take place and it also allows investigators

more evidence in each case rather than relying of statements and independent memory

of events. Best current practice where body cameras are used is to get a detailed

statement from the complainant and then to view the body worn camera prior to

conducting further interviews if they are not warranted, this is the current practice in Fort

Worth.

In reviewing the use of body worn cameras and their impact on case investigative

time the project team used an average video length of 15 minutes which is consistent with

other cities. In each of these cases an investigator must review at least one 15 minute

video. To set up and conduct an interview takes at least an hour. In this scenario an

investigator could review a video in less time than it would require to just to set up and

conduct an interview. In cases involving multiple officers and witnesses the amount of

time saved increases. Additionally, with body worn cameras complainants can review the

video and decide to not go forward with their complaint based on the content whereas

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with no body worn camera video a complete investigation including interviews must be

conducted.

The Fort Worth Police Department uses detectives to investigate complaints

instead of sergeants which is more common in other departments. The use of detectives

for this process is acceptable, but sergeants bring an additional leadership/supervisory

experience into the administrative review and they tend to have more experience working

with policy and procedures in a patrol setting where most complaints are generated. Fort

Worth complaint data indicates over 40% of complaints are generated by officers with

less than 5 years’ experience. Sergeants are also part of the command structure and are

therefore part of the normal chain of command that would conduct a review of officers’

actions outside of an internal affairs investigation unlike detectives that normally focus on

criminal investigations.

Recommendations:

Convert Detective positions to Sergeants.

Reduce staffing by one detective.

Once launched, move the early warning system coordination to the Internal Affairs
Division.

(2) Special Investigations Unit

The special investigations unit consists of one lieutenant, one sergeant, four

detectives, three officers and an administrative technician. The special investigations unit

conducts all criminal related investigations for both the police department and City of Fort

Worth. Criminal investigations are conducted separate from administrative cases and all

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cases are “walled off” from each other. The unit is responsible for providing security for

the Chief of Police. The unit reported the following performance metrics for 2017.

• There were a total of 29 criminal cases investigated in 2017 and there are 25
criminal cases assigned so far this year (2018).

• There were 5 audits conducted in 2017 and 3 audits have been conducted in 2018.

There was an average of 2.4 investigations per month for the unit or less than a

case per month per investigator, however the unit also conducts compliance and

performance audits. Compliance audits take extensive planning and time to execute.

Compliance audits require extensive document or resource evaluations. Compliance

audits can range from checking that every call dispatched for a unit is properly handled

and documented to insuring that policies and procedures are followed. To perform a

compliance audit of appropriate call response would at minimum require that CAD records

are matched to police reports over set period of time.

In addition to investigations and auditing department units the special

investigations unit provides security for the Chief of Police. The need and amount security

varies from day to day as need is dependent on the Chief’s schedule. The officers of the

unit must be flexible to accommodate the schedule of the chief, but this affects other

demands of the unit. The officers of the unit support technical evidence gathering and

have special training and technical skills that other members of the unit do not have.

When they are deployed to provide security when there are investigative needs at the

same time it strains the investigative effectiveness of the unit. The project team has seen

a variety of ways that security is provided for the Chiefs in other departments, the most

commonly used in other agencies is having a full-time adjutant travel with the chief.
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Another alternative is to have members of the SWAT team assigned on a rotational basis

as needed. Many SWAT teams are trained in dignitary protection.

The special investigations unit is able to meet the investigative needs of the city

and department. The caseload is relatively low at less than one case per month per

detective, however the current criminal caseload is almost double the rate at this point as

it was last year. The unit also conducts proactive compliance audits when time and

investigative resources allows. The officers assigned to the unit are used for security

purposes as well as investigative resources. The need to provide security limits their

availability to assist with case investigations.

Recommendations:

Maintain current staffing level.

Consider using SWAT team members on a rotating basis to provide security for
the chief when needed or adding that function to adjutant.

(3) Open Records

The Open Records Unit is comprised of one sergeant, five open records

technicians and a part time administrative support technician. The open records unit is

responsible for the release of all public records from the department. This includes

fulfilling public requests, subpoenas, Claims/ lawsuits and discovery. The unit reported

the following performance metrics for 2017.

• There has been a 17% increase in public records requests from last year. The
open records section has reported the following statistics for 2017:
- 5561 Public Information Requests
- 234 Claims / Lawsuits
- 327 Subpoenas for records
- 182 Municipal Court Discovery Requests
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- 6304 Total Request Fulfilled

There are an average of 24 requests per business work day and each request

must be processed and inspected to be sure that only information that is eligible for

released is included in the release. In some cases, information is stored in multiple

different databases and each must be searched to ensure that it complies with open

records law. The targeted time line for release is 10 days from the time of request.

To meet the timeline the open records unit averages 8 to 10 hours overtime per

week per records tech (Approx. 50 hours total per week) for the 10-day document release

target. This is approximately 2,600 hours per year or equivalent to a more than one and

half full-time positions. The ten-day timeline is department policy. The Texas Public

Information Act as spelled out in chapter 552 states the public agency must deliver the

documents “promptly.” The 10-day mark is the deadline for a governmental body, if it

contends the information is not public, to ask for an attorney general’s decision allowing

it to withhold the records. There are exemptions to complying, for example any current

investigation is exempt from release.

The open records unit is only able to meet the workload requirements with the use

of overtime. With the projected increase in city population the number of requests are

likely to go up as well. To meet the current demand additional staff is needed.

Recommendation:

Add one additional open records technician.

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6 Analysis of the Communications Division

The Communications Division is comprised of one lieutenant, one manager, three

assistant managers, nine flor supervisors, eight SPSC (FIR), one SPSC (PIC), 12 PSC

IIs, one administrative support and 99 dispatcher / call takers (119 Authorized). The

communications division operates the PSAP for the City of Fort Worth. Fire is co-located

in the same building, but they do not share personnel or operate in the same call taker-

dispatcher space. Fire and EMS calls are transferred to the fire dispatch center. The unit

reported the following performance metrics for 2017.

• The communications division handled 1,213,863 calls for service in 2017.

- 67% of the calls received in 2017 were 911 calls for a total of 815,680 -911
calls.

- There were 398,183 non-emergency calls in 2017.

- 370,655 calls were dispatched.

- Officers responded to 285,015 calls for service.

- Priority 1 (Emergency) calls are up 50% since 2013.

• In the 2016-2017 Fiscal year the communications division answered 95% of 911
calls within 10 seconds and 96% within 20 seconds.

The communications division exceeds the National Emergency Number

Association (NENA) call handling standards of 90% of 911 calls handled within 10

seconds. This is impressive considering the long-standing staffing shortages within the

division. The unit is also responsible for handling teletypes, coordinating multiple agency

response and running checks for patrol officers.

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The communications division is 20 positions below authorized strength which has

resulted in 34,973 hours of overtime in the 2016/ 2017 fiscal year. At current wages this

represents over $996,730 on overtime during the 2016-2017 fiscal year to maintain

minimum staffing levels. The communications unit conducts 2 to 3 tests a year to hire

new tele-communicators to maintain current operations, however they have a current

attrition rate though training over 50%. When including staff that has been there over a

year, the attrition rate is over 20% annually.

Chronic staffing shortages has resulted in “forced” overtime for employees and

increased use of sick time. This is not desirable for the department or the communication

division employees. In 2005 The Bureau of Justice Assistance and the National Institute

Commissioned a study by APCO that examined staffing and retention in public safety

communications centers. Among the findings were large agencies that had the highest

rate of retention were within agencies that had full staffing of all positions. The study also

found that as the amount of mandatory increased the rate of attrition increased and overall

job satisfaction declined.

The project team was informed through interviews that the division has not been

at full strength in years. Two of the issues identified as contributing to the attrition rate is

the lack of competitive pay and the amount of forced overtime that interferes with family

obligations. The previously mentioned study indicated that large call centers that are fully

staffed typically over hire to match the known attrition rate. With current the attrition rate

of over 20% the department would need to hire 43 positions this year (20 current

vacancies plus attrition of 23 positions).

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The communications division is able to meet its workload, but only through the

extensive use of overtime. This has contributed to a very high attrition rate not only for

trainees but employees that have been there over a year. The project team was informed

that one of the leading causes for turnover is forced overtime. Forced overtime impacts

child care, school and family events that can lead to dissatisfaction with work and cause

added stress. To alleviate forced overtime the division should consider the option of

having part time 911 positions and increasing cross training so some positions can be

handled by a larger pool of cross trained personnel. Adding part time positions would

add flexibility in scheduling and provide a larger number of personnel to draw on to cover

personnel shortages. The communications division is an integral part of the public safety

system. Long term shortages in the communications division could impact other parts of

the public safety system.

Recommendation:

Increase authorized staffing by 23 dispatcher/call taker positions to account to


account for attrition.

Initiate option of part time positions for call takers and dispatchers.

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Analysis of the Administrative Support Command


The Administrative Support Command is managed by an Assistant Director. Within

the Administrative Support Command, detailed below, there are one section and two

Divisions that are each managed by a civilian manager. The first section below

Employment Services Section followed by the Financial Management Division and the

Program Support Division. The following chart shows the organization structure:

Administrative Suport Command

Employment Services Financial Management Program Support


Section Division Division

Research and
Polygrapher Budget Unit Planning

Grant and Procurement


Medical Program
Records and Admin.
Management

Employment Technology
Services Services
(Sworn)

Police
Employment Application
Services Dev. &
(Civilian) Support

Research and
Projects

1 Employment Services Section

The authorized staffing in the employment services section is one manager, one

polygrapher, three administrative assistants, one record custodian, two employment

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specialists and two administrative technicians. The primary tasks performed by this unit

include:

• The tracking of positions within the police department.

• Posting job announcements.

• Conducting pre-employment polygraph examinations on non-sworn applicants

• Coordinating applicant medical exams.

• Maintaining police department personnel medical records.

• Facilitating processes for employee promotions.

• Managing performance and discipline issues.

• Liaising with city HR personnel.

One of the most important roles for the employment services section is position

tracking within the department. There is significant movement of positions within the

department through promotions, transfers, injuries (workers comp) and retirements.

These movements are entered into employment tracking software. The section also

performs all of the onboarding procedures for both sworn and non-sworn new hires. They

also assist with retirement processing.

The employment services had the following work performance metrics for 2017.

• Assisted with hiring 55 civilian employees.

• Assisted with the onboarding of 170 officers.

• Assisted with approximately 70 retirements.

• Performed 109 polygraph examinations.

• Tracked 1705 sworn and 450 civilian positions that were updated weekly.

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In evaluating the employment services section, the project team considered

alternatives to current service delivery practices especially where there was a possible

overlap or duplication with other city services or departments. The functions performed

by the employment services section are not duplicated by city HR. The unit performs pre-

employment polygraph examinations which is function not performed by city HR or other

departments. Police employment services requires a dedicated staff so consolidating this

function at city HR would not result in cost savings. Due to the amount of movement within

the department and the specific requirements that need to be met to work in a law

enforcement the functions of the employment services are appropriately located within

the police department. The employment services section is able to meet all tasks with

current staff.

Recommendation:

Maintain current authorized staffing level.

2 Financial Management Division

The authorized staffing in the unit is one manager, one senior management

analyst, one management analyst, one senior management analyst II, one senior

accountant, one senior grants specialist, grants specialists and one contract specialists.

The division is comprised of four separate units: The Budget Unit, Financial Management

Section, Grant and Program Management Unit and the CCPD Program Management.

Each of the units will be detailed below.

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(1) Budget Unit

The budget unit’s primary tasks are preparation and reconciliation of the police

department budget. The major tasks performed by this unit include:

• Works with Chief and other department units to incorporate budget priorities into
the budget.

• Plans and prepares budget.

• Prepares budget reports.

• Develops and manages general Fund Budget.

• Develops and manages CCPD Budget.

• Coordinates with City Budget Office.

• Conducts Capital Planning.

• Facilitates Budget Committee.

The Budget unit produces a 5-year CIP, maintains accounts and reporting for 11

task forces, reconciles and prepares $300 million general fund budget and $80 million

CCPD budget, prepares weekly and monthly budget to actuals report and manages the

needs assessment system. The budget unit is able to complete assigned tasks with the

current staff. Many of the tasks assigned are time sensitive and the unit is able to prepare

them within given time frames.

Recommendations:

Maintain current authorized staffing level.

(2) Financial Management Section

The financial management sections primary tasks are financial analysis, grant and

task force financial reporting. The major tasks performed by this unit include:
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• Financial Analysis and Reporting.

• Special Projects / Research.

• Prepares Grant and Task Force overtime reporting.

• Asset Forfeiture Program Management.

• Manages Task Force Funds and Donations.

• Manages Tow Truck Contracts.

The Budget unit produces a 5-year CIP, maintains accounts and reporting for 11

task forces, reconciles and prepares $300 million general fund budget and $80 million

CCPD budget, prepares weekly and monthly budget to actuals report and manages the

needs assessment system. The budget unit is able to complete assigned tasks with the

current staff. Many of the tasks assigned are time sensitive and the unit is able to prepare

them within given time frames. As mentioned above the payroll section should be moved

to the Financial Management Section.

Recommendations:

Maintain current authorized staffing level.

Move the payroll unit from bureau administration to the financial management
division.

(3) Grant and Program Management Section

The grant and program management section’s primary tasks are applying for and

managing grants. The major tasks performed by this unit include:

• Researching grant opportunities that apply to the police department.

• Coordinating grant applications with various units in the police department.

• Tracking grant expenditures.


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• Completing grant reporting.

• Maintaining grant files.

• Closing out grant reports.

The section does not have a current way of tracking the number of active grants,

though they possess all of the required records. The section is in the process of

developing a spreadsheet to track all grants so that they have better control of the number

and type of grants. This is an essential function of effective grant management. Many of

the grants that the grant and program management section manage are federal grants

that have strict reporting requirements that require time to prepare and monitor.

The grant and program management section is not able to keep up with the work

tasks assigned to the unit, specifically keeping grants organized so all grant information

is readily available. There has been some personnel movement from the unit recently

which could have contributed to some of the grant tracking issues that were identified

during the project teams site visit. Additionally, it was reported to the project team that the

unit is asked to apply for all available grants even if it does not appear that they qualify.

Completing grant applications takes significant effort and a single grant application can

take over 40 hours to complete depending on the documentation needed to support the

grant. Best practice is to apply only for grants that the department would qualify for since

grants have become increasingly more competitive over the last several years. Grant

award amounts have lowered while reporting requirements have increased. This makes

return on investment worth considering before applying. The grant and program

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management section has one current vacancy that has occurred because of recent

movement.

Recommendations:

Maintain current authorized staffing level and fill current vacancy.

Establish criteria for which grants the department will apply.

(4) CCPD Program Management

The Crime Control and Prevention District (CCPD) program management section

is responsible for all reconciling and producing reports for the CCPD budget and

expenditures. The CCPD budget is in addition to the department budget and is used to

provide additional resources to the police department and other agency partners to

reduce and prevent crime. The department uses some of the funds to support specific

units like the SRO program and to pay for overtime. Some of the money is also used by

partner agencies to support youth programing or for other crime reduction strategies. All

funds from CCPD have to be used is accordance with CCPD policies and this unit insures

compliance and reporting. The major tasks performed by this unit include:

• Manages CCPD partner agreements.

