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Annotative Bibliography: Educational Resources

Al Sultan, A., Henson Jr. H., & Fadde, P. J. (2018). Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Scientific

Literacy and Self-Efficacy in Teaching Science. IAFOR Journal of

Education, 6(1). https://doi.org/10.22492/ije.6.1.02

This journal article was used in the science goal section. “Studies show that pre-service

elementary teachers need to build more confidence in teaching science and scientific

literacy during their teacher education programs in order for them to successfully teach

science knowledge to their students”

ASIYAI, R. (2014). Students’ Perception of the Condition of Their Classroom Physical Learning

Environment and Its Impact on Their Learning and Motivation. College Student

Journal, 48(4), 716. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=f6h&AN=100358667&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Learning Environment goal statement. “The classroom is the

meeting point for students and teachers where teaching and learning takes place” And

“Students’ impression about their classroom can have positive or negative impact on their

learning. They are able to perceive the nature of their classroom environment and their

perception affects their attitude towards learning”


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Atwell, N. (2015). In the middle: A lifetime of learning about writing, reading and

adolescents. (3RD ed.). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. ISBN 978-0-325-02813-2

This was foundational text for this class, and one that I will refer back to in my

teaching practice. There was a lot of information that was useful and brought up

conversation. Some of the things that I took away from this text included the daily

poem, reading and writing workshops and how to evaluate the workshops and work

of the students. The workshops were explained well and then discussed in class so

that they were easily understood. The Appendices also have worksheets to go with

the guided workshops. Mini-Lessons! I enjoyed how this text described the craft

lessons that discussed procedures, conventions, spelling, etc. I also enjoyed the

second part of the book that talked about writing different genres of text. Usually

students are taught how to write paragraphs for academic writing, but this book

brings up different genres such as fiction and poetry to add to the classroom.

Ayodele, A. O., & Samantha, G. (2018). Using Clusters System as an Effective Teachers’

Professional Development for Improved Instructional Development. Gender &

Behaviour, 16(3), 11963–11969. Retrieved from

http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ofm&A

N=134055086&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Professionalism goal statement. “Professional development

of teachers is critical to improved classroom teaching and learning to achieve quality

education” And “Teachers are groomed to work together and be actively involved, these

acts make them to reposition themselves for positive changes that can promote their

professional functions”
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Barnett, P. E. (2011). Discussions across Difference: Addressing the Affective Dimensions of

Teaching Diverse Students about Diversity. Teaching in Higher Education, 16(6), 669–

679. Retrieved from https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://

search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ949409&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the diversity goal section. “They also need a commitment to

basic values; concern for the rights and welfare of others, commitment to critical self-

reflection or commitment to civil and rational discourse”

Bauml, M. (2016). Is it cute or does it count? Learning to teach for meaningful social studies

in elementary grades. The Journal of Social Studies Research, 40, 55–69. https://doi-

org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1016/j.jssr.2015.02.001

This journal was used in the social studies goal section. “First, social studies instruction

must be meaningful. This requires appealing to students’ interests, capitalizing on

diversity, differentiating according to students’ needs, helping students make connections

between social studies content and their own experiences, and implementing a rich

variety of practical tools.” And “For elementary social studies, practical tools may

include strategies such as graphic organizers, timelines, and document-based questions…

and instructional resources such as primary sources, children’s literature, and textbooks”

Betz, N. E., & Hackett, G. (1986). Applications of self-efficacy theory to understanding career

choice behavior. Journal Social and Clinical Psychology, 4, 279–289.

This journal was used in the science goal statement. “Low science self-efficacy has been

shown to influence the career choice of young women, and it explains, at least in part, the

gender difference in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields

(Betz & Hackett, 1986)”


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Block, B. A., & Russell, W. (2012). Teaching students to think critically about fitness and

wellness choices: by learning how to think, students are more likely to base their

decisions on facts and logic. JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation &

Dance, (7), 46. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=edsgsr&AN=edsgcl.303352198&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the health goal section. “Most unhealthy decisions are made

because people apply inappropriate processes of thinking” And “Fitness and wellness

class content provides a meaningful structure for students, as health content is universal

in nature and applicable to all”

Bozdoğan, A. E. (2011). The Effects of Instruction with Visual Materials on the Development of

Preservice Elementary Teachers' Knowledge and Attitude towards Global Warming.

TOJET: The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 10(2), 218-233.

Retrieved from http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ932241.pdf

This journal was used in the educational technology goal statement. “In such cases, the

use of technology in the learning process visualizes the lesson, simplifies the teacher's

work, and helps to broaden the students' perspectives (Bozdoğan, 2011). The use of

technology helps students transfer their existing knowledge to new situations by

strengthening the connection among the independent piles of knowledge in their mind,

and includes them in the teaching process (Novak & Krajick, 2006)”
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Brevetti, M. (2016). Laughing and Crying through First Year of Teaching. Journal of Thought,

50(1), 37–48. Retrieved from https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.

ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ofm&AN=117087700&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Content goal statement. “Knowledge held personal

connections when I [Brevetti] could relate it to their interests, backgrounds, and lives”

Brinthaupt, T. (2014). Using a Student-Directed Teaching Philosophy Statement to Assess and

Improve One’s Teaching. Journal of Faculty Development, 28(3), 23. Retrieved from

http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edo&AN

=98249449&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Philosophy goal statement. “If it is accurate, the [Teaching

Philosophy Statement] TPS provides students with a valid preview of how their teacher

intends to meet the course learning objectives. Sharing the TPS might also help to

personalize the teacher, create a bond between students and teacher, and encourage a

sense of community”

Buck, R., & Snook, B. (2016). Teaching the Arts across the Curriculum: Meanings, Policy and

Practice. International Journal of Education & the Arts, 17(29). Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=eric&AN=EJ1120772&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Art goal statement. “The idea of using the arts to support

learning across the curriculum is not new”


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Budge, K. M., & Parrett, W. (2011). Turning High-poverty Schools Into High-performing

Schools. ASCD.

Parrett and Budge, I felt were able to describe the people of poverty well. The people,

whom are in poverty, do not have the same culture and beliefs, just because they have a

similar situation. I found it almost a stereotype to even consider that all people in poverty

thought similarly and did not want to go to school.

Burke, J. (2012). EJ in Focus: Connecting the Classroom, Community, and Curriculum. The

English Journal, (4), 17. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=edsjsr&AN=edsjsr.41415468&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Parent, Family and Community Connections goal

statement. “The business community, has a vested interest in the schools and will do

what it can to help… their knowledge, their resources, their wisdom”


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Cambourne, B. (1995). Toward and Educationally Relevant Theory of Literacy

Learning: Twenty Years of Inquiry. The Reading Teacher, 49(3), 182-190.

doi:10.1598/rt.49.3.1

My parents were very helpful in teaching my how to tie my shoes, but they were also

there to keep me motivated. They knew that I could and held me to high standards

to keep practicing and not to give up. They had a lot of patience.... and it paid off for

them and me! This goes to show that with the strategies that Cambourne describes

and time, things can get accomplished in a way that the student will not resent the

project. I know I was mad and frustrated at that fake shoe, but it was what

ultimately helped me learn how to tie. And now I still remember and use it often. So

the skill was etched inside my mind and I was able to retain it from those teachings.

