Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 43

OPM1501/101/0/2019

Tutorial letter 101/0/2019

Orientation to Intermediate Phase Mathematics

OPM1501
Year module

Department Mathematics Education

IMPORTANT INFORMATION:
This tutorial letter contains important
information about your module.

BARCODE
CONTENT
1 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................................................. 4
2 PURPOSE OF AND OUTCOMES FOR THE MODULE .................................................................................. 5
2.1 Purpose ............................................................................................................................................................................ 5
2.2 Outcomes ......................................................................................................................................................................... 5
3 LECTURER(S) AND CONTACT DETAILS...................................................................................................... 6
3.1 Lecturer ............................................................................................................................................................................ 6
3.2 Department....................................................................................................................................................................... 7
3.3 University.......................................................................................................................................................................... 7
4 MODULE-RELATED RESOURCES ................................................................................................................ 7
4.1 Prescribed books.............................................................................................................................................................. 7
4.2 Recommended books....................................................................................................................................................... 7
4.3 Electronic Reserves (e-Reserves) .................................................................................................................................... 8
4.4 Library services and resources information ...................................................................................................................... 8
5 STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES FOR THE MODULE ................................................................................ 11
5.1 Study groups .................................................................................................................................................................. 11
5.2 myUnisa ......................................................................................................................................................................... 11
5.3 Tutorials.......................................................................................................................................................................... 11
5.4 Videoconferencing.......................................................................................................................................................... 12
5.5 Tutors ............................................................................................................................................................................. 12
6 MODULE-SPECIFIC STUDY PLAN .............................................................................................................. 12
7 MODULE PRACTICAL WORK AND WORK-INTEGRATED LEARNING ..................................................... 12
8 ASSESSMENT .............................................................................................................................................. 13
8.1 Assessment criteria ........................................................................................................................................................ 13
8.2 Assessment plan ............................................................................................................................................................ 13
8.3 General assignment numbers ........................................................................................................................................ 15
8.3.1 Unique assignment numbers .......................................................................................................................................... 15
8.3.2 Due dates for assignments ............................................................................................................................................. 15
8.4 Submission of assignments ............................................................................................................................................ 16
8.5 Assignments ................................................................................................................................................................... 17
9 OTHER ASSESSMENT METHODS .............................................................................................................. 17
10 EXAMINATION .............................................................................................................................................. 17
10.1 Examination admission................................................................................................................................................... 17
2
OPM1501/101

10.2 Examination paper ......................................................................................................................................................... 17


10.3 Examination period......................................................................................................................................................... 17
10.4 Previous examination papers ......................................................................................................................................... 17
10.5 Tutorial letter with information on the examination ......................................................................................................... 18
10.6 Marks.............................................................................................................................................................................. 18
11 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ........................................................................................................... 19
12 SOURCES CONSULTED .............................................................................................................................. 19
13 IN CLOSING .................................................................................................................................................. 19
14 ADDENDUM A Assignments ...................................................................................................................... 20
Assignment 01 .............................................................................................................................................................................. 20
Assignment 02 .............................................................................................................................................................................. 25
Assignment 03 .............................................................................................................................................................................. 33
Assignment 04 …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...40

3
1 INTRODUCTION
Dear Student

It is a pleasure to welcome you as a student to module OPM1501, Orientation to Intermediate Phase Mathematics. We
hope that you will find it both interesting and rewarding. We will do my best to make your study of this module
successful. You will be well on your way to success if you start studying early in the semester and resolve to do the
assignment(s) properly.

You will receive a number of tutorial letters during the semester. A tutorial letter is our way of communicating with you
about teaching, learning and assessment.

This tutorial letter contains important information about the scheme of work, resources and assignments for this
module. We urge you to read it carefully and to keep it at hand when working through the study material, preparing the
assignment(s), preparing for the examination and addressing questions to your lecturers.

In this tutorial letter (101), you will find the assignments and assessment criteria as well as instructions on the
preparation and submission of the assignments. It also provides all the information you need with regard to the
prescribed study material and other resources and how to obtain them. Please study this information carefully and
make sure that you obtain the prescribed material as soon as possible.

We have also included certain general and administrative information about this module. Please study this section of
the tutorial letter carefully.

Right from the start we would like to point out that you must read all the tutorial letters you receive during the
semester immediately and carefully, as they always contain important and, sometimes, urgent information.
We hope that you will enjoy this module and wish you all the best!

Tutorial matter

Some of this tutorial matter may not be available when you register. Tutorial matter that is not available when you
register will be posted to you as soon as possible, but is also available on myUnisa.

4
OPM1501/101

Please note: your lecturer cannot help you with missing study material.
Email: despatch@Unisa.ac.za
The department of Despatch should supply you with the following study material for this module:
 Tutorial letter 501 (This is the study guide for OPM1501)
 Tutorial letters 101 at registration and others later

Apart from tutorial letter 101, you will also receive other tutorial letters during the semester. These tutorial letters will
not necessarily be available at the time of registration, but will be dispatched to you as soon as they are available or
needed (for instance, for feedback on assignments.

If you have access to the internet, you can view the tutorial letters for the modules for which you are registered on the
university’s online campus, myUnisa, at http://my.Unisa.ac.za.

2 PURPOSE OF AND OUTCOMES FOR THE MODULE


2.1 Purpose
The purpose of this module is to develop an informed understanding of the underpinning concepts of Mathematics in
the Intermediate Phase. The module will help students to develop their pedagogical content knowledge while engaging
in the various content areas.

2.2 Outcomes
Learning Outcomes for the module

Learning Outcome 1:
Understand numbers, operations and the decimal number system.

Learning Outcome 2:
Demonstrate an understanding of common fractions and operations on common fractions.

Learning Outcome 3:
Develop the ability to recognize and interpret patterns in numerical and geometrical patterns

Learning Outcome 4:
Develop an understanding of two dimensional shapes and three dimensional objects.

5
Learning Outcome 5:
Develop an understanding of the basic elements of transformation geometry.

Learning Outcome 6:
Develop an understanding of the measurement concepts.

Learning Outcome 7:
Develop an understanding of the basic statistical concepts.