• Manages CCPD SRO program agreements.

• Tracks CCPD expenditures.

• Prepares and submits reports.

The section provides a statutorily necessary function for an approximate $80

million program. The section is required to maintain detailed records of all contracts and

expenditures. The section is able to perform all required task with current staffing.

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Recommendation:

Maintain current staffing level.

3 Program Support Division

The authorized staffing in the unit is one administrator, one planning manager,

three planners, one senior management analyst, two administrative assistants, one

account technician, one senior contract specialist, one senior account technician, one

account technician, one IT manager and one database administrator. The division is

comprised of three separate units: The Research and Planning Section, the Procurement

and Contract Administration Section and the Technology Services Section. Each of the

units will be detailed below.

(1) Research and Planning

The research and planning section is responsible for preparing official police

department crime reports, coordinates police related facility needs with city property

management, and maintains the police department website. The major tasks performed

by this unit include:

• Coordinates facility planning.

• Maintains PD website. (Not social media).

• Provides CCPD reports and documentation.

• Produces crime reports and annual reports.

• Produces business plan and manages updates.

• Coordinates facility planning and maintenance.

• Liaison with city property management.

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• Manages and updates the department strategic plan.

The research and planning section performs several roles that service the entire

department. Many of their activities involve the coordination of department wide

objectives such as the strategic plan or facilities planning. The section reported the

following performance metrics for 2017.

• Responded to approximately 10 to 30 crime data requests a month.

• Managed the strategic plan and updating progress. The department has completed
7% of the action items and 58% of the action items are on target for completion.
There are 460 goals /action items on the strategic plan.

• Assisted in coordinating management of 40 police facilities. This includes


coordination of 5 construction or refurbishment projects.

• Planning and Research coordinate’s the management of 20 leased buildings.

• Prepared quarterly crime reports.

• Prepared the annual report.

In evaluating the research and planning section the project team considered

alternatives to current service delivery practices especially where there was a possible

overlap or duplication with other city services or departments. The research and planning

section performs several roles that coordinate directly with other city departments, but the

roles do not overlap. The section maintains and updates the police department website

with specific police department content while the city coordinates the overall city website.

The section coordinates facilities planning and manages facility leases for the police

department while the city property management unit provides coordination of actual

construction /renovation and project management for building facilities. The section

recently coordinated the moving of equipment and materials to open a new police division
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while city IT coordinated the data line installation and actual setup of desktop computers

with some assistance from the police department technologies section. If city departments

took over any of these functions there would be no cost benefit as the positions would still

have to be staffed.

The research and planning section is able to accomplish all of the tasks assigned

with current personnel. There is no obvious benefit to moving any of the current functions

to other units within the department or at the city level.

(2) Technology Services Section

The technology services section provides police specific technology support to the

police department. This includes both police hardware and software related support. In

addition, the unit manages police related databases and supports police applications. The

major tasks performed by this unit include:

• Conducts technology related capital.

• Facilitates the police technology committee.

• Conducts application development.

• Does internal data mining and fulfills data requests.

• Liaison to city IT.

• Produces reports and data for external and internal requestors.

• Provides user for support for police systems (City IT handles desktop only).

• Provides audio / visual systems support.

• Provides interview and in car camera support.

• Manages PD cell phones.

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• Coordinates with police software/ hardware vendors on implementation, repairs


and upgrades.

• Conducts Application Development (Web Development) and provides support.

• Conducts advanced technology research.

• Executes renewals and contract expenditures.

The technology services section installs, supports and researches police related

software and hardware technology. The Section provides user support for police systems

and conducts application development and support for police specific systems. Many of

the services they provide require specific training for police technology. The section

reported the following performance metrics for 2017:

• Completed 350 in car camera installs in 2017.

• Managed over 100 PD specific applications.

• Researched 31 new technology advancements to determine if they could be used


by the department.

• Responded to all police application and hardware failures and coordinated repairs.

• Provided on call response to police IT issues 24 hours a day.

• Provided emergency services critical CAD and RMS support.

In evaluating the technology services section, the project team considered

alternatives to current service delivery practices especially where there was a possible

overlap or duplication with city IT services. The technology services section performs

several roles that coordinate directly with other city departments, but the roles do not

overlap. The technology services section has a specific set of SOPs that clearly outline

the roles and responsibilities of the section. The city IT department provides services that

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affect the entire city such as city-wide email, desktop support, multiple department use

servers and connectivity. These are systems that are city wide while the technology

services section provides law enforcement specific software and hardware support. Some

of the support they provide requires vendor training to be an authorized to install or

maintain. The nature of law enforcement requires all personnel who have access to

Criminal Justice Information System (CJIS) material to have a thorough background

conducted before they are authorized to have access to police systems. Many of the law

enforcement software application would fall under CJIS rules, including all of the actual

police facilities. To meet this requirement everyone in city IT would have to have a

complete background to have access to servers, police technology hardware and

software. In the project teams experience this would result in additional expense and the

possibility that existing city personnel would not pass the background.

One of the benefits of having consolidated IT functions within one department is

the ability to have multiple personnel available to service software and hardware and to

have coordinated purchases of systems. In the case of the merging Fort Worth Police

Department Technology Services Section and City IT this would not be the case as most

of the software and hardware is specific to police operations is not used by other

departments. Another possible benefit is cost reduction by needing less personnel to

service larger infrastructure, again this would not be the case in the technology services

section as the systems are not global e.g. interview room software and in car cameras

are only used by the police department. There are currently three personnel in the

technology services section authorized by Axon to install and troubleshoot in car

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cameras. The city would still need the same number of personnel to service the needs of

the police department and the city.

The current structure of having the technology services section work on police

specific hardware and software while the city IT coordinates and services more global

systems is appropriate for the complexity of services needed. There is currently good

coordination between the two units as was evidenced in the recent opening of the sixth

division. City IT coordinated the move, but the technology services sections provided

assistance. If city IT took over any of the functions provided by the technology services

section there would be no cost benefit as the positions would still have to be staffed.

There is currently no overlap in IT services provided to the police department by City IT

and policies and SOPs provide guidance to avoid duplication of services.

Recommendation:

Maintain current staffing level of the technology services section

(3) Contract and Procurement

The contract and procurement section primary tasks are managing contracts and

procurement activities of the department. The section coordinates preparation of

contracts and work closely with the city attorney and city contract department to perform

many of its tasks, however many of the processes they are responsible for are internal.

The major tasks performed by this unit include:

• Prepares and enters requisitions (City cuts purchase orders).

• Reviews invoices and conducts accounts payable.

• Manages department credit cards.

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• Processes travel documents.

• Negotiates and executes contracts.

• Prepares RFPs, bids and cooperatives.

• Coordinates with city contracts.

• Prepares contracts budget projects for budget planning.

• Conducts financial tracking and analysis.

The contracts and procurement section prepares all initial documentation for most

of its activities and enters information into purchasing software. They coordinate with

individual units within the police department and work with the units through purchasing

and contract initiation. The unit reported the following work performance metrics:

• Manages over 250 contracts.

• Manages over 100 p-cards

• Prepared 300 to 400 purchase orders in the first quarter of 2018.

In evaluating the contract and procurement section, the project team considered

alternatives to current service delivery practices especially where there was a possible

overlap or duplication with city contract services. The contract and procurement services

section performs many tasks that must be coordinately directly with city contracts. The

unit operates as the initiator of tasks while city contracts makes sure that contracts and

purchase orders meet city policy and process. The section also acts as a “go between”

for the units within the police department to coordinate the development of contracts and

purchases. Having this unit located within the police department helps insure that

contracts and purchases are conducted appropriately.

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The project team also assessed whether the unit is appropriately located with the

police organization. The project team noted that we typically see financial related

functions co-located within the same division. In this case the contracts and procurement

section is located outside of the financial management division. The project team was

informed that the section was located in the financial management division but was

moved in June 2015 to its current location to provide better management and oversight.

The contracts and procurement section is able to perform all of its tasks on time

with current staffing. Though not typical, the project team did not find any issues with its

current location outside of the financial management division.

Recommendation

Maintain Current Staffing level

(4) Asset Management Unit

The primary function of the Assessment Management unit is assignment and

tracking of equipment. The unit was recently moved to the Program Support Division.

The unit is in the process of inventorying all equipment within the police department and

establishing a database for all equipment going forward. The unit is staffed by the unit

manager and one full time and one part time position. The major tasks performed by this

unit include:

• Assigning equipment to officers.

• Removing equipment from service.

• Receiving equipment from personnel who retire and determining whether


equipment is still usable.

• Receiving equipment that is purchased or delivered to the police department.


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• Conducting inventories.

• Tracking where equipment is assigned.

• Issuing/ assigning service tags.

• Producing reports.

• Coordinates with the Grant office on purchase and tracking of grant funded
equipment.

The Asset Management Unit provides the police department with real time tracking

of equipment. The unit has not fully implemented asset tracking for all items within the

police department as the unit is still importing data and items to track. The goal is to

coordinate and issue all equipment so that there is central tracking and issuing of

equipment. The unit is adding additional items into the data base and increasing the

number and pieces of equipment that it is tracking. The unit was operated by one person

and recently added a part time position. Even with 2.5 FTE the unit is not able to enter

all equipment into the database that should be tracked and there is a back log of items to

be entered.

Long term the Asset Management Unit could reduce costs and waste for the

department by better tracking equipment and being a central point of issuance. Currently

equipment can be ordered from different units and there is no department wide tracking

system. To increase the number of items and equipment that the unit issues and tracks

requires at least three full time staff. The Asset Management Unit is not able to perform

all of its tasks on time with current staffing.

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Recommendation:

Increase part time position to full time for a total of 3 FTE in the unit.

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6 Projected Service and Staffing Needs

1 Introduction of the Projections Methodology

Fort Worth is a rapidly expanding metropolitan city, growing by as much as 75%

over the past 20 years according to recent estimates. During the same timeframe, the

city’s needs for law enforcement service have evolved considerably, with the crime rate

falling sharply as calls for service have continued to grow. With the pace of construction

and development in Fort Worth not projected to slow within the immediate and medium-

range future, the public safety service environment will continue to change over the next

decade.

The following chapter provides a plan for the department over that timeframe by

projecting police service needs, followed by the specific staffing levels that the Fort Worth

Police Department will need to maintain its service level to the community. This analysis

is based on current base workload data and projections of workloads based on the City’s

estimates of development and growth in Fort Worth during the planning period for this

study. Any changes in development and the generation of police workloads will affect the

projections provided here. As a result, workloads need to be tracked on an ongoing basis.

In the area of calls for service, which drive the patrol projections, it is critical for the

ongoing review these statistics to follow the same methodology outlined in the patrol

analysis chapter, which separates community-generated and self-initiated activity.

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(1) Data Collected to Conduct the Projections Analysis

The project team collected data from a number of sources in order to project both

population and service needs over the next decade, including the following:

• 2010 U.S. Census data at the individual block level, which includes both population
and housing unit figures.

• 2016 American Community Survey (ACS) prepared by the U.S. Census Bureau at
the block group level of geography, including estimates for population and housing
units.

• North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) population estimates by


area, running through 2040.

• Development plat data running from 2001 to 2018 at the individual plat level of
geography, including number of units, timeframe for completion, and composition
of buildout.

• Permits issued for both residential and non-residential construction at the


individual point level, running from 2001 to 2018.

• Economic development forecasts from the City of Fort Worth Planning and
Development Department.

• 2017 computer aided dispatch (CAD) data, which includes geographic point
coordinates to spatially isolate concentrations of community-generated calls for
service.

• 2017 crime data, which includes addresses and police reporting areas.

• Current and preliminary subdivisions, at an individual geographic level.

• Land use and zoning data in geographic shapefile format, showing both existing
and future land use as part of the comprehensive plan.

• Police geographic divisions, districts, and beats.

• Approved development concept plans, at an individual level of geography.

• GIS (geographic information system) shapefiles showing current land use and
zoning designations.

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The data collected was integrated into a GIS (geographic information systems)

format in order to spatially analyze historical, current, and future growth trends.

(2) Establishing a Common Level of Geography

For the planning analysis to be accurate and ultimately successful, it is critical that,

as much as possible, individual service environments are projected based on service

environments that similar to one another. Development and change may have vastly

different implications for police service demand from one part of the city to another, which

makes it necessary to identify and isolate where these differences exist.

To begin with, however, almost all of the data elements utilized in the analysis exist

at different levels of geography, for instance:

• Census: Tracts, block groups, blocks

• Census (mostly, but with differences): 2040 NCTCOG projections

• Zoning/land use: Block or neighborhood, excludes street areas

• Point layers: Calls for service incidents from CAD data, crime occurrences,
permitting data

• Police geographic zones: Patrol divisions, districts, and beats

• Plat/neighborhood: Preliminary plat plans and concept plans

• Overall: U.S. Census annual estimates, NCTCOG projections, Planning and


Development Department projections

The process of developing projections centers around making connections

between each of the data elements. Consequently, the analysis requires that the data be

transformed into a common set of geography, from which the different elements can be

compared and tabulated.

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The project team elected to use patrol districts (the second level of patrol

geography below the division level), as they shared the most in common across all types

of datasets and provided for a familiar frame of reference. However, even within individual

patrol districts, service environments can often vary extensively. For instance, Adam

District contains Downtown Fort Worth, as well as areas east of I-35W and the Trinity

River that are highly dissimilar to Downtown. Growth impacts may occur rapidly in one

area, while remaining neutral in the other.

Given these considerations, the project team subdivided many of the patrol

districts into multiple areas of geography. For instance, in Lincoln District within West

Division, the Las Vegas Trail area was split off into its own district, with the rest of the

district further subdivided into eastern and western sides. In total, the 21 planning areas

form the basis of the projection analysis, representing the level of geography at which all

development and service need data is analyzed at. In order to translate directly to the

organizational structure of the department, the planning areas are later aggregated by

division. Throughout the report, the subdivided patrol districts used to project service

needs over the next 10 years are referred to as planning areas. Other than representing

a part of patrol districts and patrol divisions, they have no implications on police

organization.

The following map provides an overview of the different planning areas established

by the project team:

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The following map provides a visualization of land use in each planning area,

showing land use under aggregated and simplified categories of residential,

commercial/mixed use, industrial/office, and other:

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The following sections build upon this foundation to first estimate the pace of

construction and development in Fort Worth, using the results of that analysis to project

future law enforcement service needs.

2 Analysis of Projected Development and Population Growth

While the data collected we received includes credible and defensible estimates

for population at an overall level, it does not necessarily tie into the level of geography

selected for the analysis – police patrol district subdivisions. Consequently, the bridge

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between overall population estimates for the future, police district geography, and

accurate 2010 U.S. data, is construction within the interval between historical and

projected timeframes.

(1) Housing Unit Construction in Recent Years

Approved permits for housing development, which the project team received as

individual points, serve as the key measure of the rate of change in development by area,

linking the past and future timeframes of demographic/growth estimates together, as well

as with data analyzed for 2017 service needs (crime and calls for service).

