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A.

Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

Syllabus
Writing 2 ACE: Introduction to Academic Writing
Winter 2009

Instructor: Alison Bright Enrollment Code: 48645


Email: alison@education.ucsb.edu (preferred) Meeting Times: T R
8:00am-9:50am
Office: South Hall (Graduate Tower) 5432 H Location: Tuesdays: HSSB 1214,
Thursdays:
Office Hours: T and R 10am-11am and by appt. Miramar Lab-Phelps Hall
1526
Messages: 893-2613

Important Dates:
January 9 (Friday)- Last day to drop Writing 2 via Gold
January 27 (Tuesday)- Portfolio One Due
February 17 (Tuesday)- Portfolio Two Due
March 12 (Thursday)- Final Portfolio Due

Texts and Materials


Both texts are available at the UCSB Bookstore in the UCen.
McLeod, Susan, John Jarvis, and Shelly Spear. Writing About the World. Third Edition.
Boston:
Thompson Wadsworth, 2005.
Hacker, Diana. A Writer’s Reference, Sixth Edition. Boston: Bedford, 2007.
Dictionary
Mini-stapler
Two portfolio folders (for Portfolios and Writing Logs and journals entries)
Please bring both books to each class meeting, unless otherwise noted.

Course Website: Our course has its own website through UCSB’s Gaucho Space. In
order to logon to our site, go to https://gauchospace.ucsb.edu/ and click on “Login”
on the upper left-hand side of the screen. You are already a participant in our site, so
just login with your UCSB NetID as a returning user.

Course Description:
Writing 2 is an undergraduate writing course focusing on developing analytical skills,
synthesizing multiple sources, sustaining coherent arguments, and revising for clarity
of style. Reading and writing assignments are drawn from a range of academic
disciplines, including the natural sciences, the social sciences, and the
humanities. More specifically, this course will focus on the theme of “literacy in the
disciplines.” Throughout the quarter we will investigate what it means to be literate
in the specific disciplines and what literacy in that discipline signifies in a larger
cultural context.

Course Objectives:
Upon completion of Writing 2, students will be able to successfully compose college-
level essays in a variety of academic disciplines. Students will demonstrate this
mastery by critically engaging secondary sources in their texts and by integrating
summary, paraphrase, and direct quotations from these sources into their texts.
Students will also be able to obtain these secondary sources through methods of
library research and understand the strategies for the evaluation of these sources,
especially electronic sources. Moreover, students will gain an understanding of the
rules governing and the value of academic honesty and demonstrate this by correctly

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A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

citing secondary sources in their work. In addition, students will understand writing
as a process involving multiple drafts and editing. Students will demonstrate their
ability to edit based on their increasing knowledge of grammar, mechanics, and the
conventions of English usage and demonstrate their knowledge in the variation of
sentence structure, clarity of expression, and paragraph development.

Prerequisites:
To be able eligible to take Writing 2, students must have either passed the University
of California Analytical Writing Placement Exam or have passed Writing 1(or an
approved equivalent.)

Grade Breakdown:
Portfolio 1 20%
Portfolio 2 25%
Portfolio 3 30%
Final Reflection 5%
Participation: Writing Logs, freewrites, reading presentations,
and in-class participation 20%

You must complete all assignments in order to pass the class. The course is broken
up into three thematic units:
Unit 1 = Literacy of the Natural Sciences, Chapter 4 of WATW: “Science and
Technology.”
Unit 2 = Literacy of the Social Sciences, Chapter 2 of WATW: “Government and
Politics.”
Unit 3 = Literacy of the Humanities, Chapter 3 of WATW: “Art and Literacy.”
In addition, we may also read relevant academic articles in specific disciplines as well
as articles and handouts concerned with specific aspects of the writing process.

Portfolios: At the end of each unit you will turn in a portfolio. On the day the first
draft is due, please bring two copies of your first draft. Each portfolio will include:
1) a business letter addressed to me explaining the strengths of the paper, the areas
of your paper in which you would improve if you had more time, and your
assessment on the relevancy of the assignment (use Hacker C5-f for the format), 2) a
table of contents of the portfolio, 3) the peer review sheets for your essay, 4) your
first draft, and 5) your final paper. (Additional requirements will be assigned for each
portfolio.)

Writing Logs and Participation Portfolio: At the end of each class meeting,
please turn in the daily freewriting journal you have completed at the beginning of
the class meeting. These will be returned to you in a timely fashion. The complied
daily freewriting journals are not only how I take roll in this course, the entries also
make up a significant part of your participation grade, which is why I refer to the
complied journal entries as your “Participation Portfolio” (please see the sample
freewrite if you have any questions). Additionally, you will be asked to complete
Writing Logs, which are responses to the readings, on a regular basis. Each assigned
Writing Log is noted in the schedule of assignments (please see the sample Writing
Log if you have any questions). I will not remind you to complete these
assignments. It is your responsibility to turn in a freewrite for each class
meeting and a Writing Log for each assigned log in the syllabus. It is your
responsibility to retain these journals and logs in a folder and to turn this
folder in on the last day of the course.