3 LECTURER(S) AND CONTACT DETAILS


3.1 Lecturer
The lecturer responsible for this module is as follows:
Prof Moshe M Phoshoko
AJH van der Walt Building 7-11, Unisa.
012 429 6993 (Work) (08:00 - 16:00)
Email: phoshmm@unisa.ac.za
Fax: 086 657 4967 (Please Note: The dialling code for Pretoria 012 and for foreign students: dial +27 12........)

All queries that are not of a purely administrative nature but are about the content of this module should be directed
to me. Please have your study material with you when you contact me. Email address and telephone numbers are
included above but you might also want to write to me. Letters should be sent to:

The module leader (OPM1501)


Department of Mathematics Education
PO Box 392
UNISA
0003
PLEASE NOTE: Letters to lecturers may not be enclosed with or inserted into assignments.

6
OPM1501/101

3.2 Department
Department of Mathematics Education
(College of Education)
PO Box 392
UNISA
0003
Tel: 012 429 3964

3.3 University
If you need to contact the University about matters not related to the content of this module, please consult the
publication Study@Unisa, which you received with your study material. This brochure contains information on how to
contact the University (e.g. to whom you can write for different queries, important telephone and fax numbers,
addresses and details of the times certain facilities are open).

Always have your student number at hand when you contact the University. Please note that all administrative enquiries
should be directed to Study@Unisa . Enquiries will then be channelled to the correct department. The details are as
follows:

 Fax number (RSA) (012) 429 4150


 Fax number (international) +27 12 429 4150
 Email study-info@Unisa.ac.za

4 MODULE-RELATED RESOURCES
4.1 Prescribed books
There is no prescribed book for this module but you will get a study guide on registration. The study guide contains the
content covered by this course. You will find that the study guide has a conversational style. We have written the study
guide in an interactive manner to encourage active learning. There are examples that have been done to help you
when you work on the other activities. Since you are a part-time student, your study guide takes the place of your
lecturer. It is important that you don’t read the study guide in a passive way (just sitting and reading as you might do
when reading a novel). You should work through all of the activities in the study guide so that you can gain maximum
benefit from the module.

4.2 Recommended books


No recommended books are used for this module.

7
4.3 Electronic Reserves (e-Reserves)
No electronic Reserves are used for this module.

If you have access to a computer that is linked to the internet, you can quickly access resources and information at the
University. The myUnisa learning management system is Unisa's online campus that will help you to communicate with
your lecturers, other students and administrative departments of Unisa – all through the computer and the internet.

To go to the myUnisa website, start at the main Unisa website, http://www.unisa.ac.za , and then click on the “Login to
myUnisa” link on the right-hand side of the screen. This should take you to the myUnisa website. You can also go there
directly by typing in http://my.unisa.ac.za.

Please consult the publication Study@Unisa, which you received with your study material, for more information.

4.4 Library services and resources information


For brief information, go to www.Unisa.ac.za/brochures/studies

For detailed information, go to the Unisa website at http://www.Unisa.ac.za/ and click on Library.

For research support and services of personal librarians, go to


http://www.Unisa.ac.za/Default.asp?Cmd=ViewContent&ContentID=7102.

The library has compiled a number of library guides:


 finding recommended reading in the print collection and e-reserves –
http://libguides.Unisa.ac.za/request/undergrad
 requesting material – http://libguides.Unisa.ac.za/request/request
 postgraduate information services – http://libguides.Unisa.ac.za/request/postgrad
 finding, obtaining and using library resources and tools to assist in doing research –
http://libguides.Unisa.ac.za/Research_Skills
 how to contact the library/finding us on social media/frequently asked questions –
http://libguides.Unisa.ac.za/ask

You will be required to provide your login details, namely your student number and myUnisa password, in order to
access the library's online resources and services. This will enable you to:
 view or print your electronic course material
8
OPM1501/101

 request library material


 view and renew your library material
 use the library's e-resources

Requesting books
Students are expected to purchase their own copies of the prescribed books listed in Tutorial Letters 101. A limited
number of copies are housed in Unisa's libraries, subject to each branch library's lending regulations. Problems
experienced in obtaining copies from booksellers should be directed to the Prescribed Book section at e-mail
vospresc@Unisa.ac.za or telephone +27 12 429 4152.

Electronic requests
The preferred way of requesting recommended or additional books is online via the library's catalogue. Go to
http://oasis.Unisa.ac.za; or via myUnisa, go to http://my.Unisa.ac.za> Login > Library > Library catalogue; or for mobile
access (AirPAC), go to http://oasis.Unisa.ac.za/airpac.

Telephonic requests
This can be done on +27 12 429 3133.

Postal requests
Books may also be requested by completing one library book request card for each book. Request cards are included
in your study package. These should be mailed to:
The Head: Request Services
Department of Library Services
UNISA
0003

or faxed to +27 12 429 8128.

Enquiries about requested books should be sent to bib-circ@Unisa.ac.za. Please note that requests should not be
sent to this e-mail address, it is for enquiries.
Telephonic enquiries can be made at +27 12 429 3133/3134; there is also an after-hour voicemail service available at
these numbers.

Requesting journal articles


Electronic course material or e-Reserves
9
Recommended material can be downloaded from the library's catalogue at http://oasis.Unisa.ac.za. Under search
options, click on Course code search and type in your course code, for example CST1501. Click on the Electronic
reserves for the current year. The recommended articles are available in PDF (portable document format).

The Adobe Reader should be loaded on your computer so that you can view or print scanned PDF documents. This
can be done free of charge at http://www.adobe.com.

Additional journal articles

The preferred way of requesting journal articles is online via the library's catalogue.
Go to http://oasis.Unisa.ac.za; or via myUnisa, go to http://my.Unisa.ac.za> Login > Library > Library catalogue; or for
mobile access (AirPAC), go to http://oasis.Unisa.ac.za/airpac.

Telephonic requests
Telephonic requests can be made at +27 12 429 3133/3134.

