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PRIMALS 4-6

Pedagogical Retooling in Mathematics, Languages,


and Science for Grades 4-6 Teachers

Session 8.0
Developing a
purpose for reading

Learning Action Cell Session Guide


English 4-6

Prepared by:

ROSE ANN B. PAMINTUAN


Master Teacher I
Pasig City Division Office
Department of Education – National Capital Regio
Objectives of the Session
At the end of the session, teachers should be able to:

1. Identify strategies that can be used for developing a purpose for reading;
2. Identify strategies that are versatile in that they cover all the three main aims
of Pre-Reading;
3. Explain the factors to be considered in structuring the Motivation-Motive
Question Tandem; and
4. Structure a pre-reading lesson plan based on the text they have chosen to
work on.

Key Understanding or Learning Points


1. Categorization could be done either in pre-reading or post-reading (e.g.
semantic map). (Dr. Nemah N. Hermosa)
2. Activating prior knowledge and generating interest in and raising
expectations about the meaning of texts creates an instructional context in
which students will read with purpose and anticipation.
3. Motivation-Motive Question Tandem: a classic questioning technique for
activating schema and developing purpose for reading. (Dr. Nemah N.
Hermosa)
a. The Motivation Question draws on the reader’s experiences. The
Motive Question draws on information in the text.
b. The Motivation Question and the Motive Question are parallel. Both are
on the same topic and are similarly worded.
c. The Motivation Question is asked and answered before reading. The
Motive Question is asked right before reading the text, but is answered
after the reading.
4. Additional Pre-reading Guidelines (Dr. Nemah N. Hermosa)
a. Teachers must read the text ahead of time to determine: 1) the
purpose of the reading lesson, 2) what the students bring to the text,
3) what pre-reading information should be provided, and 4) how and
when to provide pre-reading lessons to accomplish the purpose.
b. Amount of time spent on most pre-reading lessons should be brief and
brevity should be determined in proportion to the amount and duration
of the reading.
c. Pre-reading lessons should stimulate students’ curiosity so that there
is desire to read the text.
d. Pre-reading lessons should not reveal information that students could
acquire simply by reading the text.
e. Pre-reading lessons can focus on words and concepts that students
are not likely to know or able to determine from context and are
needed for understanding the text.
f. Not all pre-reading lessons have to take place before reading. There
is a possibility of stopping along the way during reading to look
forward. Thus, “pre-reading” could take place after a considerable
amount of reading has already been accomplished. This format can
be seen in some strategies like the Directed Reading and Thinking
Activity or DRTA.

2
Materials Needed Approximate Duration

 Session PPT 1.5 hours / 90 minuts


 meta cards
 LAC Session Video
 LINKS Lesson Winnie the Witch,
manila paper, bond paper, Copy
of the Winnie the Witch, The
Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein, A
Story About Ping by Marjorie
Flack, Millions of Cats by Wanda
Gag, How a Shark Finds Its Food,
Mafatu and the Ma’o, The Mixed-
up Chameleon by Eric Carle, The
Mouse at the Seashore, Tides ,
You are Special by Max Lucado
References

Colorin, Colorado. Pre-reading activities for ELLs. Retrieved 2/01/2017 from


www.colorincolorado.org/article/pre-reading- activities-ells

Hermosa, N. (2002). Chapter 4. Reading as comprehension. In The Reading


Process. Los Banos, Laguna: UP Open University.

Professional Learning Board. The importance of pre-reading activities. Retrieved


1/31/2017 from

https://k12teacherstaffdevelopment.com/tlb/the-importance- of-pre- reading-


activities/

Pre-reading Strategies and the Common Core State Standards. Retrieved


1/31/2017 from

www.ride.ri.gov/Portals/0/Uploads/Documents/...Core/Pre-Reading-
PowerPoint.pdf

Study Guides and Strategies. Pre-reading strategies. Retrieved 1/31/2017 from


www.studygs.net/preread.html

“Good day everyone. Welcome once again to the ____ day of our journey of
learning and discovery.”

Introduction

“Our session today is about the third sub-topic in Pre-reading Principles and
Strategies. Let’s begin.”

3
Introduce the session

“Our topic today is Developing a Purpose for Reading.”


Note to the facilitator: Show the Session Objectives slide.

At the end of the session, you should be able to:


1. Identify strategies that can be used for developing a purpose for reading;
2. Identify strategies that are versatile in that they cover all the three main
aims of Pre-Reading;
3. Explain the factors to be considered in structuring the Motivation-Motive
Question Tandem; and
4. Structure a pre-reading lesson plan based on the text they have chosen to
work on.

ACTIVITY (25 minutes)

Brainstorming Procedure: A Teeny-Weeny Lesson Plan (Part III)

1. The participants are divided into groups.


2. Each group is given a copy of the story Winnie the Witch.
3. Have each group construct three questions that draw on the readers’
experiences and three questions that draw on information from the text. (5
minutes)
4. Group presentation of outputs follows. (2 minutes per group)
Materials: bond paper, manila paper

ANALYSIS (15 minutes)

“After the group reporting, let’s reflect on the following questions.”

1. Based on the group outputs, what activities will you use in your own class?
2. What activities will you do differently?

ABSTRACTION (30 minutes)

“Let us watch the short video presentation of Dr. Nemah N. Hermosa and learn
more about how to structure pre-reading activities specifically developing a
purpose for reading. After watching, we will discuss about the following questions:”

Guide Questions

1. What strategies can be used to a) develop the readers’ prior knowledge and
b) develop a purpose for reading?
2. Which of the strategies are versatile in that they cover all the three main
aims of Pre-reading?
3. Most teachers make use of the Motivation-Motive Question Tandem. What
factors must they consider in structuring these questions?

4
Viewing: Developing a Purpose for Reading
Resource Person: Dr. Nemah N. Hermosa, PRIMALS 4-6 National
Training of Trainers

Note to the Facilitator: The Guide Questions will be answered by the participants
after the viewing. The Reflection Questions will be answered after the Guide
Questions.

Reflection Questions

1. Do you do the Developing a Purpose for Reading (DPR) in your ELA class?
If yes, are you doing the same DPR activities over and over? If no, what
other DPR activities are you doing?
2. Which DPR activities do your students enjoy very much? Why do you think
so?
3. Which DPR activities do your students enjoy least? Why do you think so?
4. What will you continue doing or do differently in your APK activities?

APPLICATION (30 minutes)

Small Group Workshop

Materials: Teeny-Weeny Lesson Plan

Procedure:

1. Ask the groups/participants to refer back to the Teeny-Weeny Lesson Plan


they made during the sessions on “Activating Prior Knowledge” and
“Developing Vocabulary and Concepts.”
2. Have them plan a pre-reading activity focusing on Developing a Purpose for
Reading.
3. Let each group present their output.

Closure

“Before we end our SLAC session today, let me share with you a quote
about Reading. This quote is taken from Katherine Patterson who is an award-
winning author of more than 30 books, including 16 novels for children and young
people.”

“It is not enough to simply teach children to read;


we have to give them something worth reading.
Something that will stretch their imaginations
--something that will help them make sense of their own lives
and encourage them to reach out toward people
whose lives are quite different from their own.”
- Katherine Patterson