Final Reflection: Each student will be responsible for a completing an in-depth


reflection on their performance in the course, on the last day of class. The reflection

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will count as five journal entries.

Classroom Polices:
Attendance and Lateness: This class differs significantly from your other first-year
courses. It is largely based on in-class work and cooperative participation.
Therefore, attendance is mandatory. More than one unexcused absence can reduce
your grade by 10%. In-class work for missed days may not be made up. It is your
responsibility to find out what was missed. More than two unexcused absences
may result in a failure of the course. In addition, please make sure that you arrive to
class on time. Arriving to class more than 15 minutes late may result in an
absence for that day. Please notify me in advance if any circumstances will
keep you from meeting your attendance or other requirements

Participation: A significant percentage of your grade is based on your participation


in class. This means that you must not only come to class, but you must come to
class prepared, having completed the reading or writing assignment for that
day. You will often be called upon to share your interpretations of topics covered in
the course, either through writing assignments or classroom discussion. Therefore, it
is vital that you come to class prepared. Active participation also includes creating a
safe space in the classroom, where students listen respectfully to others opinions.
This includes actively responding to your classmates’ work in peer reviews.

Conferences: The best way to give you immediate feedback on your writing is
through one-on-one conferencing. All students are required to have at least two
conferences with me during the quarter so we can monitor your progress in Writing 2
and help you map out your future in the class. An appointment is recommended
any time you wish to see me during office hours.

CLAS Tutoring: Our class is fortunate enough to have our very own CLAS writing
tutor. You will be expected to meet with the tutor at least three times this quarter:
one visit for every portfolio. You will make your appointments directly with the tutor,
but I will keep track of your visits and include them in your class activities grade. Our
tutor is Jamie Fujimoto and her email is jfujimoto@umail.ucsb.edu.

Email: Email is my preferred method of communication. I may respond to your


email from the address: alisonsbrown@yahoo.com. Please provide me with an email
address that you check on a regular basis. Changes in the schedule and syllabus will
be commutated over email.

Cell phones: Please turn off cell phones before entering the classroom as a courtesy
to your fellow students. Note: This policy includes the use of text messaging. Any
student using cell phones in class will be asked to leave the class and marked absent
for the day.

Revision: Students will have the opportunity to revise, only once, one of the final
drafts of the first two papers assigned in the course, in order to improve their overall
grade. Specifics of the revisions, including due dates and influence on original grade,
must be agreed upon between the instructor and student before revision takes place.

Late papers: All papers will be collected on the due date at the beginning of class
on the day they are due. Late papers will not be accepted.

Plagiarism: According to the "Academic Dishonesty" pamphlet circulated by the UC


system, "Plagiarism is academic theft. It refers to the use of another's ideas or words
without proper attribution or credit. An author's work is his/her property and should

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A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

be respected by documentation.” Essentially, plagiarism is the act of taking another


person’s ideas and/or words and passing them off as one’s own. Any act of
plagiarism committed in class will be prosecuted through the university court system
and could result in expulsion. This class will provide you with workable guidelines for
citation in papers. However, if you are still unsure about how to cite someone else’s
words or ideas, please come to me for help.

Resources: If you are a student with a documented disability and would like to
discuss special accommodations please contact me during office hours or by email.
For more information and support please call Disabled Students Program (DSP) 893-
2668. Additional support can be found at Counseling & Career Services at 893-4411.
More importantly, academic support, including writing tutors, is available for all UCSB
students at Campus Learning Assistance Service (CLAS) at 893-3269. I strongly
recommend making appointments at CLAS to review drafts of every essay
you turn in during this course.

A final note: Please feel free to contact me at any time during the quarter if you
have questions about the course, the campus, etc. I am a resource for you, so please
just ask me if you have a question or come see me in my office hours.

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Writing 2: Schedule of Assignments


Date Class topic Before class
Tuesday Introductions; course
1/6/09 description; conference
sign up with instructor;
diagnostic; summary; tour
Thursday Tutor introduction; sign up Read “Chapter 1: Reading and Writing in
1/8/09 for appointment with College” pages 2-13 in WATW, “Chapter 4”
Jamie; continue discussion Introduction pages 402-405, and “The
on summary; Scientist in Society” pages 417-423.
epistemology of the Annotate and write a Writing Log for “The
natural sciences; discuss Scientist in Society.” Write a definition for
readings; work on the word “literacy” in your own words.
summary of natural
setting; create class
discussion contract; sign
up for reading
presentations

Tuesday Due: One page summary Read and annotate “Women Scientists: Are
1/13/09 of natural setting and one They Really Different” pages 423-438 and
page reflection; reading “How Should Chemists Think?” pages 438-
presentations and discuss 451. Write one Writing Log for either
essay assignment article. Read C1 in Hacker pages 3-13.
Thursday Sign up for appointment Read and annotate Einstein’s “Religion
1/15/09 with Jamie; reading and Science” pages 451-455, Russell’s
presentations; discuss “Religion and Science” pages 456-461,
essay planning—C1 in “Science and China’s Influence on the
Hacker World” pages 461-464. Write one Writing
Log on one of the three articles.

