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THE AYMESTREY MAGAZINE AUTUMN, 1969

OLD AYMESTREY ASSOCIATION


The twenty-sixth Annual General Meeting was held in the Memorial Library at the School on Saturday, 26th
October, 1968.
Present: The President, A. B. Aitken, the Chairman, P. G. Dorrell, and B. W. Massey, A. H. Slade, R. J.
Thomason, J. B. Hughes, J. Eyton Coates, C. G. B. Scovell, W. R. Tomlinson, S. J. Dorrell, A. N. K. Brown,
D. H. Griffith, E. R. Lane, C. W. Massey, A. R. Bomford, M. Hughes, J. C. Smith, D. S. Walker, A. H.
Hartley, R. E. Lane, C. H. Foster, R. H. Collins, W. B. Stallard and Julian Gallimore.
The Chairman, P. G. Dorrell, welcomed members to the meeting and said how good it was to see so many
members present. The notice convening the meeting was read and apologies were received from : E. J.
Gallimore, J. R. E. Coates, K. Aitken, J. W. Massey and R. W. Massey.
The Statement of Accounts was then presented to the meeting. The Secretary pointed out that the Edith
Asterley Memorial Fund now stood at a nil-nil balance and J. B. Hughes told the meeting that the last
balance from the fund had been put towards buying a Copier for the Science Room. Much was discussed
about the Accounts including the fact that Magazine Subscriptions were very low and that the 0.A.A. could
not afford to go on making a loss. Postage was now about £10 per annum and ordinary life subscriptions and
interest on Bank Accounts was the total income of the Association.
The subject of Life Subscriptions was raised and it was generally thought that these were too low. One
proposition put forward was that the subscription should remain at 1 guinea, and that at the age of 25 the
member should be asked to subscribe a further sum. However, a sub-committee was formed, the Chairman,
Vice-Chairman, Headmaster and Honorary Secretary being members, to look into the subject.
The Accounts were adopted on a proposition from C. G. B. Scovell, seconded by W. B. Stallard.
Election of Officers for 1968/69.
Chairman: B. W. Massey. Vice-Chairman: W. B. Stallard. Committee Additions: A. R. Bomford and S. J.
Dorrell. Honorary Auditor: R. H. Collins was re-elected. Honorary Secretary/Treasurer: Julian Gallimore
was re-elected. School Correspondent: D. A. N. Asterley was re-elected in his absence.
A vote of thanks was proposed by C. W. Massey to D. A. N. Asterley and Julian Gallimore.
Under the heading of “ Any Other Business ” a number of subjects were raised. L. B. Hughes and D. H.
Griffith told the members present of expenses soon to befall the School. The sewage disposal system is very
much out of date and the Severn River Board were not happy about the School's sewage falling into the
Teme. The swimming pool was soon to be the subject of a fairly major overhaul. Mr. Griffith appealed to
members that if they knew of a civil engineer who was qualified to help the School in its difficulties to let
him know.
It was brought to the members notice that 1969 was the Jubilee of the School and it was thought some sort of
celebration was called for. It was left to the Headmaster to liaise with D. A. N. Asterley and members of the
Committee as to the best ways of marking the occasion.
It was felt that insufficient warning had been given to members of the Annual General Meeting and those
present agreed that in future such meetings will, as far as possible, be on the fourth Saturday in October. The
Secretary apologized for what was a lapse on his part due to a somewhat busy time at work.

