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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map

Hamilton City School District

AP Psychology

Grades 11-12

Curriculum Map
_____________________

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Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities: C Social Studies Skills and Methods: S
Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District
Course Description
AP Psychology - This course is an intensive survey of psychological principles, thought and research
equivalent to a collegiate introduction to psychology course. AP Psychology is designed for the
academically gifted and high-performing students with an interest in the study of the human mind and
behaviors as viewed through a rigorous scientific lens. The course takes a broad view of psychological
subject matter in order to address the many sub-disciplines of psychology. Students who take
Advanced Placement Psychology are required to read selections over the summer as well as to submit
papers/projects over these selections. Students are required to take the AP Exam for this course.

Course Objectives
Students will:

AP Curricular Requirements
CR1 - The course provides instruction in history and approaches.
CR2 - The course provides instruction in research methods.
CR3 - The course provides instruction in the biological bases of behavior.
CR4 - The course provides instruction in sensation and perception.
CR5 - The course provides instruction in states of consciousness.
CR6 - The course provides instruction in learning.
CR7 - The course provides instruction in cognition.
CR8 - The course provides instruction in motivation and emotion.
CR9 - The course provides instruction in developmental psychology.
CR 10 - The course provides instruction in personality.
CR 11 - The course provides instruction in testing and individual differences.
CR 12 - The course provides instruction in abnormal psychology.
CR 13 - The course provides instruction in treatment in psychological disorders.
CR 14 - The course provides instruction in social psychology.

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Ohio Social Studies Benchmarks for Grades 11-12


History People in Societies
A. Explain patterns of historical continuity and change by A. Analyze how issues may be viewed differently by various
challenging arguments of historical inevitability. cultural groups.

B. Use historical interpretations to explain current issues. B. Identify the causes of political, economic and social
oppression and analyze ways individuals, organizations
and countries respond to resulting conflicts.

C. Explain the role of diverse cultural institutions in shaping


American society.

TAN
Geography Economics
A. Explain how the character and meaning of a place reflect a A. Analyze how scarcity of productive resources affects
society's economics, politics, social values, ideology and supply, demand, inflation and economic choices.
culture.
B. Identify factors which inhibit or spur economic growth and
B. Evaluate the consequences of geographic and environmental cause expansions or recessions.
changes resulting from governmental policies and human
modifications to the physical environment. C. Explain how voluntary worldwide trade, specialization and
interdependence among countries affect standards of
C. Use appropriate data sources and geographic tools to analyze living and economic growth.
and evaluate public policies.
D. Analyze the role of fiscal and regulatory policies in a mixed
economy.

E. Explain the use of a budget in making personal economic


Government Citizenship
decisions Rightsforand
and planning the Responsibilities
future.
A.  Evaluate, take and defend positions about issues concerning  A. Evaluate various means for citizens to take action on a 
the alignment of the characteristics of American democracy  particular issue.
with realities in the United States today.
B.  Explain how the exercise of a citizen's rights and 
B.  Explain how the U.S. Constitution has evolved including its  responsibilities helps to strengthen a democracy.
philosophical foundations, amendments and court 
interpretations.

C.  Analyze how citizens participate in the election process in the 
United States.

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Social Studies Skills and Methods


A.  Obtain and evaluate information from public records and other resources related to a public policy issue.

B.  Critique data and information to determine the adequacy of support for conclusions.

C.  Develop a research project that identifies the various perspectives on an issue and explain a resolution of that issue.

D.  Work in groups to analyze an issue and make decisions.

Primary Textbook
Myers, David G. Psychology, 9th edition. New York: Worth Publishers, 2010.

Topic Outline
1. History and Approaches
2. Developmental Psychology
3. Biological Basis of Behavior
4. Sensation and Perception
5. States of Consciousness
6. Personality
7. Social Psychology
8. Learning
9. Cognition / Intelligence
10. Motivation and Emotion
11. Research Methods / Testing & Individual difference
12. Abnormal Psychology
13. Treatment of Psychological Disorders

Quarter 1
(Historical Approaches, Biological Bases of Behavior, Issues of Nature &
History: H People in Societies: P Geography: Ge Economics: E Government: Gv 11/4/10 4
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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Mapning
Hamilton City School District psy
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History: H People in Societies: P Geography: Ge Economics: E Government: Gv tion 11/4/10 5
Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities: C Social Studies Skills and Methods: S s,
and
Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District
Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
1 Introduction 1 August 4 Days
Daily Instructional Act ivies
Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Reading Assessments
Day 1 Introduction to Psychology - History & Breadth of Psychology; Nature vs Nurture pp. 8 – 11
Activity/Discussion: Identifying Specialties in Psychology/ What is and isn’t psychology
Day 2 Psychological perspectives; sub-fields of study pp. 6 – 8
Activity: What do you believe? – perspectives & points of view
Day 3 Practice with perspectives p. 1 – 2
Activity: Personal habit – Why do I do that? The influence of perspectives on explaining behavior
Day 4 History of psychology pp. 1 – 7
Contributors: Wundt, Darwin, Hall, James, Freud, Watson
Day 5 Assessment

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
2 Biological Bases of Behavior 1 September 11 Days
Unit Big Idea Question(s)

Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements


Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
1. Explain why psychologists are concerned with human biology and describe
the erroneous phrenology theory.

2. Explain how viewing each person as a biopsychosocial system helps us


understand human behavior, and discuss why researchers study other
animals in search of clues to human neural process.

3. Describe the parts of a neuron, and explain how its impulses are
generated.

4. Describe how nerve cells communicate.

5. Explain how neurotransmitters affect behavior, and outline the effects of


acetylcholine and the endorphins.

6. Explain how drugs and other chemicals affect neurotransmission, and


describe the contrasting effects of agonists and antagonists.

7. Describe the nervous system’s two major divisions, and identify the three
types of neurons that transmit information through the system.

8. Identify the subdivisions of the peripheral nervous system, and describe


their functions.

9. Contrast the simplicity of the reflex pathways with the complexity of the
neural networks.

10. Describe the nature and functions of the endocrine system and its
interaction with the nervous system.

11. Describe the several techniques for studying the brain.

12. Describe the components of the brainstem, and summarize the functions
of the brainstem, thalamus, and cerebellum.

13. Describe the structures and functions of the limbic system, and explain
how one of these structures controls the pituitary gland.

14. Define cerebral cortex, and explain its importance for the human brain.

15. Identify the four lobes of the cerebral cortex.

16. Summarize some of the findings on the functions of the motor cortex and
the sensory cortex, and discuss the importance of the association areas.

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Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities: C Social Studies Skills and Methods: S
Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
2 Biological Bases of Behavior 1 September 11 Days
Unit Big Idea Question(s)

Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements


Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements

(Continued)

17. Describe the five brain areas that would be involved if you read this
sentence aloud.

18. Discuss the brain’s plasticity following injury or illness.

19. Describe split-brain research, and explain how it helps us understand the
functions of our left and right hemispheres.

20. Discuss the relationships among brain organization, handedness, and


mortality.