Tuesday First draft of Portfolio Read and annotate “Science in Islam”


1/20/09 One due-bring two pages 464-473 and “The Tao of Physics”
copies; sign up for pages 473-477. Write one Writing Log on
appointment with Jamie; either article. Read C2 in Hacker pages 14-
peer review; reading 17.
presentations discuss
drafting—C2 in Hacker
Thursday Self revision; reading Read Chapter 4 “Introduction” pages 15-
1/22/09 presentations; discuss 16, read and annotate “The Republic”
constructing an argument. pages 28-35 and “The Prince” pages 43-
Review MLA in Hacker. 52. Read A2 in Hacker pages 67-76.

Tuesday Portfolio One due; sign Revise first draft and compile portfolio.
1/27/09 up for appointment with
Jamie; discuss readings
and essay assignment
Thursday Brainstorm essay topics; Read and annotate “The Declaration of
1/29/09 discuss critique; reading Independence” pages 53-57 and
presentation “Democracy in America” pages 57-64.
Write one Writing Log on either article.

Tuesday Sign up for appointment Read and annotate “Bourgeois and


2/3/09 with Jamie; Due: 1 and ½ Proletarians” pages 65-76 and “Woman as

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A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

page critique of local Other” pages 195-201. Write one Writing


government site/event; Log on either article.
reading presentation
Thursday Plan drafts; reading Read and annotate “Letter from
2/5/09 presentation; discuss Birmingham Jail” pages 212-227 and “I am
possible government Prepared to Die” pages 227-246. Read A3
agencies/activities for in Hacker pages77-84.
essay focus; discuss
evaluating arguments.

Tuesday First draft of Portfolio Revise first draft and compile portfolio.
2/10/09 Two due-bring two
copies; sign up for
appointment with Jamie;
peer review
Thursday Self revision; reading Read Chapter 3 “Introduction” pages 271-
2/12/09 presentation; work on 274. Read and annotate “What Use is
drafts; review APA in Art?” pages 277-279, “The Cultural
Hacker. Importance of the Arts” pages 279-286
and “Understanding Indian Art” pages 293-
298. Write one Writing Log on either
“Cultural Importance” or “Indian Art.”

Tuesday Portfolio Two due; sign Revise first draft and compile portfolio.
2/17/09 up for appointment with
Jamie; discuss essay topic
Thursday Library Instruction: 9am Read and annotate “Traditional Arts of
2/19/09 Davidson Library 1575 Black Africa” pages 298-301, “Islamic Art:
Calligraphy” pages 301-304, “Introduction
to Poetry” pages 305-306, Heraud’s “Ars
Poetica” pages 310-311, and “Poetry”
pages 311-313. Write one Writing Log on
either “Traditional Arts of Black Africa,”
“Islamic Art: Calligraphy,” or all three
poems.

Tuesday Sign up for appointment Read and annotate “The United Fruit Co.”
2/24/09 with Jamie; brainstorm for pages 313-316, “We Wear the Mask”
drafts; discuss readings pages 316-318, “A Poem about
Intelligence for My Brothers and Sisters”
pages 319-320, “Woman Hanging from the
13th Floor Window” pages 323-325, and
“No Name Woman” pages 336-346.
Thursday Discuss writing about Read A1 in Hacker pages 57-66.
2/26/09 texts

Tuesday
3/3/09
Thursday First draft of Portfolio Read C4 in Hacker 24-36.
3/5/09 Three Due-bring two
copies; peer revision;
work on drafts; perfecting

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paragraphs

Tuesday Sign up for appointment Revise first draft and compile portfolio.
3/10/09 with Jamie; work on drafts
Thursday Final reflection; course Revise first draft and compile portfolio and
3/12/09 evaluation; Portfolio any revisions. Compile Participation
Three Due; Portfolio.
Participation Portfolios
Due

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Resource for daily journals:


FREEWRITING
by Peter Elbow

The most effective way I know to improve your writing is to do freewriting


exercises regularly. At least three times a week. They are sometimes called
"automatic writing," "babbling," or “jabbering" exercises. The idea is simply
to write for ten minutes (later on, perhaps fifteen or twenty). Don't stop for
anything. Go quickly without rushing. Never stop to look back, to cross
something out, to wonder how to spell something, to wonder what word or
thought to use, or to think about what you are doing. If you can't think of a
word or a spelling, just use a squiggle or else write "I can't think what to say, I
can't think what to say" as many times as you want; or repeat the last word
you wrote over and over again; or anything else. The only requirement is
that you never stop.