Postal requests
Journal articles may also be requested by completing an article request card for each item. These should be mailed
to the same address as postal requests above or faxed to +27 12 429 8128.
Enquiries about requested articles should be addressed to bib-circ@Unisa.ac.za and telephonic enquiries can be
made at +27 12 429 3432.
Requesting literature searches
You may request a list of references on your topic from the library's information search librarians if you are enrolled for
an undergraduate course which has a research essay. To request a literature search, go to the catalogue's homepage,
and click on Request a Literature Search, fill in the form and return it to the address provided.

Unisa Library's services


The Study@Unisa booklet, which is part of your registration package, lists all the services offered by the Unisa Library.
(See http://www.Unisa.ac.za/contents/myStudies/docs/myStudies_Unisa2019.pdf.)

The Adobe Reader should be loaded on your computer so that you can view or print scanned PDF documents. This
can be done free of charge at http://www.adobe.com.

10
OPM1501/101

5 STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES FOR THE MODULE


For information on the various student support systems and services available at Unisa (e.g. student counselling,
tutorial classes, language support), please consult the publication Study@Unisa , which you received with your study
material.

5.1 Study groups


It is advisable to have contact with fellow students. One way to do this is to form study groups. The addresses of
students in your area may be obtained from the following department:

Directorate: Student Administration and Registration


PO Box 392
UNISA
0003

5.2 myUnisa
If you have access to a computer that is linked to the internet, you can quickly access resources and information at the
University. The MyUnisa learning management system is Unisa's online campus that will help you to communicate with
your lecturers, with other students and with the administrative departments of Unisa – all through the computer and the
internet.
To go to the myUnisa website, start at the main Unisa website, http://www.Unisa.ac.za, and then click on the “Login
to myUnisa” link on the right-hand side of the screen. This should take you to the myUnisa website. You can also go
there directly by typing in http://my.Unisa.ac.za.

Please consult the publication Study@Unisa , which you received with your study material, for more information on
myUnisa.

5.3 Tutorials
At the moment, we offer face-to-face tutorials at regional learning centres across South Africa. A tutor can assist you
to understand your study material, approach your assignments correctly, offer you more opportunities for practicing
skills, and so on. We would like to start offering this service online for students who choose this option. We would also
like start offering a tutor connection to students who have no access to our learning centres or the Internet, so that they
at least have someone who can help them on request.
11
A tutorial is a regular meeting of students under the leadership of a tutor. The tutor leads you through aspects of the
study material with which you are experiencing difficulties.
NB: Please refer to:

 https://my.Unisa.ac.za for tutorials available at UNISA Learning Centres throughout the country --- click on the
link

5.4 Videoconferencing
UNISA is currently providing tutorials by means of video-conferencing at some of its learning centres. This mode of
delivery will be used as and when necessary.
Video-conferences:
 provide “live” tutorial support for learners who live in remote areas (where the facilities are available)
 is a viable technology for providing quality tutorial support while reducing costs; research has shown that there
is “no significant difference” between the result obtained by distance learners and those obtained by students
who have been taught in a traditional face-to-face environment

5.5 Tutors
Tutors employed in this programme are all professional people who have extensive practical and theoretical knowledge
of the course(s) in which they conduct tutorials. They are appointed by UNISA Academic Departments in collaboration
with the Department of Tutorial Services, Discussion Classes and Work-Integrated Learning (TSDL).

6 MODULE-SPECIFIC STUDY PLAN


Use the Study@Unisa brochure for general time management and planning skills.

7 MODULE PRACTICAL WORK AND WORK-INTEGRATED LEARNING


This module will assist you in the understanding of teaching mathematics in the Intermediate Phase.

12
OPM1501/101

8 ASSESSMENT
8.1 Assessment criteria
The student can:
8.1.1 demonstrate the ability to interpret the decimal number system in a variety of contexts.
8.1.2 exhibit the competence to apply their knowledge of numbers and operations concepts in a school context.
8.1.4 display understanding of variety of models to interpret fractions.
8.1.4 illustrate the ability to use and apply fraction algorithms.
8.1.5 exhibit the understanding of indicating the relationship between commons fractions, decimal fractions and
percentages
8.1.6 expose the ability to do calculations which include ratio and proportion.
8.1.7 exhibit the competence of recognising the relationships between terms in number patterns.
8.1.8 show the ability to recognise the relationships between terms in geometric patterns.
8.1.9 show the understanding of classifying 2D shapes according to given criteria.
8.1.10 demonstrate the capability to classify 3D objects according to given criteria
8.1.11 illustrate the ability to perform translations of two dimensional figures on grip paper.
8.1.12 demonstrate the competence to reflect a two dimensional figure in a line of symmetry.
8.1.13 exhibit the competence to rotate a two dimensional figure around a point.
8.1.14 show the understanding of arbitrary units of measurement.
8.1.15 demonstrate the competence to estimate attributes such as length, area, volume and mass.
8.1.16 show the capability to measure objects or shapes according to a specific attribute.
8.1.17 demonstrate evidence of the ability to measure objects or shapes using standard units of measurement.
8.1.18 show understanding of data collection.
8.1.19 expose the ability to read information from data representations, such as bar graphs and pictograms.
8.1.20 exhibit the ability to calculate and interpret the measures central tendency from basic data sets.

8.2 Assessment plan


Assignments are seen as part of the learning material for this module. As you do the assignment, study the reading
texts, consult other resources, discuss the work with fellow students or tutors or do research, you are actively engaged
in learning. Looking at the assessment criteria given for each assignment will help you to understand what is required
of you more clearly.