21. Define psychoactive drug.

22. Discuss the nature of drug dependence, and identify three common
misconceptions about addiction.

23. Name the main categories of psychoactive drugs, and list three ways
these substances can interfere with neurotransmission in the brain.

24. Discuss the biological, psychological, and social-cultural factors that


contribute to drug use.

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District
Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
2 Biological Bases of Behavior 1 September 11 Days
Daily Instructional Act ivies
Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments
Day 1 Basic Neuroanatomy pp. 47 – 51
Activity: Labeling structure and functions

Day 2 – 3 Neurotransmitters and Their Influence pp. 51 – 54, 296 – 308


Major Concepts: agonistic & antagonistic neurochemicals, synaptic activity, drug activity
Activity : Mouse Party
Day 4 The Nervous System: Structure and functions pp. 56 – 58
Major Concepts: autonomic & somatic nervous systems
Day 5 The Endocrine System and Influence on Behavior pp. 58 – 60
Major Concepts: Pituitary/hormone activity , behavior and cycles
Day 6 – 7 Understanding Brain Structure and Function pp. 62 – 67
Day 8 The cerebral cortex – cortical areas pp. 68 – 75
MC: Evolutionary sophistication, sensory & motor cortex
Day 9 – 10 Hemisphere specialization: Distinguishing activity of left & right hemispheres pp. 75 – 81
Discussion: Jill Bolte’s Stroke of Insight
Day 11 Assessment

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

History: H People in Societies: P Geography: Ge Economics: E Government: Gv 11/4/10 10


Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities: C Social Studies Skills and Methods: S
Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Pacing GuideQuarter Month Time Frame
Unit
3 Number Unit Title
Issues of Nature and Nurture 1 Quarter Month
September Time Frame
6 Days
3 Issues of Nature and Nurture Unit Big Idea Question(s) 1 September 6 Days
Unit Big Idea Question(s)
Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements
Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) Standards
APand AP Course
Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements
Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
1. Give examples of differences and similarities within the human family.
(Continued)
2. Describe the types of questions that interest behavior geneticists.
18. Evaluate the importance of peer influence on development.
3. Define chromosomes, DNA, gene and genome and describe their relationship.
19. Describe the survival benefit of cultural.
4. Explain how identical and fraternal twins differ, and cite the ways that behavior
geneticists use twinsome
20. Describe studies to understand
ways that culture the effects of environment and heredity.
differ.
5. Cite
21.ways that why
Explain behavior geneticists
changes use adoption
in the human studies
gene pool andaccount
cannot the effects of
for culture change
environment and heredity.
over time.
6. Discuss how the
22. Identify relative
some waysstability of our
a primarily temperament
individualist illustrates
culture differs the
frominfluence of collectivist
a primarily
heredity on development.
culture, and compare their effects on personal identity.
7. Discuss heritability’s
23. Describe someapplication to individualsdiffers
ways that child-rearing and groups, and explain
in individualistic what
and we
collectivists
meancultures.
when we say genes are self-regulating.

8. Give
24.an examplesome
Describe of a genetically influenced
ways that humans are trait thatdespite
similar can evoke
theirresponses in others,
cultural differences.
and give another example of an environment that can trigger gene activity.
25. Identify some biological and psychological differences between males and females.
9. Identify the potential promise and perils of molecular genetics research.
26. Summarize the gender gap in aggression.
10. Describe the area of psychology that interests evolutionary psychologists.
27. Describe some gender differences in social power.
11. State the principle of natural selection, and point out some possible effects of natural
selection in the development
28. Discuss of human
gender differences in characteristics.
connectedness, or the ability to “tend and befriend.”
12. Identify some how
29. Explain gender differences
biological sex isindetermined,
sexuality. and describe the role of sex hormones in
biological development and gender differences.
13. Describe evolutionary explanations for gender differences in sexuality.
30. Discuss the importance of environment in the development of gender roles, and
14. Summarize thetheories
describe two criticisms
ofof evolutionary explanations of human behaviors and
gender-typing.
describe the evolutionary psychologists response to those criticisms.
31. Describe the biopsychosocial approach to development.
15. Describe some of the conditions that can affect development before birth.

16. Describe how experience can modify the brain.

17. Explain why we should be careful about attributing children’s successes and failures
to their parents’ influence.

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District
Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
3 Issues of nature and Nurture 1 September 6 Days
Daily Instructional Act ivies
Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments
Day 1 – 2 Issues of Nature and Nurture pp. 133 – 146
MC: Evolutionary Psychology, Behavior Genetics, Evolutionary ideas of sexuality
Video Clip: Helen Fisher on Evolution of Human Sexuality
Day 2 – 3 Twin studies as a naturalistic experiment Audio: “Identical
Discussion: “Identical Strangers” – a case in development, biology and ethics Strangers”
Days 4 Influence of Parents, Peers & Culture pp.149 – 156
MC: individualistic, collectivistic culture
Day 5 The Nature & Nurture of Gender pp. 159 - 165
MC: gender differences
Day 6 Assessment

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
4 Developmental Psychology 1 Sept – October 14 days
Unit Big Idea Question(s)

Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements


Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
P 12A: Analyze how issues 1. State the three main areas of change that developmental psychologists CR 9 – The course provides instruction in
may be viewed differently study, and identify the three main issues in developmental psychology. developmental psychology
by various cultural groups.
2. Describe the union of sperm and egg at conception. CR 15 – The course provides instruction in
empirically supported psychological facts,
S 12B: Critique data and 3. Define zygote, embryo, and fetus, and explain how teratogens can affect research findings, terminology, associated
information to determine the development. phenomena, major figures, perspectives and
adequacy of support for psychological experiments.
conclusions. 4. Describe some attributes of the newborn, and explain how researchers use
habituation to assess the infant sensory and cognitive abilities.

5. Describe some developmental changes in a child’s brain, and explain why


maturation accounts for so many of our similarities.

6. Outline four events in the motor sequence from birth to toddlerhood, and
evaluate the effects of maturation and experience on that sequence.

7. Explain why we have few memories of experiences during our first three
years of life.

8. State Piaget’s understanding of how the mind develops, and discuss the
importance of assimilation and accommodation in this process.

9. Outline Piaget’s four main stages of cognitive development, and comment


on how children’s thinking changes during these four stages.

10. Discuss psychologists’ current views on Piaget’s theory of cognitive


development.

11. Define stranger anxiety.

12. Discuss the effects of nourishment, body contact, and familiarity on infant
social attachment.

13. Contrast secure and insecure attachment, and discuss the roles of parents
in the development of attachment and an infant’s feelings of basic trust.

14. Assess the impact of parental neglect, family disruption, and day care on
attachment patterns and development.

15. Trace the onset and development of children’s self-concept.

16. Describe three parenting styles, and offer three potential explanations for
the link between authoritative parenting and social competence.