I look back and realize the struggle was worth it, and I think other learners would do

the same thing. This model also reminds me of the language learning models.

Carlson, T. (1966). The Sharing Period in First Grade. Elementary English, 43(6), 612–14.

Retrieved from https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.

ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=ED025501&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Development goal statement. “A sharing period in the first

grade can provide children with many opportunities for developing both personally and

educationally (e.g. becoming aware of others' attitudes and expressing themselves

orally)” (Carlson, 1966).


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Cervato, C. cinzia@iastate. ed., & Kerton, C. kerton@iastate. ed. (2017). Improving the Science

Teaching Self-Efficacy of Preservice Elementary Teachers: A Multiyear Study of a

Hybrid Geoscience Course. Journal of College Science Teaching, 47(2), 83–

91. https://doi-org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.2505/4/jcst17pass:[_]047_02_83

This journal was used in the Science goal statement. “Low science self-efficacy has been

shown to influence the career choice of young women, and it explains, at least in part, the

gender difference in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields

(Betz & Hackett, 1986)”

Chen, M.-E., Anderson, J., & Watkins, L. (2016). Parent Perceptions of Connectedness in a Full

Service Community School Project. Journal of Child & Family Studies, 25(7), 2268–

2278. https://doi-org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1007/s10826-016-0398-5

This journal was used in the Parents, Family and Community Connections goal

statement. “Children’s learning is promoted through reciprocal relationship among

families, schools, and communities that occur across these systems (Kim et al. 2012)”

Clark, S. K., Helfrich, S. R., & Hatch, L. (2017). Examining preservice teacher content and

pedagogical content knowledge needed to teach reading in elementary school. Journal of

Research in Reading, 40(3), 219–232. https://doi-

org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1111/1467-9817.12057

This journal was used in the Language Arts goal statement. “A balance between content

and pedagogical knowledge as well as a balance of all components of reading instruction

may be critical factors in determining the levels of overall teacher knowledge needed to

teach children to read”


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Colley, B. M. (2012). Teaching Social Studies through the Performing Arts. Educational

Forum, 76(1), 4–12. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=eric&AN=EJ950360&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Arts goal statement. “[A study] demonstrates that the arts

can be used to teach higher critical thinking skills and the complexities that surround

social, cultural, economic, and political events in everyday life”

Cothran, D. J., Kulinna, P. H., & Garn, A. C. (2010). Classroom teachers and physical

activity integration. Teaching And Teacher Education, 261381-1388.

doi:10.1016/j.tate.2010.04.003

The most powerful piece that I took away from this study was the fact that there were so

many concerns about the implementation of physical activity into the classroom. Many of

the issues were concerning the amount of time that the teachers had in the classroom with

the students, and trying to get everything in that was required through the curriculum.

Academic multi-tasking was a new term for me, but I can definitely see how that can be a

challenge to balance. I feel that this cautionary tale will be something to review and take

into consideration when I am making my conclusions about adding physical activity into

the classroom to promote focus and build academic success.


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Darling-Hammond, L. (2000). Teaching quality and student achievement: A review of state

policy evident. Educational Policy Analysis Archives; 8, 1.

This journal was used in the Content goal statement. “To meet the demands of

accrediting bodies and standards (e.g. INTASC and NCATE), many institutions adopted

the TWS in an effort to move beyond isolating assessment (Darling-Hammond, 2000) to

a more authentic measure to gauge new teacher preparation”

Darling-Hammond, L., Hyler, M. E., & Gardner, M. (2017). Effective teacher professional

development. Palo Alto, CA: Learning Policy Institute

This was referenced in the Professionalism goal statement. “Darling-Hammond, Hyler,

and Gardner (2017) “define effective [Professional Development] PD as structured

professional learning that results in changes to teacher knowledge and practices, and

improvements in student learning outcomes” (p. 2)”

Denner, P., Norman, A. D., Salzman, S., Pankratz, R., & Evans, S. (2004). The Renaissance

Partnership Teacher Work Sample: Evidence supporting score generalizability, validity,

and quality of student learning assessment. ATE Yearbook, 12, 23-56.

This journal was used in the Content goal statement. “In their study of the early TWS,

Denner and colleagues (2004) considered the following to judge the quality of learning

goals and assessments developed within the TWS: validity of learning goals, assessment

design in types of questions, alignment of questions to depth of knowledge established in

learning goals, and alignment of assessments to standards and the appropriate depth.

They found a positive relationship between overall performance on the TWS and the

quality of learning goals and assessments”


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Denton, D. W., & Sink, C. (2015). Preserving Social Studies as Core Curricula in an Era of

Common Core Reform. Journal of Social Studies Education Research, 6(2), 1–17.

Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=eric&AN=EJ1105364&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Social Studies goal statement. “Examples of integrated

lesson and activities in elementary classrooms take many forms… For example, grade

two students learn about their community by identifying recreational activities, their

geographic location and distance from school, and paint pictures and write poems to

symbolize what the activities mean to them”

Devlin-Scherer, R., Burroughs, G., Daly, J., & McCartan, W. (2007). The Value of the Teacher

Work Sample for Improving Instruction and Program. Action in Teacher Education,

29(1), 51–60. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=eric&AN=EJ762043&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Content goal statement. “A significant feature of the TWS is

its ability to facilitate pre-service teacher analysis of individual learner progress and

reflection”
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Dewi, E. K., Rusmawati, D., & Ratnaningsih, I. Z. (2015). The Effect of Music and

Motoric Movement Intervention to Increase Attention among Elementary School

Studentsin Semarang Central Java. Procedia Environmental Sciences, 23(Basic

Researches in The Tropical and Coastal Region Eco Developments), 179-185.

doi:10.1016/j.proenv.2015.01.028

This article addresses the fact that students often have a hard time concentrating and

focusing on a given task for a long enough period of time to accomplish a task. The study

that was performed consisted of a control group and two variable groups. Those groups

consisted of a music focus and music with motoric (physical activity) group. The purpose

of the study was to see if there was a benefit to one or both of these implemented ideas on

students’ abilities to concentrate in school and preform better academically. Although

their results did not show a great deal of progress on the post assessment, the variable

groups did provide some benefit in comparison to the control group. This research is a

positive study that would conclude that increasing attention in the classroom would lead

to higher academic success. The study that I want to implement also deals with physical

activity to promote focus and attentiveness in the classroom.


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Donnelly, J. E., Hillman, C. H., Greene, J. L., Hansen, D. M., Gibson, C. A., Sullivan, D.

K., & ... Washburn, R. A. (2017). Physical activity and academic achievement across the

curriculum: Results from a 3-year cluster-randomized trial. Preventive Medicine, 99140-

145. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.02.006

This article is a great example of how physical activity in the classroom can assist

students in academic success. This study was done over a three year time period

(increasing validity) with control schools and variable schools. The main idea was to

have teachers trained in ways to incorporate physical activity into the classroom on a

daily basis to improve academic success. This article leads me to believe that there is so

much potential that students in the classroom can benefit from physical exercise. The

article does bring up a good point that it was difficult for the teachers to be able to add

this physical exercise to their academic lessons, but there must be a happy medium

somewhere to assist the students. Finding the time seems to be a common theme

throughout all school districts.