Given these considerations, the first step in developing projections of population

growth and service need changes is to look backwards toward 2010, using the relatively

accurate 2010 U.S. Census Data to establish a baseline number of housing units in 2010.

From that point, the permitting data is used to establish the number of housing units that

have been constructed each year since then, leading up to 2018.

The following table provides these statistics, showing the number of housing units

built from 2010 to 2017 by planning area:

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Recent Housing Unit Construction by Planning Area

Division Planning Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

CENTRAL Adam East 2 37 2 4 3 4 285 308


Adam West 2 4 14 265 7 8 374 324
Baker 19 91 183 30 26 481 487 334
EAST George 20 14 29 41 58 38 38 58
Henry North 16 381 300 125 440 378 32 216
Henry South 37 32 43 64 20 32 3 114
NORTH Edward 553 654 658 557 403 574 468 431
Frank 1,114 1,046 1,154 1,763 1,604 1,469 1,962 2,594
NORTHWEST Charlie NE 12 3 3 3 7 15 342 64
Charlie SW 5 12 9 12 8 9 14 8
David 283 266 345 527 1,064 383 652 949
SOUTH Ida North 13 24 15 13 25 8 28 248
Ida South 604 168 141 140 186 302 439 218
John North 1 5 250 6 4 5 5 9
John South 156 106 180 172 293 402 301 445
WEST King Central 18 36 110 120 680 59 104 42
King North 185 92 127 1,086 88 705 449 183
King South 39 20 155 3 12 17 28 7
Lincoln-LV Trail 1 8 1 0 1 1 325 4
Lincoln East 108 7 14 10 15 381 13 94
Lincoln West 134 100 131 331 124 131 138 341

Total 3,322 3,106 3,864 5,272 5,068 5,402 6,487 6,991

It is worth noting that the data does not include renovations or other additions to

existing structures and has been filtered for new construction only. The data also reflects

the number of units, as opposed to the new number of structures (i.e., multi-family

residential developments count as multiple units).

Evidently, construction rapidly picked up from 2013 to 2013, with 2017

experiencing the highest rate of housing unit growth, totaling just short of 7,000 units. For

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2018 and beyond, housing unit construction is estimated based on an average of recent

years, and is cross-referenced against preliminary plat and concept plan data

geospatially.

(2) Projected Housing Unit Construction

Many of the areas that have experiences significant growth in recent years still

have significant room to go before full buildout is reached, and so the projection timeframe

of 10 years provides for a short enough timeframe for development cycles and larger

demographic trends to have a relatively higher degree of accuracy. Using this

methodology, the project team has estimated the number of housing units constructed

through the year 2028, as shown in the following table:

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Projected Housing Unit Construction by Planning Area

Division Planning Area 2013 2018 2023 2028 15YR%

CENTRAL Adam East 6,081 6,978 8,406 9,855 62.1%


Adam West 4,320 5,382 7,102 8,831 104.4%
Baker 12,751 14,490 16,466 18,470 44.9%
EAST George 21,788 22,028 22,278 22,524 3.4%
Henry North 10,629 11,819 12,531 13,209 24.3%
Henry South 20,380 20,608 20,956 21,283 4.4%
NORTH Edward 33,634 35,960 38,189 40,424 20.2%
Frank 23,456 33,363 45,069 56,657 141.5%
NORTHWEST Charlie NE 5,555 6,186 7,062 7,990 43.8%
Charlie SW 6,794 6,844 6,896 6,949 2.3%
David 23,237 27,086 31,237 35,332 52.1%
SOUTH Ida North 11,111 11,558 12,358 13,117 18.1%
Ida South 12,712 14,186 15,718 17,291 36.0%
John North 10,994 11,024 11,061 11,097 0.9%
John South 28,686 30,500 32,437 34,347 19.7%
WEST King Central 13,071 14,029 14,363 14,709 12.5%
King North 16,567 18,308 19,755 21,252 28.3%
King South 12,522 12,604 12,681 12,761 1.9%
Lincoln/LV Trail 8,072 8,568 9,230 9,952 23.3%
Lincoln East 12,988 13,545 13,853 14,145 8.9%
Lincoln West 8,706 9,680 10,979 12,239 40.6%

Total 304,054 334,746 368,627 402,434 32.4%

Over the 15-year period from 2013 to 2028, the number of housing units is

expected to grow by approximately 32.4%, reaching over 400,000 units in total.

Differences in the pace of development by planning area are stark, highlighting the

importance of subdividing areas as much as possible to isolate different service

environments.

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For instance, the number of housing units Downtown (Adam West) will more than

double, while Adam East will grow by a comparatively slower rate (although still faster

than almost every other planning area). North Division provides another example, even

without its districts being subdivided. Edward District will increase its housing units by

about 141.5%, while Edward will grow at a moderate rate of around 20.2% over the entire

15-year period.

(3) Forecasting Population Per Housing Unit

Housing units do not automatically translate to a set number of residents across

the entire jurisdiction. Instead, the ratio of population per housing unit varies extensively

from one area to another, ranging in 2010 from 1.80 in the King South planning area to

as high as 3.56 in Charlie NE. Numerous factors contribute to the demographical

differences, including composition of different areas by age, density, and other

considerations.

Nonetheless, from the 2010 U.S. Census to the 2016 American Community

Survey, both of which are developed by the same agency, a clear shift emerged in the

estimated ratio of population per housing unit, as shown in the following table:

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Shift in Population Per Housing Unit Ratios from 2010 to 2018

Division Area 2010 2018 % Shift


CENTRAL Adam East 2.93 3.05 4.1%
Adam West 2.07 2.34 13.0%
Baker 2.60 2.64 1.5%
EAST George 2.57 2.66 3.5%
Henry North 2.11 2.37 12.3%
Henry South 2.07 2.17 4.8%
NORTH Edward 2.73 2.89 5.9%
Frank 3.02 3.03 0.3%
NORTHWEST Charlie NE 3.56 3.70 3.9%
Charlie SW 2.98 2.84 -4.7%
David 2.89 3.16 9.3%
SOUTH Ida North 3.06 3.11 1.6%
Ida South 2.82 2.99 6.0%
John North 3.17 3.23 1.9%
John South 2.64 2.69 1.9%
WEST King Central 2.19 2.37 8.2%
King North 1.80 1.86 3.3%
King South 1.87 2.03 8.6%
Lincoln/LV Trail 1.90 1.99 4.7%
Lincoln East 1.97 1.94 -1.5%
Lincoln West 2.56 2.61 2.0%

While some of these changes may appear marginal, differences of as much as

13% can present major implications for estimating overall and district-specific population

changes. As a result of these differences, the project team developed the assumption

that following the year 2010, the ratio of population per housing unit increased to the ACS-

estimated levels over a period of four years, with the resulting population totals being in

line with U.S. Census and NCTCOG population estimates.

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(4) Projected Population by Planning Area

Using the individual housing unit totals and population per unit ratios for each

planning area, the project team developed population projections through the year 2028,

as shown in the following table:

Projected Population by Planning Area

Division Planning Area 2018 2023 2028 +/-%

CENTRAL Adam East 21,269 25,624 30,041 41.2%


Adam West 12,576 16,595 20,636 64.1%
Baker 38,321 43,547 48,849 27.5%
EAST George 58,567 59,231 59,886 2.3%
Henry North 28,013 29,700 31,306 11.8%
Henry South 44,635 45,389 46,097 3.3%
NORTH Edward 103,859 110,297 116,755 12.4%
Frank 101,165 136,661 171,797 69.8%
NORTHWEST Charlie NE 22,896 26,139 29,574 29.2%
Charlie SW 19,427 19,575 19,725 1.5%
David 85,621 98,743 111,688 30.4%
SOUTH Ida North 35,925 38,412 40,770 13.5%
Ida South 42,475 47,062 51,774 21.9%
John North 35,656 35,776 35,893 0.7%
John South 82,068 87,280 92,419 12.6%
WEST King Central 33,309 34,102 34,923 4.8%
King North 34,049 36,740 39,523 16.1%
King South 25,581 25,737 25,901 1.3%
Lincoln/LV Trail 17,077 18,397 19,836 16.2%
Lincoln East 26,308 26,907 27,475 4.4%
Lincoln West 25,246 28,634 31,923 26.4%

Total 894,043 990,548 1,086,791 21.6%

Over the 10-year planning period, the population of Fort Worth is projected to grow

by about 21.6%, totaling nearly 1.1 million residents by 2028. Growth is significantly

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higher in some areas, with those increasing in population by at least 25% highlighted in

bold text. This includes all of Central Division, as well as the vast majority of Northwest

Division. Many of the areas currently have the highest densities of call for service

concentrations are not expected to grow significantly over the projection timeframe. At

the same time, many of the fastest growing areas, excluding districts Edward and Frank,

do not currently have high population or call for service totals.

This is also evident when aggregating the population projection data by patrol

division:

Projected Population Totals by Division

Division 2018 2023 2028 +/-% +/-

Central 72,166 85,766 99,526 37.9% +27,360


East 131,215 134,320 137,289 4.6% +6,074
North 205,024 246,958 288,552 40.7% +83,528
Northwest 127,944 144,457 160,987 25.8% +33,043
South 196,124 208,530 220,856 12.6% +24,732
West 161,570 170,517 179,581 11.1% +18,011
Total 894,043 990,548 1,086,791 21.6% +192,748

Compared to the decreases in the Central and North divisions, any chance to East

are relatively modest. South and West divisions fall around the lower end, despite adding

a combined total of nearly 33,000 residents over the next decade.

3 Analysis of Projected Service Needs

The following sections build upon the analysis of expected development to

examine its effects on two key service need indicators – calls for service and investigator

workloads.

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(1) Calls for Service Rates by Planning Area

As population totals change in each area, the previous year’s call for service totals

are highly predictive of the next year’s total, relative to the magnitude of growth and

development taking place. As a result, call for service rates in 2017 (the year of CAD data

analyzed by the project team) provide effective benchmarks from which to estimate the

how growth will affect police service demand in subsequent years, as well as

disproportionately by planning area.

The following table presents the total and per capita rate of community-generated

calls for service that patrol responded to by planning area in 2017:

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2017 Calls for Service Per Capita by Planning Area

Division Planning Area 2017 CFS CFS/Per Capita

CENTRAL Adam East 8,731 0.43


Adam West 12,804 1.09
Baker 26,750 0.72
EAST George 30,379 0.52
Henry North 6,783 0.24
Henry South 17,425 0.39
NORTH Edward 14,701 0.14
Frank 11,389 0.12
NORTHWEST Charlie NE 9,370 0.42
Charlie SW 7,428 0.38
David 14,143 0.17
SOUTH Ida North 15,099 0.43
Ida South 14,056 0.34
John North 9,192 0.26
John South 20,045 0.25
WEST King Central 6,978 0.21
King North 11,767 0.35
King South 7,637 0.30
Lincoln/LV Trail 9,022 0.54
Lincoln East 10,392 0.40
Lincoln West 5,247 0.21

Service needs clearly differ from one area to another relative to population, as

evidenced throughout the table. Calls for service occur Downtown (Adam West) at a rate

of 1.09 per capita, compared to just 0.12 in Frank, largely due to the uniqueness of

Downtown, including its high daytime population, entertainment, special event venues,

and numerous other factors.

Regardless, the chart emphasizes the importance of estimating future service

needs individually for different service environments. If the less dense/more suburban

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Lincoln West is growing at a much faster rate than Adam West/Downtown, then if call for

service growth was multiplied overall from the average rate, it would consequently distort

the picture of how different types of development translate to service needs.

(2) Calls for Service Projections

Using the population estimates and call for service generation rates that have been

developed for each planning area, calls for service totals are then projected through the

year 2028:

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Projected Calls for Service by Planning Area

Division Planning Area 2018 2023 2028 +/-%

CENTRAL Adam East 9,199 11,067 12,960 40.9%


Adam West 13,810 18,186 22,585 63.5%
Baker 27,777 31,531 35,340 27.2%
EAST George 30,725 31,071 31,411 2.2%
Henry North 6,918 7,331 7,724 11.7%
Henry South 17,636 17,931 18,208 3.2%
NORTH Edward 15,023 15,946 16,872 12.3%
Frank 12,329 16,617 20,863 69.2%
NORTHWEST Charlie NE 9,774 11,146 12,599 28.9%
Charlie SW 7,509 7,565 7,623 1.5%
David 14,704 16,937 19,141 30.2%
SOUTH Ida North 15,420 16,478 17,481 13.4%
Ida South 14,519 16,073 17,669 21.7%
John North 9,283 9,314 9,344 0.7%
John South 20,478 21,767 23,038 12.5%
WEST King Central 7,079 7,246 7,418 4.8%
King North 12,083 13,029 14,008 15.9%
King South 7,718 7,764 7,813 1.2%
Lincoln/LV Trail 9,282 9,992 10,768 16.0%
Lincoln East 10,529 10,766 10,992 4.4%
Lincoln West 5,428 6,150 6,851 26.2%

Total 277,223 303,907 330,708 19.3%

Over the next 10 years, calls for service are projected to increase by approximately

19.3%, with much of that growth occurring disproportionately in various areas.

Divisions that previously had the highest call for service totals will not grow as fast

as other divisions, as shown in the following table which aggregates patrol districts by

division:

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Projected Calls for Service by Patrol Division

Division 2018 2023 2028 10YR +/-

Central 50,786 60,784 70,885 39.6% +20,099


East 55,279 56,333 57,343 3.7% +2,064
North 27,352 32,563 37,735 38.0% +10,383
Northwest 31,987 35,648 39,363 23.1% +7,376
South 59,700 63,632 67,532 13.1% +7,832
West 52,119 54,947 57,850 11.0% +5,731
Total 277,223 303,907 330,708 19.3% +53,485

Interesting, calls for service will increase in North and Central at over 10 times the

rate of East Division. The disproportionate rates of service need growth will in effect

realign the future staffing needs of each division, as the priorities for assigning additional

patrol personnel in 2028 are different than they are today.

(3) Creation of an Index Metric for Projecting Crime-Related Workloads

To determine the impact of growth on crime rates throughout the jurisdiction, and

ultimately investigative and other staffing needs, the project team analyzed the geography

of crime occurrences in 2017 using data provided by the police department.

With the objective of determining department staffing needs, the project team

developed an index of crime events that can be used to project investigator workload in

the future. Given that not all crimes correlate to investigator workload – particularly

caseload-driven detectives (i.e., largely non-proactive) – an index allows for crimes to be

filtered down to those that most reliably indicate whether caseloads will rise. For instance,

certain liquor law violations are crimes categories included within NIBRS (National

Incident Based Reporting System), but they do not generate cases assigned to detectives

with the same probability as motor vehicle theft.


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Crime types have been selected for the index by fulfilling either (or a combination)

of the two following criteria:

• A crime that is included as a UCR (Uniformed Crime Reporting) Part I crime


category, or a less severe version of a Part I crime category. For instance,
aggravated assault is Part I crime category, but simple/misdemeanor assaults are
also included because they are a less severe version of it. This allows for a larger
dataset to be used in the projections.

• Crimes that are not Part I crimes, but are directly related to investigator workloads,
such as fraud or identity theft.