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Finally the meeting closed with a vote of thanks proposed by the Chairman to Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Griffith
and Staff for their hospitality during the afternoon.
The Annual Dinner was at the Georgian Restaurant where 46 Members with their wives and fiancees were
present.
Secretary: C. J. A. Gallimore, Saxon, Eaton Bishop, Hereford.
Changes of address should be sent to the Secretary, or to D. H. Griffith at the School, or to D. A. N. Asterley,
Crown East Cottage, Rushwick, Worcester News for inclusion in the magazine is always welcome.
OLD BOY NEWS J. F. Bowles visited us recently while on holiday in England with his wife. He has retired
from Rhodesian government service and is living in the outskirts of Salisbury.
N. P. D. Green-Price is High Sherriff of Radnorshire and took part in the Investitute of the Prince of Wales.
Canon I. R. A. Leakey with his wife and youngest son stayed a night in June while on furlough from his
missionary work in Burundi.
Commander T. 0. Holgate is on the staff of Durlston Court School in Hampshire. He was again helping to
run the Course at Gilwell Park which was attended by the Aymestrey Patrol Leaders in April.
Major A. V. Claydon, R.A., is now working at the Ministry of Defence after four years in command of a
Guided Missile Battery with the B.A.O.R.
E. R. Lane has a third son, born last October.
A. G. M. Slatter is in the Gilbert Islands for two years as Broadcasting Information Officer.
D. R. McLeod has gone to the United States to take charge of I.C.I's. office in New York.
N. R. Bomford is on the staff of Wellington College.
0. A. Mayfield has a son, born in December. He is working in Lagos, Nigeria.
Of the Barnes family, W.T. has a daughter, C.J. a son, and R.E. a daughter. Christopher has emigrated to
Australia.
Flight Lieutenant P. D. Stokes was married in October. He visited us recently when in the neighbourhood on
an advanced engineering course at Cranwell. He won the R.A.F. Squash Championship for the fifth time, in
the semi-final beating his brother, who is also married, and is with a Hercules Squadron at Fairford and
recently flew round the world.
A. R. Bomford is Assistant Films Officer to the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.
R. N. S. Parry was married in September to Miss E. Agnew. He has left the army and has been in Hong Kong
as Assistant Manager in the travel section of Mackinnon Mackenzie.
Hon. N. C. Helsby is engaged to Miss S. R. Brown. He has had four months in New York on loan' from
Marconi's to C.B.S.
A. G. Duncan was married in September to Miss L. Whatley.
P. D. Coates has left the staff of Berkhamsted and become Director of Music at Oakham.
D. G. Powell was married in Arnhem to Miss J. Bakker. He has now left Holland and is Manager, Cost
Control, of Dunlop's subsidiary company in Bilbao. His brother, C.J., has a son born last September.
R. W. Robbins was married last September to Miss A. Rishworth. He is Manager of the Agricultural
Department of Jackson, Stops and Staff in Cirencester.
We heard from Mr. and Mrs. Taylor at Christmas and Taylor asked to be remembered to all Old Boys.
S. D. S. Grimshaw is working for the National Bank of Australasia in Melbourne.

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P. M. A. Ashwell, after doing a language course for seven months in Germany and Switzerland, is now
studying Social Sciences at Loughborough University. He played for their 2nd XV last season until he was
injured.
A. M. Gosling, after winning a National University Scholarship, one of only nine awarded, is studying
Oriental Languages at Canberra University, obtaining Distinctions in his second year exams.
G. Hughes is at Harvard University with a Kennedy Scholarship.
A. J. Powell, C. J. Dowson and W. A. Banks are all at the Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester.
R. D. C. Maughan is in his second year at Bedford College, London University, studying Sociology.
J. W. G. Perry is a School Prefect at Malvern. He is a sculptor and in charge of the Art Department, an
activity which has led him into even such an improbable event as a reception at the Nepalese Embassy. He
plans to study Architecture at either Bath or Bristol University.
N. A. K. Brown has won an Exhibition in Classics from Malvern to Magdalene College, Cambridge.
W. I. C. Clark goes up to Fitzwilliam, Cambridge, this autumn to read Medicine, having left Epsom with two
A's and a B, and Grades 1 and 2 in special papers in A levels. Shooting with the British Cadets' Team in
Canada last year, he won the Banker's Trophy after a tie and a shoot-off, and the trophy for the highest cadet
aggregate, receiving his awards from the hands of the Governor General. This summer he has been working
on a Kibbutz in Israel.
G. A. R. Green is a School Prefect and Head of his House at Repton, and was in the football XI, of which he
is to be Captain this season.
N. J. Fisher has left Merchant Taylors, where he was a School Prefect, Head of his House, and Captain of
Rugger, Hockey and Athletics.
S. R. D. Coates has passed three A levels at Wellington.
C. F. C. Maughan at Cranleigh was in the Rugger XV, Hockey XI, Tennis VI and Squash V.
M. C. Powell has left Cheltenham, where he was in the 2nd XI for cricket.
I. G. Urquhart got six 'O' levels last year at Tonbridge. He was in the 2nd XI for hockey, the 3rd XV for
rugger, plays the horn in the orchestra, and does a good deal of singing.
S. J. Hickman played once for the 1st XV at Sebright at the age of 15.
A. S. Woodward was in the rugger XV at King's, Worcester, and broke school records for his division in the
100, 440, Triple Jump and Shot.
E. C. Pearce has swum for the school at Repton, and was in his house junior football XI.
W. H. Collins has passed nine 'O' levels at Bromsgrove. He was in the junior colts hockey XI and rugger XV,
scoring all his side's five tries in one match. He was 3rd in his division in the 100, 200 and 400 metres.
G. H. Daniel and S. M. Andrews were in the Shooting VIII at Bromsgrove and E. F. Weaving was their ninth
man at Bisley.
C. Yuvaboon was in the Under 15 XV at Rendcomb, where J. C. Smith was in the Under 14 XV and was top
of his form.
J. L. Aldersey has been swimming for the school at Bromsgrove.
Also at Bromsgrove P. E. M. Ticehurst was in the Yearlings Hockey XI and the C.C.F. Band; and M. J.
Hughes passed his Advanced Safety Award at swimming and was in his house junior cricket XI.
P. W. D. Davies is in the second orchestra, choir and choral society at Malvern, and has been swimming for
his house.
MAJOR C. R. TROTMAN
After 10 years on the staff Major Trotman retired at the end of the Christmas Term 1968 and he and Mrs.
Trotman have gone to live in their cottage in Suffolk at 4 Doric Place, Woodbridge. They made a most
welcome