Douglass, F., & Quarles, B. (1960). Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An

American Slave Written by Himself. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

The first chapter of this text was used in an assignment to use the method of ‘Talk to the

Text.’ The text described Douglass’ life as a child and what he experienced through that

time. This text could be used, with the ‘Talk to the Text’ strategy for students. Another

strategy that would be nicely used for this text is front loading vocabulary for students, as

the historical text included words that are not usually used today.
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Duh, M. (2016). Art Appreciation for Developing Communication Skills among Preschool

Children. Center for Educational Policy Studies Journal, 6(1), 71–94. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=eric&AN=EJ1128996&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Art goal statement. “Several opportunities thus exist for

using various branches of art for the development of the child’s cognitive, affective, and

psychomotor areas. It depends on the teacher whether, in the process of artistic creative

activity, children will develop their potential to the maximum; whether they will develop

new skills through varied methods and forms of learning; and whether they will know

how to observe, interpret, perceive, and thus develop their competences”

Egan, K., & Judson, G. (2009). Values and Imagination in Teaching: With a Special Focus on

Social Studies. Educational Philosophy & Theory, 41(2), 126–140. https://doi-

org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1111/j.1469-5812.2008.00455.x

This journal was used in the Social Studies goal statement. “Teachers have used stories,

images, humor, binary oppositions, a sense of mystery, a sense of reality… [to] routinely

engaging students’ imaginations in learning social studies content”


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Enhancing P.E. in Illinois Naperville Central High School. (2013). 1st ed. [pdf]

Naperville: Illinois Public Health Institute, pp.1-3. Available at:

http://iphionline.org/pdf/P.E._Case_Study_Naperville.pdf [Accessed 25 Jan. 2018].

This research sparked my interest in the entire purpose of my research. This was taken

from the PE Curriculum course that I took last semester. The Naperville high school

implements before school PE courses that allow the students to use heart monitors to

reach their target heart rate. The study then continues on to see how the students perform

in school when their target heart rate had been achieved. The staff works with the

students to let them know how meeting their target heart rate helps their brains perform

better in school. This information was mind blowing to me, I can see the benefit in other

schools and just want to help out these students in my host teacher’s classroom. There is

so much potential that they could do if only they had the ability to sit still and focus. It is

for their success that I want to continue on with this research project.

Evans, C., & Weiss, S. L. (2014). Teachers Working Together: How to Communicate,

Collaborate, and Facilitate Positive Behavior in Inclusive Classrooms. Journal of the

International Association of Special Education, 15(2), 142–146. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=eric&AN=EJ1058268&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Parents, Families, and Community Connections goal

statement. “Effective communication and collaboration between special educators and

their general education colleagues is essential”


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Ferris, D. R. (2014). Responding to student writing: Teachers’ philosophies and

practices. Assessing Writing, 19, 6–23. https://doi-

org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1016/j.asw.2013.09.004

This journal was used in the Philosophy goal statement. “A principle or philosophy is

only truly valuable if it is actually applied effectively”

Figg, C., & Jamani, K. J. (2011). Exploring teacher knowledge and actions supporting

technology-enhanced teaching in elementary schools: Two approaches by pre-service

teachers. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 27(7), 1227. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=edo&AN=77928279&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the educational technology goal statement. “Teaching with

the tools rather than teaching the tools allows teachers to see more quickly how the tools

can be used to support learning”


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Fletcher, R. & Portalupi, J. (2001). Writing workshop, the essential guide.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. ISBN 978-0-325-00362-7

This book was great. I want to keep this book in the forefront of my education texts.

Implementing the writer’s workshop in the proper time and space is essential.

Similar to reading, students should be comfortable when they write to create a good

working environment. In my future classroom, I want to create writing folders for

students to have an area to keep their work, self-evaluations and comments. Mini-

lessons! I loved this part, because it is so versatile and it can be adapted to what the

students need the most. These could include the writing process and incorporating

literature and other information into the writing workshop time. This book brought

up a lot of great discussion in the group as well as connection making times.


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Freeman, D.E. & Freeman, Y.S. (2014). Essential linguistics: What you need to know

to teach reading, ESL, spelling, phonics, grammar. (2nd ed.). Portsmouth, NH:

Heinemann. ISBN 978-0-325-05093-5

I found a lot of relevant information for ESL students in this book. I had little prior

knowledge of how to prepare to teach ESL students, so this is extremely helpful. The

background knowledge that was presented in the beginning of the book was helpful

to understand how both speakers and new speakers look at the English language.

Understanding the needs of ESL students was important for me, and it connected

with the UDL that was taught in other classes that I have had. The ways of teaching

phonology, orthography, and morphology to ESL students could also benefit fluent

English speakers in the classroom. I found the section about sounds of letters in the

orthography section very useful, as it made me think back to how all those letters

have different sounds. I teach sounds in RTI so that was beneficial and made

connections for me. I was also able to make some connections again through the

lens of UDL and use cloze reading strategies to gain comprehension for ESL and

fluent English speaking students.

Frig. (2010). TeachFor.Science. Retrieved April 23, 2018, from

http://msfrig.teachforus.org/2010/12/11/my-philosophy-on-science-education/

This journal was used in the Science goal statement. Ms. Frig described in her science

philosophy, “To me, this means allowing the students to either see demonstrations, or

allowing them to have hands-on experiences with the Science as much as possible”
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Garvis, S., & Pendergast, D. (2011). An Investigation of Early Childhood Teacher Self-Efficacy

Beliefs in the Teaching of Arts Education. International Journal of Education & the

Arts, 12(9). Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=eric&AN=EJ937070&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Arts goal statement. “Teacher self-efficacy beliefs about

their capacity to deliver arts education shapes their perceived competence in teaching the

arts, which in turn impacts on the degree and nature of inclusion of arts in the

curriculum”

Green, S. L. (2007). Preparing Special Educators To Work With Diverse Student Populations:

Culturally Responsive Teaching And Its Alignment With The Teaching Of Social

Studies. Black History Bulletin, 70(1), 12–18. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=khh&AN=27417838&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Diversity goal statement. “Providing culturally relevant

support systems for students with disabilities will help them succeed academically”
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Gruber, R., Somerville, G., Bergmame, L., Fontil, L., & Paquin, S. (2016). Original

Article: School-based sleep education program improves sleep and academic

performance of school-age children. Sleep Medicine, 2193-100.

doi:10.1016/j.sleep.2016.01.012

This is a great experiment to conduct in schools. Understanding how sleep affects

students and their abilities is an essential part of preparing a student to learn. This study

broke down how sleep affected students on their report cards. The efficiency of the sleep,

rather than the duration of the sleep had more benefits for the students. This lead them to

higher academic success. Sleep analysis is another important piece to the study of how

students learn and behave in school. The perspective of sleep on academic success has

many benefits to my study, and really the opposite look at how physical exercise can

increase academic success. Very beneficial and will add to my research as another

possible way to gather information on student success.