In some cases, additional assessment might be available on the myUnisa site for your module. For students attending
tutorial sessions, tutors may also set additional tasks and give feedback in class.
13
There are four (4) assignments for the year. The assignments contribute to the year mark and final mark as shown in
the table below:

Assignment Type Marks Year mark Contribution to final mark (%)


01 Multiple Choice Questions 15 15% 3%
02 Short questions & paragraphs 100 35% 7%
03 Short questions & paragraphs 100 30% 6%
04 Short questions & paragraphs 100 20% 4%
Total 100% 20%

In some cases, additional assessment might be available on the myUnisa site for your module. For students attending
tutorial sessions, tutors may also set additional tasks and give feedback in class. Ensure that your assignments reach
the university well before the time.
The nature of the module requires that the students study and cover a wide spectrum of module related knowledge.
The content specified in the module should be delivered in a developmental format. As a result, knowledge
development for this module is addressed in a form of assignments. As you do the assignments you will get an
opportunity to engage strongly with the content. However, the lecturer will sample certain questions (items) in the
assignment for marking purposes, while others will not be marked. It is only the marked section of the assignment that
will be used to compute the semester mark for each student. This arrangement is meant to encourage each student to
study all sections (topics) of the module as the knowledge of all these sections will be required for examination
purposes. You are therefore advised to develop your own study schedule (plan, organise yourself and manage your
time properly) and begin assignments soon after you received your study material

Please note: Although students may work together when preparing assignments, each student must write and submit
his or her own individual assignment. In other words, you must submit your own ideas in your own words, sometimes
interspersing relevant short quotations that are properly referenced. It is unacceptable for students to submit identical
assignments on the basis that they worked together. That is copying (a form of plagiarism) and none of these
assignments will be marked. Furthermore, you may be penalised or subjected to disciplinary proceedings by the
university.

You will receive ZERO if you copy an assignment from a


fellow student or directly from a memorandum.

14
OPM1501/101

You will receive the correct answers automatically for multiple-choice questions. For written assignments, markers will
comment constructively on your work. However, feedback on compulsory assignments will be sent to all students
registered for this module in a follow-up tutorial letter, and not only to those students who submitted the
assignments. The tutorial letter number will be 201, 202, etc.

As soon as you have received the feedback, please check your answers. The assignments and the feedback on these
assignments constitute an important part of your learning and should help you to be better prepared for the next
assignment and the examination.

8.3 General assignment numbers


Assignments are numbered consecutively per module, starting from 01. This module requires two assignments which
have to be submitted for the semester. You are compelled to number the assignments as stated in the table below.
Incorrect numbering will result in assignments being delayed and maybe lost in the system.

8.3.1 Unique assignment numbers


Unique assignment numbers have to be used for multiple choice as well as for written assignments. Please use the
numbers given in the table below.

8.3.2 Due dates for assignments


The following assignments are compulsory and must be submitted:

Assignment Unique number Due date Nature of assignment Year Mark

01 683791 22 March 2019 Multiple-choice questions(MCQ) 15%

02 656186 24 May 2019 Short questions & paragraphs 35%

03 849751 01 July 2019 Short questions & paragraphs 30%

04 755321 23 August 2019 Short questions & paragraphs 20%

The summary of year mark and the examination mark is as follows:


Assignments = 20 % (This is your year mark)
Examination mark = 80%
15
Final mark = 100%

8.4 Submission of assignments


PLEASE NOTE: Enquiries about assignments (e.g. whether or not the University has received your assignment or the
date on which an assignment was returned to you) must be directed to Study@Unisa .

You might also find information on myUnisa. To go to the myUnisa website, start at the main Unisa website,
http://www.Unisa.ac.za, and then click on the ‘login to myUnisa’ link under the myUnisa heading on the screen. This
should take you to the myUnisa website. You can also go there directly by typing in http://my.Unisa.ac.za.

Assignments should be addressed to:


Assignment Section
PO Box 392
UNISA
0003

You may submit written assignments and assignments done on mark-reading sheets either by post or electronically
via myUnisa. Assignments may not be submitted by fax or email. For detailed information and requirements as far as
assignments are concerned, see the brochure Study@Unisa , which you received with your study material.
To submit an assignment via myUnisa:

 Go to myUnisa.
 Log in with your student number and password.
 Select the module.
 Click on assignments in the menu on the left.
 Click on the assignment number you want to submit
 Follow the instructions on the screen.

IMPORTANT
When assignments are handed in electronically:
 Write or type your name and student number on the first page of the assignment. Number all questions
ACCURATELY.
 Use a ruler and sharp pencil to draw diagrams. You may also draw diagrams electronically

16
OPM1501/101

 All assignments must be submitted in pdf format. No zip files will be accepted

8.5 Assignments
Assignments 01 and 02 are compulsory and have been added to the end of this tutorial letter. Please complete them
and submit them as required.

9 OTHER ASSESSMENT METHODS


None

10 EXAMINATION
10.1 Examination admission
The Department of Education requires the university to prove that a student was active during the period of tuition
before the student will be subsidised by the Department of Education. Senate has approved that the submission of a
compulsory assignment will be used to prove students’ study activity. Examination admission is solely dependent on
submission of Assignment 01. Admission to the examination is administered by the Examination Section and not your
lecturers. Please study Study@Unisa and contact the Examination Section should you have a problem with admission
to the examination. Applications for rechecking or remarking should also be submitted to the Examination Section.

10.2 Examination paper


An examination paper of 2 hours will be written at the end of the year. The examination paper will cover all the content
in the module and will be out of 100 marks.

10.3 Examination period


This module is a year module in 2019. This means that you will write the examination in October/November 2019. The
Examination Section will provide supplementary examination dates. During the year, the Examination Section will
provide you with information regarding the examination in general, examination venues, examination dates and
examination times.
Should you qualify for a supplementary exam, you will not receive any study material. You should visit the OPM1501
website and the discussion forum for study material or exam guidance

10.4 Previous examination papers


Previous examination papers are available to students. You may be advised if papers are available at myUnisa. We
advise you, however, not to focus on old examination papers only as the content of modules and therefore examination

17
papers changes from year to year. You may, however, accept that the type of questions that will be asked in the
examination will be similar to those asked in the activities in your study guide and in the assignments.

10.5 Tutorial letter with information on the examination


To help you in your preparation for the examination, you will receive a tutorial letter that will explain the format of the
examination paper, give you examples of questions that you may expect and set out clearly what material you have to
study for examination purposes.
Furthermore, your attention is drawn to the fact that the assignments and activities will help you not only to prepare for
the examinations but for the teaching of Mathematics. Do them to the best of your ability.