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District
Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
4 Developmental Psychology 1 Sept – October 14 days
Unit Big Idea Question(s)
Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments
Day 1 Prenatal Development, Patterns of Development, Environmental factors pp. 173 – 176

Day 2 Infancy / Childhood: Physical Development, Maturation and Learning pp. 177 – 179
Activity: Ordering skill development in infants
Day 3 Infancy / Childhood: Cognitive Development pp. 179 – 188
Major Concepts: assimilation, accommodation, object permanence, egocentrism, conservation
Day 4 Infancy / Childhood: Social Development pp. 188 – 194
Major Concepts: stranger & separation anxiety, attachment styles, parenting styles
Day 5 Infancy / Childhood: Social Development pp. 194 – 196
Major Concepts: parenting styles, Kohlberg Stage 1 Moral Reasoning
Day 6 Assessment: Childhood Development
pp. 196 - 199
Day 7 Adolescence: Physical Development
Major Concepts: Puberty – onset & environment
Day 8 Adolescence: Physical Development
Major Concepts: Body Image, Eating Disorders
pp. 199 – 202
Day 9 Adolescence: Cognitive Development
Major Concepts: Piaget’s formal operations
pp. 202 – 205
Day 10 Adolescence: Social Development
Major Concepts: Erickson’s Identity formation, conformity, Kohlberg Stages 2 & 3
pp. 206 - 212
Day 11 Adulthood: Physical Development
Major Concepts: cultural differences. physical decline, menopause
pp. 212 – 216
Day 12 Adulthood: Cognitive Development
Major Concepts: Crystallized vs. fluid intelligence, Maintaining a healthy brain, Alzheimers
pp. 216 – 222
Day 13 Adulthood: Social Development
Day 14 Assessment : Unit Test

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Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities: C Social Studies Skills and Methods: S
Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
5 Methods 1 October 9 Days
Unit Big Idea Question(s)

Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements


Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
1. Describe hindsight bias, and explain how it can make research findings seem like
mere common sense.

2. Describe how overconfidence contaminates our everyday judgments.

3. Explain how the scientific attitude encourages critical thinking.

4. Describe how psychological theories guide scientific research.

5. identify an advantage and a disadvantage of using case studies to study behavior.

6. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of using surveys to study behavior and
mental processes, and explain the importance of wording effects and random sampling.

7. Identify and advantage and a disadvantage of using naturalistic observation to study


behavior.

8. Describe positive and negative correlations, and explain how correlational measures
can aid the process of prediction.

9. Explain why correlational research fails to provide evidence of cause-effect


relationships.

10. Describe how people form illusory correlations.

11. Explain the human tendency to explain order in random sequences.

12. Explain how experiments help researchers isolate cause and effect.

13. Explain why double-blind procedures and random assignment build confidence in
research findings.

14. Explain the difference between an independent and a dependent variable.

15. Explain the importance of statistical principles, and give examples of their use in
everyday life.

16. Explain how bar graphs can misrepresent data.

17. Describe the three measures of central tendency, and tell which is most affected by
extreme scores.

18. Describe two measures of variation.

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements


Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements

. (Continued)
19. Identify three principles for making generalizations from samples.

20. Explain how psychologists decide whether differences are meaningful.

21. Explain the value of simplified laboratory conditions in discovering general principles
of behavior.

22. Discuss whether psychological research can be generalized across cultures and
genders.

23. Explain why psychologists study animals, and discuss the ethics of experimentation
with both animals and humans.

24. Describe how personal values can influence psychologists’ research and its
application, and discuss psychology’s potential to manipulate people.

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
5 Methods 1 9 Days

Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments


Day 1 Psychological research pp. 15 - 22
MC: hindsight bias, critical thinking, scientific method
Day 2 Non-experimental methods pp. 22 – 25
MC: observation, case study, surveys, wording effect, random sampling
Day 3 Correlational studies pp. 25 – 30
MC: types & strengths of correlation, scatterplots, causation, illusory correlation
Day 4 Experimental Method – Uses and limitations pp. 30 - 33
MC: variables, controls, groupings
Day 5 – 6 Statistics pp. 33 – 38
MC: types of data, measures of central tendency, range, frequency graphs
Practice: Mean, Median, Modes
Activity: Standard deviation and measures of body temperature
Day 7 Statistics
MC: inferential statistics, generalizability of results
Day 8 Ethics in Research pp. 40 – 43
MC: ethics for animal, human research, consent, IRB
Discussion – When does knowing not serve the greater good?
Day 9 Assessment

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Quarter 2
(States of Consciousness, Social Psychology,
Sensation & Perception, Memory)

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Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities: C Social Studies Skills and Methods: S
Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

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Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities: C Social Studies Skills and Methods: S
Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
6 States of Consciousness 2 November 7 Days
Unit Big Idea Question(s)

Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements


Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
.
1. Discuss the history of psychology’s discussion of consciousness, and contrast
conscious and unconscious information processing.

2. Distinguish four types of biological rhythms, and give an example of each.

3. Describe the cycle of our circadian rhythms and identify some events that can
disrupt this biological clock.

4. List the stages of the sleep cycle, and explain how they differ.

5. Explain why sleep patterns and duration vary from person to person.

6. Discuss several risks associated with sleep deprivation.

7. Identify four theories of why we sleep.

8. Identify the major sleep disorders.

9. Describe the most common content of dreams.

10. Compare the major perspectives on why we dream.

11. Define hypnosis, and note some similarities between the behavior of hypnotized
people and that of motivated unhypnotized people.

12. Discuss the characteristics of people who are susceptible to hypnosis, and
evaluate claims that hypnosis can influence people’s memory, will, health and
perception of pain.

13. Give arguments for and against hypnosis as an altered state of consciousness.

14. Describe the near-death experience and the controversy over whether it provides
evidence for a mind-body dualism

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
6 States of Consciousness 2 7 Days
Daily Instructional Act ivies
Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments
Day 1 Circadian Rhythms pp. 91 – 93

Day 2 Stages of Sleep pp. 93 – 96


MC: Different Brain Waves
Day 3 Need for Sleep and Sleep Disorders pp. 97 – 103
MC: Major disorders – symptoms, frequency, and treatment
Day 4 Dream Theory: Psychological vs. Biological pp. 103 – 107
Day 5 Hypnosis pp. 108 – 112
MC: Role Theory, state theory, hidden observer
Day 6 Near Death Experiences pp. 126 – 128
Day 7 Assessment

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
7 Social Psychology 2 10
Unit Big Idea Question(s)

Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements


Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
1. Describe the three main focuses of social psychology.

2. Contrast dispositional and situational attributions, and explain how the fundamental
attribution error can affect our analyses of behavior.

3. Define attitude.

4. Describe the conditions under which attitudes can affect actions.

5. Explain how the foot-in-the-door phenomenon, role-playing, and cognitive


dissonance illustrate the influence of actions on attitudes.

6. Describe the chameleon effect, and give an example of it.

7. Discuss Asch’s experiments on conformity, and distinguish between normative and


informational social influence.

8. Describe Milgram’s experiments on obedience, and outline the conditions in which


obedience was highest.