Only one crime per case number was counted in the analysis. For instance, if there

was an identity theft was tied to a larceny under the same case number, it is counted as

one crime event. In total, 45,835 crime events over the entirety of 2017 were included in

the index, which represents a significantly higher total than the number of Part I crimes.

(4) Developing the Analysis Within the Context of Historical and Recent Trends
in Crime Rates

Over the past 27 years, the crime rate in Fort Worth has dropped precipitously,

fundamentally altering the public safety service environment over time. Since 1990, when

the city experienced 14,977 Part I crimes per 100,000 residents, the crime rate has fallen

to just 3,892. Since 1995, the year in which CCPD (Crime Control Prevention District)

was implemented, the crime rate has fallen at a particularly steady rate, averaging a

decrease of 3.7% each year against the previous year. In the last five years, the rate of

change has grown further, with crime falling by an average of approximately 5.0% each

year.

The following chart provides a visualization of the crime rate’s decrease over the

past 20 years:

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Given the high degree of consistency in these changes, it is very likely (but not

certain) in the near-term horizon, that the crime rate will continue to fall. It is critical that

this context be factored into the projections for the approach to be effective in accurately

estimating the number of crime occurrences over the planning timeframe.

However, there is also cause to be conservative and guarded in immediately

assuming that this rate of decrease will hold forever. As a result, the methodology used

in developing crime projections assumes that in each projection year (2018 and later), the

crime rate per capita will decrease at a rate equal to half of the average annual decline

over the past year. In other words, instead of the crime rate decreasing by 3.52% (the

average annual decrease over the past 20 years), the crime rate will decrease by only

1.76%.

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(5) Projected Changes to Index Crime Rates

The following table provides the decrease in crime rates over the projection

timeframe using the analytical factors outlined previously, with the results expressed as

a rate of index crimes per 1,000 residents in each planning area:

Projected Rate of Index Crimes Per 1,000 Residents

Division Planning Area 2018 2023 2028 +/-%

CENTRAL Adam East 78 71 66 -15.4%


Adam West 123 113 104 -15.4%
Baker 114 105 97 -14.9%
EAST George 83 77 71 -14.5%
Henry North 33 30 28 -15.2%
Henry South 69 63 58 -15.9%
NORTH Edward 24 22 20 -16.7%
Frank 20 18 17 -15.0%
NORTHWEST Charlie NE 71 65 60 -15.5%
Charlie SW 75 69 64 -14.7%
David 32 30 27 -15.6%
SOUTH Ida North 71 65 60 -15.5%
Ida South 54 50 46 -14.8%
John North 36 33 31 -13.9%
John South 39 36 33 -15.4%
WEST King Central 46 43 39 -15.2%
King North 67 61 56 -16.4%
King South 69 64 59 -14.5%
Lincoln/LV Trail 90 82 76 -15.6%
Lincoln East 73 67 62 -15.1%
Lincoln West 30 27 25 -16.7%

Total 1,297 1,191 1,099 -15.3%

Compounded each year from 2018 to 2028, the net decline in crime rate would

then total approximately 15%. However, given that this decline occurs at the same time

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that the population of Fort Worth is projected to increase rapidly, the change in crime rate

does not necessarily translate to a lower total of crime occurrences.

(6) Index Crime Projections

Using the population projections developed for each area in combination with the

previously calculated crime rates, the number of index crime occurrences is then

estimated through the year 2028:

Projected Index Crime Occurrences by Planning Area

Division Planning Area 2018 2023 2028 +/-%

CENTRAL Adam East 1,652 1,830 1,978 19.7%


Adam West 1,546 1,876 2,152 39.2%
Baker 4,374 4,570 4,728 8.1%
EAST George 4,890 4,546 4,239 -13.3%
Henry North 924 901 876 -5.2%
Henry South 3,058 2,859 2,678 -12.4%
NORTH Edward 2,487 2,428 2,371 -4.7%
Frank 2,003 2,488 2,885 44.0%
NORTHWEST Charlie NE 1,627 1,708 1,782 9.5%
Charlie SW 1,458 1,351 1,256 -13.9%
David 2,748 2,913 3,039 10.6%
SOUTH Ida North 2,551 2,508 2,455 -3.8%
Ida South 2,293 2,336 2,370 3.4%
John North 1,283 1,183 1,095 -14.7%
John South 3,209 3,137 3,064 -4.5%
WEST King Central 1,545 1,454 1,373 -11.1%
King North 2,266 2,248 2,231 -1.5%
King South 1,768 1,635 1,518 -14.1%
Lincoln/LV Trail 1,529 1,514 1,506 -1.5%
Lincoln East 1,925 1,810 1,705 -11.4%
Lincoln West 751 783 805 7.2%

Total 45,887 46,078 46,106 0.5%

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Despite the rapid growth in population, the decline in crime rate at half the 20-year

average annual change results in a net increase in the number of index crime occurrences

or just 0.5% over the 10-year planning timeframe. In effect, the population growth and

decline in crime rate cancel one another out. Despite the relatively marginal change at an

overall level, significant changes occur at the local level. Crime in Downtown (Adam West)

increases greatly – by over 39% – while crime in Frank District rises by as much as 44%

over the next decade. By contrast, the total number of index crimes decreases by more

than -10% in 7 of the 21 planning areas.

4 Projected Patrol Division Staffing Needs

As detailed in the Patrol Bureau analysis chapter, proactivity (or % of uncommitted

time) is the primary metric used to evaluate resource needs at the officer level. Following

the analysis of calculating total patrol workload hours and net available hours spent on

duty per officer position, patrol staffing needs can be determined by setting a target level

of proactivity. For instance, a department staffing for a patrol proactivity level of 50%

needs more officer positions in order to have the number of on-duty and available hours

needed if workload is to take up only 50% of that time, compared with a department that

sets 40% as their target.

A large metropolitan department such as Fort Worth that contains a wide array of

dedicated proactive units in the field other than patrol – such as bike units, West 7th Rapid

Response Team, SRT teams, NPO teams, BAT squads, and others – can target at least

40% overall proactivity as a minimum resource level. Despite this consideration, the

projection analysis centers around the number of staff needed to provide the same level
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of service in the future that is provided currently, given changes to service demands

and related workloads. Consequently, the department’s current14 level of service is used

as the target, at 41.6% overall proactivity. Furthermore, the issues identified with

proactivity falling to severely low levels during certain hours of the day indicate that a

proactivity level 40% as a staffing target would frequently result in inadequate service

levels, and potentially issues with response times.

Another important factor in this analysis is the rate of turnover, which is defined as

the rate at which patrol officer positions become vacant through attrition. In determining

staffing needs, this represents the ‘buffer’ that must be staffed for in order to provide the

targeted level of service as vacancies occur. At a turnover rate of 5.0%, patrol unit

positions should be staffed at least 5.0% higher than they would otherwise if position slots

were always filled and never became vacant.

Given a target service level of 41.6%, and a turnover rate of 5.0%, the following

table calculates patrol officer staffing needs through the year 2028 given projected

increases to call for service workloads:

14“Current” refers to patrol workload derived from CAD data covering calendar year 2017
workload and patrol officer staffing levels on 5/18/18.
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Projected Patrol Officer Staffing Needs

2018 2023 2028

Total Workload Per CFS 102.4 min 102.4 min 102.4 min
# of Calls for Service* 277,223 303,907 330,708
Total Workload Hours 472,952 518,475 564,199

Annual Work Hours 2,080 2,080 2,080


% Net Availability (NA) 66.6% 66.6% 66.6%
Total NA Hours Per Officer 1,386 1,386 1,386

Overall Proactivity Target 41.6% 41.6% 41.6%


% Turnover Per Year 5.0% 5.0% 5.0%

Patrol Units Required 614 673 733


+/– Ofc. Positions +42 +59 +60

Central Division 112 135 157


East Division 122 125 127
North Division 61 72 84
Northwest Division 71 79 87
South Division 132 141 150
West Division 116 122 128

The number that should be allocated to each division has been set based on the

proportion of workload in each division from the base year of data through 2018, 2023,

and 2028. The result of the calculation process is then rounded to the nearest whole

number. In total, 42 additional positions are needed in the upcoming budget cycle,

another 59 five years from now, and an additional 60 officers in 2028. Overall, 161 more

patrol officer positions over the next decade are needed. It is again important to note that

adding these positions will not raise the service level or proactivity, but instead represents

only the number needed to maintain its current level given projected changes to workload.

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Patrol sergeant staffing needs can then be determined based on adequate spans

of control, targeting a ratio of 1 sergeant for every 7 officers at an overall level, with slight

variation expected at the division level. These calculations are provided in the following

table:

Projected Patrol Sergeant Staffing Needs

2018 2023 2028

Targeted Span of Control 1:7 1:7 1:7


# Officers 614 673 733

Sergeants Recommended 88 97 105


+/– Sgt. Positions +16 +9 +8
Officers Per Sergeant 7 7 7

Central Division 16 19 22
East Division 17 18 18
North Division 9 11 12
Northwest Division 10 11 12
South Division 19 20 21
West Division 17 18 18

16 sergeants are needed in this upcoming budget cycle, another 9 in five years,

and an additional 8 positions are needed by 2028, or 33 in total over the entire projection

timeframe.

Recommendations:

By 2023, add an additional 59 officers and 8 sergeant positions to regular patrol


roles, and allocate the personnel as indicated in the Patrol Bureau projection
analysis.

By 2028, add 60 officers and 8 sergeant positions to regular patrol roles in addition
to the number need five years previously, and allocate the personnel as indicated
in the Patrol Bureau projection analysis.

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5 Comprehensive Staffing Projections

The service need projections have provided the basis of the methodology used to

determine staffing needs of core functions that scale directly with service needs, including

patrol officers and sergeants, as well as decentralized detective positions. From this

important foundation, the staffing needs for every other department function are then able

to be developed. The majority of these projections are interrelated to the staffing needs

of patrol and decentralized detectives, either through changes to service needs, or as a

result of organizational/support factors. It is critical that the process of developing

projections for the entire department be done position by position, rather than scale the

department as a whole, given that the factors contributing to an individual position’s

staffing needs are unique and different from those of another position.

As detailed previously in the chapter, five primary scaling factors are involved in

determining how the staffing needs for an individual role change as growth occurs in the

jurisdiction. The needs for an individual position may be based on:

• Service needs and related workloads (e.g., patrol staffing scales to call for service
workloads).

• Relationship to workloads created by other positions (e.g., records workloads


increasing with patrol staffing.

• Spans of control and management responsibilities (e.g., patrol sergeant staffing is


set by achieving a targeted span of control).

• Size of command/division or organization (e.g., human resources staffing needs


based on number of positions in the department they support).

• Non-scalable (e.g., there is only one chief of police).

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Using these scaling factors, the projection analysis determines the staffing levels

needed over the next ten years. The following pages contain this analysis, provided an

overview of the projection factors utilized for each position in calculating needs through

the year 2028.

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It is important to note that the “Actual” column contains where filled position slots are actually assigned and operate on a day-to-day
basis. As a result, even though West 7th Response Team officers are technically budgeted under the patrol officer staffing number for
West Division, they are shown separately. The “Auth.” column represents authorized (or budgeted) staffing levels, but also breaks out
positions to where they are actually assigned and operate (by function).
/ / /

Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

PATROL BUREAU

Administration Assistant Chief Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Lieutenant Executive officer position; scales at 1 per bureau, 1 1 1 1 1


command, or division executive.

Sergeant Unique role; does not directly scale. 2 2 2 2 2

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Asst. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Office Asst. Support position, scales to number of positions 6 6 6 6 6


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Special Projects Lieutenant Scales with number of special projects, but is largely a 1 1 1 1 1
unique role.
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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

NORTH COMMAND

Administration Deputy Chief Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Captain Executive officer position; scales at 1 per bureau, 1 1 1 1 1


command, or division executive.

Sr. Admin. Asst. Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Courier Scales to support needs, with no changes expected 1 1 1 1 1


within the projection timeframe.

Office Asst. (The 1.5 vacant FTEs reflect 3 vacant part-time 2.5 4 4 4 4
positions) Scales to support needs, with no changes
expected within the projection timeframe.

Quartermaster Position does not currently exist. Fulfills the same 0 0 4 4 4


roles and responsibilities as the equipment officers in
each patrol division. Each quartermaster position
should be assigned to one division.

Command Captain Unique role; position does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1


Inspections
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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

NORTHWEST DIVISION

Administration Commander Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Captain Executive officer position; scales at 1 per bureau, 1 1 1 1 1


command, or division executive.

Sergeant Unique role; does not directly scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Officer Equipment officer role. Recommended reallocation of 1 1 0 0 0


the position, with the role being replaced by the
quartermaster classification.

Admin Tech. Support position, scales to number of positions 2 2 2 2 2


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Patrol Operations

Patrol Lieutenant Scales to coverage needs. No changes to the number 3 3 3 3 3


of positions needed to fulfill these requirements are
anticipated within the projection timeframe.

Sergeant Scales to supervisory spans of control. As detailed in 12 12 10 11 12


the expanded overview of patrol staffing projections,
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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
staffing needs are based on the number needed to
achieve a 1:7 span of control overall, and then divided
among the divisions based on the number of officers
projected for each.

Corporal Non-scalable, set at 1 for most divisions. 1 1 1 1 1

Officer Scales to service needs. The projection methodology 74 71 70 78 86


for patrol officers has been outlined earlier in the
chapter and is based on estimated increases to call
for service workloads by area.

Community Operations

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Decentralized Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


Detectives directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:10, including all personnel
assigned to the unit.

Detective (Recommended increase in 2018) Scales to the 12 12 13 13 13


number of index crime occurrences, which are not
projected to increase significantly by 2028.

Officer (BAT) Elective priority; scales based on level of 3 3 3 3 3


coverage/enforcement desired as a proactive unit.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Officer (Metal Elective priority; scales based on level of 2 2 2 2 2
Theft) coverage/enforcement desired as a proactive unit.

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Asst. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

NPO Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


directly report to the position. Based on this type of
function, spans of control should be set at a maximum
of 1:11.

Officer Based on the number of beats in the division, unless 10 10 10 11 11


some of those beats have do not have enough people
and/or community groups, and other factors involved
in NPO workload. In the long-term range, all beats are
assumed to meet these standards.

SRT Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:8, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Corporal Backup supervisor and lead of the unit, scales based 1 1 1 1 1


on supervisory spans of control. Based on the
sergeant's relatively narrower span of control of 1:6,
an additional sergeant is not needed within the
projection timeframe.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Officer Recommended reallocation of 2 officers to the 8 8 6 6 6
Intelligence Section, with 2018 number also based on
the number needed to fully accomplish the
reconfigured role of SRT as a proactive enforcement
and support unit operating at the division level. By
2028, divisions with the highest index crime totals will
experience the most significant decrease in crime,
while the divisions with the lowest crime totals will
experience the greatest increase. As a result,
divisions will not have significantly higher needs for
SRT units relative to another.

NORTH DIVISION

Administration Commander Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Captain Executive officer position; scales at 1 per bureau, 1 1 1 1 1


command, or division executive.