DEMARCATION OR “SCOPING” FOR EXAMINATIONS AND ASSESSMENTS


NB: In terms of a decision reached by the College, lecturers may not demarcate or “scope” specific work for
examination purposes and examination questions should be based on all the work covering the notional hours of
modules. Lecturers should encourage students to learn everything. In cases where competencies or skills are
assessed differently during the tuition period, the various methods of assessment will be spelled out clearly by the
lecturer in Tutorial Letter 201.
According to Assessment Procedure Manual 2013, paragraph 4.5.2(e), the examination memoranda (guidelines,
rubrics, and so on) shall not be made available to students.
Use your myStudies@Unisa brochure for general examination guidelines and examination preparation guidelines.

10.6 Marks

10.6.1 Year mark

The year mark contributes 20% of the final mark. It is composed of the marks obtained in each assignment.
Assignment marks
Assignment 01 3 marks Compulsory for examination admission
Assignment 02 7 marks
Assignment 03 6 marks
Assignment 04 4 marks
Total 20 marks

Although each assignment is converted to a percentage, this mark will be converted to a mark as indicated
above to add to a total out of 20. By handing in assignments, you can work towards a substantial year mark.
The exam mark, however, carries the most weight.

18
OPM1501/101

10.6.2 Exam mark


The exam mark contributes 80% of the final mark.
The mark that is obtained in the final examination will be converted to a mark out of 80.

10.6.3 Final mark


The final mark consists out of the year mark (20%), plus the exam mark (80%). In order to pass this course,
you must obtain a final mark of at least 50%. A sub-minimum of 40% must be obtained in the
examination. You will be allowed to write a supplementary examination if your final mark is between
46 and 49%
In summary:
Assignments Weight Percentage Due dates
Assignment 01 3 22 March 2019
Year mark
Assignment 02 7 24 May 2019
20
Assignment 03 6 01 July 2019

Assignment 04 4 23 August 2019


Exam mark 2-hour exam 80 See timetable
Final mark 100

11 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


1 Are all assignments compulsory?
All assignments are compulsory.

2 May I scan and submit the assignments on myUnisa?


All assignments may be submitted online. If you submit assignments electronically we request that you
submit it them pdf documents.

The Study@Unisa brochure contains an A-Z guide of the most relevant study information.

12 SOURCES CONSULTED
None

13 IN CLOSING
I wish you every success with your studies.

19
14 ADDENDUM A Assignments

Assignment 01

ASSIGNMENT 01: COMPULSORY

CONTRIBUTES 15% TO YEAY MARK

Unique number: 683791

Due date: 22 March 2019

NO EXTENSION

The questions are based on UNITS 1 and 2 of your tutorial letter 501.

The purpose of this assignment is to introduce you to a new kind of thinking about the teaching and learning of
mathematics. It also introduces new ideas on how learners learn, what kinds of Mathematics knowledge they acquire,
how they understand mathematics and how we as teachers can use this knowledge and the advised approaches to
teaching and learning to be more effective teachers.

Instructions:

This assignment contains 15 multiple-choice questions.


You have to select the correct answer or statement in each question and then indicate your choice on the MARK
READING SHEET included for this purpose.
Question 1
Mathematics is best described by the following statement:
1. Mathematics is based on memorisation of facts, rules, formulas and procedures.
2. Mathematics problems are meant to be solved as quickly as possible.
3. Mathematics requires a good memory.
4. Mathematics is a science of pattern and order.
Question 2
Select the correct statement.
Doing mathematics means the following:
1 To explain concepts and skills in such a manner that learners can do the exercises with ease.
20
OPM1501/101

2 Generating strategies for solving problems, applying those strategies, seeing whether they lead to solutions, and
checking to see whether the answers make sense.
3 To be able to do the operations (+, -, x, ÷) with whole numbers, fractions and decimal numbers correctly.
4 To memorise procedures and concepts and apply this in different calculations and applications.

Question 3
Relational understanding can be linked to:
1 Learning that occurs in a vacuum
2 Producing correct answers rather than developing mathematical understanding
3 Producing previously learnt facts
4 Knowing what to do and why

Question 4
Integrated network of concepts can also be called:
1 Thinking tools
2 Social interaction
3 Cognitive schemas
4 New knowledge and skills

Question 5
The following principles apply in terms of activities and content in a Vygotskian classroom. Which one does
not apply?
1 The ZPD serves as a guide for curricular and lesson planning.
2 Learning occurs in a vacuum; the link to the real world is rarely made.
3 Classroom activities should be reality based and applicable to the real world.
4 Learning and development are social, collaborative activities.

Question 6
Which of the following cannot be considered as one of the strands of mathematical proficiency
1 Strategic competence
2 Procedural fluency
3 Rote learning
4 Productive disposition

21
Question 7
Creating opportunities for reflective thought means:
1 Ideas that are not connected to each other
2 Not allowing students to construct deeper meaning for the mathematics they are learning
3 Providing feedback to learners
4 Learners must find the relevant ideas they possess and bring them to bear on the development of the new idea

Question 8
Understanding is defined as… :
1 Ideas and skills that are well known to us.
2 A measure of the quality and quantity of connections that an idea has with existing ideas.
3 The number of connections in our networks of ideas.
4 Knowledge and skills that we can apply.

Question 9
Which of the following relates to a low -level cognitive demand:
1 Tasks are usually represented in multiple ways
2 Require that students engage with the conceptual ideas that underlie procedures in order to successfully
complete the task
3 No connection to related concepts
4 Require considerable cognitive effort

Question 10
Good problems have multiple entries. This implies that:
1 Leaners should not draw on their own network of mental tools, concepts and ideas
2 Teachers should dictate how learners must think about a problem in order to solve it
3 The diversity of learners in the classroom should not be accommodated to avoid problems
4 Learners should use different ideas of their own to solve a problem

Question 11
The following strategy may be used in the “before phase” of a lesson. The teacher:
1 Summarises the main ideas of the lesson
2 Ensures that learners understand the problem before setting them to work

22
OPM1501/101

3 Starts marking the classwork.


4 Explains the correct way in which the homework must be done.

Question 12
The following are teacher’s actions in the “during phase” of a lesson:
1 Engage the class in discussions
2 List the answers of all groups on the board without comment
3 Allow learners to defend their answers
4 Listen actively to find out what the learners know and how they think.