What happens to a freewriting exercise is important. It must be a piece of


writing which, even if someone else reads it, doesn't send any ripples back to
you. It is like writing something and putting it in a bottle in the sea.
Freewritings help you by providing no feedback at all. When I assign one, I
invite the writer to let me read it, but also tell him to keep it if he prefers.

Here is an example of a fairly coherent exercise (sometimes they are very


incoherent, which is fine):
I think I'll write what's on my mind, but the only thing on my mind right
now is what to write for ten minutes. I've never done this before and I'm
not prepared in any way--the sky is cloudy today, how's that? now I'm
afraid I won't be able to think of what to write when I get to the end of
the sentence--well, here I am at the end of the sentence--here I am
again, again, again, again, at least I'm still writing--Now I ask is there
some reason to be happy that I'm still writing--ah yes! Here comes the
question again--What am I getting out of this? What point is there in it?
It's almost obscene to always ask it but I seem to question everything
that way and I was gonna say something else pertaining to that but I got
so busy writing down the first part that I forgot what I was leading into.
This is kind of fun oh don't stop writing--cars and trucks speeding by
somewhere out the window, pens clittering across peoples' papers. The
sky is still cloudy--is it symbolic that I should be mentioning it? Huh? I
dunno. Maybe I should try colors, blue, red, dirty words--wait a minute--
no can't do that, orange, yellow, arm tired, green pink violet magenta
lavender red brown black green--now I can't think of any more colors--
just about done--relief? maybe.

Freewriting may seem crazy but actually it makes simple sense. Think of the
difference between speaking and writing. Writing has the advantage of
permitting more editing. But that's its downfall too. Almost everyone
interposes a massive and complicated series of editings between the time the
words start to be born into consciousness and when they finally come of the
end of the pencil or typewriter onto the page. This is partly because
schooling makes us obsessed with the "mistakes" we make in writing. Many

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people constantly think about spelling and grammar as they try to write. I
am always thinking about the awkwardness, wordiness, and general
mushiness of my natural verbal product as I try to write down words.

But it's not just "mistakes" or "bad writing" we edit as we write. We also edit
unacceptable thoughts and feelings, as we do in speaking. In writing there is
more time to do it so the editing is heavier: when speaking, there's someone
right there waiting for a reply and he'll get bored or think we're crazy if we
don't come out with something. Most of the time in speaking, we settle for
the catch-as-catch-can way in which the words tumble out. In writing,
however, there's a chance to try to get them right. But the opportunity to get
them right is a terrible burden: you can work for two hours trying to get a
paragraph "right" and discover it's not right at all. And then give up. Editing,
in itself, is not the problem.

Editing is usually necessary if we want to end up with something satisfactory.


The problem is that editing goes on at the same time as producing. . . .

The main thing about freewriting is that it is nonediting. It is an exercise in


bringing together the process of producing words and putting them down on
the page. Practiced regularly, it undoes the ingrained habit of editing at the
same time you are trying to produce. It will make writing less blocked
because words will come more easily. . . .

Next time you write, notice how often you stop yourself from writing down
something you were going to write down. Or else cross it out after it's been
written. "Naturally," you say, "it wasn't any good." But think for a moment
about the occasions when you spoke well. Seldom was it because you first
got the beginning right. Usually it was a matter of a halting or even a garbled
beginning, but you kept going and your speech finally became coherent and
even powerful. There is a lesson here for writing: trying to get the beginning
just right is a formula for failure--and probably a secret tactic to make
yourself give up writing. Make some words, whatever they are, and then
grab hold of that line and reel in as hard as you can. Afterwards you can
throw away lousy beginnings and make new ones. This is the quickest way to
get into good writing.

The habit of compulsive, premature editing doesn't just make writing hard. It
also makes writing dead. Your voice is damped out by all the interruptions,
changes, and hesitations between the consciousness and the page. In your
natural way of producing words there is a sound, a texture, a rhythm--a
voice--which is the main source of power in your writing. I don't know how it
works, but this voice is the force that will make a reader listen to you. Maybe
you don't like your voice; maybe people have made fun of it. But it's the only
voice you've got. It's your only source of power. You better get back into it,
no matter what you think of it. If you keep writing in it, it may change into
something you like better. But if you abandon it, you'll likely never have a
voice and never be heard.

Taken from Writing Without Teachers. New York: Oxford UP, 1973, 1-7.

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A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

Resource for Writing Logs:


Writing Logs

Writing Logs are a required long-term part of the learning in this class. You
will be asked to complete a Writing Log for specific readings from WATW, as
outlined in our course schedule. Essentially, Writing Logs are a reflective
response to the readings. These responses can be hand-written (if it is
legible) or typed (preferably the latter) and should be at least a page.
Writing Logs can be complied in the same portfolio folder in which you write
your journal entries. Be sure to bring logs to each class meeting for larger
discussion.

Include:
You may include comments on what is of particular interest to you, how the
article has (or has not) enhanced your understanding of the topic you’ve
read, what the author discusses and whether you agree or disagree, what
you found troubling, confusing or enlightening. The focus of your response is
not as important as showing how you engaged with the reading.

