Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 4

The

 Miller  Effect  
What  is  the  Miller  Effect?  
 
• At  this  point,  don’t  know,  don’t  care  
• It  is  caused  by  a  capacitor  (or  any  complex  or  non  complex  impedance)  bridged  across  an  amplifier  
 

 
• We  can  analyze  this  in  1  of  2  ways…  
o 1.    Break  the  resistance/impedance  into  2  while  maintaining  it’s  “equivalent”  effect  
o 2.    Analyze  it  “as  is”  

Usage:  
1. 𝒁 = 𝒁𝑴𝑰𝑳𝑳𝑬𝑹𝑰𝑵 + 𝒁𝑴𝑰𝑳𝑳𝑬𝑹𝑶𝑼𝑻  
 
  Z  
  Change  
  çthis  
  into  
  this  è  
  𝑍!"#!"!!"   𝑍!"##$!!"#  
 
 
 
 
• With  these  equations:  
 
𝒁 𝒁
𝒁𝑴𝑰𝑳𝑳𝑬𝑹𝑰𝑵 =                                  𝒁𝑴𝑰𝑳𝑳𝑬𝑹𝑶𝑼𝑻 =                                          
𝟏 − 𝑨𝑽 𝟏
𝟏−[ ]
𝑨𝑽
   

THE  MILLER  EFFECT   1  


 
Example  (with  capacitor  across)  
 
• A  100pF  capacitance  connects  to  an  input  and  output  of  an  amplifier  which  has  
o A  gain  of  -­‐19  
• “Millerize”  that  thing…  
 
 
 
  100pF  
 
 
 
 
  VIN   VOUT  =  -­‐19(V IN)   1V   -­‐19V  
  2000pF   105pF  
 
 
 
 
• Keep  in  mind,  we  need  to  keep  track  of  line  currents  and  voltages  in  this  process.  
 
 
 
  1mA 1mA  
 

1V   -­‐19V  
1mA   1mA  

 
 
!
• Reminder:    𝑍   ∝ ∴ 𝑖𝑚𝑝𝑒𝑑𝑎𝑛𝑐𝑒  𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜  𝑖𝑠  𝑖𝑛𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑠𝑒𝑙𝑦  𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑝𝑜𝑟𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛𝑎𝑙  𝑡𝑜  𝑐𝑎𝑝𝑎𝑐𝑖𝑡𝑎𝑛𝑐𝑒  𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜  
!
• Gain  is  not  affected  by  C  
 
𝟏
• 𝒁 = 𝑹 + 𝒋𝑿          𝒘𝒉𝒆𝒓𝒆      𝑿   =  𝒐𝒓  𝝎𝑳  
𝝎𝑪
 
 
 
 

2. For  a  common  source  amplifier  


 

Rg1  
G   D  
VIN   VOUT  
goss   RD   RLOAD  
  gmVGS  

S  
• Momentarily  forget  Rg1  
• 𝐴! !   = 𝑔𝑚(𝑅! ∕∕ 𝑅!"#$   ∕∕ 𝑔!"" )  
• Re-­‐insert  Rg1  
 
𝒈𝒎 𝑹𝑮 𝟏 − 𝟏
𝑨𝑽 = (𝑨𝑽 )′   !
     
(𝒈𝒎 𝑹𝑮𝟏 − 𝑨𝑽
 
• This  creates  a  “correction  factor”  due  to  the  effect  of  R  

Example  (with  resistor  across)  


 
• 𝑔! = 250 𝑚𝐴
𝑉
    • 𝑅!"#$ = 1𝑘Ω  
• 𝑔!"" = 50𝜇℧  
• 𝑅! = 560Ω  
 
  12MΩ    
  Rg1  
 
  G   D  
VIN   VOUT  
  goss   RD   RLOAD  
  50𝜇℧   560Ω     1kΩ    
gmVGS  
 
  S  
 
 
 
 
 
𝐴! !   = 𝑔𝑚(𝑅! ∕∕ 𝑅!"#$   ∕∕ 𝑔!"" )  
 
! 𝑚𝐴
𝐴!   = −250 (560Ω   ∕∕  1𝑘Ω   ∕∕ 20𝑘Ω)  
𝑉
𝑚𝐴
=   −(352.6Ω)(250 )  
𝑉
𝑽
𝑨𝑽 !   =   −𝟖𝟖. 𝟏𝟔  
𝑽
 
• Now  that  we’ve  solved  for  𝐴! ! ,  put  it  back  into  the  equation  to  solve  for  AV  
 
𝒈𝒎 𝑹𝑮 𝟏 − 𝟏
𝑨𝑽 = (𝑨𝑽 )′   !
       
(𝒈𝒎 𝑹𝑮𝟏 − 𝑨𝑽
 
𝑚𝐴
25012𝑀Ω − 1 2,999,999
𝐴! = −88.16   𝑉       = −88.16  
𝑚𝐴 3,000,088
250 12𝑀Ω − 88.16
𝑉
 
𝑨𝑽 =   −𝟖𝟖. 𝟏𝟔(𝟎. 𝟗𝟗𝟗𝟕)  

THE  MILLER  EFFECT   3  


 
 

Example  (with  capacitor  across)  


 
• Same  values  but  what  if  a  47nF  capacitor  was  bridged  across  the  input  and  output  instead?  
• 𝑓 = 1𝑘𝐻𝑧  
• 𝑋! = 3386Ω  
 
 
 
47nF    

Rg1  

G   D  
VIN   VOUT  
goss   RD   RLOAD  
50𝜇℧   560Ω     1kΩ    

 
!"
!"# !!!!"#$ !! !!!!!"#.!
!
• 𝐴! = −88.16   !"       = −88.16  
!"# !!!!"#$ !!!.!" !!!.!"!!!"#.!
!
 
• 𝑨𝑽 =   −𝟖𝟖. 𝟏𝟔(𝟎. 𝟗𝟗𝟒𝟔∠𝟓. 𝟖𝟖°)