Question 13
Moving around in your mathematics class, you notice a learner getting an answer of 20 from the calculator for
working the sum: 2 + 3 x 4. What will be the correct reaction?
1. Leave the student in order to check the answer later with the rest of the class.
2. Indicate to the learner that the answer is correct and encourage the good work.
3. Rebuke the learner for using the calculator to get the answer.
4. None of the above.

Question 14:
A learner subtracted using the vertical algorithm.

What calculation error did the learner make in subtraction?

1. borrowing
2. changing the 6 to 5
3. changing the 3 to 13
4. All of the above.

23
Question 15

This is a drawing of a cube without a top.

Which of the nets below can be folded to make this cube?

1 2 3

4 5
6

7 8

1. 1;3;5;7
2. 1;5;6;7
3. 1;2;3;5
4. 1;2; 3;7

[15]

24
OPM1501/101

Assignment 02

ASSIGNMENT 02

CONTRIBUTES 35% TO YEAR MARK

Unique number: 656186

Due date: 24 May 2019

The questions are based on UNITS 2, 3 and 4 of your tutorial letter 501.

This assignment consists of parts A and B. Part A covers the content and in part B you need to
draw up a lesson plan (NB: refer to lesson plan assessment rubric at the end of this assignment).

PART A
1 Name the three ways one can count a set of objects, and explain how these methods of
counting can be used to combine concepts and written names for numbers. (3)

2 How can learners learn to write two- digit numbers in a way that it is connected to the base 10
meaning of ones and tens? (2)

3 Show a way in which a hundreds chart can aid the teaching of subtraction of two digit numbers (2)

4 Draw Dienes block to show how to find the solution to:

a) 58 + 37

b) 83  28 (4)

5 Test the following numbers for divisibility by 6, 9, and 11. (Do not divide or factorise)
a) 10 354 872
b) 19 752 606 (4)

25
6 The Sieve of Eratosthenes is a well-known way to find prime numbers.
6.1 Use the method given in the chart below to find all the prime numbers between 1 and
100. (5)

Sieve of Eratosthenes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 METHOD
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Cross out 1 (1 is not prime)
Cross out all the multiples of 2, 3, 5, 7,
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
except these numbers themselves.
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
The numbers that are not crossed out will
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
be prime.
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 Circle all the prime numbers
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80

81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90

91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100

6.2 Use the factor tree to determine the prime factors of 135 (3)

7 Use the vertical and horizontal algorithms to find the sum or difference of: (Explain the "borrow
and carry" concepts)
a) 673 +736

b) 539  465 (2)

8 How are standard algorithms different from student-invented strategies? Explain the benefits
of invented strategies over standard algorithms (give at least two valid points). (2)

9 Draw pictures showing how 39 × 6 could be modelled: with counters, with base – ten blocks,
or with areas on base 10 grids. (Use at least two of the methods) (3)

10 Use the method of compensation to show how you can make the subtraction of 468 − 39
easier. (2)
11 A learner in your class says that the value of the underlined digit in 12 678 is 2. How will you
help the learner to overcome this misconception? (2)

26
OPM1501/101

12 What does partitioning mean? Explain and illustrate (3)


13 In the context of choosing a “whole”, explain when a “third” is not always equal to a “third”.
Give an example. (2)
14 Use the correct language to explain the difference between the expressions:
“It is the fifth of December”
“You are the fifth in the row”
“I want a fifth of the pizza”
What types of numbers are we dealing with in the above expressions? (4)
15 The exercise is based on your understanding of the fraction concept.

Use a ruler and sharp pencil to make


No “free-hand sketches” accurate drawings
will be accepted

15.1 If the rectangle is one whole


 Show one sixth
Redraw the same
 Show three eighths rectangle three times

 Show seven quarters (5)

15.2 If fifteen counters are a whole set, Redraw and illustrate


by grouping and
how many are there in three-fifths colouring
of the set? Answer: ____ (2)
15.3 If 12 counters are three fourths of a set how many counters are in full set? Answer: ____ (2)

Redraw, group and


colour

3
15.4 A common error that learners make is to write for the fraction of the whole represented
5

here:

Why do you think they do this? What activity or strategy would you use to try to address this
misconception? (3)

27
15.5 If this triangle is one third of the Copy and illustrate
whole, what would the whole
look like? (2)
15.6 If this figure is two-sixths of the whole, draw a
Copy the shape and
shape that could be the half. illustrate (2)

3 6
16 Use the following models to show the equivalence of the fractions and
7 14
16.1 set model
16.2 area model
16.3 number line (6)
2 2
17 Compare the fractions and by making use of the number line. (You should be able to arrange
5 7
the fractions from small to big). Make sure that you choose the whole correctly, and make accurate
drawings. (4)

3 1
18 Use a standard algorithm to calculate: 4   (3)
4 3

19 The following question was given to Grade 4 learners:


2
Which point on the number line shows ?
3

A B C D

0 1 2 3
Nine percent of the learners chose A as the answer, 14% chose B, 43% chose C and 34% chose D.

19.1 What is the correct answer? Draw a circle around the correct letter. (1)
19.2 Give an explanantion about the misconceptions learners had when they chose the incorrect
answers? (3)

2 3
20 Use the grid alongside to illustrate: of . Show the
5 4
process clearly by making use of different types of
shading. (4)

28
OPM1501/101

PART B
Lesson Plan
Use the guidelines and the lesson plan template below to draw up a lesson on any mathematics content in Unit
3 or 4 of tutorial letter 501 (study guide).
(20)
Guidelines for planning a lesson

Van de Walle, Karp and Bay-Williams (2016) provide processes that assist in the designing of lesson plans that promote
mathematical practices which emphasise enquiry and problem solving where learners are challenged to think,
communicate and justify their ideas. The lesson plans they advocate for takes the three-phase format, namely, before,
during and after. The three phases are briefly discussed below.
The “before part”:
Date
Grade The grade that it is intended for.
Duration A lesson is usually about 30 minutes, but you can make it longer (maximum 60 minutes)
Topic/Concept/Theme
Content knowledge The content area, general content focus and specific content focus should be noted and
clearly stated in the lesson plan. It must show exactly what you intend to achieve at
the end of the lesson. Ask yourself: What do I want the learners to learn in this
lesson?