Haghighi, S.T., & Eskandari, M. (2012). A study on barriers of using information

technology on learning and teaching in elementary schools. Management Science

Letters, (1), 417. Retrieved from https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?ur

l=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edsdoj&AN=edsdoj.f7b1d2cf

ed9e4d88b6362358c1629495&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the educational technology goal statement. “Information

technology plays an important role on today's learning programs and there are literally

different information technology methods to improve teaching or learning skills”


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Haraway, D. L., & Pease, J. S. (2014). Worthwhile Challenges in the Implementation of Teacher

Work Sample. Curriculum & Teaching Dialogue, 16(1/2), 37–46. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=aph&AN=99391997&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Content goal statement. “To meet the demands of

accrediting bodies and standards (e.g. INTASC and NCATE), many institutions adopted

the TWS in an effort to move beyond isolating assessment (Darling-Hammond, 2000) to

a more authentic measure to gauge new teacher preparation”


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Harvey, S., & Goudvis, A. (2007). Strategies that work: Teaching comprehension for

understanding, engagement, and building knowledge, K-8. Portland, ME:

Stenhouse , Pembroke.

Harvey and Goudvis was a good reference to sum up how students and teachers can use

the text. Teachers have the responsibility to prepare the students for using textbooks in

the future. Teachers should be prepared to support their students when they struggle and

present ways to get past the confusion to use the information. Through a few different

courses I have heard that students build their knowledge on previously known

knowledge. I definitely can see that, it is easier to talk about something that you have

heard of, rather than something you have not. A good way to leading into new knowledge

would be to make a connection that students would be able to make before getting into

the new knowledge. The text brought up anchor lessons that provided good ideas to guide

students to prepare them to read for comprehension. I found the anchor lessons very

helpful and I think they could be applied to many different subjects and grade levels. I

would like to incorporate the analysis of an article or photograph in a daily journal. It

really would not matter if the students knew exactly what was going on, but if they could

get their minds thinking it would give them some direction to be going in their thought

process.
Monta 23

Henriksen, D. (2016). The seven transdisciplinary habits of mind of creative teachers: An

exploratory study of award winning teachers. Thinking Skills and Creativity, 22, 212

–232. https://doi-org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1016/j.tsc.2016.10.007

This journal was used in the Content goal statement. “Teachers are primary mediators of

thinking and learning for their students, and understanding how excellent teachers

function and use thinking skills is an important, albeit often underserved, area of

research”

Hicks, T. (2009). The digital writing workshop. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. ISBN

978-0-325-02674-9

The idea of taking the writing process to digital is not a new concept and is the next

logical process for the students of today. The text of this piece was published a while

ago, but still has relevant material. I did not do a lot of digital work on writing until I

started the MAT program. Using wikis and blogs would be a great concept to add

into the classroom, especially in the intermediate grades. The students, more often

than not, are using their ipads and computers to write the texts for the drafts of

their writing already. Technology is only advancing, and not going away. Without

transitioning to the resources online and ready for the classroom would be

detrimental to the students. The students I work with use the Google classroom for a

lot of their work.


Monta 24

Hodges, M. (2015). An Innovative Strategy for Teaching Health-Related Fitness Knowledge in

Elementary Physical Education Classes. Strategies: A Journal for Physical and Sport

Educators, 28(4), 19–25. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=eric&AN=EJ1067859&site=eds-live

This journal was used for the health goal statement. “Students’ health-related fitness

knowledge (HRFK) can be described as the health content in physical education that

encompasses the necessary knowledge for individuals to remain physically active for

life”

Howe, W. A., & Lisi, P. L. (2014). Becoming a multicultural educator: Developing awareness,

gaining skills, and taking action. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

This journal was used in the Diversity goal statement. “Cultural competence is defined as

the ability to think, act, and feel in ways that are respectful of diversity”

Hummell, L. J. (2018). community connections. Children’s Technology & Engineering, 22(3),

12. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=sch&AN=128284257&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Parents, Families, and Community Connections goal

statement. “Building regular school-community connections is significant and, if

developed and implemented well, can have lasting positive impacts on the students,

teachers, and community members involved for years to come”


Monta 25

İlter, B. G. (2015). How does Technology Affect Language Learning Process at an Early

Age? Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 199, 311–316. https://doi-

org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1016/j.sbspro.2015.07.552

This journal was used in the educational technology goal statement. “Technology can

be one of the ways to create real and enjoyable atmosphere for young language learners

when it is used correctly and effectively”

Jackson, N. M. (2018). BRING LIFE TO LEARNING: Connecting instruction to community

service provides a deeper level of student commitment. District Administration, 54(9),

53–56. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=tfh&AN=131583900&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Parents, Families and Community Connections goal

statement. “Community projects and service learning initiatives allow students to use

their classroom skills to benefit the world around them. In turn, the skills and lessons

learned can boost academic achievement”


Monta 26

Jones, J. (2014, October 06). 6 1 Trait® Rubrics. Retrieved from

http://educationnorthwest.org/traits/traits-rubrics

The Common Core 6+1 Trait (c) Assessment rubrics (which I put in my information

to get to look at the grades 3-12 rubric) are so nicely laid out. It was easy to follow

and therefore I would think easy to implement in the classroom. The traits were

broken down into easy to comprehend formats, as well as the rubric. The rubrics

followed the presented traits, keeping good consistency and ability to transfer over

to use in the classroom. I would think that it would be hard to expect students to

already know how to write proficiently if they have never been taught. So using

these systems and teaching this system will prepare students to become better

writers. The common core standards with examples were also very helpful to see. I

learn well with examples, and so with the students.

Jurs, J., Mangili, L., & Jurs, S. (1990). Preschool children's attitude toward health risk

behaviors. Psychological Reports, 66, 754.

This journal was used in the health goal statement. “Health education

and safety programs are critical components of the elementary school's curriculum (Jurs,

Mangili, & Jurs, 1990; Thomas, Groer, & Droppleman, 1993). These programs can

positively impact negative health habits and behaviors of children that persist throughout

their lives and that are more difficult to change as they grow older”
Monta 27

Kim, E. M., Coutts, M. J., Holmes, S. R., Sheridan, S. M., Ransom, K. A., Sjuts, T. M., &

Rispoli, K. M. (2012). Parent involvement and family-school partnerships: Examining the

content, processes, and outcomes of structural versus relationship-based approaches.

CYFS Working Paper No. 2012-6: Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth,

Families and Schools. http:// eds.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?sid=a51201b6-bfc9-

4eb0- 8aa2-3e29309eb685%40sessionmgr112&crlhashurl=login.aspx%

253fdirect%253dtrue%2526db%253deric%2526AN%253dED53

7851%2526site%253dehost-live%2526scope%253dsite&hid=11

4&vid=0&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZSZzY29wZT1zaX

Rl#db=eric&AN=ED537851

This journal was used in the Parents, Families and Community Connections goal

statement. “Children’s learning is promoted through reciprocal relationship among

families, schools, and communities that occur across these systems (Kim et al. 2012)”
Monta 28

Koechlin, C., & Zwaan, S. (2014). Q tasks: How to empower students to ask questions

and care about answers. Markham, Ontario: Pembroke Limited.