5
return visit for the 60th anniversary in July this year when they were greeted by the school and many of their
friends amongst the Old Boys.
Trotty'will be remembered here for a long time, not only for his teaching, but for the gaiety with which he
took part in anything and everything that was going on and for the willingness with which he took on any
job, even the dullest, which needed doing.
The joy on his face when the boys presented him with an anchor, for the boat he had built, will be an abiding
memory; we wish him many years of good sailing in the River Deben. May they both have a long and happy
retirement.
OBITUARY
Peter Atherton died in a motor accident on May 19th when returning home from the recording studios of the
B.B.C.
Mr. Atherton, who was the principal trombone in the Midland Light Orchestra, first came to Aymestrey in
October 1966 offering to teach any instrument. By the end of the first term he had a quarter of the school
learning something, mostly instruments he borrowed and brought with him, and at the end of a year over half
the school was learning and many had bought their own instruments. He found music in boys whose parents
felt sure there was little or none and very often, as a result of success in music, a boy's other work improved
markedly. He had no experience of teaching boys but he had a sure touch and his lessons were fun and
exciting. No compulsory practice list was necessary as boys worked because they loved it. In a very short
time most boys would find themselves playing in a group, with a part specially written for them, and here I
think perhaps lay his genius, as we all felt we were working with him, not for him, or ourselves.
He was primarily a composer, though a top class performer on the trombone, and almost all the pieces he
wrote for us either have been or will be published.
For many boys his death has meant a truly personal loss but they feel, as we all do, a deep sense of gratitude
for the privilege of having known him and having been taught and inspired by him.
He leaves a widow and three young children for whom we have opened a fund so that we may send them a
token of our respect.
Mr. James Hutcheon was killed in the same car. He had been the leader of the Midland Light Orchestra and
had been coming here for a short time to teach the violin. He too was a first class musician and was liked and
revered by those of us who knew him.
To the families of both men we extend our deepest sympathy for their loss.

LEAVERS AND NEW BOYS


The following have left
R. Averies. Came January 1966. P. W. D. Davies. Came September 1963. Orchestra. S. C. Blake. Came May
1964. Prefect. Rugger XV. Soccer XI. Choir.
A. G. Powell. Came September 1963. Rugger XV. Soccer XI. Colours for Shooting and Gym.
R. B. Pratt. Came May 1965. Rugger XV. Soccer XI. Choir. J. Pratt. Came May 1967. B. H. Gaskell. Came
September 1963. Orchestra. Choir.
H. P. Lewin. Came September 1963. Prefect. Leader of Greys. Patrol Leader. Rugger XV. Soccer XI. Cricket
XI. Choir.
E. W. D. Tildesley. Came September 1964. Prefect. Orchestra. Choir.
New Boys : September, J. Davies, R. Davies, S. M. Davis, D. MacGregor, A. J. Masters, J. C. Peters, E. C.
J. Rees, R. Veal. May, P. D. Hickman, J. Twinberrow.
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60th ANNIVERSARY
Sports Day was altered slightly this year to include some activities in commemoration of the 60th
anniversary of the foundation of the school by Mr. M. N. Asterley in Malvern in 1909.
It was very good to see such a large number of Old Boys and Parents at the Service.
After Sports, the swimming display and tea a play was presented on the Tennis Court. This was Noah's Ark, a
mediaeval Miracle play with some modern additions : it was well received and much enjoyed by the
audience and the cast.
Mr. Simpson was a most able and unflappable producer and we are very grateful to him and all those who
helped with the many costumes; also to Mr. Oakey for his clever design of an Ark that could be built during
the action of the play.
Fred enjoyed the performance too and distinguished himself by getting on board the Ark at precisely the right
moment without so much as a single rehearsal.
CAST
Angel -- -- -- HARRIS M.
Noah -- -- -- LANE
Mrs. Noah -- -- -- DAVIES D.
Shem -- -- -- NICHOLAS
Ham -- -- -- SCHILIZZI
Japheth -- -- -- WOODWARD
Mrs. Shem -- -- -- KNOX
Mrs. Ham -- -- -- KINGSTON
Mrs. Japheth -- -- -- MEAD
Horse -- -- -- ANDREWS & VEAL
Bear -- -- -- HARDY D.
Dove -- -- -- TILDESLEY J.
Beast -- -- -- MAUGHAN
Properties -- -- -- MAUGHAN
Wardrobe Mistress -- -- Miss MARTIN
Producer -- -- -- A. P. T. SIMPSON