9. Explain how the conformity and obedience studies can help us understand our
susceptibility to social influence.

10. Describe the conditions in which the presence of others is likely to result in social
facilitation, social loafing, or deindividuation.

11. Discuss how group interaction can facilitate group polarization and groupthink.

12. Identify the characteristics common to minority positions that sway majorities.

13. Identify the three components of prejudice.

14. Contrast overt and subtle forms of prejudice, and give examples.

15. Discuss the social factors that contribute to prejudice.

16. Explain how scapegoating illustrates the emotional component of prejudice.

17. Cite four ways that cognitive processes help create and maintain prejudice.

18. Explain how psychology’s definition of aggression differs from every usage.

19. Describe three levels of biological influences on aggression.

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Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements

(Continued)

20. Outline four psychological triggers of aggression.

21. Discuss the effects of violent video games on social attitudes and behavior.

22. Explain how social traps and mirror-image perception fuel conflicts.

23. Describe the influence of proximity, physical attractiveness, and similarity on


interpersonal attraction.

24. Describe the effect of physical arousal on passionate love, and identify two
predictors of enduring compassionate love.

25. Define altruism, and give an example.

26. Describe the steps in the decision-making process involved in bystander effect.

27. Explain altruistic behavior from the perspective of social exchange theory and social
norms.

28. Discuss effective ways of encouraging peaceful cooperation and reducing social
conflict.

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Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
7 Social Psychology 2 10 Days
Daily Instructional Act ivies
Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments
Day 1 Attributions: Types and Errors pp. 676 – 679
MC: Factors affecting attributions, errors and their effect on behavior
Day 2 Attitudes: Formation and change pp. 676 – 679
MC: foot-in-the-door phenomenon, roles, cognitive dissonance
Day 3 Conformity: Asch & influential factors pp. 680 – 683
MC: Conformity, peer pressure, normative social influence
Demonstration: Asch experiment
Day 4 Obedience: Milgram experiment pp. 683 – 686
MC: obedience to authority, banality of evil, ethics

Day 5 Group influence pp. 687 – 691


MC: Social facilitation, social loafing, deindividuation , group think, polarization
Day 6 Prosocial behavior pp. 712 – 719
MC: altruism, peace, Bystander effect
Analysis: Case of Kitty Genovese
Day 7 Antisocial Behavior pp. 698 – 704
MC: aggression, violence, social learning
Day 8 Prejudice and discrimination pp. 691 – 697
Day 9 Attraction and love pp. 705 – 712
MC: proximity, attractiveness, similarity, complementariness, types of love
Day 10 Assessment

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Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
8 Sensation and Perception 2 November 14 Days
Unit Big Idea Question(s)

Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements


Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
1. Contrast sensation and perception, and explain the difference between bottom-up and
top-down processing.
2. Distinguish between absolute and difference thresholds, and discuss whether we can
sense stimuli below our absolute thresholds and be influenced by them.
3. Describe sensory adaption, and explain how we benefit from being unaware of
unchanging stimuli.
4. Define transduction, and specify the form of energy our visual system converts into the
neural messages our brain can interpret.
5. Describe the major structures of the eye, and explain how they guide an incoming ray of
light toward the eye’s receptor cells.
6. Contrast the two types of receptor cells in the retina, and describe the retina’s reaction
to light.
7. Discuss the different levels of processing of visual information traveling from the eye’s
retina to the brain’s cortex.
8. Define parallel processing, and discuss its role in visual information processing.
9. Explain how the Young-Helmholtz and opponent process theories help us understand
color vision.
10. Explain the importance of color constancy.
11. Describe the pressure waves we experience as sound.
12. Describe the three regions of the ear, and outline the series of events that triggers the
electrical impulses sent to the brain.
13. Contrast place and frequency theories, and explain how they help us to understand
pitch perception.
14. Describe how we pinpoint sounds.
15. Contrasts the two types of hearing loss, and describe some of their causes.
16. Describe how cochlear implants function, and explain why Deaf culture advocates
object to these devices.
17. Describe the sense of touch.
18. State the purpose of pain, and describe the biopsychosocial perspective on pain.
19. Describe the sense of taste, and explain the principle of sensory interaction.
20. Describe the sense of smell, and explain why specific odors so easily trigger
memories.

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AP Curricular
Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives Requirements

(Continued)
21. Distinguish between kinesthetic and the vestibular sense.
22. Describe the interplay between attention and perception.
23. Explain how illusions help us to understand some of the ways we organize stimuli
into meaningful perceptions.
24. Describe Gestalt psychology’s contribution to our understanding of perception.
25. Explain the figure-ground relationship, and identify principles of perceptual grouping
in form perception.
26. Explain the importance of depth perception, and discuss the contribution of visual
cliff research to our understanding of this ability.
27. Describe the two binocular cues for perceiving depth, and explain how they help the
brain to compute distance.
28. Explain how monocular cues differ from binocular cues, and describe several
monocular cues for perceiving depth.
29. State the basic assumption we make in our perceptions of motion, and explain how
these perceptions can be deceiving.
30. Explain the importance of perceptual constancy.
31. Describe the shape and size constancies, and explain how our expectations about
perceived size and distance contribute to some visual illusions.
32. Discuss lightness constancy and its similarity to color constancy.
33. Describe the contribution of restored-vision and sensory deprivation research in our
understanding of the nature-nurture interplay in our perceptions.
34. Explain how the research on distorting goggles increases our understanding of the
adaptability of perception.
35. Define perceptual set, and explain how it influences what we do or do not perceive.
36. Explain why the same stimulus can evoke different perception in different context.
37. Describe the role human factors psychologists play in creating user-friendly
machines and work settings.

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Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
8
Sensation and Perception 2 14 Days
Daily Instructional Act ivies
Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments
Day 1 Differences in Sensation and Perception pp. 229 – 231
MC: Differences in the processes
Activity: Optical illusions – why don’t you see what I see?

Days 2 – 3 Sensory Thresholds and Adaptation pp. 231 – 236


MC: Weber’s Law, threshold differential
Activity: Detecting subliminal messages
Day 4 The Sense of Vision pp. 236 – 243
MC: Anatomy of the Eye
Activity: Location of the Blind spot
Day 5 Color Vision pp. 243 – 245
MC: additive & subtractive color, opponent process theory
Activity: Eye adaptation to low light
Day 6 Attention pp. 87 – 91
MC: inattention blindness
Activity: Video Basketballs and Bear Suits
Day 7 – 8 The Sense of Hearing pp. 245 – 252
MC: Anatomy of the ear, Noise, Deafness
Day 9 The Sense of Touch and Pain, Kinethesis & Vestibular Senses pp. 252 – 258
Discussion: Life Without Pain

Day 10 Taste and Smell: Anatomy of the connection pp. 258 – 263
MC: Differences in taste & smell, concentrations of tastebuds
Days 13 & 14 Assessment

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Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
9 Cognition: Memory 3 9 Days
Unit Big Idea Question(s)

Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements


Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
1. Define memory, and explain how flashbulb memories differ from other memories.

