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Introduction

The Great Gatsby follows around the man of dreams and goal, Jay Gatsby, is the wonderful
piece of work of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Gatsby orders elite life around on desire to get back with his
lost love Daisy Buchanan. His life leads from poverty to wealth, into the arms of his beloved,
and eventually to death. The Great Gatsby is a classic piece of American fiction. It is a novel of
triumph and tragedy, noted for the remarkable way Fitzgerald captured a cross-section of
American society.
Events of the novel took place 1920s in West Egg, Long Island.

Main characters:
Jey Gatsby, Daisy Buchanan, Tom Buchanan, Myrtle Wilson.
Summary:
Nick caraway, the narrator; start to unfold the story of Jay Gatsby. He remembers his
upbringings and the lessons his family taught him. He was an educated and had sense of moral
justice. The narration takes place many years after the incident happened. The story begins
when Nick move from Midwest to West Egg, Long Island, to make his way as a bond salesman
and to recapture the excitement and adventure he experienced as soldier in WWI. He starts
living in the small house near the mansion which, it turns out, belong to Gatsby.
Daisy Buchanan, Nick's cousin, and her husband, Tom, live across the bay in the fashionable
community of East Egg. Nick goes to visit Daisy, an ephemeral woman with a socialite's
luminescence, and Tom, a brutish, hulking, powerful man made arrogant through generations of
privilege, and there he meets Jordan Baker, the professional golfer and a girlhood friend of
Daisy's. As the foursome lounge around the Buchanan’s estate, they discuss the day's most
pressing matters: the merits of living in the East, what to do on the longest day of the year,
reactionary politics, and other such shallow topics. When Tom takes a phone call, Jordan
informs Nick that Tom's mistress is on the phone. Tom, known for his infidelities, makes no
pretense to cover up his affairs. As Tom and Daisy work to set up Nick and Jordan, they seize
the opportunity to question him about his supposed engagement to a girl back home. Nick
reassures them there is no impending marriage, merely a series of rumors that cannot
substitute for truth.
The next day Tom asks Nick to accompany him to the Yale Club. During the journey there was
change in the course of the events and they leave the train and Tom went to his mechanic,
George Wilson, to ask him about his car but he actually went there to invite mistress, George’s
wife, Myrtle Wilson to get on the next train and meet him in his city apartment. On that evening it
was the first time Nick got drunk and has no idea how he got back to his house.
The next day he got an invitation for one of the Gatsby’s extravagant parties he threw in which
"men and girls came and went like moths among the whisperings and the champagne and the
stars." During the weekend, people flocked to his house for his parties, as well as to use his
pool, his boats, his car, and so on. Nick went and it seems like he was the only one who got an
invitation. Gatsby ask him for a favor to invite Daisy to his house for a tea. He later explained his
relation and his lost love history with Daisy to Nick. Nick agreed.
After their first meet, they start seeing each other and make plans to live together in future.
Daisy want to run away with Gatsby and leave her life. But Gatsby said to leave his husband
and tell him that she never loved him. So they meet with Tom in the city and told him about his
plans. So Daisy told him about what they discussed and that she never loved him. But Tom
starts to make her realize how much he loves her and about the good time they had. Daisy start
crying and Tom start to demoralize Gatsby that he is low life and that he can never be like him
no matter how much money he will make. And at that moment Daisy was drawing further and
further into herself and told Tom that she cannot stand it anymore. Tom tells them that why not
they go home in Mr. Gatsby’s car. On the way back, Daisy was driving the car and when they
cross by the Wilson’s garage Myrtle came out of nowhere. She mistook Gatsby as Tom as Tom
was driving Gatsby’s car. Daisy ran over her. But they did not stop because Gatsby wanted to
protect Daisy. When Tom came back and saw the crowd over there. He was keen to see what
happened here so he found Myrtle was hit by Gatsby’s car. Tom tells Wilson that it was
Gatsby’s car so Wilson replied; maybe he was the one with whom she was fooling around. Tom
plotted the Gatsby as culprit saying “something ought to be done about a fella like that”.
Gatsby met with Nick and told him everything about the incident. Nick could not told him about
what happened back there, all he manage to told him that he should go away because he could
be traced from his car. But Gatsby was sure that Daisy will call in the morning and they will go
away together. The next morning Gatsby was in his lawn waiting for Daisy call but Daisy was
long gone with Tom away from trouble. Wilson showed up at Gatsby’s mansion and killed him
and himself, later on They pinned everything on Gatsby. The affair with Myrtle, the hit and run,
everything, except the one and honorable fact, that nothing of it was true.
Nick tried to contact Daisy but all the means were blocked and he was told that they had gone
away. They were careless people, Tom and Daisy .They smashed up things and people; and
then retreated back into their money and their vast carelessness. He rang, he wrote, he
implored, but not a single one of the sparkling hundred that enjoyed his hospitality attended the
funeral. And from Daisy not even a flower.