Lastly three short pieces of Tower music for Brass ensemble by the 18th century composer Petzel were
played on the roof, with the audience on the Tennis Court. Mr. Reid kindly came over and conducted
Sarabande, Gigue and Intrade played by Gaskell and Schilizzi (trumpets), Lane and Andrews (French horns),
Tildesley E. (trombone), Harris M. and Hardy D. (tubas).
In the evening there was a very pleasant gathering of Old Boys for dinner at the Giffard Hotel in Worcester.
In the absence of Alan Aitken, who most unfortunately was not well enough to come, the chair was taken by
Eyton Coates.
GIFTS
We are most grateful for the generous contribution to the overhead projector made by Mr. and Mrs. Smith in
1968 and apologise for the omission of their names in last year's magazine.
We are also very grateful for the following gifts to the School :
To R. and J. Pratt for 4 Rucksacks and a token for £10 for Scouts' equipment.
To Mr. and Mrs. Gaskell for a Bursary for a boy to have free music lessons.
To Miss Sheila Martin for a new lamp for the Hall Piano.
To Mr. and Mrs. Tildesley for the offer of a percussion instrument : we are trying to find a suitable one.
To Mr. and Mrs. A. W. H. Blake for a most generous contribution towards some Science Room equipment
which has not yet been chosen.

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PAUL BRINTON MEMORIAL
Mr. and Mrs. T. L. Brinton have arranged for a Prize to be awarded annually in memory of Paul. The award
takes the form of money to be spent on books or other suitable equipment, and it is to be given each year to a
boy who has completed his time at Aymestrey with a good record of citizenship and service and who has
wide outdoor interests.
The Prize for 1968 was awarded to E. F. Weaving. The recipient for 1969 will not be decided till Christmas.
MUSIC This year 17 boys have been learning Brass instruments, 11 the piano and 2 the flute.
We entered for the Worcestershire Schools Festival in March but had several cases of 'flu at the time and so
were not able to play the main piece Mr. Atherton had written for us, a Serenade for brass in 9 parts.
However Harris M. and Hardy D. saved the day and won the large under 18 duet class with a piece for 2
tubas and piano called 'A Hypothesis for two Hippopotamuses,' also specially written for the occasion by Mr.
Atherton. Mr. Harold Rich of the B.B.C. Midland Light Orchestra very kindly came over and supplied a first
rate piano accompaniment. They were highly praised by the adjudicator who marked them at 93% and said
this was exactly the right sort of music for these instruments and that they were well balanced and beautifully
in tine.
This was a most commendable performance particularly as Harris had been in bed only hours before playing.
After the disappointment of not playing the Serenade at Worcester it was entered in the Hereford Festival in
May. Unfortunately there was not a Brass Ensemble Class available so we had to enter in the Open Brass
Band section which caused some embarrassment to the Adjudicator: however he said he was very pleased to
hear us and placed us = 2nd. Mr. Reid's calm, firm and expert conducting had much to do with the fact that
the boys had never played this difficult piece better than on the night.
We are most grateful to Mr. Reid for taking over all the instrumental teaching in the school on top of his
duties with the B.B.C.
In June Mr. Brett, director of music at Malvern College, kindly brought over a group of masters and boys to
play to us. Amongst other things they played some very lively Sea Shanties by Malcolm Arnold written for
wind quintet. The whole performance was much enjoyed and appreciated by the school.
VISIT TO LONDON
We are most grateful to a parent, who wishes to remain anonymous, for giving us tickets for the Royal
Festival Hall. With 12 boys we caught an early train to Paddington on May 17th and attended one of the
Ernest Reid concerts for children. We had splendid seats and very much enjoyed the following programme :
Overture, The Bartered Bride Smetana
On hearing the First Cuckoo in Spring Delius
Violin Concerto in D (finale) Tchaikovsky
Soloist : Iona Brown.
The Birdcatchers Song Mozart
(We all sang this one).
Symphony No. 9 (from the New World) Dvorak
2nd and 4th movements.
The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra was conducted by Bernard Keefe who gave several explanatory talks and
demonstrations and directed everything with great skill and charm.
Afterwards we had a picnic lunch on the south bank and then went on the river from Westminster to the
Tower and back. Our walk from there to the underground took in Whitehall, Downing St., the Horseguards
and Trafalgar Square and we were back at Aymestrey in time for evening prayers.