This was another text that I had from a previous course. This text provides different

strategies for students to be able to ask their own questions about education and the

world. In Q-Tasks, I appreciated when the topic of leading through examples came up

with the student research. Sometimes students do not know where to begin on a project if

they have not been taught to do it. Sometimes students can be taught something, but do

not fully understand how to use it. So guided practice is very important. I can see using

this in the classroom, presenting and showing an example of how to ask the right

questions can lead students down a path that will allow them to replicate the process for

future use. The use of organizational documents is useful to be able to replicate a process.

Kuzu, A. (2009). Action research in teacher education and professional development. The

Journal of International Social Research, 2(6), 425-433.

This was referenced in the Professionalism goal statement. “Teachers themselves are also

influenced by the changes and improvements they make. It is seen that participants

involved in an action research consider themselves as more effective teachers and have a

more positive attitude towards their profession” (Atay, 2003; as cited in Kuzu, 2009)”
Monta 29

Lerkkanen, M.-K., Kiuru, N., Pakarinen, E., Poikkeus, A.-M., Rasku-Puttonen, H., Siekkinen,

M., & Nurmi, J.-E. (2016). Child-centered versus teacher-directed teaching practices:

Associations with the development of academic skills in the first grade at school. Early

Childhood Research Quarterly, 36, 145–156. https://doi-

org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.12.023

This journal was used in the Development goal statement. “In the first grade classrooms

in which the teachers deployed a high degree of child-centered teaching practices,

defined as sensitivity to children’s interests, scaffolding learning according to individual

needs, and creating opportunities for active peer engagement, children showed greater

skills development during the academic year than in classrooms characterized by less

child-centered teaching practices” (Lerkkanen, Kiuru, Pakarinen, Poikkeus, Rasku-

Puttonen, Siekkinen, & Nurmi, 2016).

Lesh, B. (2011). Why Won't You Just Tell Us the Answer? Stenhouse.

Amazing resource. I know that the text mainly focused on intermediate historical

thinking, but there are so many techniques that can be used in elementary school as well.

I really like the way that Lesh describes how time lines nicely layout a part of history, but

in reality those time lines could only have been put together after the fact. No one at a

specific time in history knew what had happened before would affect what was going to

happen in the present and the future. He made the argument of ‘doing’ to learn, becoming

hands on in history is just as important as reading to get better at reading, and doing math

problems and science labs to get better at math and science, respectively. Applications

are much easier for me to understand, and I am sure that many of the students that I work

with would also work better getting hands on and minds on work.
Monta 30

Lia Lopes, G., Mariana Callil, V., Maria Helena Morgani de, A., & Fátima Aparecida, C.

(2017). Massage and Storytelling Reduce Aggression and Improve Academic

Performance in Children Attending Elementary School. Occupational Therapy

International, Vol 2017 (2017), doi:10.1155/2017/5087145

There are many factors that lead to student aggression in schools. Two implementations

were looked at in classes to decrease the amount of aggression and increase the academic

performances of the students. The students were put into different class periods; one of

massage, one of story telling and a control group that experienced randomly selected

additional class periods. The students in the massage and story telling groups preformed

better academically and had a reduction in aggression in comparison to the control group.

This study is another way to improve academic success in students. I can see how it

would be very beneficial, but can see that there may be issues in incorporating all of these

into the general education classroom without losing academic curriculum time. The issue

of implementation in classrooms was also seen in other studies.

Looney, L., Perry, D., & Steck, A. (2017). Turning Negatives into Positives: The Role of an

Instructional Math Course on Preservice Teachers’ Math Beliefs. Education, 138(1), 27–

40. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=aph&AN=125376916&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Math goal statement. “Working with teachers to help them

learn how to effectively teach math to young children, as well as to become math

proficient could help minimize the negativity toward the subject, increase positivity, and

help them to feel more efficacious about the subject matter”


Monta 31

Lu Chi. (2000). The art of writing: Lu Chi’s wen fu (S. Hamill, translator).

Minneapolis, MN: Milkweed. ISBN 978-1-57131-412-3

This book reminds me of the writing workshop. In the poems, Lu Chi (translated by

Hamill) describes each stage of thought and step in writing. I would love to use

these poems in an older-grade writing workshop. I do not know if they would be as

beneficial in a fourth grade as they might be an eighth grade workshop, but I think

all students would enjoy the different format of the process. The writing process

seems to usually be about writing paragraphs or other formal pieces of writing, this

text could even describe how to brainstorm for poetry as well. I particularly liked

the Five Criteria section. This section requires a lot of thinking on the part of the

reader, but can be used in a writer’s workshop easily. Looking forward to

incorporating this text someday.

Lucey, T. A., Shifflet, R. A., & Weilbacher, G. A. (2014). Patterns of Early Childhood,

Elementary, and Middle-Level Social Studies Teaching: An Interpretation of Illinois

Social Studies Teachers’ Practices and Beliefs. Social Studies, 105(6), 283–290.

https://doi.org/10.1080/00377996.2014.945641

This journal was used in the Social Studies goal statement. “Elementary teachers viewed

other forms of instruction, such as class projects and discussion as more effective while

secondary teachers considered lecture as more effective”


Monta 32

Macià, M., & García, I. (2016). Review: Informal online communities and networks as a source

of teacher professional development: A review. Teaching and Teacher Education, 55,

291–307. https://doi-org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1016/j.tate.2016.01.021

“Although courses are the most popular formula, teachers who undertake professional

development activities that involve individual and collective research, peer observation

and participation in professional networks tend to implement active teaching practices

involving projects, group work and the use of new technologies (OECD, 2014)” And “It

is not uncommon for teachers in search of new ideas or willing to try new methodologies

to look for collaboration opportunities and support outside the school”

Martens, P., Martens, R., Doyle, M. H., Loomis, J., & Aghalarov, S. (2012). Learning From

Picturebooks: Reading and Writing Multimodally in First Grade. Reading Teacher, 66(4),

285–294. https://doi-org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1002/TRTR.01099

This journal was used in the Language Arts goal statement. “Picture books are one type

of multimodal text; the meaning of the whole involves the weaving together of multiple

modes, including the linguistic (written text), visual (illustrations), spatial (evident in the

design, layout, and composition), and gestural (found in the positions and movement in

the illustrations)”

McGregor, G., & Voglesberg, R. T. (1998). Inclusive schooling practice: Pedagogical and

research foundations. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes

This journal was used in the Diversity goal statement. “An inclusive education refers to a

service for students with disabilities providing education in their neighbourhood school

and general education classes with supplementary aids and supports to assure the child’s

success academically, behaviourally, and socially”


Monta 33

Merriam-Webster: America's most-trusted online dictionary. (n.d.). Retrieved from

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary

According to Merriam-Webster, success is defined as a favorable or desired outcome.

Moline, S. (2012). I see what you mean: Visual literacy K-8. Portland, Me.: Stenhouse.

This is a wonderful text, I have used pieces of it for many courses. For this class we

reviewed how to present and read different graphs. Chapter five really made me

happy, I saw many different ways that maps could be used to connect students to

their world. The personal maps and the classroom maps are something that I have

seen before, and something that I have done. Connections between how we see

something in comparison to how it really is can let students know their place in the

world. The students could draw what their room, house, town, country and globe

look like in their eyes and then see real maps or Google Earth and compare. That

would be a fun way to introduce human geography to students of all grades (it could

be a yearly thing and see how it changes).