Sergeant Unique role; does not scale directly. 1 1 1 1 1

Officer Equipment officer role. Recommended reallocation of 1 1 0 0 0


the position, with the role being replaced by the
quartermaster classification.

Admin Tech. Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.
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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

Patrol Operations

Patrol Lieutenant Scales to coverage needs. No changes to the number 1 1 1 1 1


of positions needed to fulfill these requirements are
anticipated within the projection timeframe.

Sergeant Scales to supervisory spans of control. As detailed in 9 9 9 11 12


the expanded overview of patrol staffing projections,
staffing needs are based on the number needed to
achieve a 1:7 span of control overall, and then divided
among the divisions based on the number of officers
projected for each.

Corporal Non-scalable, set at 1 for most divisions. 1 1 1 1 1

Officer Scales to service needs. The projection methodology 68 66 60 71 82


for patrol officers has been outlined earlier in the
chapter and is based on estimated increases to call
for service workloads by area.

Community Operations

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Decentralized Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


Detectives directly report to the position. Span of control should
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/ / /

Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
be set at around 1:10, including all personnel
assigned to the unit.

Detective (Recommended increase in 2018) Scales to the 10 8 13 13 13


number of index crime occurrences, which are not
projected to increase significantly by 2028.

Officer (BAT) Elective priority; scales based on level of 3 3 3 3 3


coverage/enforcement desired as a proactive unit.

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Asst. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

NPO Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


directly report to the position. Based on this type of
function, spans of control should be set at a maximum
of 1:11.

Officer Based on the number of beats in the division, unless 9 9 9 10 11


some of those beats have do not have enough people
and/or community groups, and other factors involved
in NPO workload. In the long-term range, all beats are
assumed to meet these standards.

SRT Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:8, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Corporal Backup supervisor and lead of the unit, scales based 1 1 1 1 1
on supervisory spans of control. Based on the
sergeant's relatively narrower span of control of 1:6,
an additional sergeant is not needed within the
projection timeframe.

Officer Recommended reallocation of 2 officers to the 8 8 6 6 6


Intelligence Section, with 2018 number also based on
the number needed to fully accomplish the
reconfigured role of SRT as a proactive enforcement
and support unit operating at the division level. By
2028, divisions with the highest index crime totals will
experience the most significant decrease in crime,
while the divisions with the lowest crime totals will
experience the greatest increase. As a result,
divisions will not have significantly higher needs for
SRT units relative to another.

WEST DIVISION

Administration Commander Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Captain Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Sergeant Unique role; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Officer Equipment officer role. Recommended reallocation of 1 1 0 0 0


the position, with the role being replaced by the
quartermaster classification.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Admin Tech. Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1
supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Patrol Operations

Patrol Lieutenant Scales to coverage needs. No changes to the number 3 3 3 3 3


of positions needed to fulfill these requirements are
anticipated within the projection timeframe.

Sergeant Scales to supervisory spans of control. As detailed in 13 13 16 17 18


the expanded overview of patrol staffing projections,
staffing needs are based on the number needed to
achieve a 1:7 span of control overall, and then divided
among the divisions based on the number of officers
projected for each.

Corporal Non-scalable, set at 1 for most divisions. 1 1 1 1 1

Officer (Actual staffing total includes overhire positions that 123 103 114 120 126
were assigned to the unit at the time of the patrol
staffing snapshot on 5/19/2018.)

Scales to service needs. The projection methodology


for patrol officers has been outlined earlier in the
chapter and is based on estimated increases to call
for service workloads by area.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

Community Operations

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Decentralized Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


Detectives directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:10, including all personnel
assigned to the unit.

Detective Scales to the number of index crime occurrences, 19 19 18 18 18


which are not projected to increase significantly by
2028.

Officer (BAT) Elective priority; scales based on level of 3 3 3 3 3


coverage/enforcement desired as a proactive unit.

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Asst. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

NPO Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 2 2 2 2 2


directly report to the position. Based on this type of
function, spans of control should be set at a maximum
of 1:11.

Officer Based on the number of beats in the division, unless 18 18 18 18 18


some of those beats have do not have enough people
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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
and/or community groups, and other factors involved
in NPO workload. In the long-term range, all beats are
assumed to meet these standards.

SRT Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:8, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Corporal Backup supervisor and lead of the unit, scales based 1 1 1 1 1


on supervisory spans of control. Based on the
sergeant's relatively narrower span of control of 1:6,
an additional sergeant is not needed within the
projection timeframe.

Officer Recommended reallocation of 2 officers to the 8 8 6 6 6


Intelligence Section, with 2018 number also based on
the number needed to fully accomplish the
reconfigured role of SRT as a proactive enforcement
and support unit operating at the division level. By
2028, divisions with the highest index crime totals will
experience the most significant decrease in crime,
while the divisions with the lowest crime totals will
experience the greatest increase. As a result,
divisions will not have significantly higher needs for
SRT units relative to another.

West 7th Rapid Sergeant (Numbers reflect 1 assigned to West 7th Rapid 2 2 2 2 2
Response Team Response Team, as well as 1 assigned to West
Bikes).

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that
directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at no more than 1:10, given that it is a field
function with both proactive and reactive roles.

Corporal Lead/backup supervisory position, with staffing set at 1 1 1 1 1


a rate of 1 corporal per sergeant position.

Officer (Numbers reflect 14 assigned to West 7th Rapid 20 0 20 20 20


Response Team, as well as 6 assigned to West
Bikes).

Based on both the number of officers needed to


establish a fully functional team, as well as the
number of teams needed for optimal coverage. Given
that peak workload times for the West 7th area largely
occur during an 8-10 hour window, and mostly on
certain days, one team is needed now and throughout
the planning timeframe.

CENTRAL DIVISION

Administration Commander Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Captain Executive officer position; scales at 1 per bureau, 1 1 1 1 1


command, or division executive.

Sergeant Unique role; does not directly scale. 1 1 1 1 1


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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

Officer Equipment officer role. Recommended reallocation of 1 1 0 0 0


the position, with the role being replaced by the
quartermaster classification.

Admin Tech. Staffing set on workload and roles assigned to the 1 1 1 1 1


unit. No major changes are expected to the position's
functional responsibilities within the projection
timeframe.

Patrol Operations

Patrol Lieutenant Scales to coverage needs. No changes to the number 3 3 3 3 3


of positions needed to fulfill these requirements are
anticipated within the projection timeframe.

Sergeant Scales to supervisory spans of control. As detailed in 13 13 16 19 22


the expanded overview of patrol staffing projections,
staffing needs are based on the number needed to
achieve a 1:7 span of control overall, and then divided
among the divisions based on the number of officers
projected for each.

Officer Scales to service needs. The projection methodology 98 109 111 133 154
for patrol officers has been outlined earlier in the
chapter, and is based on estimated increases to call
for service workloads by area.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

Community Operations

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Decentralized Sergeant (Recommended increase in 2018) Supervisor of unit; 1 1 2 2 2


Detectives scales to the number of staff that directly report to the
position. Span of control should be set at around 1:10,
including all personnel assigned to the unit.

Detective (Recommended decrease in 2018) Scales to the 17 17 15 15 15


number of index crime occurrences, which are not
projected to increase significantly by 2028.

Officer (BAT) Elective priority; scales based on level of 3 3 3 3 3


coverage/enforcement desired as a proactive unit.

NPO Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 2 2 2 2 2


directly report to the position. Based on this type of
function, spans of control should be set at a maximum
of 1:11.

Officer Based on the number of beats in the division, unless 16 16 16 17 18


some of those beats have do not have enough people
and/or community groups, and other factors involved
in NPO workload. In the long-term range, all beats are
assumed to meet these standards.
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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

SRT Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:8, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Corporal Backup supervisor and lead of the unit, scales based 1 1 1 1 1


on supervisory spans of control. Based on the
sergeant's relatively narrower span of control of 1:6,
an additional sergeant is not needed within the
projection timeframe.

Officer Recommended reallocation of 2 officers to the 8 8 6 6 6


Intelligence Section, with 2018 number also based on
the number needed to fully accomplish the
reconfigured role of SRT as a proactive enforcement
and support unit operating at the division level. By
2028, divisions with the highest index crime totals will
experience the most significant decrease in crime,
while the divisions with the lowest crime totals will
experience the greatest increase. As a result,
divisions will not have significantly higher needs for
SRT units relative to another.

Special Events

Special Events Lieutenant Lead/supervisor of unit, scales to workload and 1 1 1 1 1


positions supervised. Only one position is needed in
this role through 2028.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Sergeant Scales with special event planning need, with 1 1 1 2 2
population used as an indirect proxy. Staffing is set at
1 sergeant position for every 600,000 residents of the
city, rounded to the nearest whole number.

Downtown Bikes Sergeant Scales to supervisory spans of control. For a reactive 2 2 3 3 3


and proactive field function that operates often as a
unit or subdivided into groups, spans of control should
not exceed 1:10 or 1 per team, whichever occurs first.

Officer At two teams and 10 officers per bike, the unit is fully 20 20 20 20 20
staffed to achieve significant coverage over the
relatively small geographic area of Downtown. Despite
the projected increase to workload in Fort Worth over
the projection timeframe, the current staffing level will
remain sufficient without requiring a third team to be
established Downtown.

SOUTH COMMAND

Administration Deputy Chief Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Lieutenant Executive officer position; scales at 1 per bureau, 1 1 1 1 1


command, or division executive.

Quartermaster Position does not currently exist. Fulfills the same 0 0 2 2 2


roles and responsibilities as the equipment officers in
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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
each patrol division. Each quartermaster position
should be assigned to one division.

Public Safety Public Safety Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1


Support Support
Manager

Sergeant Unique role; does not scale directly. 1 1 1 1 1


(Admin.)

Patrol Support Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Tactical Medic Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 2 2 2 2 2
directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at one sergeant per team, or one for every 9
officers assigned, whichever is exceeded first.

Officer Staffing scales to the number of teams and the 8 8 8 8 8


number of offices needed to form a fully functional
team. No changes needed to the unit to expand its
current scope and objectives over the projection
timeframe.

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Mental Health Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Intervention / directly report to the position. Span of control should
Crisis be set at around 1:9 given the roles and responsibility
of the position.

Officer Scales directly with coverage needs and calls for 6 6 7 8 8


service. Based on emerging needs and increasing
callouts for specialized Mental Health
Intervention/Crisis resources, staffing needs are set at
1 officer for every 40,000 community-generated calls
for service.

Air Support Division

Air Support Chief Pilot Supervisor of unit; scales based on unit size and 1 1 1 1 1
coverage needs. Staffing set at a ratio of 1:12
(excluding mechanic/support personnel).

Pilot Scales based on coverage needs and availability of 5 6 6 6 6


equipment. No coverage gaps when fully staffed, but
attrition rate is not sufficient to warrant an additional
position as a buffer against turnover.

Officer Scales based on coverage needs. Based on these 4 4 4 4 4


needs remaining constant, no additional positions are
required within the projection timeframe.

Mechanic Scales to roles and responsibilities that are delineated 1 2 2 2 2


to FWPD, as opposed to contracts with private
vendors. Based on these roles, no changes to staffing
needs are anticipated within the projection timeframe.
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Auto Pound/Fleet Services Section

Administration Lieutenant Based on the recommended transfer of the Auto 1 1 0 0 0


Pound function to the Police Records Management
Section within the Property and Records Management
Division, the sergeant position will be sufficient to
manager the section, which will be comprised only by
Fleet Services.

Sergeant Based on the number of functions managed. As the 1 1 1 1 1


sergeant will be responsible for Fleet Services, which
has its own supervisors and leads, spans of control
are not applicable to determining the position's
staffing needs.

Auto Pound Property Control Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Supervisor directly report to the position. Based on the
organizational structure of the section and supervisory
roles of the position, spans of control should be set at
approximately 1:15 (rounded to the nearest whole
number), but should never exceed 1:22, including all
personnel assigned to the unit.

Sr. PC Spec. Staffing needs are combined with the non-senior 4 4 4 4 4


specialist position. Based on recent progress against
the backlog, staffing is sufficient to handle current
incoming workloads. No major changes are expected
within the projection timeframe, although the backlog
should be monitored for emerging needs.
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PC Spec. Staffing needs are combined with the senior specialist 7 8 8 8 8


position. Based on recent progress against the
backlog, staffing is sufficient to handle current
incoming workloads. No major changes are expected
within the projection timeframe, although the backlog
should be monitored for emerging needs.

PC Attendant Staffing needs are set by workload and coverage 7 8 8 8 8


needs. Based on current workloads, no major
changes are expected within the projection timeframe
to the position's staffing needs.

Administrative Staffing set on workload and roles assigned to the 1 1 1 1 1


Tech. unit. No major changes are expected to the position's
functional responsibilities within the projection
timeframe.

Fleet Services Public Safety Manager of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Support directly report to the position. Span of control should
Manager be set at around 1:12, based on functional
responsibilities.

Fleet Supervisor Supervisor of unit; scales to coverage needs and the 1 1 1 1 1


number of staff that directly report to the position.
Based on the number of positions and organization of
the unit, one position is needed throughout the
projection timeframe.

Fleet Crewleader Scales to number of positions supervised in a lead 1 1 1 1 1


capacity. Staffing is set at 1 position per 9 technicians.
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Electronics Scales to size of fleet supported by the position. Given 6 7 8 8 9


Technician that patrol represents the single largest workload
driver of Fleet Services, staffing can be set at 80
patrol officers per 1 electronics technician.

Administrative Scales to the number of positions supported. Given 1 1 1 1 1


Tech. the position's administrative responsibilities, another
position is needed if the unit's size rises above 15
FTEs.

SOUTH DIVISION

Administration Commander Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Captain Executive officer position; scales at 1 per bureau, 1 1 1 1 1


command, or division executive.

Sergeant Unique role; does not directly scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Officer Equipment officer role. Recommended reallocation of 1 1 0 0 0


the position, with the role being replaced by the
quartermaster classification.

Admin Tech. Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

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Patrol Operations

Patrol Lieutenant Scales to coverage needs. No changes to the number 3 3 3 3 3


of positions needed to fulfill these requirements are
anticipated within the projection timeframe.

Sergeant Scales to supervisory spans of control. As detailed in 13 13 19 20 21


the expanded overview of patrol staffing projections,
staffing needs are based on the number needed to
achieve a 1:7 span of control overall, and then divided
among the divisions based on the number of officers
projected for each.

Corporal Non-scalable, set at 1 for most divisions. 1 1 1 1 1

Officer Scales to service needs. The projection methodology 105 113 130 139 147
for patrol officers has been outlined earlier in the
chapter, and is based on estimated increases to call
for service workloads by area.

Community Operations

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Decentralized Sergeant (Recommended increase in 2018) Supervisor of unit; 1 1 2 2 2


Detectives scales to the number of staff that directly report to the
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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
position. Span of control should be set at around 1:10,
including all personnel assigned to the unit.

Detective (Recommended decrease in 2018) Scales to the 21 21 18 18 18


number of index crime occurrences, which are not
projected to increase significantly by 2028.

Officer (BAT) Elective priority; scales based on level of 3 3 3 3 3


coverage/enforcement desired as a proactive unit.

NPO Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 2 2 2 2 2


directly report to the position. Based on this type of
function, spans of control should be set at a maximum
of 1:11.

