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SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF NURSING
BAGUIO CITY, PHILIPPINES

TEACHING CARE PLAN:


POST-OPERATIVE CARE

Submitted by:
DELA CRUZ, DANNIELLE KATHRINE JOYCE D.
BSN III-D3
Submitted to:
Ma’am DIADEM DEPAYSO
Clinical Instructor
Submitted on:
November 25, 2017
BeGH Operating Room
DESCRIPTION OF THE LEARNER: The learners are the patients who have undergone surgical procedures and need health teaching about
post-operative care particularly on post-operative exercises
LEARNING NEEDS: Post-Operative Care Management
LEARNING DIAGNOSIS: Knowledge deficit: post-operative care management related to inadequate information
GOAL: After 30 minutes of health teaching, the client will be able to identify post-management in surgical procedure
TIME ALLOTMENT: 20-30 minutes
TEACHING CARE PLAN PROPER:
Learning Teaching Time allotment and
Learning Content Evaluation
Objectives Strategy resources needed
A. Cognitive The postoperative exercises include: One-on-one Time resource (2 Instant oral
Domain 1. Turning discussion mins) feedback: the
2. Deep breathing Pamphlet patient will be
3. Coughing
The patient will be able to enumerate
4. Extremity movement/exercise
able to: 4 important
1. Enumerate operative post-
post- exercise
operative
exercise

B. Psychomotor 1) Turning One-on-one Time resource (15 Instant oral


Domain The patient may need special aids, such as a pillow discussion mins) feedback: the
between the legs, to help maintain body alignment. Pamphlet patient will be
(a) Patient turned away from the nurse with arms
The patient will be able to
and legs crossed.
able to: (b) Patient turned toward the nurse with arms and demonstrate 4
1. Demonstrate legs crossed. post-operative
4 post- (c) Patient on side in middle of bed with a pillow in exercises
operative front of the bottom leg with the top leg on the
exercises pillow in flexed position, a pillow against the
back, a small pillow supports the arm and hand,
pillow under head and shoulder.
2) Deep Breathing
(a) Inhale slowly through the nose, distending the
abdomen and exhaling slowly through pursed lips
(b) Deep breathe as often as possible, preferably 5
to 10 times every hour during the postoperative,
immobilized period.

3) Coughing
The patient should be in a sitting or lying position.
Instruct the patient to:
(a) Lean forward slightly while sitting in bed.
(b) Take a deep breath.
(c) Inhale fully with the mouth slightly open.
(d) Let out three to four sharp "hacks."
(e) With mouth open, take in a deep breath and
give one or two strong coughs.
(f) Repeat steps (a) through (e) ten times, as
tolerated.
(g) The patient may lace his fingers and hold
them tightly across the incision before
coughing. This is used as a splint to minimize
pressure and helps to control pain when the
patient is coughing. A small pillow or folded
towel may be used in place of laced fingers.
NOTE: The above steps should be repeated every two
hours during the postoperative phase or as prescribed.

4) Extremity Exercises
(a) Flex and extend each joint, particularity the
hip, knee, and ankle joints, keeping the lower
back flat as the leg is lowered and
straightened.
(b) Move each foot in a circular motion.
B. Affective Domain 1)Turning. Turning in bed and early ambulation helps One-on-one Time resource (3 Instant oral
patients maintain blood circulation, stimulate discussion mins) feedback: the
The patient will be respiratory functions, and decrease the stasis of gas in Pamphlet patient will be
the intestines and resulting discomfort.
able to: able to state
1. State 2) Deep breathing. Deep breathing helps prevent importance of
importance postoperative pneumonia and atelectasis. In deep post-operative
of post- breathing, the patient should inhale and exhale as exercises
operative much air as possible.
exercises
3) Coughing. Coughing is done to mobilize and expel
respiratory system secretions which, because of the
effects of anesthesia, tend to pool in the lungs and
may cause pneumonia.

(4) Extremity exercises. These exercises help to prevent


circulatory problems, such as thrombophlebitis, by
facilitating venous return to the heart. It also decreases
postoperative "gas pains”

References:
Smeltzer, S. C. O., Hinkle, J. L. ., Cheever, K. H. ., & Bare, B. G.. (2010). Brunner & Suddarth's textbook of medical-surgical nursing (12th,
North American Edition, Combined Volume edition.).Preoperative Nursing Management (pp. 399-414) Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer
Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Ignatavicius, D. D., Workman, M. L., & Henderson, L. (2015). Medical-surgical nursing: Critical thinking for collaborative care (7th ed.). Care
of Preoperative Patients (pp.239-259). Toronto: Elsevier Saunders. (ISBN 978-1-4377-2801-9.