Montroy, J. J., Bowles, R. P., Skibbe, L. E., McClelland, M. M., & Morrison, F. J. (2016). The

Development of Self-Regulation across Early Childhood. Developmental

Psychology, 52(11), 1744–1762. Retrieved from https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.

edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=E

J1118151&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Development goal statement. “Self-regulation depends on

the coordination of many processes across levels of function, with children’s ability to

draw on, integrate, and manage these multiple processes increasing across developmental

time” (Montroy, Bowles, Skibbe, McClelland, & Morrison, 2016).


Monta 34

Novak, A. M., & Krajick, J.S. (2006). Scientific Inquiry and Nature of Science. Implications for

Teaching, Learning, and Teacher Education, Science & Technology Education Library,

25.

This journal was used in the educational technology goal statement. “In such cases, the

use of technology in the learning process visualizes the lesson, simplifies the teacher's

work, and helps to broaden the students' perspectives (Bozdoğan, 2011). The use of

technology helps students transfer their existing knowledge to new situations by

strengthening the connection among the independent piles of knowledge in their mind,

and includes them in the teaching process (Novak & Krajick, 2006)”

Obenchain, K. M., & Morris, R. V. (2015). 50 social studies strategies for K-8

classrooms. Boston: Pearson.

This was a really well documented resource, with ideas to use in all grades. I appreciated

how the text described using different teaching/learning techniques, which included

transmission strategies as well as using graphic organizers. Establishing multiple

perspectives is very important in a social studies classroom. So many good ideas,

including discovering historical characters, providing students with meaningful field

trips, and even introducing graphic novels in the social studies setting. I loved the mini-

society that I had in fifth grade, and I think it would be amazing to add it to the

curriculum of my own classroom. So many different aspects can be learned for students,

and it is very memorable. I still remember it fourteen years later. The text also discussed

wikis. I have been learning about digital writing in the intermediate literacy course, and I

think this is a great way to introduce the writing process to students in our age of

technology.
Monta 35

O'Connor, M. A., & Daly, I. J. (2017). Selecting effective intervention strategies for

escape-maintained academic-performance problems: Consider giving 'em a break!.

Journal Of School Psychology, doi:10.1016/j.jsp.2017.09.003

This article reviews different interventions for students who are struggling with

mathematics. This study looked at elementary school students who were serviced by

Response-to-Intervention (RTI) to increase their academic success in math. The students

were provided different implementations to aid them in their academic success, and each

of them benefitted from different programs on a case-by-case basis. This article could be

beneficial for my research in the fact that academic success was achieved by

implemented different methods of application for students to improve their academic

success. Even though the implementations were in different forms rather than physical

activity, the students still found academic success.

Our Philosophy. (2011). Retrieved April 23, 2018, from

http://www.elementaryschoolscience.org/our-philosophy/

This journal was used in the Science goal statement. “Guided questioning is the best

teacher of all, helping students to develop critical thinking skills”


Monta 36

Owen, S. M. (2015). Teacher Professional Learning Communities in Innovative Contexts: “Ah

Hah Moments,” “Passion” and “Making a Difference” for Student Learning. Professional

Development in Education, 41(1), 57–74. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=eric&AN=EJ1047178&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Content goal statement. “Another teacher in another school

indicated individual students with significant issues becoming passionate about their

learning following the teacher introducing new pedagogies such as improved questioning

and also learning new techniques for dealing with disengaged students”

Park, S., Stone, S. I., & Holloway, S. D. (2017). School-based parental involvement as a

predictor of achievement and school learning environment: An elementary school-level

analysis. Children & Youth Services Review, 82, 195–206. https://doi-

org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1016/j.childyouth.2017.09.012

This journal was used in the Learning Environment goal statement. “Parents may be

willing and able to influence the school's learning environment… volunteerism may be

beneficial to creating positive school learning environments”

Pike, B., Bradley, F., & Mansfield, J. (1997). Philosophy of Teaching: Developing a Statement

That Thrives in the Classroom. The Clearing House, 70(3), 125. Retrieved from

http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edsjsr&

AN=edsjsr.30189265&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Philosophy goal statement. “An interesting, creative, and

caring teacher's philosophy statement does not come from thin air; it evolves from a

range of reflections and insights about students and the learning process”
Monta 37

Pirrie, A. M., & Lodewyk, K. R. (2012). Investigating links between moderate-to-

vigorous physical activity and cognitive performance in elementary school students.

Mental Health And Physical Activity, 593-98. doi:10.1016/j.mhpa.2012.04.001

This article dives directly into seeing the benefits of physical activity on academic

success in students. Students were collaboratively compared based upon standardized test

scores to see if their abilities in cognitive processes such as planning, attention,

simultaneous processing and successive processing were affected by physical activity.

After the program was initiated and monitored, the students’ scores showed progress in

advancement of their planning skills (the student’s individual ability to problem solve),

leading to higher test scores in that area. This article will be very helpful in showing that

other studies of physical activity can assist students in advancing some of their academic

scores successfully.

Rivard, M.-C., Deslandes, R., & Beaudoin, C. (2011). Collaboration within the Context of the

Healthy School Approach (HSA): The Case of a Disadvantaged Elementary School in

Quebec. Canadian Journal of Education, 34(4), 158–176. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=ofm&AN=72015046&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the health goal statement. “The responsibility for health belongs

not only to schools, but to families and communities as well”


Monta 38

Saied Bishara. (2018). Active and traditional teaching, self-image, and motivation in learning

math among pupils with learning disabilities. Cogent Education, Vol 5, Iss 1 (2018), (1).

https://doi-org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1080/2331186X.2018.1436123

This journal was used in the Math goal statement. “Math is perceived as difficult and

boring, and prone to failure during the very first years of formal education. The source of

the difficulties and lack of interest is a result of the current teaching methods.” And

“Math content is usually identified with rigid rules, terms and principles and sometimes

the pupils are required to remember rules, principals, terms, ways to find solutions,

comparison, relationships, math statements, and formulas without understanding them”

Sarama, J. & Clements D.H. (2009). Teaching Math in the Primary Grades: The Learning

Trajectories Approach. YC Young Children, 64(2), 63. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=edsjsr&AN=edsjsr.42730409&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Math goal statement. “A useful tool in understanding and

supporting the development of children's mathematical reasoning is a math learning

trajectory. There are learning trajectories for mathematics at all age levels, from birth

throughout the school years, and for learning all kinds of content - from specific math

concepts such as number and operations to specific science concepts like understanding

electricity”
Monta 39

Saritas, E. (2016). Relationship between Philosophical Preferences of Classroom Teachers and

Their Teaching Styles. Educational Research and Reviews, 11(16), 1533–1541.