Officer Based on the number of beats in the division, unless 18 18 18 18 18


some of those beats have do not have enough people
and/or community groups, and other factors involved
in NPO workload. In the long-term range, all beats are
assumed to meet these standards.

SRT Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:8, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Corporal Backup supervisor and lead of the unit, scales based 1 1 1 1 1


on supervisory spans of control. Based on the
sergeant's relatively narrower span of control of 1:6,

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an additional sergeant is not needed within the
projection timeframe.

Officer Recommended reallocation of 2 officers to the 8 8 6 6 6


Intelligence Section, with 2018 number also based on
the number needed to fully accomplish the
reconfigured role of SRT as a proactive enforcement
and support unit operating at the division level. By
2028, divisions with the highest index crime totals will
experience the most significant decrease in crime,
while the divisions with the lowest crime totals will
experience the greatest increase. As a result,
divisions will not have significantly higher needs for
SRT units relative to another.

EAST DIVISION

Administration Commander Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Captain Executive officer position; scales at 1 per bureau, 1 1 1 1 1


command, or division executive.

Sergeant Unique role; does not directly scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Officer Equipment officer role. Recommended reallocation of 1 1 0 0 0


the position, with the role being replaced by the
quartermaster classification.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Admin Tech. Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1
supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Patrol Operations

Patrol Lieutenant Scales to coverage needs. No changes to the number 3 3 3 3 3


of positions needed to fulfill these requirements are
anticipated within the projection timeframe.

Sergeant Scales to supervisory spans of control. As detailed in 14 14 17 18 18


the expanded overview of patrol staffing projections,
staffing needs are based on the number needed to
achieve a 1:7 span of control overall, and then divided
among the divisions based on the number of officers
projected for each.

Corporal Non-scalable, set at 1 for most divisions. 1 1 1 1 1

Officer Scales to service needs. The projection methodology 100 110 121 123 125
for patrol officers has been outlined earlier in the
chapter, and is based on estimated increases to call
for service workloads by area.

Community Operations

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.
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Decentralized Sergeant (Recommended increase in 2018) Supervisor of unit; 1 1 2 2 2


Detectives scales to the number of staff that directly report to the
position. Span of control should be set at around 1:10,
including all personnel assigned to the unit.

Detective (Recommended change in 2018) Scales to the 15 18 17 17 17


number of index crime occurrences, which are not
projected to increase significantly by 2028.

Officer (BAT) Elective priority; scales based on level of 3 3 3 3 3


coverage/enforcement desired as a proactive unit.

Officer Elective priority; scales based on level of 1 1 1 1 1


(Nuisance coverage/enforcement desired as a proactive unit.
Abatement)

NPO Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 2 2 2 2 2


directly report to the position. Based on this type of
function, spans of control should be set at a maximum
of 1:11.

Officer Based on the number of beats in the division, unless 16 16 16 16 17


some of those beats have do not have enough people
and/or community groups, and other factors involved
in NPO workload. In the long-term range, all beats are
assumed to meet these standards.

SRT Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


directly report to the position. Span of control should
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be set at around 1:8, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Corporal Backup supervisor and lead of the unit, scales based 1 1 1 1 1


on supervisory spans of control. Based on the
sergeant's relatively narrower span of control of 1:6,
an additional sergeant is not needed within the
projection timeframe.

Officer Recommended reallocation of 2 officers to the 8 8 6 6 6


Intelligence Section, with 2018 number also based on
the number needed to fully accomplish the
reconfigured role of SRT as a proactive enforcement
and support unit operating at the division level. By
2028, divisions with the highest index crime totals will
experience the most significant decrease in crime,
while the divisions with the lowest crime totals will
experience the greatest increase. As a result,
divisions will not have significantly higher needs for
SRT units relative to another.

East Bikes Sergeant Scales to supervisory spans of control. For a reactive 1 1 1 1 1


and proactive field function that operates often as a
unit or subdivided into groups, spans of control should
not exceed 1:10 or 1 per team, whichever occurs first.

Officer Elective priority that functions in both a proactive and 6 6 6 6 6


reactive capacity. Scales based on both the number of
officers needed to establish each team, as well as the
number of teams needed for optimal coverage. At 6
officers, the unit is able to be fully functional as a
single team. At the same time, workload is projected
to increase in East Division the least of any patrol
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division – at only +3.7% over 10 years. Consequently,
additional staffing in East Bikes not needed within the
projection timeframe.

TRAFFIC DIVISION

Administration Captain Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Technician supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Enforcement Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Commercial Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


Vehicle directly report to the position. Span of control should
Enforcement be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
Unit to the unit.

Officer Based on coverage needs. With no changes expected 4 4 4 4 4


to the target service level for the function, no
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additional staffing is needed within the projection
timeframe.

Traffic Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 7 7 7 7 8


Enforcement directly report to the position. Span of control set at
Unit current ratio of around 6.5.

Officer Scales to call for service increases, beginning within 45 45 45 47 49


the 2023 projection timeframe. Staffing set at base
number of officers in 2018, plus the percentage
growth in CFS in 2023 and 2028 versus 2018, with
that percentage then multiplied by 20 (and rounded).

Traffic Investigations Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Traffic Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


Investigations directly report to the position. Span of control should
Unit be set at around 1:10, including all personnel
assigned to the unit.

Corporal Scales to population of the city, with projected needs 9 10 10 11 12


based on percentage increases to city population.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
DWI Unit Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 2 2 1 2 2
directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:7, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Officer Scales to population of the city, with projected needs 10 10 10 11 12


based on percentage increases to city population.

Abandoned Traffic Control (Position does not currently exist) Recommended 1 1 1 1 1


Vehicle Supervisor creation of the position to supervise the civilian traffic
Enforcement control technicians. As a supervisory position, staffing
Unit needs scale with span of control, which has been set
at 1 position for every 10 technicians.

Traffic Control No changes are projected to the workload of the 9 7 7 7 7


Technician position.

SUPPORT BUREAU

Administration Assistant Chief Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Sergeant Executive officer position; scales at 1 per bureau, 1 1 1 1 1


command, or division executive.

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Tech. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.
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TACTICAL COMMAND

Administration Deputy Chief Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Sergeant Executive officer position; scales at 1 per bureau, 1 1 1 1 1


command, or division executive.

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Tech. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

TACTICAL OPERATIONS DIVISION

Administration Captain Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Tech. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

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SWAT Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Office Assistant Support position that should be added, scales to 0 1 1 1 1


number of positions supported. No major changes are
expected to roles or workload within the projection
timeframe.

SWAT Unit Sergeant Scales to number of teams, with 1 sergeant position 2 2 2 3 3


needed for every team. A new team should be added
by 2020, after which point staffing and capabilities will
be sufficient.

Corporal Scales to number of teams, with recommended 3 3 3 4 4


increase to 3 teams in 2020. Beyond that point, no
additional teams are needed within the projection
timeframe.

Officer Scales to number of teams, with recommended 20 20 20 30 30


increase to 3 teams in 2020. Beyond that point, no
additional team are needed within the projection
timeframe.

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Special Operations Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Mounted Patrol Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Unit directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Officer Elective need; does, not directly scale with service 9 9 9 9 9


needs, but instead scales with targeted level of
coverage/service. Changes to the program are not
expected within the projection timeframe.

Animal Control Elective need; does, not directly scale with service 1 1 1 1 1
Tech. needs, but instead scales with targeted level of
coverage/service. Changes to the program are not
expected within the projection timeframe.

Office Asst. Scales with administrative duties and the number of 1 1 1 1 1


positions supported. Given that no changes are
expected to either within the projection timeframe,
additional positions will not be needed.

SEER Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


directly report to the position. Span of control should
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be set at around 1:8, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Officer Elective need; does, not directly scale with service 4 4 4 4 4


needs, but instead scales with targeted level of
coverage/service. Changes to the program are not
expected within the projection timeframe.

Special Response Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

K9 Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 2 2 2


directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:6, given that it is a highly
demanding supervisory position, but also that patrol
sergeants provide direct field supervision when K9
units are attached to incident responses.

Officer Scales to coverage needs. Recommended increase in 10 10 11 11 11


capabilities to 11 officers in order to more frequently
field at least 4 K9s on duty. From that point, staffing
needs remain unchanged unless targeted coverage
needs increase.

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TACTICAL INTELLIGENCE DIVISION

Administration Captain Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Tech. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Information Management Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Office Assistant Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.
Crime Analysis Sr. Crime Lead/supervisory role; scales to direct workloads and 2 2 2 2 2
Unit Analyst the number of staff that directly report to the position.
Span of control should be set at around 1:7, including
all personnel assigned to the unit.

Crime Analyst Support position, scales to direct support roles and 5 5 9 10 10


size of the organization. Reactive needs scale to the
number of patrol divisions (6), while the proactive and
other roles are set at 1 crime analyst for every t00
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sworn in the organization (rounded to the nearest
whole number).

Real-Time Crime Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 2 2 2
Center directly report to the position. Recommended increase
of 1 sergeant in 2018. From there, span of control
should be set at around 1:8, including all personnel
assigned to the unit.

Officer Coverage-based need, scales based on level of 11 11 11 11 11


functionality and coverage desired. With no changes
expected within the projection timeframe other than
the recommended changes for 2018, no additional
staff are needed by 2028.

Crime Analyst As with the officers assigned to the unit, the crime 0 0 3 3 3
analyst position is primarily a coverage-based need,
scaling based on level of functionality and coverage
desired. With no changes expected within the
projection timeframe other than the recommended
changes for 2018, no additional staff are needed by
2028.

Criminal Crime and Intel (Recommended merger of the unit into the Crime 2 2 2 2 2
Intelligence Analyst Analysis Unit)
Analysis Unit

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Intelligence Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Office Asst. Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Homeland Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


Security/ Intel directly report to the position. Span of control should
Unit be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Corporal Elective need; scales to level of functionality desired. 1 1 1 1 1


At one team, the unit is fully able to perform its roles
and responsibilities. Unless targeted capabilities
and/or coverage needs change, staffing needs will
remain constant.

Officer Elective need; scales to level of functionality desired. 4 4 4 4 4


At one team, the unit is fully able to perform its roles
and responsibilities. Unless targeted capabilities
and/or coverage needs change, staffing needs will
remain constant.

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Criminal Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Intelligence Unit directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:8, given that direct supervision
duties are relatively high for the unit.

Corporal Staffing set based on desired level of service and 1 1 1 1 1


number of teams. Beyond the addition of 2 sergeants
and 12 officers to the unit in 2018, no additional
positions are needed for the unit within the projection
timeframe.

Officer Staffing set based on desired level of service and 10 10 22 22 22


number of teams.

Criminal Tracking Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 2 2 2
Unit directly report to the position. Span of control should be
set at around 1:8, given that direct supervision duties
are relatively high for the unit.

Beyond the addition of 1 sergeant to the unit in 2018,


one additional position is needed for the unit within the
projection timeframe.

Corporal Staffing set based on desired level of service and 1 1 1 1 1


number of teams.

Officer Staffing set based on desired level of service and 12 6 16 16 16


number of teams. Includes the recommended transfer
of 1 officer from every SRT team, for a total of 6
authorized positions in 2018. The other 6 officers are
‘on loan’ from other work units. Beyond those changes,
a total of 16 officers are needed within the projection
timeframe.
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Electronic Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


Surveillance directly report to the position. Span of control should
Unit be set at around 1:9 (rounded), given that direct
supervision duties are relatively low compared to
many other supervisor positions, particularly because
of the corporal position attached to the unit.

Corporal Lead/backup supervisor, scales with number of 1 1 1 1 1


sergeants at a 1:1 ratio.

Officer Scales with index crime changes, at 1 additional 10 10 10 10 10


position per 10% increase in the total number of index
crime occurrences.

Dignitary Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


Protection Unit directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Officer Scales to dignitary protection needs. No changes are 5 5 5 5 5


expected within the projection timeframe.

TACTICAL INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION

Administration Captain Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

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Narcotics Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Corporal Unique role within the unit; does not scale directly. 1 1 1 1 1

Office Asst. Based on the number of positions supported, which is 1 1 1 1 1


not expected to change significantly over the
projections' timeframe.

Narcotics Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


Detectives directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Detective Elective need, with staffing needs being set at the 9 9 9 9 9


number of teams desired. If greater coverage is not
prioritized, then the lack of increase in crime levels
over the projection timeframe will not change staffing
needs for the position.

Narcotics Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 3 3 3 3 3


Complaint directly report to the position. Span of control should
Teams be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

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Officer Elective need that scales with capability level 24 24 24 24 24
targeted. With no changes to unit objectives, and
combined with the crime increase being marginal, no
additional staffing needs are forecasted over the
projection period.

North Texas Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
HIDTA directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Officer Elective need; staffing is based on desired service 8 8 8 8 8


level. No significant changes expected over the
projection timeframe, particularly given the marginal
change in crime totals over the next 10 years.

DEA/DFW Task Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Force directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Officer Elective need; staffing is based on desired service 5 5 5 5 5


level. No significant changes expected over the
projection timeframe, particularly given the marginal
change in crime totals over the next 10 years.

Vice Unit Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 2 2 3 3 3
directly report to the position. Span of control should

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
be set at around 1:7, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.
Corporal Unique role within the unit; does not scale directly. 1 1 1 1 1

Officer Elective need. Recommended increase contingent on 10 10 18 18 18


game room workload continuing to prevent vice
enforcement activity from being conducted regularly.

Gang Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Gang Detectives Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:7, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Detective Elective need; staffing is based on desired service 5 5 5 5 5


level. No significant changes expected over the
projection timeframe, particularly given the marginal
change in crime totals over the next 10 years.

Enforcement Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 2 2 2 2 2


Teams directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Corporal Unique role within the unit; does not scale directly. 1 1 1 1 1

Officer Scales to index crime increases. Staffing set at 1 19 18 19 19 19


additional position per 10% increase in crime
occurrences.

Prevention/ Officer Elective need; does not directly scale with service 4 4 4 4 4
Intervention Unit need increases.

Gang Intel Unit Officer Elective need; staffing is based on desired service 4 4 4 4 4
level. No significant changes expected over the
projection timeframe, particularly given the marginal
change in crime totals over the next 10 years.

INVESTIGATIVE AND SUPPORT COMMAND

Administration Deputy Chief Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Sergeant Executive officer position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Asst. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.
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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

TACTICAL OPERATIONS DIVISION

Administration Captain Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Tech. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Victim Victim Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


Assistance Assistance directly report to the position. Span of control should
Coord. be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Sr. Victim Scales directly with crime occurrences. Staffing is set 1 1 1 1 1


Assistance proportionally to increases in the number of index
Spec. crimes. Given the marginal rate of increase expected
over the next ten years, no changes are anticipated to
the staffing needs of the position.

Victim Scales directly with crime occurrences. Staffing is set 5 5 5 5 5


Assistance proportionally to increases in the number of index
Spec. crimes. Given the marginal rate of increase expected
over the next ten years, no changes are anticipated to
the staffing needs of the position.

Human Services Scales directly with crime occurrences. Staffing is set 1 1 1 1 1


Spec. proportionally to increases in the number of index
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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
crimes. Given the marginal rate of increase expected
over the next ten years, no changes are anticipated to
the staffing needs of the position.