2. Describe Atkinson-Shiffrin’s classic three stage processing model of memory, and


explain how the contemporary model of memory differs.

3. Describe the types of information we encode automatically.

4. Contrast effortful processing with automatic processing, and discuss the next-in-line,
the spacing effect, and the serial position effect.

5. Compare the benefits of visual, acoustic, and semantic encoding in remembering


verbal information, and describe a memory-enhancing strategy related to self-reference
effect.

6. Explain how encoding imagery aids effortful processing, and describe some memory-
enhancing strategies that use visual encoding.

7. Discuss the use of chunking and hierarchies in effortful processing.

8. Contrast two types of sensory memory.

9. Describe the duration and working capacity of short term memory.

10. Describe the duration and working capacity of long term memory.

11. Discuss the synaptic changes that accompany memory formation and storage.

12. Discuss some ways stress hormones can affect memory.

13. Distinguish between implicit and explicit memory, identify the main brain structures
associated with each.

14. Contrast the recall, recognition, and relearning measures of memory.

15. Explain how retrieval cues help us access stored memories, and describe the
process of priming.

16. Cite some ways that context can affect retrieval.

17. Describe the effects of internal states on retrieval.

18. Explain why we should value our ability to forget, and distinguish three general ways
our memory fails us.

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Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements

(Continued)

19. Discuss the role of encoding failure in forgetting.

20. Discuss the concept of storage decay, and describe Ebbinghaus’ forgetting curve.

21. Contrast proactive and retroactive interference and explain how they can cause
retrieval failure.

22. Summarize Freud’s concept of repression, and state whether this view is reflected in
current memory research.

23. Explain how misinformation and imagination can distort our memory of an event.

24. Describe source amnesia’s contribution to false memories.

25. List some differences and similarities between true and false memories.

26. Give arguments supporting and rejecting the position that very young children’s
reports of abuse are reliable.

27. Discuss the controversy over reports of repressed and recovered memories of
childhood abuse,

28. Explain how an understanding of memory can contribute to effective study


techniques.

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Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
9 Cognition: Memory 3 9 Days
Daily Instructional Act ivies
Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments
Day 1 Memory Systems – Atkinson and Schiffin’s model of memory pp. 328 – 329
MC: sensory, short-term, long-term, working memory, capacity & duration of memory

Day 2 Encoding Information pp. 330 – 335


MC: role of attention, encoding modes - visual, auditory, semantic
Day 3 Encoding: Mnemonics pp. 335 – 337
MC: mnemonics, chunking, hierarchies
Activity: Creating mnemonics devices
Day 4 Storage of Memories pp. 337 – 339
MC: context, mood & state of mind in creating memories
Day 5 Biology of Memory pp. 340 – 345
MC: brain areas devoted to memory, neurochemistry, flashbulb memories, implicit/explicit memories
Day 6 Retrieval Cues pp. 345 – 349
MC: priming, mood-congruency, tip-of-tongue phenomenon
Day 7 Theories of Forgetting pp. 349 – 355
MC: interference, decay, retrieval failure
Discussion: Is forgetting healthy?
Day 8 Memory Error pp. 356 – 365
MC: misinformation, imagination, amnesia
Day 9 Assessment

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Quarter 3
(Learning, Thinking & Language,
Intelligence, Motivation & Work, Emotion)

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Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
10 Cognition: Learning 3 January – February 10 Days
Unit Big Idea Question(s)

Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements


Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
1. Define learning, and identify two forms of learning.

2. Define classical conditioning and behaviorism, and describe the basic components of
classical conditioning.

3. Describe the timing requirements for the initial learning of a stimulus-response


relationship.

4. Summarize the processes of extinction, spontaneous recovery, generalization and


discrimination.

5. Discuss the survival value of generalization and discrimination .

6. Discuss the importance of cognitive processes in classical conditioning.

7. Describe some of the ways that biological predispositions can affect learning by
classical condition.

8. Summarize Pavlov’s contribution to our understanding of learning.

9. Describe some uses of classical conditioning to improve human health and well
being.

10. Identify the two major characteristics that distinguish classical conditioning from
operant condition.

11. State Thorndike law of effect, and explain its connection to Skinner’s research on
operant conditioning.

12. Describe the shaping procedure, and explain how it can increase our understanding
of what animals and babies can discriminate.

13. Compare positive and negative reinforcement, and give one example each of a
primary reinforcer, a conditioned reinforcer, an immediate reinforcer, and a delayed
reinforcer.

14. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of continuous and partial (intermittent)
reinforcement schedules, and identify four schedules of partial reinforcement.

15. Discuss the ways negative punishment, positive punishment, and negative
reinforcement differ, and list some drawbacks of punishment as a behavior-control
technique.

16. Explain how latent learning and the effect of external rewards demonstrate that
cognitive processing is an important part of learning.

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Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements

(Continued)

17. Explain how biological predispositions place limits on what can be achieved through
operant conditioning.

18. Describe the controversy over Skinner’s views of human behavior.

19. Describe some ways to apply operant conditioning principles at school, in sports, at
work, and at home.

20. Identify major similarities and differences between classical and operant
conditioning.

21. Describe the process of observational learning, and explain the importance of the
discovery of mirror neurons.

22. Describe Bandura’s findings on what determines whether we will imitate a model.

23. Discuss the impact of prosocial modeling.

24. Explain why correlations cannot prove that watching violent TV causes violent
behavior, and cite some experimental evidence that helps demonstrate the cause-effect
link.

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Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
10 Cognition: Learning 3 January - February 10 Days
Daily Instructional Act ivies
Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments
Day 1 Associative Learning – Principles of Stimulus and Response pp. 291 – 293
MC: Learning, Stimulus, Response
Day 2 Classical Conditioning – Processes pp. 294 – 296
MC: Work of Pavlov & Watson, CS, UCS, CR, UCR
Activity: Identifying components
Day 3 Classical Conditioning – Phenomena pp. 296 - 303
MC: Acquisition, discrimination, generalization, extinction, spontaneous
Discussion: The case of Little Albert
Day 4 Operant Conditioning – Perspectives of B.F. Skinner pp. 304 – 308
MC: Skinner’s box & Shaping, reinforcement, punishment
Activity: Identifying consequences
Days 5 – 6 Schedules of Reinforcement pp. 308 – 311
MC: fixed and variable schedules
Activity: Identifying reinforcement schedules in social activities
Day 7 Evaluating Operant Conditioning pp. 311 – 313
MC: intrinsic & extrinsic motivations as limits on reinforcement
Day 8 Social & Observational Learning – Ideas of Bandura pp. 317 – 323
MC: modeling, aggression, mirror neurons, prosocial & antisocial effects
Day 9 Cognition & Learning: The role of thought in motivation
Activity: seminar – contrasting the role of learning theories in real life
Day 10 Assessment

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Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities: C Social Studies Skills and Methods: S
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Hamilton City School District
Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
11 Cognition : Thinking & Language 3 February 8 Days
Unit Big Idea Question(s)

Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements


Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
1. Define cognition.