8
RUGGER
Another poor season, but better than the one before. We were very small, often much, much smaller than our
opponents. This made it hard for our forwards to gain enough possession, but they were also slow of foot and
rather slow of thought. Our more courageous players became battered and tired with the constant tackling of
much heavier men, and we had too many who were not courageous. But we should have twelve of our team
available next year. The scores against us were smaller than last season, and we scored more ourselves; and
we did at least achieve one draw.
The two worst games were against the Elms. On their ground we played moderately for a score of 8-15; but
at home we went down 0-28, which was by far our heaviest defeat and our worst performance. We drew at
home with Winterfold, scoring two tries to a try and a penalty' goal. The return was played as a Colts match
for those available next year, and with the sides more evenly matched for weight we only lost 6-8. Our best
performance was in the first half of the Abberley match away, when we did much that was really good.
Special mention must be made of one try, when the forwards got a good heel from a ruck and Schilizzi,
Maughan, Powell and Nicholas combined splendidly for the latter to score our best try for several seasons.
The halftime score was 6-9, but afterwards the mud and pouring rain exhausted our forwards who hardly got
the ball again at all, and the final score was 9-21.
The senior game improved steadily and we were able to play fourteen a side by the end, which we have not
been able to do for some time, an encouraging fact. Our best players were Woodward, Schilizzi, Lewin and
Kingston; and Tildesley J. and Martineau were two outstanding nine-year-olds.
In the seven-a-side Colour Matches, Blues beat Greens 15-6, and Greens beat Greys 15-0. Blues played the
other two combined, ten a side, and the score was 6-6. Blues won the Kicking Cup easily, Woodward being
the highest individual scorer.
SOCCER
Spring 1969 was a difficult one because the weather and the 'flu bug were most unco-operative with the
result that the soccer season never got properly going at all.
It was not until March 5th that we managed to play our only match in which we were trounced 6 nil by
Winterfold on their ground.
In the end no final side was chosen but it would probably have been selected from Blake, Davies D.,
Kingston, Lane, Lewin, Maughan, Nicholas, Powell, Pratt R., Rosoman M., Schilizzi and Woodward.
CRICKET
Played 7, Won 1, Drawn 1, Lost 5. These are similar figures to last year's and again the most interesting
match was against the Fathers. Drawn games sound dull but this one never was.
Kingston started in devastating form and bowled Mr. Yeoward, who is always a tough nut to crack, and Mr.
MacGregor in his first over. Mr. Maughan was in his usual form and with Major Kingston and then Mr. Lane
put on over 60 runs. Things were looking bad for the boys when Schilizzi, very sensibly brought on
Rosoman who straight away took 2 wickets with consecutive balls but then Mr. Hardy and Mr. Rosoman
began an onslaught which put on another 60 runs; however Hickman, who had been the steadiest bowler by
far, came back and with the help of two run-outs polished off the tail.

9
162 looked a very formidable total but Maughan and Davies D. started sensibly and 27 was on the board
before a wicket fell. Davies D. carried on and batting for a whole hour and for once watching the ball really
attentively finished with the admirable score of 70 including three 6's and ten 4's. One of his 6's was a vast
hit into the trees by the swimming pool and another was brilliantly caught by Mr. Hickman who was judged
to be just over the square leg boundary.
Rosoman M. and Kingston continued to go for the runs but when they were out the score was 143 for 9 with
a bare 10 minutes left so they were ordered to put up the shutters. The last 3 overs were very exciting,
including a maiden from Mr. Lane to his own son, but the boys survived to draw the match.
THE FATHERS
Mr. Yeoward, b Kingston .................................................................................................. 2
Mr. Maughan, st Woodward, b Hickman...........................................................................32
Mr. MacGregor, b Kingston............................................................................................... 0
Major Kingston, b Hickman ............................................................................................ 22
Mr. Lane, b Rosoman M.................................................................................................. 15
Mr. McCulloch, c and b Rosoman M............................................................................... 5
Mr. Hardy, st Woodward, b Hickman ............................................................................. 30
Mr. Rosoman, run out........................................................................................................ 43
Mr. Schilizzi, run out......................................................................................................... 3
*Mr. Tildesley, b Hickman ............................................................................................. 0
Mr. Hickman, not out.......................................................................................................... 2
Extras .............................................................................................................................. 8
Total.............................................................................................................................. 162