Format:
Each log can either be hand-written or typed and should be at least a page in
length for each night’s assignments. Please include an appropriate heading
and includes the title of the article(s) and the author(s) in a prominent
location (note: please use discipline appropriate formatting for the publishing
information).

Jessie Munoz
March 2, 2009
WRIT 2
Bright

Katz, N. (1999). The end of the road: Technology for


tomorrow.
New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Katz’s essay is his personal story of frustration as an engineer


for a major
automaker. He writes of the difficulty in keeping up with all the new
“gadgets”
in cars, stating “just when we think we’re on top of the latest
navigation system,
we install it only to find that it is obsolete within two years of the car’s
sale.” I
can understand how Katz feels when he describes his frustration. Last
summer,

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A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

I worked for a computer repair shop and used my lunch breaks to


rebuild my
hard drive. It seemed like just when I had given my computer all the
latest in power, memory and upgrades, I’d find something new to add
within six months. I felt like I had wasted all those lunch breaks.
Another point Katz makes is that technology can never really
be caught up with;
our knowledge is always moving forward. I think….

Figure 1
Sample of student writing log

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Resource for: Reading Presentations

Context
In order to become more familiar with the assigned readings as well as the
act of presenting, we will be sharing in-class, group reading presentations on
readings from the WATW text. This activity will begin to prepare you for
leading classroom discussions, which you will be asked to do many times in
your undergraduate (and graduate) career.

Task
In groups of two, please sign up to present on a collection of assigned
readings (see below). On the day the readings are assigned to the class,
your group will lead the class discussion. Your assignment is to become an
“expert reader” of this text and present it to the rest of the class.

In your group:
• Sign up for a selection of readings with the instructor
• Read the articles several times, in order to become an expert on the
readings
• Present all relevant information from the texts in a 15 minute
presentation, including:
o A summary and an analysis of each reading
o Relevant quotes to illuminate your group’s points
o Stimulating discussion questions (at least 2)
• Optional, but not required: construct a visually appealing handout to
share to the rest of the class (and bring at least 18 copies of the
handout)

Your groups will be assessed in the following areas:


• Quality of the summary and analysis of each reading
• Apparent level of group expertise regarding the readings
• Appropriate presentation style and ability to maintain interest in class
for 10-15 minutes

Purpose
The goal of this assignment is to gain familiarity with presenting in front of
the class, as well as to continue highlighting the distinction between
summary and analysis. Additionally, reading presentations are a great way
to generate ideas for your essays.

Presentation dates (please sign up with instructor for your group’s date):
Date Readings Students
1/13/09 “Women Scientists: Are
They Really Different”
pages 423-438 and “How
Should Chemists Think?”
pages 438-451
1/15/09 Einstein’s “Religion and
Science” pages 451-455,
Russell’s “Religion and

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A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

Science” pages 456-461,


“Science and China’s
Influence on the World”
pages 461-464.
1/20/09 “Science in Islam” pages
464-473 and “The Tao of
Physics” pages 473-477
1/22/09 Chapter 4 “Introduction”
pages 15-16, “The
Republic” pages 28-35 and
“The Prince” pages 43-52.

1/29/09 “The Declaration of


Independence” pages 53-
57 and “Democracy in
America” pages 57-64
2/3/09 “Bourgeois and
Proletarians” pages 65-76
and “Woman as Other”
pages 195-201
2/5/09 “Letter from Birmingham
Jail” pages 212-227 and “I
am Prepared to Die” pages
227-246
2/12/09 Chapter 3 “Introduction”
pages 271-274, “What Use
is Art?” pages 277-279,
“The Cultural Importance
of the Arts” pages 279-286
and “Understanding Indian
Art” pages 293-298
2/19/09 “Traditional Arts of Black
Africa” pages 298-301,
“Islamic Art: Calligraphy”
pages 301-304,
“Introduction to Poetry”
pages 305-306, Heraud’s
“Ars Poetica” pages 310-
311, and “Poetry” pages
311-313

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A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

Assignments
Unit One Literacy of the Natural Sciences:
Portfolio Checklist and Grading Rubric

Context: One of the major goals of this course it to develop an


understanding of the role literacy plays within different academic
disciplines. To this end, we have examined not only what it means to
be literate in the natural sciences, but also the implications this type of
literacy has in a larger socio-cultural context.

Task: In order to continue this discussion regarding the socio-cultural


implications of literacy in the natural sciences, I would like you develop
an essay in which you discuss what you think it means to be literate in
the natural sciences (in contemporary society) and what you think this
literacy says/means in a larger socio-cultural context. Essentially, I am
asking you to develop your own argument regarding this topic: what do
you think it means to be literate in the natural sciences? In a 4-5 page
(double-spaced) essay, please develop your argument and attempt to
persuade your specific audience to adopt/believe your argument using
specific evidence from at least two articles from the WATW text.