Baseline knowledge State the pre – knowledge that you expect your learners should have. This will
depend on what has been covered on the topic previously. (If you introduce the
lesson for the first time, then make sure that you know what has been done in
previous grades) You must consult the CAPS document to make sure that you
know what the sequence for introducing topics is. Ask yourself: How will I link it
to the previous lesson/ grade. Are you going to start with a basic question, a
spot test or a short activity?

The “during” part


Introduction State exactly how you are going to handle the lesson from the time the learners come into your
class. You can use different techniques for this. A mind map works well if you want
to give them the “picture” of what they have to achieve at the end of the lesson.
Ask yourself: What is the best way to let my learners know what we are going

29
to do in the lesson. Try to make it exciting so that you have the attention of your
learners

Class arrangement Are you going to let your learners do the activities in individually, in pairs or in small
groups? Are you going to use workstations or jigsaw groups?

Activities Remember that learners learn maths concepts best through being actively involved with
material. Carefully plan the activities that the learners will engage in. All activities
have to be explained in detail. Do not just say: “I will ask questions”. You must
actually phrase the questions that you will ask. Explain how you will involve the
learners in the lesson. Give attention to the level of the activities. You can start
with basic activities that address the knowledge and understanding levels of
thinking, but it is essential to get to more advanced cognitive levels, like
application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation. (See the attached document below
that describes the different levels of thinking.)

Assessment While your learners are working individually or in their groups, how do you assess
their knowledge, behaviour and skills? State what type of assessment you will use.
Are you going to let your learners self-assess their performance in the form of
journal writing? Are you going to diagnose those learners who cannot cope with
the activity and provide them with alternatives to develop the concepts that they
might be lacking?

Inclusion: Have you made provision for learners who are sick, tired, hungry, mentally or physically
challenged? What about the more advanced learners? Do your activities cater for
their needs?
The “after” part
Feedback This part of the lesson is the most important. Learners should provide feedback after they have
done the activities and you should wrap up the lesson with constructive feedback.
Reinforcement and corrective feedback should be provided to learners. The
teacher who is most effective at enhancing learning will provide much feedback
that is appropriate to learners’ current understanding and plenty of reinforcement
to motivate learners to achieve their goals. This teacher will set appropriate,
challenging and specific learning goals for the learners and will constantly seek
ways to improve teaching practices through reflection and in-service education.
This teacher will effectively manage the classroom in order to maximize the
30
OPM1501/101

quantity of teaching, do lots of direct teaching, adopt a teaching style oriented to


learning that includes questioning and provides feedback on homework set
according to learning goals.
Lesson plan template

Grade
Duration
Subject
Content area
General content focus
Specific content focus
Before: During: After:
-Lesson Outcomes -Introduction -Feedback from learners
-Resources -Class arrangement -Teacher feedback
Integration -Baseline question/activity - Reflection
-Example Activity
-Formative assessment
-Teacher role(s)
-Learner role(s)
-Differentiated teaching
Reflection

Please note
The above is just a framework for guidance.
You are expected to write down every single detail of your lesson. We can just judge the lesson if
you tell us exactly how you anticipate to conduct the lesson. For example, do not just say “I will
facilitate the lesson”. We want to know how you will do it and what you will do. We want to know
which questions you anticipate asking.
The reflection part is equally important. After the lesson had been conducted, you must write up the
shortcomings or successes of the lesson. If you want to change anything about the lesson, write it
up in the reflection.

31
Part B of the assignment will be assessed using the following rubric:
A: The lesson plan 10% per lesson plan

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4


0-3 4–7 8 – 11 12 – 15
Minimal or no essential aspects Some essential aspects of the Most or all of the essential Meets level 3 and personal as
of the lesson plan displayed. lesson plan displayed. Activities aspects of the lesson plan are well as creative adaptations to
Little or no integration apparent that are planned may achieve present. Activities that are enhance the achievement of a
in the displayed activities for some of the lesson objectives planned have adequate potential successful lesson presentation
achievement of the lesson to achieve most or all lesson are apparent
objectives objectives

B: Presentation strategy 10% per lesson plan

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4


0-2 3–5 6–8 9 – 10
Little or no evidence of the Presentation strategy adopted is Presentation strategy is applied Meets level 3 and the adopted
presentations strategy that is apparent however it is not in an adequate and strategy is appropriate and/or
adopted for the lesson adequately applied. understandable manner complements the presented
lesson

[100]

32
OPM1501/101

Assignment 03

ASSIGNMENT 03
CONTRIBUTES 30% TO YEAR MARK
Unique number: 849751
Due date: 01 July 2019

The questions are based on UNITS 5, 6 and 7 of your tutorial letter 501.

This assignment consists of parts A and B. Part B are activities in the tutorial letter 501 (your study
guide).

PART A

1 Redraw the flow diagram and complete to get outputs from the inputs on the left.

0
1
2
x3 -4
k

(4)
2 Use the values of the flow diagram in 2.1 to complete the table below: (2)

Input values 0 1 2 k

Output values

3 Determine the next term of the following sequence:


0, 3, 8, 15, …..
What is the eleventh term of this sequence? Show all your working. (3)
4 Study the calendar page for the month of August 2019 below and describe as many number patterns
as you can find. (4)
33
THE CALENDAR

AUGUST 2019
M T W T F S S
1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30 31

5 Lester selected the following pattern of numbers from the


calendar. He says that that anywhere in the calendar, for numbers
arranged in this pattern, the sum of the outside four numbers will
be four times the number in the middle. Do you think that Lester
is correct? How can you check? Explain! (2)
6 Is there a similar pattern between the middle number and the four
corner numbers? Identify it. (3)

7 Lester also says that the sum of the "four numbers" in questions 2 and 3 are always the same. Do
you agree? Can you explain why? (3)

8 Describe in your own words the first three van Hiele levels of Geometric thought
(level 0, 1 and 2). How do the activities that you will give learners on the three levels differ? (6)
9 Draw the triangles described by following characteristics. Your sketches must be done with a ruler
and very neatly drawn.