2. Describe the roles of categories, hierarchies, definitions, and prototypes in concept


formation.

3. Compare algorithms and heuristics as problem solving strategies, and explain how
insight differs from both of them.

4. Contrast the confirmation bias and fixation, and explain how they can interfere with
effective problem solving.

5. Contrast the representative and availability heuristics, and explain how they can
cause us to underestimate or ignore important information.

6. Describe the drawback and advantages of overconfidence in decision making.

7. Describe how others can use framing to elicit from us the answers they want.

8. Explain how preexisting beliefs can distort our logic.

9. Describe the remedy for the belief perseverance phenomenon.

10. Describe the smart thinker’s reaction to using intuition to solve problems.

11. Describe the basic structural units of a language.

12. Trace the course of language acquisition from the babbling stage though the two-
word stage.

13. Discuss Skinner’s and Chomsky’s contributions to the nature-nurture debate over
how children acquire language, and explain why statistical learning and critical periods
are important concepts in children’s language and learning.

14. Summarize Whorf’s linguistic determinism hypothesis , and comment on its standing
in contemporary psychology.
15. Discuss the value of thinking in images.
16. List five cognitive skills shared by the great apes and humans.
17. Outline the arguments for and against the idea that animals and humans share the
capacity for language.

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Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
11 Cognition: Thinking and Language 3 February 8 Days
Daily Instructional Act ivies
Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments
Day 1 Thinking: Concept Formation and Problem Solving pp. 369 – 373
MC: prototypes, algorithms, heuristics, fixation
Activity: Thinking aloud while problem solving
Day 2 Decision Making pp. 373 – 382
MC: representative & availability heuristics, framing, belief perseverance, belief bias, mental set
Functional fixedness
Day 3 Language Structure and Acquisition pp. 382 – 384
MC: grammar, syntax, components of language
Days 4-5 Theories of Language Development – Chomsky, Skinner & Cognition pp.384 – 395
MC: nativist, cognitive and behaviorist theories
Days 6-7 Animals and Cognition pp. 395 – 401
MC: Communication with animals, relationship between great apes & humans
Video: NOVA
Day 8 Assessment

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Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
12 Intelligence 3 February – March 10 Days
Unit Big Idea Question(s)

Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements


Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements

1. Discuss the difficulty of defining intelligence, and explain what it means to “reify
intelligence.”
2. Present arguments for and against considering intelligence as one general mental
ability.
3. Compare Gardner’s and Sternberg’s theories of intelligence.
4. Describe the four aspects of emotional intelligence, and discuss criticisms of this
concept.
5. Identify the factors associated with creativity, and describe the relationship between
creativity and intelligence.
6. Describe the relationship between intelligence and brain anatomy.
7. Discuss findings on the correlations between perceptual speed, and intelligence.
8. Define intelligence test and discuss the history of intelligence testing.
9. Distinguish between aptitude and achievement tests, and describe modern tests of
mental abilities, such as the WAIS.
10. Discuss the importance of standardizing psychological tests, and describe the
distribution of scores in a normal curve.
11. Explain what it means to say that a test is reliable.
12. Explain what it means to say a test is valid, and describe two types of validity.
13. Describe the stability of intelligence scores over the life span.
14. Discuss the two extreme of the normal distribution of intelligence.
15. Discuss the evidence of the genetic contribution to individual intelligence, and
explain what psychologists mean by the heritability of intelligence.
16. Discuss the evidence for environmental influences on individual intelligence.
17. Describe ethnic similarities and differences in intelligence tests scores, and discuss
some genetic and environmental factors that might explain them.
18. Describe gender differences in abilities.
19. Discuss whether intelligence tests are biased, and describe the stereotype threat
phenomenon.

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Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
12 Intelligence 3 February – March 10 Days
Daily Instructional Act ivies
Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments
Day 1 History of Intelligence Testing pp. 415 – 418
MC: Binet – Paris School Children, Terman & IQ, Post WWII testing
Day 2 Definitions of Intelligence – Spearman, Gardener & Sternberg pp. 405 – 413
MC: General intelligence vs. Multiple intelligences, Emotional intelligence
Day 3 The Biology of Intelligence pp. 413 – 415
MC: Brain size and brain function
Day 4 Genetics, Environment and Intelligence pp. 427 – 430
MC: Heritability, environmental factors, poverty
Day 5 Testing Intelligence pp. 419 – 422
MC: Achievement & aptitude tests, Modern intelligence testing, reliability & validity issues
Day 6 Is Intelligence Stable? pp. 422 – 426
MC: The range of intelligence, fluid & crystallized intelligence
Day 7 Intelligence and Creativity pp. 410 – 412
MC: components of creativity, relationship between intelligence and creativity
Day 8 Ethnicity, Gender and Intelligence pp. 431 – 437
MC: Group differences/similarities in intelligence, sociocultural factors in intelligence, influence on girls
Day 9 Culture, Bias, and Intelligence pp. 437 – 439
MC: stereotype threat (Aronson & Steele), Cultural differences in definition of intelligence
Discussion: Observing Stereotype Threat and Bias in the Real World
Day 10 Assessment

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Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
13 Motivation and Work 3 March 8 Days
Unit Big Idea Question(s)

Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements


Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
1. Define motivation as psychologists use the term today, and name four perspectives
useful for studying motivated behavior.

2. Discuss the similarities and differences between instinct theory and the evolutionary
perspective.

3. Explain how drive-reduction theory views human motivation.

4. Discuss the contribution of arousal theory to the study of motivation.

5. Describe Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.

6. Describe the physiological determinants of hunger.

7. Discuss psychological and cultural influences on hunger.

8. Explain how eating disorder demonstrate the influence of psychological forces on


physiologically motivated behaviors.

9. Describe the human sexual response cycles, and discuss some causes of sexual
disorders.

10. Discuss the impact of hormones on sexual motivation and behavior.

11. Describe the role of external stimuli and fantasies on sexual motivation and
behavior.

12. Discuss some of the forces that influence teen pregnancy and teen attitudes towards
sex.

13. Describe trends in the spread of sexually transmitted infections.

14. Summarize current views on the number of people whose sexual orientation is
homosexual, and discuss the research on environmental and biological influences on
sexual orientation.

15. Discuss the place of values in sex research.

16. Describe the adaptive value of social attachments, and indentify both healthy and
unhealthy consequences of our need to belong.

17. Discuss the importance of flow, and identify the three subfields of industrial-
organizational psychology.

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Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements

. (Continued)
18. Describe how personnel psychologists help organizations with employee selection,
work placement, and performance appraisal.

19. Define achievement motivation, and explain why organizations would employ an I/O
psychologist to help motivate employees and foster employee satisfaction.