Retrieved from

http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN

=EJ1111496&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Philosophy goal statement. “Philosophy helps us to be

interested in personal beliefs and values, understand who we are and the reason of our

existence and to some extent where we go” And “Educational philosophy studies the

theoretical bases on which the available educational practices are based, and criticize

them”

Science Scope. (2018). Engineering a classroom that works for all: Classroom management tips

for students with learning differences. Science Scope, 42(1), 16. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=sch&AN=130826775&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Learning Environment goal statement. “Classroom

management is one of, if not the most important thing to consider when determining how

your classroom will run in the upcoming year. To ensure all students meet success,

establish predictable routines and procedures, give concise directions, use visuals, and

use repetition and reinforcement regularly”


Monta 40

Sipra, M.A. (2013). Fostering Communicative Competence through Technology. International

Journal of Applied Linguistics and English Literature, (3), 124. https://doi-

org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.7575/aiac.ijalel.v.2n.3p.124

This journal was used in the educational technology goal statement. “Teachers can take

advantage of learners’ interests in the latest technology by designing project-based tasks”

Skiba, R., Ormiston, H., Martinez, S., & Cummings, J. (2016). Teaching the Social Curriculum:

Classroom Management as Behavioral Instruction. Theory Into Practice, 55(2), 120–128.

Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=eric&AN=EJ1096852&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Learning Environment goal statement. “A teacher’s ability

or failure to develop a positive classroom climate, and find ways to deescalate rather than

escalate student behavior, also has important consequences for students” And “Classroom

management is defined, then, as a collection of teaching strategies that promote the self-

regulation of behavior by students, to enable them to take full advantage of available

learning time”
Monta 41

Sotiropoulou-Zormpala, M. (2012). Aesthetic Teaching: Seeking a Balance between Teaching

Arts and Teaching through the Arts. Arts Education Policy Review, 113(4), 123.

https://doi.org/10.1080/10632913.2012.719419

This journal was used in the Arts goal statement. “Researchers found that engagement

with the arts could promote not only aesthetic development, but also holistic growth and

personality balance.” And “Aesthetic teaching activities can improve and encourage more

comprehensive implementation of arts education in a school by allowing teachers to

adopt concurrently the virtues of both “teaching arts” and “teaching through the arts”

approaches and can help teachers and students generate new knowledge—in other words,

redefine themselves and their world”

State, T. M. 1.., Simonsen, B., Hirn, R. G. ., & Wills, H. (2019). Bridging the Research-to

Practice Gap Through Effective Professional Development for Teachers Working With

Students With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Behavioral Disorders, 44(2), 107–

116. https://doi-org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1177/0198742918816447

This journal was used in the Professionalism goal statement. “Darling-Hammond, Hyler,

and Gardner (2017) “define effective [Professional Development] PD as structured

professional learning that results in changes to teacher knowledge and practices, and

improvements in student learning outcomes” (p. 2)”


Monta 42

Stobaugh, R. R., Tassell, J. L., & Norman, A. D. (2010). Improving Preservice Teacher

Preparation through the Teacher Work Sample: Exploring Assessment and Analysis of

Student Learning. Action in Teacher Education, 32(1), 39–53. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=eric&AN=EJ915836&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Content goal statement. “In their study of the early TWS,

Denner and colleagues (2004) considered the following to judge the quality of learning

goals and assessments developed within the TWS: validity of learning goals, assessment

design in types of questions, alignment of questions to depth of knowledge established in

learning goals, and alignment of assessments to standards and the appropriate depth.

They found a positive relationship between overall performance on the TWS and the

quality of learning goals and assessments”


Monta 43

Strickland, D., Ganske, K., Monroe, J. K. (2001 or 2002). Supporting struggling readers

And writers: Strategies for classroom intervention 3 – 6. Portland, ME: Stenhouse.

ISBN 978-1-57110-055-9

This is probably my favorite text for this class. I found out a lot about instruction

from this book and the class to work with students who are struggling. I found the

processes fascinating to help students who struggle. Daniel Kullander and I worked

on a project to look at the strategies to assist struggling readers. Then I used some of

these tips in my CCKI section on reluctant readers. I use one of the strategies with

some students in my RTI section, the literature circle. I used this process when I was

in school many times in the fourth, fifth and sixth grade. Again UDL would fit in well

with many of these topics with ease, creating differentiated and multi-leveled

instruction is very important. Scaffolding is huge in my personal philosophy and this

was described here as well. I had not realized that the ‘think-aloud’ process had an

actual name! I have used this strategy and remember it from my own days in school.

Very useful and I will continue to use it in all content areas.


Monta 44

Stylianou, M., Kulinna, P. H., van der Mars, H., Mahar, M. T., Adams, M. A., &

Amazeen, E. (2016). Before-school running/walking club: Effects on student on-task

behavior. Preventive Medicine Reports, 3196-202. doi:10.1016/j.pmedr.2016.01.010

The presentation of this research was very good. The idea of having a before school

walking/running club provided the opportunity for students to get in structured focus time

without interrupting the academic learning time. The study was analyzed by a pedometer

and direct observation. Their results were positive that there was an affect of physical

activity on students’ academic success. The layout of this research is similar to how I

would like to structure my research. I want to look at the ten-minute recess that the

students have after their snack break, so that it does not interfere with the provided

curriculum. This will be a primary source that I reference frequently.

Sumarni, S., & Pd., M. (2013). The Role of Educators in Introduce Technology in Early

Childhood through Science Activities. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 103,

1161–1170. https://doi-org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1016/j.sbspro.2013.10.443

This journal was used in the educational technology goal statement. “Advances in

technology closely related to science, with the development of science, the technology

will also be growing rapidly. Therefore science is a great way to introduce technology to

children”

Sumrall, W., & Sumrall, K. (2018). Understanding by Design. Science and Children, 56(1), 48

–54. Retrieved from https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.

ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ1187970&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Content goal statement. “A main tenet of the UBD model

involves starting at the end rather than at the beginning of the planning process”
Monta 45

Tanic, M., Nikolic, V., Stankovic, D., Kondic, S., Zivkovic, M., Mitkovic, P., & Kekovic, A.

(2015). Interconnection between physical environment and pedagogical process in

elementary schools in Niš, Serbia. Current Science (00113891), 108(7), 1228. Retrieved

from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=sch&AN=102164511&site=eds-live

This journal was used in Learning Environment goal statement. “School children and

teachers are inevitably involved in the creation of a unified ‘social space’ through various

forms of activities in the pedagogical process. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the

optimal configuration of physical environment from the perspective of teachers, and in

particular, school children who are the subjects of modern pedagogical process”

Tanir, A. K., Ilhan, A. C., Ozer, A., & Deniz, Z. (2012). Teaching Visual Arts in Primary School

Teaching Departments with Postmodern Art Education Approach. Procedia - Social and

Behavioral Sciences, 51, 1044–1049. https://doi-

org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.1016/j.sbspro.2012.08.285

This journal was used in the Arts goal statement. “Visual arts education should have a

characteristic of aiming at developing senses, the power of expression and imagery and

creativity”
Monta 46

Thomas, S. P., Groer, M., &; Droppleman, P. (1993). Physical health of today's school children.