Audience: High school students from your high school who have not
thought about what it means to be literate in the natural
sciences, and who could benefit from the discussion about
the socio-cultural implications of this type of literacy before
they go to college.
Format: Papers should be composed in a traditional font (Times,
Times New Roman), in 12-point font, contain a traditional
MLA header and citation style, and contain the standard
Word margins. Please proofread your document before
turning it in.

A successful essay will include:


• 4-5 pages of a thoughtful argument
• Attention to the needs of the audience
• Support for your argument with:
o Quotes and examples from at least 2 other readings in the
text
• A convincing and analytic argument that shares new knowledge
with the audience and persuades the readers to adopt your point
of view
• The requirements outlined in the rubric

Additional ideas: In order to support your argument, you may


consider (but are not required to) including up to paragraph summary

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A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

of your observation of a natural setting or up to paragraph summary of


an article from a scientific journal on a similar topic covered in your
observation (perhaps to show what literacy in the natural sciences may
“sound like”).

Purpose: In your undergraduate general education, you will take


courses in the natural sciences. And although professors might not
necessarily expect you to be literate in the natural sciences to the
same extent s/he is, the professor will expect you to be familiar with
the kind of reading, writing, and thinking that occurs in the natural
sciences. More importantly, your professor will expect that you will
have a growing understanding of the social implications of possessing
literacy in the natural sciences as a college student and future
graduate of UCSB.
First draft due: 1/20 Portfolio One due: 1/27

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A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

Name: _______________________________________ Essay Number:


______________________

Please list your goals for this essay:


1.

2.

3.

Portfolio Checklist: Please place a checkmark before each item. Please place all
portfolio items into a folder with your name on the front. Be sure to include this
sheet.
____Business Letter ____Table of Contents ____Pre-Essay Assignment
____Rubric
____Peer Review Sheet ____First Draft ____Final Draft
____Blue card

Grading Rubric* Score


Introduction and Thesis: effectively introduces topics (Score x 3)
discussed and places it within the wider context of science
literacy; moves from the general issue to the specific
argument the author is making; the thesis is specific and
presents the argument the author will make regarding their /
interpretation of the implications of being literate in the 15
natural sciences
Argument: clearly identifies the author’s position regarding (Score x 5)
the social implications of possessing a science literacy; /25
develops argument with evidence from at least two articles
from the text; shows complex and sophisticated thinking
about issues raised in class discussions; develops throughout
the course of the essay
Use of Evidence: uses at least two sources from WATW to (Score x 3)
support the author’s argument; shows ability to make
generalizations from specific examples; uses evidence to /
support argument without losing focus on the argument 15
Integration of Sources and Citation: inserts source (Score x 2)
material in appropriate and interesting ways; correctly uses
summary; demonstrates an ability to integrate sources using
signal phrases correctly cites sources using MLA format for in- /
text citations and a works cited page 10
Topic Sentences and Paragraph Organization: each (Score x 2)
paragraph has a clear topic sentence that expresses the main
idea; each paragraph expresses one main idea and offers /
supporting evidence; paragraphs build logically upon the next 10
Sentence and Paragraph Flow: uses language with control, (Score x 3)
elegance, and imagination to suit the essay’s purpose;
sentences with in each paragraph flow logically; the syntax
within sentences is clear; paragraphs flow logically without
leaps /15
Conclusion: the supported argument is summarized (Score x 1)
sufficiently and effectively in the conclusion; conclusion
leaves the reader with a memorable impression of what the

Subject to change: students are responsible for all modifications


16
A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

writer is trying to persuade /5


Grammar and Punctuation: uses forms of grammar, (Score x 1)
punctuation, spelling, and syntax that are appropriate for
standard written English; demonstrates careful attention to
proofreading /5

Total: _________/100

*5 = Advanced: strong control and skill in this area; many strengths are present; 4
= Proficient: effective control and skill; strengths outweigh weaknesses; 3 =
Developing equal number of strengths and weaknesses in this area; 2/1 = Needs
Improvement: not yet showing control or skill in this area
Total Unit One Portfolio Grade_____/120 Portfolio in Context of
Final Grade ____/20

Subject to change: students are responsible for all modifications


17
A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

Unit Two Literacy of the Social Sciences:


Portfolio Assignment and Grading Rubric

Context: One of the major goals of this course it to develop an


understanding of the role literacy plays within different academic disciplines.
To develop our literacy in the social sciences, particularly in political science,
we have focused on looking critically at the structure, function, and
ramifications of governments and government agencies. By developing a
better understanding of these governmental bodies, we will be able to ensure
that these bodies are achieving their established goals and to become more
critical and informed consumers of these agencies.

Task: In order to continue this critical analysis I would like you to develop a
critique of a government agency, using your primary research as the
foundation of your critique. When analyzing a government agency or site,
focus on the connection between the stated goals of the agency or site, and
the actual results. Evaluate whether the agency or site is effective and/or
successful. Then, analyze what the efficacy of this agency represents in the
context of our current government. In a 5-6 page (double-spaced) essay,
please develop your argument and attempt to persuade your specific
audience to adopt/believe your argument using specific evidence from at
least two articles from the WATW text, the mission statement of your agency,
one primary source, and any other relevant secondary sources.