20. Describe some effective management techniques.

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Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
13 Motivation and Work 3 March 8 Days

Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments


Day 1 Basic introduction to motivation theory pp. 443 – 447
MC: instinct, drive-reduction theory, homeostasis, optimum arousal

Days 2-3 Hunger as motivation pp. 447 – 464


MC: Biology of Hunger, processes and effects of obesity
Days 4-5 Sexuality as motive & Role of Sexual Orientation pp. 465 – 478
MC: adolescent sexuality, research on sexual orientation
Day 6 Belonging as a Motive pp. 478 – 481
MC: group needs, influence on health
Day 7 Work & Organization as motives pp. 482 – 493
MC: flow, organizational & personnel psychology, leadership style
Day 8 Assessment

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Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
14 Emotion Pacing Guide 3 March 5 Days
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
14
Date(s) Emotion
Lesson/Activities/Readings 3 March
Text Readings 5 Days
Assessments
Day 1 Basic Emotions Standards and AP Course Unit Big Idea Question(s)
Objectives pp. 507 – 509, 514 – 528
and Curricular Requirements
Benchmark MC: Ekman’sGrade
emotional faces,
Level identifying emotions,AP
Indicator(s) cultural
Courseuniversals
Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
Day 2 Emotion Theories Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements pp. 497 – 499
Benchmark
.
Grade Canon-Bard,
MC: James-Lange, Level Indicator(s)
two-factor theoriesAP Course Objectives (Continued) AP Curricular Requirements
Day 3 Emotion as Physiological Response, Cognition & Emotion pp. 500 – 507
1. Identify
19. the three
Summarize components
the findings on theofrelationship
emotions, and contrast
between the James-Lange,
affluence Cannon-
Day 4 Stress and Illness Bard, and two factor theories of emotion. pp. and
513happiness.
– 514, 527 – 549
MC: effects on immune system 20. Describe how adaptation and relative deprivations affect our appraisals of
Day 5 Assessment 2. Describe the role of the automatic system during emotional arousal.
achievement.
3.
21.Discuss the relationship
Summarize between
the ways that we canarousal and
influence performance.
our own levels of happiness.
4. Name three emotions that involve similar physiological arousal.

5. Describe some physiological and brain pattern indicators of specific emotions.

6. Explain how the spillover effect influences our experience of emotions.

7. Distinguish the two alternative pathways that sensory stimuli may travel when
triggering an emotional response.

8. Describe some of the factors that affect our ability to decipher nonverbal cues.

9. Describe some gender differences in perceiving and communicating emotions.

10. Discuss the research on reading and misreading facial and behavioral indicators of
emotion.

11. Discuss the culture-specific and culturally universal aspects of emotional expression,
and explain how emotional expressions could enhance survival.

12. Discuss the facial feedback and behavior feedback phenomena, and give an
example of each.

13. Name several basic emotions, and describe two dimensions psychologists use to
differentiate emotions.

14. State two ways we learn our fears.

15. Discuss some of the biological components of fear.

16. Identify some common triggers and consequences of anger and assess he catharsis
hypothesis.

17. Describe how the feel-good, do-good phenomenon works, and discuss the
importance of research on subjective well-being.

18. Discuss some of the daily and longer-term variations in the duration of emotions.

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
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Hamilton City School District

Quarter 4
(Personality, Abnormality,
Treatment of Psychological Disorders)

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
15 Personality 4 April 7 Days
Standards and AP Course Objectives
Unit Big and Curricular Requirements
Idea Question(s)
Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
Standards and AP Course Objectives and(Continued)
Curricular Requirements
.Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
17. Identify the Big Five personality factors, and discuss some of the strengths of this
1. Define personality.
approach to studying personality.

2. Explain
18. how the
Summarize Freud’s experience in
person-situation private practice
controversy, led to his
and explain its theory of
importance as a
psychoanalysis.
commentary on the trait perspective.

3. Discuss
19. Explain Freud’s view of theare
why psychologists mind as an iceberg,
interested and explainofhow
in the constancy he used this image
the trait
to represent conscious and unconscious regions of the mind.
expressiveness.

4. Describe
20. DescribeFreud’s view of personality
the social-cognitive structure,
perspective, and and discuss
explain how the interactions
reciprocal of the id,
determinism
ego, and superego.
illustrates that perspective.

5. Identify
21. DiscussFreud’s stages
the effects of aofperception
psychosexual development,
of internal andcontrol,
or external describe thedescribe
and effects of
the
fixation
conceptonof behavior.
learned helplessness.

6. Describe
22. the link
Discuss the function of defense
between mechanisms
performance and identify
and optimistic six of them.
or pessimistic attributional
style, and contrast positive psychology with humanistic psychology.
7. Contrast the views of neo-Freudians and psychodynamic theorists with Freud’s
original
23. theory.
Explain why social-cognitive researchers assess behavior in realistic situations.

8. Describe
24. State thetwo project
major testsofused
criticism to assess personality,
the social-cognitive and discuss some criticisms of
perspective.
them.
25. Explain why psychology has generated so much research on the self, and give three
9. Summarize
examples psychology’s
of current researchcurrent
on the assessment
self. of Freud’s theory of psychoanalysis.

10.
26. Summarize Abrahamexplanations
Give two alternative Maslows’ concept
for the of self-actualization,
positive and explain
correlation between low how
self- his
ideas illustrate
esteem the humanistic
and personal problems.perspective.

11. Discuss some


27. Carl Rogers’ person-centered
ways that perspective,
people maintain and explain
their self-esteem underthe importance
conditions of of
unconditional
discrimination positive regard.
or low status.

12. Discuss
28. Explain how humanistic
self-serving psychologists
bias, and contrastassessed
defensivepersonality.
and secure self-esteem.

13. State the major criticisms of the humanistic perspective on personality.

14. Cite the main difference between the trait and psychoanalytic perspectives on
personality.

15. Describe some of the ways psychologists have attempted to compile a lists of basic
personality traits.

16. Explain how psychologists use personality inventories to assess traits, and discuss
the most widely used personality inventory.

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
nit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
15 Personality 4 April 7 Days

Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments


Day 1 Psychoanalytic Perspective pp. 553 – 564
MC: levels of unconscious, psychosexual stages, defense mechanisms
Days 2 – 3 Trait Perspective pp. 567 – 576
MC: Big 5 Theory of Personality, stability
Day 4 Humanistic Perspective pp. 564 – 567
MC: hierarchy of needs, self-actualization, unconditional positive regard, ideal state, client-centered
therapy
Day 5 Social-Cognitive Perspective pp. 576 - 579
MC: reciprocal determinism, locus of control, learned helplessness,
Day 6 Positive psychology pp. 579 – 589
MC: Focuses of positive psychology, positive subjective experience, optimism, hope
Day 7 Assessment

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
Unit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
16 Abnormality 4 April – May 9 Days
Standards and AP Course Objectives
Unit Big and Curricular Requirements
Idea Question(s)
Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives AP Curricular Requirements
Standards and AP Course Objectives and Curricular Requirements
Benchmark
. Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives (Continued) AP Curricular Requirements
18.Identify
1. Outline the
some abnormal
criteria brain chemistry,
for judging functions
whether behavior and structures associated
is psychologically disordered.with
schizophrenia, and discuss the possible link between prenatal viral infections and
schizophrenia.
2. Contrast the with the medical model of psychological disorders with the
biopsychosocial approach to disordered behaviors.
19. Discuss the evidence for a genetic contribution to the development of schizophrenia.
3. Describe the goals and content of the DSM-IV.
20. Describe some psychological factors that may be early warning signs of
schizophrenia
4. Discuss theinpotential
children.dangers and benefits of using diagnostic labels.