AYMESTREY
Maughan, b Mr. McCulloch .................................................................................................15
Davies D., c Maj. Kingston, b .Mr. Hardy.............................................................................70
Nicholas, b Mr. Hardy.......................................................................................................... 6
Woodward, c Mr. MacGregor, b Mr. Hardy............................................................................2
*Schilizzi, b Mr. Lane ... Hickman, run out............................................................................4
Hickman, run out ....................................................................................................................6
Lewin, c Mr. Yeoward, b Mr. Schilizzi....................................................................................0
Rosoman M., c Mr. McCulloch, b Mr. Yeoward....................................................................10
Kingston, c Mr. McCulloch, b Mr. MacGregor........................................................................7
Andrews, not out .....................................................................................................................2
Lane, not out............................................................................................................................0
Extras ....................................................................................................................................22
Total.....................................................................................................................................144 for 9
PENTATHLON
The most noteworthy thing here was that for the first time we had two holders of the White Badge in one
year - Woodward and Maughan. Those who passed the whole of Second Stage were Rosoman M., Knox,
Powell, Blake, Lewin, Davies D., Schilizzi, Tildesley E., Nicholas, Kingston and Tildesley J. The two last
named, being only 10-year-olds, are particularly to be commended, and Blake was only one test short of his
White Badge.
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SHOOTING
The standard this year was atrocious. It is hard to account for this except by saying that no boy really
appeared to try, or to have the ambition to do well, or to believe what he was told. Greys won the cup, and
Andrews was the highest scorer, but no Colours were awarded.
GYM
This was perhaps a little better than last year, though not outstanding, except for Woodward who passed the
‘Expert' standard in 14 out of the 17 tests. Colours were awarded to Woodward and Powell; and others who
did well were Maughan, Pratt R., Hardy S. and Hamer. The competition was won by Blues.
BOXING
Fair progress was made by some boys. Woodward was the best of the seniors with Schilizzi not far behind.
These two were far too good for anyone else, but when boxing together they were much too apt to let the
affair degenerate into a slugging match and neglect defence. Among the juniors Kingston was the best, and
MacGregor after him.
SWIMMING
The start was delayed by bad weather, but once we got going things went well and the over-all standard was
above average. The tests were slightly altered to incorporate the new Scout Swimmer Badge, for which quite
a high standard is demanded, and one or two items in it held up a number of boys. Colours were awarded to
Woodward, Maughan and Lead P., and others who did well were Nicholas, Rosoman M., Lane, Knox,
Yeoward, Jones, Mead, Kingston, Harris N. R., Brandram-Jones, Veal, Hardy S., McCulloch, Peters,
Tildesley J., Lead W., and Rees. Blues won the competition, and the individual cup was won for the second
year by Woodward, who was possibly the best all-round performer the school has had.
A swimming meeting was held with Abberley and the King's School juniors at the bath of the latter.
Woodward won the Free Style, Back Stroke, and Life Saving, and was second in the Diving; his victory in
the Free Style was particularly impressive, but our other competitors were only moderate. Our team was :
Seniors — Woodward, Maughan, Lead P. Juniors — Peters, Lead W., Tildesley P.
The results in the Swimming Sports were :
SENIOR: Free Style 1. Woodward 2. Lead P. 3. Maughan
Breast Stroke 1. Woodward 2. Maughan 3. Lead P.
Back Stroke 1. Woodward 2. Lead P. 3. Lewin
Life Saving 1. Woodward 2. Lead P. 3. Maughan
Underwater 1. Woodward 2. Lead P. 3. Davies D.
Diving 1. Woodward 2. Maughan 3. Lead P.
JUNIOR : Free Style 1. Peters 2. Lead W., Mead
Breast Stroke Lead W., Tildesley J. 3. Mead
Back Stroke 1. Peters 2. Lead W. 3. Kingston
Diving 1. Lead W. 2. Peters 3. Mead
RELAYS : (a) 1. Greys
(b) 1. Blues 2. Greys