Audience: Family members who may be familiar with the government


agency/site, but who have never considered its efficacy and
would benefit from your analysis of the effectiveness of the
agency/site. Ask them to evaluate the efficacy of this
government agency/site and encourage them to reflect on the
social implications of this reflection.

Format: Papers should be composed in a traditional font (Times, Times


New Roman), in 12-point font, contain a traditional APA header
and citation style, and contain the standard Word margins.
Please proofread your document before turning it in.

A successful essay will include:


• 5-6 pages of a thoughtful argument
• Attention to the needs of the audience
• Support for your critique with:
o A mission statement (or similar) of your agency
o Quotes and examples from one primary source
o Quotes and examples from at least 2 other readings in the text
• A convincing and analytic critique of the agency, with special attention
paid to the relevant of the efficacy of your agency in our current
government
• Your research instrument
• The requirements outlined in the rubric

Subject to change: students are responsible for all modifications


18
A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

Purpose: In your undergraduate general education, you will take courses in


the social sciences. And like other discipline we will cover in this class, the
social science professors might not necessarily expect you to be literate in
the social sciences to the same extent s/he is, the professor will expect you
to be familiar with the kind of reading, writing, and thinking that occurs in the
social sciences. More importantly, your professor will expect that you will
have a critical viewpoint of the aspects of the government that you interact
with on a regular basis.
First draft due: 2/10 Portfolio One due: 2/17

Subject to change: students are responsible for all modifications


19
A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

Name: _______________________________________ Essay Number:


______________________

Please list your goals for this essay:


1.

2.

3.

Portfolio Checklist: Please place a checkmark before each item. Please place all
portfolio items into a folder with your name on the front. Be sure to include this
sheet.
____Business Letter ____Table of Contents ____Pre-Essay Assignment
____Rubric
____Peer Review Sheet ____First Draft ____Final Draft
____Blue card

Grading Rubric* Score


Introduction and Thesis: effectively introduces topics (Score x 3)
discussed and places it within the wider context of social
science literacy; moves from the general issue to the specific
critique of agency; the thesis is specific and presents the
critique the author will make regarding the relevancy of /
examining the efficacy of governmental agencies in the 15
current government
Argument: clearly identifies the author’s position regarding (Score x 5)
the efficacy of his/her agency; develops critique with evidence
from at least two articles from the text and a primary source;
shows complex and sophisticated thinking about issues raised /
in class discussions; develops throughout the course of the 25
essay
Use of Evidence: effectively utilizes the primary source; (Score x 3)
uses at least two sources from WATW to support the author’s
critique; shows ability to make generalizations from specific
examples; uses evidence to support argument without losing /
focus on the argument 15
Integration of Sources and Citation: inserts source (Score x 2)
material in appropriate and interesting ways; correctly uses
sources in critique; demonstrates an ability to integrate
sources using signal phrases correctly cites sources using APA /
format for in-text citations and a references page 10
Topic Sentences and Paragraph Organization: each (Score x 2)
paragraph has a clear topic sentence that expresses the main
idea; each paragraph expresses one main idea and offers /
supporting evidence; paragraphs build logically upon the next 10
Sentence and Paragraph Flow: uses language with control, (Score x 3)
elegance, and imagination to suit the essay’s purpose;
sentences with in each paragraph flow logically; the syntax
within sentences is clear; paragraphs flow logically without
leaps /15
Conclusion: the supported argument is summarized (Score x 1)
sufficiently and effectively in the conclusion; conclusion

Subject to change: students are responsible for all modifications


20
A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

leaves the reader with a memorable impression of what the


writer is trying to persuade /5
Grammar and Punctuation: uses forms of grammar, (Score x 1)
punctuation, spelling, and syntax that are appropriate for
standard written English; demonstrates careful attention to
proofreading /5

Total: _________/100

*5 = Advanced: strong control and skill in this area; many strengths are present; 4
= Proficient: effective control and skill; strengths outweigh weaknesses; 3 =
Developing equal number of strengths and weaknesses in this area; 2/1 = Needs
Improvement: not yet showing control or skill in this area
Total Unit Two Portfolio Grade_____/120 Portfolio in Context of Final Grade ____/20

Subject to change: students are responsible for all modifications


21
A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

Unit Three Literacy of the Humanities:


Portfolio Assignment and Grading Rubric

Context: One of the major goals of this course it to develop an


understanding of the role literacy plays within different academic disciplines.
To develop our literacy in the humanities, we will be looking analytically at
the history, content, and socio-cultural implications of an artistic genre of
which we are fans, participants, or critics. By developing a more analytical
understanding of this artistic genre, we will have a stronger understanding of
its history, influences, and socio-cultural significance.