34
OPM1501/101

9.1 Isosceles, right- angled triangle


9.2 Scalene, acute- angled triangle (2)
10 Which quadrilaterals are described by the following characteristics? (Name them) Make a neat
drawing of each. (Do not assume properties that are not given)
10.1 A rectangle with adjacent sides equal
10.2 A trapezium in which the non-parallel sides are equal
(4)
11 Classify the following shapes: polyhedrons or non-polyhedrons. Name each of the objects
(a mathematical name) (8)
3D objects Mathematical name Polyhedron Non polyhedron

12 Draw neat diagrams of the following 3D Objects, made up of: (Name the 3D Object)
12.1 Regular hexahedron
12.2 A hexahedron which is a pyramid
(4)
13 Draw the nets of the following polyhedra:
35
13.1 Triangular prism
13.2 Octagonal pyramid
(4)
14 Draw the front, top and side view of the following structure (4)

Top view

side view

Front view

15 The side view and front view of a 3D object, built from cubes, are given. Draw the 3D object

Front view Side view

(3)

36
OPM1501/101

16 Translate ∆PQR four units to the right (2)

17 Translate trapezium PQRS three units to the left and five units up. (2)

S Q

18 Reflect ΔPQR over the line PQ. (2) 19 Reflect figure PQRS over the line SR (2)

P Q

R
R

37
20 Reflect ΔPQR over the line XY (2) 21 Reflect figure PQRS over the line XY (2)

R Q P

X Y
Q
S
Y

22 Rotate figure PQRS 900 about point R (2)

P Q

S R

38
OPM1501/101

23 Mavis uses a triangle to come up with the following patterns:

A.

B. C.

23.1 Mavis became excited about these patterns and calls a friend to tell her about them. Can you help Mavis
to describe to her friend how she moved the triangle to make each pattern? Is there more than one way
to describe the movement? (3)
23.2 Are there any other patterns she can make by moving this triangle? Draw these patterns. In each case,
describe how you moved the triangle. (3)
23.3 Now choose a different figure and make your own patterns. In each case, describe how you moved the
figure. (3)

PART B
Do the following activities in the tutorial letter 501 (your study guide).
ACTIVITY MARKS
Activity 5.7, number 2 5
Activity 5.8 8
Activity 7.10, numbers 2 & 4 6
TOTAL 19

[100]

39
Assignment 04

ASSIGNMENT 04
CONTRIBUTES 20% TO YEAR MARK

Unique number: 755321

Due date: 23 August 2019

The questions are based on UNITS 8 and 9 of your tutorial letter 501.

1. What are the benefits of the use of non-standard units of measurement? Give three valid points. (3)
2. Discuss the role of estimation in the development of measurement concepts. (4)
3. Explain how the formula for the perimeter of a rectangle and square can be introduced. Use drawings
to illustrate your answer. (5)
4. It is the task of the teacher to introduce concepts of measurement in a practical way to Intermediate
Phase learners. Using the attribute of volume, give three examples of practical ways in which the
teacher can introduce this concept.
5. The surface area of a cube is 24cm². Calculate the length of the sides of the cube. (5)
6. Draw up an activity that will enable learners to develop a formula for calculating the area of a trapezium.
(7)
7. Calculate the area of a trapezium which has parallel sides of 10cm and 6cm respectively and
perpendicular distance of 7cm between the parallel sides. (5)
8. Andrew’s parents follow a regular schedule for taking care of their car. They change the oil every 3 000
km, rotate the tyres every 10 000 km and replace the wiper blades every 15 000 km. After how many
kilometres will they first have to change the oil, rotate the tyres and replace the wiper blades all at once?
(5)
9. The average mass of 50 pumpkins is 2,1kg. If one more pumpkin is added, the average mass is 2,2kg.
What is the mass of the extra pumpkin? (5)

10 Mark did a survey of each Grade 7’s favourite fruit. His survey yielded the following results:
apple, pear, apple, mango, pineapple, orange, apple, melon, pear, apple, pineapple,
mango, mango, banana, melon, apple, pear, pineapple, melon, apple, pineapple,
pear, pear, apple, orange, mango, banana, pineapple, mango, mango, melon, apple,
mango, pineapple, banana, pear, pineapple, melon, apple, pineapple
40
OPM1501/101

Use Mark’s data to complete the following table:

Favourite fruit Tally Frequency (f)/number of


students

[16]

11 Examine the information in the boxes below. Use the information provided to draw your own pictograph.
(6)
A farmer has the following animals on his farm: 20 goats, 18 cows, 10 sheep and 5
horses:

(1) Heading: Farm animals


(2) Vertical axis: Number of animals
(3) Horizontal axis: Animals at the farm
(4) Fill in these labels under the vertical columns (goat, sheep, cows and
horses)
(5) Cut and paste the number of animals in each column (Hint: 1 creature
represents 5 creatures)

41
12 Use the data in 11 to answer the following questions:
12.1 Which animal is the most plentiful on the farm? (1)
12.2 Are there more sheep or goats? (1)
12.3 How many horses are there less than cows? (1)
12.4 How many sheep are there more than goats? (1)
12.5 What is the total number of animals found on the farm? (1)

13 A survey was conducted on 120 learners in Grade 8 to find out what their favourite subject
was at school. It was found that 30 preferred history, 40 preferred geography and 50 preferred
maths.
Illustrate this information by drawing:
13.1 a table (5)
13.2 a bar chart (4)
13.3 a pie chart (5)

14 The heights (in centimetres) of Grade 9 learners were taken and recorded as follows:

169 181 145 159


171 165 109 170
173 176 140 178
150 170 162 151

14.1 Rank the heights from tallest to shortest. (2)

14.2 How many learners were involved? (1)


42
OPM1501/101

14.3 What is the modal height? (1)


14.4 What is the median of the heights? (2)
14.5 What is the mean of the heights of the learners? (3)
14.6 Identify extreme values of the data (i.e. the very small and the very big values of the data). (2)
14.7 Delete one extreme value of the data and recalculate the mean of the data to one decimal
place. What do you notice about the original mean and the new mean? (5)
14.8 Did the mode and the median change when you deleted the extreme value? Give reasons for
your answer. (4)

[100]

43