Educational Psychology Review, 5(1), 5-33

This journal was used in the health goal statement. “Health education

and safety programs are critical components of the elementary school's curriculum (Jurs,

Mangili, & Jurs, 1990; Thomas, Groer, & Droppleman, 1993). These programs can

positively impact negative health habits and behaviors of children that persist throughout

their lives and that are more difficult to change as they grow older”

Unlu, Z. K., Dokme, I., & Tufekci, A. (2015). An Action Research on Teaching Science through

Technology Supported Inquiry - based Learning: A Pilot Study. Procedia - Social and

Behavioral Sciences, 186, 46–52. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2015.04.183

This journal was used in the educational technology goal statement. “In such cases, the

use of technology in the learning process visualizes the lesson, simplifies the teacher's

work, and helps to broaden the students' perspectives (Bozdoğan, 2011). The use of

technology helps students transfer their existing knowledge to new situations by

strengthening the connection among the independent piles of knowledge in their mind,

and includes them in the teaching process (Novak & Krajick, 2006)”
Monta 47

Utley, C. A., Reddy, S. S., Delquadri, J. C., Greenwood, C. R., Mortweet, S. L., & Bowman, V.

(2001). ClassWide Peer Tutoring: An Effective Teaching Procedure For Facilitating the

Acquisition of Health Education and Safety Facts with Students with Developmental

Disabilities. Education & Treatment of Children, 24(1), 1. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=pbh&AN=4686864&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the health goal statement. “Health education

and safety programs are critical components of the elementary school's curriculum (Jurs,

Mangili, & Jurs, 1990; Thomas, Groer, & Droppleman, 1993). These programs can

positively impact negative health habits and behaviors of children that persist throughout

their lives and that are more difficult to change as they grow older” And “In addition to

prevention instruction, making young children aware of dangers in their home and school

environments and helping them to increase their knowledge about safety issues needs to

become a priority in the school's curriculum”

Wang, L. (2018). On the Content of the Pre-service Teachers’ Teaching Reflection in the

Practicum. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, (9), 1195. Retrieved from

http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.556572180

&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Philosophy goal statement. “Teaching reflection is a critical

way to promote teachers' development. By reflecting, teachers can find out the teaching

problems, check their teaching behaviors and improve their teaching ability”
Monta 48

Watkins, P., & Watkins, S. (2011). Predictors of Teacher Candidate Success in Developing a

Capstone Project: The Teacher Work Sampling (TWS) Methodology. Critical Questions

in Education, 2(2), 84–92. Retrieved from

https://egan.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?dir

ect=true&db=eric&AN=EJ1047575&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Content goal statement. “Teacher candidates must

understand their community of learners, design the learning experiences around that

community, and analyze outcomes through assessments designed around the learning

goals. These require structure and guidance that provide a scaffold for planning,

implementing and assessing”

Weaver, C. (2009). Reading process: Brief edition of reading process and practice (3rd

ed.). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. ISBN 978-0-325-02843-9.

Very useful text, the text was well laid out and easy to read. The IRI Reading Profile

Project was strongly connected to the text. In the sections discussing the miscue

analysis, I was able to see how the process was done and in class the text was put to

work. I believe because I actually performed the process and used the graphics from

the text, I fully understood what the book was trying to describe. I do not think that I

can say the same for other texts that I have read. The text was not just useful to

make the reader profile, but also to discuss what could be done after that. There are

strategies for phonics, reading fluency and using scaffolding processes of ‘think-

aloud’.
Monta 49

Webster, C. A., Zarrett, N., Cook, B. S., Egan, C., Nesbitt, D., & Weaver, R. G. (2017).

Movement integration in elementary classrooms: Teacher perceptions and implications

for program planning. Evaluation And Program Planning, 61134-143.

doi:10.1016/j.evalprogplan.2016.12.011

The national standard of children having 60 minutes a day of physical activity is brought

up in national schools curriculums. Teachers have a lot of responsibility to their students,

parents, teachers and the community. In this study, the teachers were asked to record how

the integration of physical activity was through out the time period of the study. The

purpose was to see how best to organize the curriculum to get students interacting. The

physical activity curriculum was placed into the classrooms, but did not over stress the

time boundaries of a given subject. The teachers overall were happy with the results and

the benefits that were brought by the physical activity, but also it had its challenges. The

challenges included the amount of time (which I have seen in classroom teachers in my

host school), the limited resources and trying to balance it with what was already going

on in the curriculum.
Monta 50

Yamamoto, T., Matsumoto, Y., & Bernard, M. E. (2017). Effects of the cognitive

-behavioral You Can Do It! Education program on the resilience of Japanese elementary

school students: A preliminary investigation. International Journal Of Educational

Research, 8650-58. doi:10.1016/j.ijer.2017.08.006

This preliminary research of a Japanese elementary school was looking at how emotional

disorders can affect attendance in schools. A program was implemented called, “You Can

Do It! Education” which produced beneficial results in the experimental group. The

results from this program could benefit my study as students’ abilities can be correlated

with the amount of school that is missed, thus affecting academic performance. The

experimental group performed better than the control group in academic performance.

Even though this is a different implementation, it still assisted in bettering the academic

performance of elementary school students.

Yigit, C., & Bagceci, B. (2017). Teachers’ Opinions Regarding the Usage of Action Research in

Professional Development. Journal of Education and Training Studies, 5(2), 243–252.

Retrieved from

http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN

=EJ1133840&site=eds-live

This journal was used in the Professionalism goal statement. “Teacher research enables

teachers to be involved in designing and implementing researches serving as productive

professional development experiences” And “Teachers themselves are also influenced by

the changes and improvements they make. It is seen that participants involved in an

action research consider themselves as more effective teachers and have a more positive

attitude towards their profession” (Atay, 2003; as cited in Kuzu, 2009)”


Monta 51

Yi-Hsiang Pan, Hung-Shih Chou, Wei-Ting Hsu, Chiung-Huang Li, & Yuh

-Lin Hu. (2013). Teacher Self-Efficacy and Teaching Practices in the Health and Physical

Education Curriculum in Taiwan. Social Behavior & Personality: An International

Journal, 41(2), 241–250. https://doi-

org.ezproxy.uas.alaska.edu/10.2224/sbp.2013.41.2.241

This journal was used in the health goal statement. “Students acquire good attitudes

about, and knowledge of, health-related concepts, including self-recognition, emotional

management, interpersonal skills, and life values”

Zaretsky, V. (2016). Vygotsky's Principle "One Step in Learning - One Hundred Steps In

Development": From Idea To Practice. Kulʹturno-Istoričeskaâ Psihologiâ, Vol 12, Iss 3,

Pp 149-188 (2016), (3), 149. doi:10.17759/chp.2016120309

Under Vygotsky’s theory of proximal development zones, he brought the idea to expand

students’ learning abilities by encouraging them to go beyond what they are comfortable

with to something new.


Monta 52

Zinn, H. (1990). A people's history of the United States. New York: Harper & Row.

Appreciated this text for the way it was laid out. This text went through the major

aspects of American History, including the founding of the English colonies, the

Revolutionary War, the American Civil War, World Wars, the Cold War, Vietnam,

and the War in Iraq. I was excited to actually read a text that described some history

that I lived through; it was really interesting though. The model that was used read

this text, Read Around the Text, was great for this piece of work. The images were

extremely helpful and provided almost as much information as the text did. I would

use this as a supplementary text to the curriculum textbook when I have a future

classroom. I also took away from this text the interesting information that was

incorporated in and around the different wars.