11
ATHLETICS
In Standards there was a slight improvement on last year, mainly in the field events, but performances in the
track events was again poor, especially in Hurdles where only four boys passed their Standard. Those who
obtained all their Standards were : Woodward, Kingston, Hamer and Martineau.
In the finals Maughan did best in Div. I, his high jump being particularly good and equalling our second best
performance; and Woodward's hurdling was very good. Kingston did very well all round in Div. III. The cup
was won by Blues, with Greys second; and Colours were awarded to Woodward and Maughan. The results
were :
Division I.
440 yards 1. Woodward 2. Maughan 3. Nicholas 69.2 sec.
100 yards 1. Maughan 2. Woodward 3. Knox 12.8 sec.
Hurdles 1. Woodward 2. Maughan 3. Gaskell 11.4 sec.
High Jump 1. Maughan 2. Woodward 3. Nicholas 4ft. 6½ in.
Long Jump 1 Maughan 2. Woodward 3. Davies 12ft. 10½ in.
Cricket Ball 1. Maughan 2. Woodward 3. Davies 57 yds.

DIVISION II.
220 yards 1. Schilizzi 2. Kingston 3. Hickman 31 sec.
100 yards 1. Hickman, Schilizzi 3. Yeoward 13.6 sec.
High Jump 1. Hickman 2. Rosoman, Schilizzi, Yeoward 4ft. 1 in.
Long Jump 1. Hickman 2. Schilizzi 3. Jones . 12ft. 9 in.
Cricket Ball 1. Hickman 2. Schilizzi 3. Harris 42 yds.

DIVISION III.
100 yards 1. Kingston 2. Martineau 3. Hamer 13.6 sec.
Hurdles 1. Kingston 2. Martineau 3. Hamer --
High Jump 1. Kingston 2. Hamer, Hardy, Martineau 3ft. 7in.
Long Jump 1. Kingston 2. Martineau 3. Hamer, Tildesley 11 ft. 7½ in.
Cricket Ball 1. Kingston, 2. Hardy 3. Tildesley 48 yds.

DIVISION IV.

80 yards 1. Peters 2. Davis S 3. McCulloch 10.8 sec.


High Jump 1. Lead 2. Peters 3. McCulloch 3ft. 3 in.
Long Jump 1. Lead, Peters 3. McCulloch 10ft. 4½ in.
Cricket Ball 1. Masters 2. Lead 3. Peters 32 yds.

Medley Race 1. Blues 2. Greys


Sprint Relay 1. Blues 2. Greys

CAMP
“... Six, five, four, three, two, one ...” But the sequel is not a horrific boil of smoke and flame as another
rocket thunders up into space : it is merely “Oh, I think I'll go in the other way after all," as Kingston makes
his seventeenth unsuccessful attempt to launch himself into the icy waters of Stony Dingle Pool. Count-
downs were a great deal more numerous than lift-offs on that first bathe, and it is strange to remember that
Camp was off to a cold and drizzly start; for after the first two days it became certainly the hottest since
1951, probably our hottest ever.
Mum and Dad, relaxing in the evening with the ice tinkling in their glasses, with supper waiting in the
electric cooker and the fridge, with everything from washing-up machine to milkman at their service, think
what lovely weather Johnny is having for camp. And so it is lovely. But do they realise that Johnny has spent
four or five hours of the day, with the temperature in
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the eighties in the shade (and he is rarely in the shade), toiling up 200 feet to fetch milk and water, or cutting
and carting wood, or digging refuse pits, or cooking over an open fire? And on his ability to do all these
things, and go on doing them, cheerfully and efficiently, with attention to a great many precautions, depend
the happiness and maybe the health and safety of himself and those round him. It is very easy indeed for a
hot camp to be beset by stomach trouble, headaches, food going bad, laziness, quarrels, and grumbling; and
the fact that none of these troubles overtook us reflected the greatest credit on Johnny and his twenty-one
mates. They worked like beavers, were as fit as fleas, and as cheerful as crickets; and if there are any more
zoological similes, no doubt they deserve those too. They put up a very good show indeed.
And, with its drawbacks and dangers firmly dealt with, the weather was indeed gorgeous. You open one eye
at 6 o'clock perhaps : thick, white mist, and the grass and rushes silver with dew. Wake again, or are rudely
woken, at 7: the dew is still there, but the sun is above the woods now and gaining power every minute. Off
go the wood patrol with axes, saws and sacks; off go the diggers with their spades to make a new refuse pit;
and the camp patrol divide, half going up to the Neuadd for water and a chat to the new foal or the kitten,
half to wash up the supper things — and if they are delayed by the bullheads which insist on getting into the
mugs, that is of course not their fault. Lane trails past, eyes still half shut, mouth open and bootlaces
dangling, but doing his job even if only half conscious; then Gaskell, with yellow soul wester protecting
from sunstroke a brain which is meditating some scheme whose originality may not be matched by its
usefulness; then Twinberrow, almost completely hidden by an immense pair of shorts, and with a face that
has continued to get dirty even in sleep. Within ten minutes of the cooks' arrival in the kitchen both fires are
blazing and the billies are on, twenty-five minutes later the horn blows for breakfast, and by 8.30 we are all
basking in the sun, blissfully full of porridge, bacon and eggs, tea and bread-and.' Purest luxury, and no
millionaire could excite our envy at this moment.
We made several innovations this year, two of which we owed to Charles Leakey, who got himself off from
school early after A levels (no doubt a great sacrifice) in order to come and help us out. Using materials from
the farm scrap-heap, he made an oven which produced excellent scones, and we shall hope to have a bigger
one next year to the same design; and he constructed an ingenious and highly successful refrigerator on the
evaporation principle, which safely housed our butter and bacon. We also reorganized the washing up,
putting two large 'sinks on the fires directly cooking was over (unless we forgot), and using detergent for the
first time. This concession to progress was certainly more efficient and probably slightly quicker, but we still
found the old ' grassing' method best for frying pans.
Food stores, meticulously planned by Mrs. Griffith so that everything worked out with complete accuracy,
were splendidly organized at our end by Andrews and Rosoman; we certainly never went short and there was
remarkably little waste, though it was as usual rather difficult to forecast our consumption of bread and milk.
Wood supplies are an unspectacular but essential element, and each patrol in turn managed this department
admirably. Dry weather helped, of course; but it is hard work, especially in heat, and we have probably never
had quite such perfect supplies of every class of fuel with so little fuss, and it enabled us to have meals
always on time and often early.
Only once did we have to eat in the Shelter because of rain, but several meals had to be taken in there
because it was unbearably hot outside. A more welcome outcome of the heat was that, owing to the speed
and efficiency with which jobs were done, we were able to have a good many extra bathes. The two
beginners put their bathes to good use and could swim considerably further by the end of camp. The rest just
sloshed and wallowed.
Mr. Griffith paid his usual visit on our third day, had a three-course lunch, and did not, as far as we know,
have to buy indigestion tablets on his way back. Mrs. Asterley came next day, with our second round of
supplies and Smuggler,