Task: In order to develop this argument, I would like you to develop a genre
highlighted in your Pre-Essay Assignment into a critical synthesis, using the
techniques we have discussed in class. When synthesizing the
implications/effects an artistic genre, focus on the synthesis between your
interest/participation in the genre and the theories of at least two (2)
secondary scholarly texts of the same genre. Do the ideas/opinions of the
scholarly critics coincide with your own? Why or why not? What does your
interest/participation in this genre signify to a larger audience? What are
some of the implications of your literacy in this genre? In a 6-7 page (double-
spaced) essay, please develop your synthesis and attempt to convince your
specific audience of your argument using specific evidence from at least two
articles from the WATW text, two scholarly texts, and your own opinions and
experiences.

Audience: Other fans/participants of this artistic genre who have never


considered the implications of being a fan/participants.
Encourage them to reflect on the social implications of their
expert-level degree of literacy in this genre, and convince them
of the argument presented in your synthesis.

Format: Papers should be composed in a traditional font (Times, Times


New Roman), in 12-point font, contain a traditional MLA header
and citation style, and contain the standard Word margins.
Please proofread your document before turning it in.

A successful essay will include:


• 6-7 pages of a thoughtful synthesis
• Attention to the needs of the audience
• Support for your synthesis with:
o Quotes and examples from at least 2 scholarly text
o Quotes and examples from at least 2 readings in the WATW text
o Your own opinions/experiences as a fan/participant of this genre
• A thoughtful and analytic synthesis of the artistic genre, based on a
strong argument resulting from the combination of your opinions and
the opinions of scholars
• The requirements outlined in the rubric

Purpose: In your undergraduate general education, you will take courses in

Subject to change: students are responsible for all modifications


22
A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

the humanities. Humanities professors will expect you to be highly literate in


the humanities due to the type of reading and writing you’ve done in high
school. However, professors may also expect you to apply this type of
thinking to the artistic world around you and to synthesize your own
experiences with those of so-called experts.
First draft due (BRING 2 COPIES): 3/3 Portfolio Three
due: 3/10

Subject to change: students are responsible for all modifications


23
A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

Name: _______________________________________ Essay Number:


______________________

Please list your goals for this essay:


1.

2.

3.

Portfolio Checklist: Please place a checkmark before each item. Please place all
portfolio items into a folder with your name on the front. Be sure to include this
sheet.
____Business Letter ____Table of Contents ____Pre-Essay Assignment
____Rubric
____Peer Review Sheet ____First Draft ____Final Draft
____Blue card

Grading Rubric* Score


Introduction and Thesis: effectively introduces topics (Score x 3)
discussed and places it within the wider context of humanities
literacy; moves from the general issue to the specific aspects
of the synthesis; the thesis is specific and presents the
synthesis the author will make between their own opinions /
regarding the significance of an artistic genre with the 15
opinions of scholars
Argument: clearly identifies the author’s position (Score x 5)
synthesizing the implications of an artistic genre; develops
the synthesis with evidence from at least two articles from
the text, two scholarly sources, and your own opinions; shows /
complex and sophisticated thinking about issues raised in 25
class discussions; develops throughout the course of the
essay
Use of Evidence: effectively utilizes two scholarly sources (Score x 3)
and your own opinion; uses at least two sources from WATW
to support the author’s synthesis; shows ability to make
generalizations from specific examples; uses evidence to /
support argument without losing focus on the argument 15
Integration of Sources and Citation: inserts source (Score x 2)
material in appropriate and interesting ways; correctly uses
sources in synthesis; demonstrates an ability to integrate
sources using signal phrases correctly cites sources using /
MLA format for in-text citations and a works cited 10
Topic Sentences and Paragraph Organization: each (Score x 2)
paragraph has a clear topic sentence that expresses the main
idea; each paragraph expresses one main idea and offers /
supporting evidence; paragraphs build logically upon the next 10
Sentence and Paragraph Flow: uses language with control, (Score x 3)
elegance, and imagination to suit the essay’s purpose;
sentences with in each paragraph flow logically; the syntax
within sentences is clear; paragraphs flow logically without
leaps /15
Conclusion: the supported argument is summarized (Score x 1)

Subject to change: students are responsible for all modifications


24
A. Bright Writing 2 Winter 2009

sufficiently and effectively in the conclusion; conclusion


leaves the reader with a memorable impression of what the
writer is trying to persuade /5
Grammar and Punctuation: uses forms of grammar, (Score x 1)
punctuation, spelling, and syntax that are appropriate for
standard written English; demonstrates careful attention to
proofreading /5

Total: _________/100

*5 = Advanced: strong control and skill in this area; many strengths are present; 4
= Proficient: effective control and skill; strengths outweigh weaknesses; 3 =
Developing equal number of strengths and weaknesses in this area; 2/1 = Needs
Improvement: not yet showing control or skill in this area
Total Unit Three Portfolio Grade_____/120 Portfolio in Context of Final Grade
____/30

Subject to change: students are responsible for all modifications


25