SOCIOLOGOLICAL ANALYSIS
GAME THEORY
CONFLICT THEORY
FUNCTIONLISM
LEARNING THEORY
SYMBOLIC INTERACTIONISM
SOCIAL STRATIFICATION
LABELLING THEORY
STRUCTURAL STRAIN
SOCIAL EXCHANGE
CHAOS THEORY
Game Theory:
Game theory is a theory of social interaction, which attempts to explain the interaction people
have with one another.
Elements of a Game:

The players.
1-Jay Gatsby 2- Tom Buchanan

The strategies of each player.


Jay Gatsby: He threw large parties in hopes she would come here someday. He put Jorden to
the task to help and convince Nick to arrange a meeting with Daisy in Nick’s home. Then he
showed his charm and wealthy ways to convince Daisy never loves Tom, it was Gatsby all
along. He convinces to tell that to Tom and his marriage.

Tom Buchanan: while knowing the fact that Daisy was slipping through his hands, Tom made
inquiries about Gatsby. He took them to New York where they had a conversation. He managed
to put a seed in Daisy’s mind that Gatsby was mixed up with the Mafia and he wasn’t an Oxford
man. After the death of Myrtle, he convinced Wilson that it was Gatsby in that car which hits her.
And also Gatsby was the one having affair with her.

The consequences
Tom managed to win Daisy’s heart by making her feel safe. Gatsby was killed by Wilson and
then he shot himself.

Conflict Theory:
Conflict theory emphasizes the role of coercion and power in producing social order. This
perspective is derived from the works of Karl Marx, who saw society as fragmented into groups
that compete for social and economic resources.

Social Stratification: (OLD MONEY -NEW MONEY -NO MONEY)


In The Great Gatsby, there are two types of wealthy people. First, there are people like the
Buchanan’s and Jordan Baker who were born into wealth. Their families have had money for
many generations; hence they are "old money." As portrayed in the novel, the "old money"
people don't have to work (they rarely, if ever, even speak about business arrangements) and
they spend their time amusing themselves with whatever takes their fancy. Daisy, Tom, Jordan,
and the distinct social class they represent are perhaps the story's most elitist group, imposing
distinctions on the other people of wealth (like Gatsby) based not so much on how much money
one has, but where that money came from and when it was acquired. For the "old money"
people, the fact that Gatsby (and countless other people like him in the 1920s) has only just
recently acquired his money is reason enough to dislike him. In their way of thinking, he can't
possibly have the same refinement, sensibility, and taste they have. Not only does he work for a
living, but he comes from a low-class background which, in their opinion, means he cannot
possibly be like them.
People with no money convey a strong message. Nick, although he comes from a family with a
bit of wealth, doesn't have nearly the capital of Gatsby or Tom. In the end, though, he shows
himself to be an honorable and principled man, which is more than Tom exhibits. Myrtle, though,
is another story. Daisy comes from the middle class at best. She is trapped, as are so many
others, in the valley of ashes, and spends her days trying to make it out. In fact, her desire to
move up the social hierarchy leads her to her affair with Tom and she is decidedly pleased with
the arrangement.

Feminist Theory:
Feminist theory is one of the major contemporary sociological theories, which analyzes the
status of women and men in society with the purpose of using that knowledge to better women's
lives.
Many of the men in “The Great Gatsby” had served in WWI, and like their real-life counterparts,
they returned from the war changed. They found the ideas and attitudes waiting for them at
home to be representative of an outmoded way of thinking, and so they rebelled. The women at
home, too, found post-war America to be too constrictive for their tastes. Many women had
entered the workforce when the men went to war and were unwilling to give up the by-products
of their employment — social and economic freedom — when the men returned from the war. In
addition, the Nineteenth Amendment, enacted in 1920, gave women the right to vote, making
their independence even more necessary.