21. Contrast
5. Define the three
anxiety clusters
disorders, of explain
and personality
howdisorders, and describe
these conditions the behaviors
differ from normal and
brain activity
feelings associated
of stress, with
tension, or antisocial
uneasiness.personality disorder.

22.Contrast
6. Discuss the symptoms
prevalenceofofgeneralized
psychological disorders,
anxiety andand
disorder summarize the findings on
panic disorder.
the link between poverty and serious psychological disorders.
7. Explain how a phobia differs from the fears we all experience.

8. Describe the symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

9. Describe the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, and discuss survivor


resiliency.

10. Discuss the contributions of the learning and biological perspectives to our
understanding of the development of anxiety disorders.

11. Describe the symptoms of dissociative disorders, and explain why some critics are
skeptical about dissociative identity disorder.

12. Define mood disorders, and contrast major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder.

13. Discuss the facts that an acceptable theory of depression must explain.

14. Summarize the contribution of the biological perspective to the study of depression,
and discuss the ink between suicide and depression.

15. Summarize the contributions of the social-cognitive perspective to the study of


depression, and describe the events in the cycle of depression.

16. Describe the symptoms of schizophrenia, and differentiate delusions and


hallucinations.

17. Distinguish the five subtypes of schizophrenia, and contrast chronic and acute
schizophrenia.

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Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
nit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
16 Abnormal Psychology 4 April – May 9 Days

Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments


Day 1 Distinguishing Abnormal Behavior pp. 593 – 600
MC: normality, roles of culture, DSM-IV-TR
Discussion and Analysis – “What makes someone’s behavior ‘abnormal’? “
Day 2 Anxiety Disorders pp. 601 – 603
MC: panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, phobias
Discussion – Rationality and assessing our phobia
Day 3 Anxiety Disorders pp. 603 – 608
MC: Obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder
Day 4 Mood disorders pp. 611 - 621
MC: depression – symptoms, causes, treatments
bipolar disorder, seasonal affective disorder, post-partum
Day 5 Dissociative Disorder pp. 609 – 611
MC: Amnesia, fugue, dissociative identity disorder
Day 6 Schizophrenia pp. 621 – 628
MC: symptoms & types of schizophrenia
Day 7 Personality Disorders pp. 628 – 30
MC: types, symptoms and causes of personality disorders
Day 8 Disorder Prevalence and Culture pp. 631 – 633
MC: effects of culture on assessing disorder
Day 9 Assessment

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Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
Unit
Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
17 Standards and
Treatments of Psychological AP Course Objectives and Curricular
Disorders 4 Requirements May 8 Days
Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives
Unit Big Idea Question(s) AP Curricular Requirements

. Standards and AP Course Objectives and(Continued)


Curricular Requirements
AP Curricular
16. Describe the three benefits attributed to all psychotherapies.
Benchmark Grade Level Indicator(s) AP Course Objectives Requirements
17. Discuss the role of values and cultural differences in the therapeutic process.
1. Discuss some ways that psychotherapy, biomedical therapy and an eclectic
approach
18. to therapy differ.
Define psychpharmacology, and explain how double-blind studies help researchers
evaluate a drug’s effectiveness.
2. Define psychoanalysis and discuss the aims of this form of therapy.
19. Describe the characteristics of antipsychotic drugs, and discuss their use in treating
3. Describe some of the methods used in psychoanalysis, and list some criticisms
schizophrenia.
of this form of therapy.
20. Describe the characteristics of antianxiety drugs.
4. Contrast psychodynamic therapy and interpersonal therapy with traditional
psychoanalysis.
21. Describe the characteristics of antidepressant drugs, and discuss their use in
treating specific disorders.
5. Identify the basic characteristics of the humanistic therapies, and describe the
specific
22. Describegoals
theand
usetechniques
and effectsofofCarl Rogers’ clientmedications.
mood-stabilizing centered therapy.

6. Describe
23. Explain how the basic
the use assumption of therapy
of electroconvulsive behaviorintherapy
treatingdiffers
severefrom those of and
depression,
traditional
discuss somepsychoanalytic and humanistic
possible alternatives to ECT. therapies.
7. Summarize
24. Define counterconditioning,
the history of the and describe theprocedure
psychosurgical techniques used as
known in exposure
a lobotomy, and
therapies
discuss the and
use aversive conditioning.
of psychosurgery today.
8. Explain
25. State the
themain premise
rationale of therapymental
of preventive based health
on operant conditioning principles,
programs.
and describe the views of proponents and critics of behavior modification.

9. Contrast cognitive therapy and cognitive-behavior therapy, and give some


examples of cognitive therapy for depression.

10. Discuss the rationale and benefits of group therapy, including family therapy.

11. Explain why clients tend to overestimate the effectiveness of psychotherapy.

12. Give some reasons why clinicians tend to overestimate the effectiveness of
psychotherapy, and describe two phenomena that contribute to clients’ and
clinicians’ misperceptions in this area.

13. Describe the importance of outcome studies in judging the effectiveness of


psychotherapies, and discuss some of these findings.

14. Summarize the findings on which psychotherapies are most effective for
specific disorders.

15. Evaluate the effectiveness of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing


(EMDR) and light exposure therapies.
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Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities: C Social Studies Skills and Methods: S
Advanced Placement Psychology - Curriculum Map
Hamilton City School District

Pacing Guide
nit Number Unit Title Quarter Month Time Frame
17 Treatment of Psychological Disorders 4 May 8 Days

Date(s) Lesson/Activities/Readings Text Readings Assessments


Day 1 History of therapies, Psychoanalysis & psychodynamic therapies pp. 637 – 640
MC: psychotherapy, biomedical approach, eclectic approach, free association, transference,
resistance, use of hypnosis
Day 2 Humanistic Therapies pp. 641 – 642
MC: insight therapy, client-centered therapy, unconditional positive regard, genuineness, acceptance,
empathy
Day 3 Behavior Therapies pp. 643 – 646
MC: counter-conditioning, exposure therapies, systematic desensitization, aversive conditioning, using
VR, operant conditioning, token economies
Day 4 Cognitive and Group Therapies pp. 646 – 650
MC: changing thought & behavior, family therapy, AA
Day 5 Biomedical Therapies pp. 660 – 667
MC: drug therapy, neurotransmitter activity, light therapy, brain surgery & lobotomy
Days 6 – 7 Evaluating Effectiveness of Therapy pp. 650 – 659
MC: errors in estimating effectiveness, matching disorder and treatment
Activity: Creating skits for different therapies
Day 8 Assessment

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