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and fortunately the former did not arrive inside the latter. There were between forty and fifty visitors on
Sunday afternoon, and it was good that they were able to look round this time without getting knee-deep in
mud.
The traditional short hike to Llandegley Rocks was accomplished without anybody getting lost, though two
pairs of blistered feet were parked at Bryn Thomas while the rest completed the course. The long hike was
something of an ordeal in the heat, and the Sahara is hardly more waterless than Radnor Forest in dry
weather. But there was an unexpected bonus of interest, since we found Harley Dingle occupied by a team of
I.C.I. ammunition testers and the boss man most kindly invited us to come and watch for a bit; which we did,
coming to the conclusion that a battle must be rather a noisy business. During the roasting toil up to the
higher levels we saw a family of merlins at short range; and at last we were able to get out into the breeze on
the open hill where we lunched at about 2,000 feet. Five boys then made a detour to the actual summit,
including Twinberrow, who was the only 11-year-old to complete the full course. Then the long but easy trek
down to the blessings of cold spring water, and the final three miles through steaming lanes to the heaven of
tea at the Severn Arms. And so back to camp; and it was typical of the whole week that even after a gruelling
day all the necessary jobs of the evening were well done without a trace of grumble.
On the last morning, breakfast, striking camp, packing and carrying up were accomplished in the record time
of a few minutes over three hours, and back at school the labours of sorting out and putting away and the
final washing up were also done exceptionally well. And that was that.
Cuckoos were the best patrol, mainly because Maughan showed a shade more ability to organize and keep
his lot going as a team. But the rest, between whom was little to choose, ran them close, and any one of them
might have been the best in a less good year. Schilizzi, Woodward and Lewin occasionally slipped a little in
organization but they set a splendid example in personal hard work.
The Troop historian is conscious that this is a dull account, consisting chiefly of boasting; but it is not so
easy to make an exciting story of things which go smoothly, and it is usually the mistakes which are apt to be
funny – afterwards, anyway. If Mead had fallen in the river ten times instead of only once; if Lewin had lost
his head every day instead of his watch; if someone else had burnt himself instead of the S.L. (which was
not, of course, funny at all); if the cooking had been atrocious instead of excellent; if a hundred things had
gone wrong which in fact went right, there would have been more to write about. As it is, one can only say
that this was fully the equal of the best camps in the Troop's history. As could be said of that last piece of
fried bread cooked by Kingston into an imitation of a piece of coal, — well done.

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