Office Asst. Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Violent Person Crimes Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Homicide Unit Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 2 2 2
directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:10, including all personnel
assigned to the unit.

Detective Scales to number of crime occurrences, and more 11 11 13 13 13


specifically, to the number of homicides. No significant
changes to that total are expected within the
projection timeframe.

Detective (Cold Elective need; does not scale directly with growth. 1 1 1 1 1
Case)

Officer (New recommended position) Elective need; does not 0 0 3 3 3


scale directly with growth.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Office Asst. Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1
supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Robbery Unit Sergeant (Recommended 2018 increase) Supervisor of unit; 1 1 2 2 2


scales to the number of staff that directly report to the
position. Span of control should be set at around 1:10,
including all personnel assigned to the unit.

Detective (Recommended 2018 increase) Scales to crime 13 13 18 18 18


occurrences, and more specifically, to the number of
robberies.

Detective (Task Elective need; does not scale directly with growth. 2 2 2 2 2
Forces)

Office Asst. Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Major Case Unit Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:10, including all personnel
assigned to the unit.

Detective Scales to index crime increases. Staffing set at 1 6 6 6 6 6


additional position per 20% increase in crime
occurrences.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Detective (Recommended move to Vice Unit) Elective priority; 2 2 2 2 2
(Human does not directly scale with need.
Trafficking)

Officer (Missing Scales to index crime increases, particularly the 2 2 2 2 2


Persons) number of missing persons cases that require follow
up. Staffing set at 1 additional position per 20%
increase in missing persons cases.

Program Coord. Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Fugitive Unit Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:10, including all personnel
assigned to the unit.

Officer (US Elective need based partially on workload. No 9 9 9 9 9


Marshals Task expected increase in workload expected.
Force)

Forensic and Economic Crimes Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Fraud Unit Sergeant 1 1 1 1 1


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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that
directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:10, including all personnel
assigned to the unit.

Detective Scales to crime occurrences, and more specifically, to 7 7 11 11 11


the number of investigable fraud cases, which are not
projected to increase significantly within the projection
timeframe.

Detective (FBI Elective need; does not scale. Set based on desired 1 1 1 1 1
Task Force) level of involvement in task forces.

Office Asst. Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Commercial Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1


Auto Theft Unit directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:10, including all personnel
assigned to the unit.

Detective Scales to index crime increases, and particularly auto 5 5 5 5 5


thefts. Staffing set at 1 additional position per 20%
increase in auto theft Part I crimes.

Detective (Task Elective need; does not scale. Set based on desired 1 1 1 1 1
Force) level of involvement in task forces.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Officer Scales to index crime increases. Staffing set at 1 1 1 1 1 1
additional position per 20% increase in crime
occurrences.

Office Asst. Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Digital Forensics Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Unit directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:10, including all personnel
assigned to the unit.

Detective Scales to index crime increases. Staffing set at 1 5 5 5 5 5


additional position per 20% increase in crime
occurrences.

Computer Scales to index crime increases. Staffing set at 1 1 1 1 1 1


Forensic additional position per 20% increase in crime
Examiner occurrences.

Office Asst. Support position, scales to number of positions 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5
supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Crime Scene Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 2 2 2 2 2
Unit directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:10, including all personnel
assigned to the unit.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Officer Scales to index crime increases. Staffing set at 1 15 15 15 15 15
additional position per 10% increase in crime
occurrences.

Special Victims Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Domestic Sergeant (Recommended 2018 increase) Supervisor of unit; 0 1 2 2 2


Violence Unit scales to the number of staff that directly report to the
position. Span of control should be set at around 1:10,
including all personnel assigned to the unit.

Detective (DV) (Recommended 2018 increase) Scales to crime 10 11 22 22 22


occurrences, and more specifically, to the number of
investigable domestic violence crimes, which are not
projected to increase within the projection timeframe.

Detective (High Scales to crime occurrences, and more specifically, to 2 2 2 2 2


Risk) the number of investigable sex crimes, which are not
projected to increase within the projection timeframe.

Officer Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Customer Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1
Service Rep. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Sex Crimes Unit Sergeant (Recommended 2018 increase) Supervisor of unit; 1 1 2 2 2


scales to the number of staff that directly report to the
position. Span of control should be set at around 1:10,
including all personnel assigned to the unit.

Detective (Recommended 2018 increase) Scales to crime 6 6 8 8 8


occurrences, and more specifically, to the number of
investigable sex crimes, which are not projected to
increase within the projection timeframe.

Detective (Cold Elective priority; does not directly scale with service 1 1 1 1 1
Case) needs.

Officer Scales to crime occurrences, and more specifically, to 8 8 8 8 8


the number of investigable sex crimes, which are not
projected to increase within the projection timeframe.

Customer Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Service Rep. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Crimes Against Sergeant (Recommended 2018 increase) Supervisor of unit; 1 1 2 2 2


Children Unit scales to the number of staff that directly report to the
position. Span of control should be set at around 1:10,
including all personnel assigned to the unit.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Detective (Recommended 2018 increase) Scales to number of 11 11 18 18 18
crimes against children, with no expected increase in
total occurrences by 2028.

Officer (Child- (Recommended creation; positions do not currently 0 0 3 3 3


based Family exist) Elective priority; does not directly scale with
Offenses) service needs.

Detective (ICAC) Elective priority; does not directly scale with service 1 1 1 1 1
needs.

Officer (ICAC) Elective priority; does not directly scale with service 1 1 1 1 1
needs.

Office Assistant (Recommended creation; position does not currently 0 0 1 1 1


exist) Support position, scales to number of positions
supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Sex Offender Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Registration Unit directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:10, including all personnel
assigned to the unit.

Detective Scales based on sex offender workloads, with no 1 1 1 1 1


projected increase by 2028.

Officer Scales based on sex offender workloads, with no 3 3 3 3 3


(Registration) projected increase by 2028.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Officer (Monitor) (Recommended 2018 increase) Scales based on the 1 1 6 6 6
number of patrol divisions.

PROPERTY AND RECORDS MANAGEMENT DIVISION

Administration Public Safety Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1


Support
Manager

Warrant/Data Collection Section

Administration Asst. Public Manger position; scales with number and depth of 1 1 1 1 1
Safety Support functions that report to the position.
Manager

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Tech. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Warrants and Warrant/ID Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Identification Supervisor directly report to the position. Span of control should
Unit be set at around 1:12, given supervisory duties of the
position.

Sr. Warrant/ID Scales to index crime increases. Staffing set at 1 2 3 3 3 3


Tech. additional position per 20% increase in crime
occurrences.
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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

Warrant/ID Tech. Scales to index crime increases. Staffing set at 1 8 8 8 8 8


additional position per 20% increase in crime
occurrences.

NIBRS Sr. Data Scales to index crime increases. Staffing set at 1 3 3 3 3 3


Reporting Tech. additional position per 20% increase in crime
occurrences.

Data Collection Data Reporting Manager of unit; scales to the number of functions 1 1 1 1 1
Reporting Unit Supervisor and staff in the unit.

Asst. Data Lead/supervisor position; scales with call for service 3 3 3 2 3


Reporting workloads with unit as a whole.
Supervisor

Sr. Data Scales to call for service increases, beginning within 3 3 3 3 4


Reporting Tech. the 2023 projection timeframe. Staffing set at base
number of officers in 2018, plus the percentage
growth in CFS in 2023 and 2028 versus 2018, with
that percentage then multiplied by 5 (and rounded).

Sr. Data Scales to number of positions supported, at a ratio of 1 1 1 1 1


Reporting Tech. one FTE per 30 non-supervisory FTEs
(Training)

Data Reporting Scales to call for service increases, beginning within 19 19 21 23 25


Tech. the 2023 projection timeframe. Staffing set at base
number of officers in 2018, plus the percentage
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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
growth in CFS in 2023 and 2028 versus 2018, with
that percentage then multiplied by 20 (and rounded).

Police Records Management Section

Administration Asst. Public (Recommended 2018 increase) Manger position; 1 1 2 2 2


Safety Manager scales with number and depth of functions that report
to the position. Recommended transfer of Auto Pound
Unit to the section will increase functional span of
control, though it will remain within reasonable
standards.

Property Control Property Control Manager position, does not directly scale with the 1 1 1 1 1
Unit Supv. number of direct reports in the unit.

Sr. Property Staffing needs tied to the Property Control Technician 3 4 4 4 4


Control Tech. position, with needs determined by unit workload.
Using index crimes as an indicator of the unit's
workload, the lack of increase over the next ten years
suggests that no additional staffing will be needed.

Property Control Staffing needs relate directly to Property Control 11 14 14 14 14


Spec. workloads. Using index crimes as a proxy, staffing
needs can be set by their percentage increase from
2018. Based on the marginal rate of increase in crime
occurrences, it is unlikely that the workload of
Property Control will increase. Consequently, no
additional staffing needs are anticipated within the
projection timeframe.
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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

Account Tech. Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Records Unit Customer Svc. Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Supervisor directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at a maximum of 1:10, including all personnel
assigned to the unit.

Sr. Customer Scales indirectly to call for service workloads. Line- 2 2 2 2 2


Svc. Rep. level staffing for the unit as a whole increases by 1 per
10% increase in calls for service, beginning with the
Customer Service Rep. I position and moving up.

Customer Svc. Scales indirectly to call for service workloads. Line- 4 4 4 4 5


Rep. II level staffing for the unit as a whole increases by 1 per
10% increase in calls for service, beginning with the
Customer Service Rep. I position and moving up.

Customer Svc. Scales indirectly to call for service workloads. Line- 2 2 3 3 3


Rep. I level staffing for the unit as a whole increases by 1 per
10% increase in calls for service, beginning with the
Customer Service Rep. I position and moving up.

Community Programs Division

Administration Captain Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1


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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

Sergeant (Recommended creation of new position; does not 0 0 1 1 1


currently exist) Executive officer position; does not
scale.

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Tech. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Crime Intervention Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Jail Operations Sergeant Scales based on coverage needs. Based on these 6 6 6 6 6


Unit needs not changing within the projection timeframe,
no additional staff are needed beyond 2018.

Intox. Operator Scales based on coverage needs. Based on these 4 4 4 4 4


needs not changing within the projection timeframe,
no additional staff are needed beyond 2018.

Youth Services Section

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1
Tech. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

School Sergeant Supervisory position; scales to the number of direct 5 5 6 7 7


Resource Unit reports at a ratio of 1 sergeant for every 11 SROs.

Officer (Recommended 2018 increase) Scales directly to the 66 66 69 73 77


number of school requesting a school resource officer.
Staffing is set proportional to half of the cumulative
increase in population growth, rounded to the nearest
whole number.

Youth Services Sergeant Scales to number of direct reports, at 1 sergeant for 1 1 1 1 1


Unit every 9 positions that the position supervises.

Detective Support position, does not directly scale with size of 1 1 1 1 1


unit. No major changes to staffing needs are
anticipated within the projection timeframe.

Youth Officer Scales to level of service desired, as well as 6 6 6 6 7


population growth. Additional positions beyond 2018
are proportional to half the cumulative increase in
population from 2018, rounded to the nearest whole
number.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 0 1 1 1 1
Tech. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Forensic Science Division

Administration Forensic Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1


Division
Manager

Crime Lab QA Support position that does not directly scale with the 1 1 1 1 1
Coord. number of positions in the division. It is not anticipated
that an additional QA Coordinator will be needed,
given the nature of the role.

Admin. Unit Sr. Forensic Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Specialist supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Tech. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Evidence Unit Property Room (Recommended 2018 decrease) Scales based on 2 2 1.5 1.5 1.5
Specialist index crime increases. With a marginal increase
expected over the next decade, no additional staff will
be needed.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Forensic Scales based on index crime increases. With a 2 2 2 2 2
Specialist marginal increase expected over the next decade, no
additional staff will be needed.

Latent Print Unit Latent Print Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Supervisor directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:8, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Technician Scales based on index crime increases. With a 2 2 2 2 2


marginal increase expected over the next decade, no
additional staff will be needed.

Latent Print (Recommended 2018 increase) Scales based on 2 2 3 3 3


Examiner index crime increases. With a marginal increase
expected over the next decade, no additional staff will
be needed.

Firearms Unit Forensic Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Supervisor directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Firearms Tech. (Recommended 2018 increase) Scales based on 1 1 2 2 2


index crime increases. With a marginal increase
expected over the next decade, no additional staff will
be needed.

Sr. Forensic Scales based on index crime increases. With a 1 1 1 1 1


Scientist marginal increase expected over the next decade, no
additional staff will be needed.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Forensic Scales based on index crime increases. With a 1 1 1 1 1
Scientist marginal increase expected over the next decade, no
additional staff will be needed.

Chemistry Unit Forensic Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Supervisor directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Sr. Forensic Scales based on index crime increases. With a 5 5 5 5 5


Scientist marginal increase expected over the next decade, no
additional staff will be needed.

Forensic Scales based on index crime increases. With a 1 1 1 1 1


Scientist marginal increase expected over the next decade, no
additional staff will be needed.

Biology Unit Forensic Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Supervisor directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Sr. Forensic (Recommended 2018 increase) Scales based on 2 2 3 3 3


Scientist index crime increases. With a marginal increase
expected over the next decade, no additional staff will
be needed.

Forensic Scales based on index crime increases. With a 1 1 1 1 1


Scientist marginal increase expected over the next decade, no
additional staff will be needed.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

FINANCE/PERSONNEL BUREAU

Administration Assistant Chief Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Sergeant Executive officer position; scales at 1 per bureau, 1 1 1 1 1


command, or division executive.

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Asst. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Officer Support position, scales to number of positions 2 3 3 3 3


supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Police Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


Administration the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Sergeant Unique role, does not directly scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Corporal Unique role, does not directly scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Officer Unique role, does not directly scale. 4 4 4 4 4


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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

Sr. Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Administrative supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
Asst. workload within the projection timeframe.

Media Services Scales to size of city, with 1 FTE needed for every 1 1 1 1 1
Spec. 600,000 residents (rounded down).

Communications Scales to size of city, with 1 FTE needed for every 1 1 1 1 1


Spec. 600,000 residents (rounded down).

Payroll (Move to Financial Management Division) Department 1 1 1 1 1


Supervisor support position; scales to the number of employees
in the department. No major changes expected to the
unit's workload that would require an additional
position within the projection timeframe.

Centralized (Move to Financial Management Division) Department 1 1 1 1 1


Payroll Coord. support position; scales to the number of employees
in the department. No major changes expected to the
unit's workload that would require an additional
position within the projection timeframe.

Payroll Tech. (Move to Financial Management Division) Department 6 6 7 7 7


support position; scales to the number of employees
in the department. Set at 1 per 350 FTEs, including
both sworn and civilian.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

OPERATIONAL COMMAND

Administration Deputy Chief Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Sergeant Executive officer position; scales at 1 per bureau, 1 1 1 1 1


command, or division executive.

Policy Analyst Unique role; does not directly scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Training Scales to size of department, with another position 1 1 1 1 1


Specialist needed at 2,000 sworn positions.
Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1
Technician supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.
Policy Program Manager of unit; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1
Management and Manager
Safety Unit
Safety Support position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1

Training Division

Administration Captain Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028

Career Lieutenant Manager of unit; but does not scale with size of unit, 1 1 1 1 1
Development given the two sergeants and two corporals that are
attached.

Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 2 2 2 2 2


directly report to the unit. Set at a ratio of 1 supervisor
(with corporals counting as 0.5 supervisor per FTE)
for every 8 positions attached to the unit, including
both sworn and civilian personnel.

Corporal Lead/backup supervisor position, set at current rate of 2 2 2 2 2


1 corporal for every 1 sergeant.

Officer Support position; scales to number of sworn in the 18 18 18 20 21


department. Staffing is set at 1 position for every 95
sworn in the department.

Administrative Support position, scales to number of positions 2 2 3 3 3


Tech. supported. Recommended conversion of one part-
time position that operates as the body camera
administrator to a full-time position.

Administrative (There are 4 part-time positions, but this analysis 2 2 1.5 1.5 1.5
Tech. (PT) counts each as 0.5 FTE in order to achieve
consistency) Support position, scales to number of
positions supported. No major changes are expected
to roles or workload within the projection timeframe.

Recommended conversion of one part-time position


that operates as the body camera administrator to a
full-time position. This reflected above in the full-time
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row, and consequently shows as a loss of 0.5 FTE in
the pat-time row.

Enhanced Skills Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 2 2 2 2 3
directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Corporal Lead/backup supervisor position, set at current rate of 1 1 1 1 1


1 corporal for every 2 sergeants.

Officer Support position; scales to number of sworn in the 15 9 16 16 17


department. Staffing is set at 1 position for every 120
sworn in the department.

Administrative (Position does not exist currently) Recommended 0 0 1 1 1


Technician creation of the position, which used to be allocated to
the unit before a staffing reduction was made in the
past.

Background and Lieutenant Manager of unit; does not scale with size of unit as a 1 1 1 1 1
Recruiting result of the two attached sergeant positions.

Sergeant Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 2 2 2 2 2


directly report to the position. Span of control should
be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Officer Support position; scales to number of sworn in the 13 13 13 14 15
department. Staffing is set at 1 position for every 135
sworn in the department.

Administrative Support position; scales to number of positions 1 1 1 1 1


Tech. supported. No major changes are expected to roles or
workload within the projection timeframe.

Office Asst. (PT) (There are 2 positions in this role; however, because 1 1 1 1 1
they are part time, they have been counted here as
0.5 FTE each, for a total of 1.0 FTE) Support position,
scales to number of positions supported. No major
changes are expected to roles or workload within the
projection timeframe.

PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS DIVISION

Administration Captain Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1

Internal Affairs Lieutenant Unit manager position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1


Section

Sergeant (Recommended change from detectives to sergeants) 1 1 7 7 8


Scales to number of sworn in the organization, as the
number of internal affairs investigations increases with
the number of employees.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Detective (Recommended change from detectives to sergeants) 7 7 0 0 0

Administrative (Position shared with SIS) Support position, scales to 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5
Tech. number of positions supported. No major changes are
expected to the roles or workload of the position within
the projection timeframe.

Special Lieutenant Unit manager position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1


Investigations
Section

Sergeant Supervisory position; staffing is set at 1 sergeant for 1 1 1 1 1


every 9 non-sergeant/lieutenant position in the unit.

Detective Scales to number of sworn in the organization, as the 4 4 5 5 5


number of internal affairs investigations increases with
the number of employees. Staffing is set at 1 per 500
sworn FTEs.

Officer Scales to number of sworn in the organization, as the 3 3 3 3 3


number of internal affairs investigations increases with
the number of employees. Staffing is set at 1 per 600
sworn FTEs.

Administrative (Position shared with IA) Support position, scales to 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5
Tech. number of positions supported. No major changes are
expected to roles or workload within the projection
timeframe.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Open Records Sergeant Supervisory position; staffing is set at 1 sergeant for 1 1 1 1 1
Unit every 10 direct reports.

Officer Supervisory position; staffing is set at 1 sergeant for 2 2 2 2 2


every 9 non-sergeant/lieutenant position in the unit.

Open Records (Recommended 2018 increase) Scales to number of 5 5 6 6 6


Technician sworn in the organization, as the number of internal
affairs investigations increases with the number of
employees. Staffing is set at 1 per 400 sworn FTEs.

Administrative Support position; scales to size of the organization. 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5
Asst.

COMMUNICATIONS AND QUALITY ASSURANCE DIVISION

Administration Lieutenant Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the lieutenant. No changes to functional span of
control are expected within the projection timeframe.

Communications Public Safety Manager position, does not directly scale with the 1 1 1 1 1
and Quality Support number of reports.
Assurance Manager

Asst. Public Scales to functional spans of control. 3 3 3 3 3


Safety Support
Manager
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Comm. Shift Scales to the number of shift teams, which remain 9 9 9 9 9


Supervisors static over the projection timeframe.

Sr. SPSC (Floor) Scales directly to call for service workloads. Beyond 9 9 9 10 11
2018, staffing is set to increase by the percentage
increase in workload, rounded to the nearest whole
number.

Sr. SPSC (PIC) Scales directly to call for service workloads. Beyond 1 1 1 1 1
2018, staffing is set to increase by the percentage
increase in workload, rounded to the nearest whole
number.

PSC IIs (Disp. In Scales directly to call for service workloads. Beyond 10 10 10 11 12
PIC) 2018, staffing is set to increase by the percentage
increase in workload, rounded to the nearest whole
number.

Administrative (There are 4 part-time positions, but because they are 2 2 2 2 2


Tech. (PT) counted as 0.5 FTE each, the staffing number is
shown as 2.0 FTE)

Call Center Unique support role, does not directly scale with 1 1 1 1 1
Analyst communication workloads.

Dispatcher/ Call Scales directly to call for service workloads. Beyond 93 116 139 152 165
Takers 2018, staffing is set to increase by the percentage
increase in workload, rounded to the nearest whole
number.

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ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT COMMAND

Administration Assistant Executive position; does not scale. 1 1 1 1 1


Director

Employment Services Section

Administration Employment Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


Services the position. No changes to functional span of control
Manager are expected within the projection timeframe.

Polygraph Polygrapher Scales to number of sworn in the department. Set at 1 .75 .75 1 1 1
FTE per 1800 sworn, rounded down to the nearest
0.25.

Medical Records Sr. Scales to unit-specific records workloads. No 1 1 1 1 1


Unit Administrative significant changes are expected within the projection
Asst. timeframe.

Administrative Support position, scales to administrative workloads 1 1 1 1 1


Tech. that are assigned. Staffing needs not anticipated to
change over the projection timeframe.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Sworn Employment Supervisor of unit; scales to the number of staff that 1 1 1 1 1
Employment Specialist directly report to the position. Span of control should
Services be set at around 1:9, including all personnel assigned
to the unit.

Administrative Support position; no major changes are expected to 1 1 1 1 1


Asst. the unit's workload over the projection timeframe.

Administrative Support position; no major changes are expected to 1 1 1 1 1


Tech. the unit's workload over the projection timeframe.

Civilian Employment Supervisor of unit, as well as lead. Staffing based 1 1 1 1 1


Employment Specialist primarily on workload given the size of the unit. Needs
Services will not change significantly over the projection
timeframe.

Administrative Support position; no major changes are expected to 1 1 1 1 1


Asst. the unit's workload over the projection timeframe.

Administrative Support position; no major changes are expected to .75 .75 .75 .75 .75
Tech. the unit's workload over the projection timeframe.

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT DIVISION

Administration Administrative Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


Services the position. No changes to functional span of control
Manager are expected within the projection timeframe.

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Budget Section

Budget Management Analyst/support position; scales to size of department. 1 1 2 2 2


Analyst II Combined with needs for the Management Analyst I
position, staffing is set at 1 FTE per 500 employees
(sworn and civilian) in the department, rounded to the
nearest whole number. An additional FTE is added
before the Management Analyst I position.

Management Analyst/support position; scales to size of department. 3 3 3 3 3


Analyst I Combined with needs for the Management Analyst I
position, staffing is set at 1 FTE per 500 employees
(sworn and civilian) in the department, rounded to the
nearest whole number.

Finance Section

Finance Sr. Management Staffing needs are linked with the Management 1 1 2 2 2
Analyst Analyst I position. Staffing is set at 1 FTE per 750
employees (sworn and civilian) in the department,
rounded to the nearest whole number.

Sr. Accountant Scales with size of department, at 1 position per 1,750 1 1 1 1 1


FTEs (sworn and civilian).

Management Staffing needs are linked with the Senior Management 0 1 1 1 1


Analyst I Analyst position. Staffing is set at 1 FTE per 750
employees (sworn and civilian) in the department,
rounded to the nearest whole number, with the Senior
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Management Analyst receiving the first additional
position.

Grant and Grant Manager Scales with grant application workloads. This position 0 1 1 1 1
Program should be filled, but workload is not expected to
Management increase over the planning timeframe.
Unit

Grants Scales with grant application workloads. Both 1 2 2 2 2


Specialist positions should be filled, but workload is not
expected to increase over the planning timeframe.

CCPD Program Contract Does not directly scale with size of the department, 0 1 1 1 1
Management Compliance given the specific scope of CCPD. Needs will remain
Specialist unchanged for the projection timeframe.

PROGRAM SUPPORT DIVISION

Administration Administrator Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


the position. No changes to functional span of control
are expected within the projection timeframe.
Research and Planning Section

Research and Planning 1 1 1 1 1


Planning Manager
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Supervisor position, and also a unique role. No
changes needed within the projection timeframe
based on scaling factors.

Sr. Planner Scales based on targeted capability level of the unit, 1 1 1 1 1


and workloads associated with conducting analysis
and preparing various reports. At four positions within
Research and Planning, capabilities are currently
sufficient and no additional workloads are forecasted
over the planning timeframe.

Planner As with the Senior Planner position, scales based on 2 2 2 2 2


targeted capability level of the unit, and workloads
associated with conducting analysis and preparing
various reports. At four positions within Research and
Planning, capabilities are currently sufficient and no
additional workloads are forecasted over the planning
timeframe.

Procurement and Contract Administration Section

Procurement Sr. Management Lead and supervisor position, scaling primarily with 1 1 1 1 1
and Contract Analyst unit workload as a whole. No major changes are
Administration expected to the workload of the unit over the
projection timeframe.

Administrative Support position, scales primarily based on unit 2 2 2 2 2


Asst. workloads. No major changes are expected to the
workload of the unit over the projection timeframe.

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Unit Name Classification Projection Factors Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028
Account Tech. Scales primarily based on unit workloads. No major 1 1 1 1 1
changes are expected to the workload of the unit over
the projection timeframe.

Contract Sr. Contract Unique role; one per unit. 1 1 1 1 1


Administration Specialist
Unit

Contract Scales primarily based on unit workloads. No major 1 1 1 1 1


Specialist changes are expected to the workload of the unit over
the projection timeframe.

Sr. Account Scales primarily based on unit workloads. No major 0 1 1 1 1


Tech. changes are expected to the workload of the unit over
the projection timeframe.

Account Tech. Scales primarily based on unit workloads. No major 1 1 1 1 1


changes are expected to the workload of the unit over
the projection timeframe.

QA/Asset Management Analyst/support position; scales to size of 1 1 1 1 1


Management Analyst II department. Combined with needs for the
Unit Management Analyst I position, staffing is set at 0.5
FTE per 800 employees (sworn and civilian) in the
department, rounded to the nearest 0.5. Additional
FTEs added after Management Analyst I.

Management Analyst/support position; scales to size of 1.5 1.5 2 2 2.5


Analyst I department. Combined with needs for the
Management Analyst I position, staffing is set at 0.5
FTE per 800 employees (sworn and civilian) in the
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department, rounded to the nearest 0.5. Additional


FTEs added before the Management Analyst II
position.

Technology Services Section

Technology IT Manager Scales to the number of units/functions managed by 1 1 1 1 1


Services the position. No changes to functional span of control
are expected within the projection timeframe.

Administrative Support position, scales to administrative workloads 2 2 2 2 2


Asst. that are assigned. Staffing needs not anticipated to
change over the projection timeframe.

Operations Sr. IT Tech Unique role; one per unit. 1 1 1 1 1


Support Unit Support Analyst

IT Tech Support Scales primarily based on unit workloads. No major 1 1 1 1 1


Analyst II changes are expected to the workload of the unit over
the projection timeframe.

IT Tech Support Scales primarily based on unit workloads. No major 1 1 1 1 1


Analyst I changes are expected to the workload of the unit over
the projection timeframe.

Technology Sr. IT Unique role; one per unit. 1 1 1 1 1


Services Programmer/
Analyst

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IT Programmer/ Scales primarily based on unit workloads. No major 1 1 1 1 1


Analyst changes are expected to the workload of the unit over
the projection timeframe.

Research and Sr. IT Business Scales primarily based on unit workloads. No major 1 1 1 1 1
Project Planner changes are expected to the workload of the unit over
the projection timeframe.

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7 Summary of Staffing Projections

Overall, the expansive growth Fort Worth will experience over the next decade will

translate to greatly increased police service demand, although that growth will likely occur

unequally. Calls for service can be anticipated to increase by nearly 20%, while Part I

crimes are likely to remain more or less the same. For instance, the staffing analysis has

demonstrated significant deficiencies in investigative staffing currently, although from that

point, there is relatively little growth in needs.

The following table provides a summary of the staffing projections, including a 10-

year summary of 2028 forecasted needs versus 2017 authorized (not including staffing

analysis recommendations):

Summary of Staffing Projections

Bureau Type Actual Auth. 2018 2023 2028 10YR


Civ. 69.5 74.0 81.0 81.0 82.0 8.0
PATROL BUREAU
Sworn 1,143.0 1,129.0 1,190.0 1,269.0 1,342.0 213.0

Civ. 145.5 153.5 168.0 170.0 176.0 22.5


SUPPORT BUREAU
Sworn 457.0 452.0 540.0 557.0 561.0 109.0

FINANCE/PERSONNEL Civ. 200.5 228.5 257.8 272.8 289.3 60.8


BUREAU Sworn 94.0 89.0 97.0 100.0 105.0 16.0

Total Civ. 415.5 456.0 506.8 523.8 547.3 91.3


Sworn 1,694.0 1,670.0 1,827.0 1,926.0 2,008.0 338.0

It is important to note that the total staffing numbers exclude any staff in

functions not covered by the study. For instance, the Chief of Police and any

personnel in the Office of the Chief are not reflected in the numbers above. The
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10YR column shows the cumulative effects of recommendations (“Auth.” to “2018”

columns, plus the change from “2018” to “2028” columns, which represent the projected

needs over the next decade).

Excluding the changes recommended as a result of the staffing analysis, a total of

41 civilian and 181 sworn positions are recommended over the 10-year period from 2018

to 2028.

Recommendations:

Over the next 10 years, the projections estimate that population will increase by
approximately 21.6%, calls for service by 19.3%, and index crimes by 0.5%.

In total for 2018, the staffing analysis contained in previous chapters recommends
a total addition of 157 sworn and 51 civilian positions.

Beyond that, over the next 10 years, an additional 181 sworn and 41 civilian
positions will be needed to maintain the same level of service.

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