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Mathematics Training Guide Item 21564

Grade HS Teen Driving Restrictions Claim 4 • Target A

Student constructed-response items from the Smarter Balanced Interim Assessments are hand
scored by local educators. This training guide and the exemplar set are to be used for training
prior to scoring mathematics student responses. While these materials may be downloaded and
printed, they should be used only for classroom, building- or district-level training. These materials
should not be posted or distributed to teachers or others not involved in training or scoring the
interim assessments.

Training Guide

The Training Guide for mathematics contains a stimulus, item stem, item-specific rubric, and
condition code document.

Directions for using the Teacher Hand Scoring Materials for Mathematics Items
1. Start by reading the dependent items.
• These are items that students answer and then use to complete this item.
2. Examine the item-specific rubric and rationale for each score point.
3. Compare the exemplar, full-credit student response to the item-specific rubric. The
answers to the dependent items are also included so that they can be compared to the
exemplar student response.

4. Read through the condition code document to better understand how to score unusual
responses.
Having completed these steps, you are now ready to train on examples of student responses.

A target chart is provided to support the understanding of all targets in Claims 2, 3, and 4.

Exemplar

A document containing an anchor set, a check set, and the key for scoring the check set is
located in the Exemplar tab.

The anchor set is provided to help the scorer understand how the rubric and scored papers align.
• The anchor set contains example student responses ordered from full-credit to partial to
zero-point responses, with scores and scoring comments. These responses also include
answers the student gave to the dependent items.

The check set contains randomly ordered example student responses without scores or scoring
comments.
• The check set is an opportunity for the scorer to practice accurate scoring.
• The score points and scoring comments for the check set can be found in the key.
Each set contains approximately 10 examples of student responses.
Each student response includes a metadata table indicating the claim, target, and other item-
specific information.

Examples of student responses are authentic (original spelling, grammar, and punctuation).
By viewing the Training Guide and practicing using both the exemplars and check sets,
educators are ready to begin scoring assigned student responses.

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publishers. Do not post publicly and do not reproduce for commercial purpose.
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Mathematics Training Guide Item 21564
Grade HS Teen Driving Restrictions Claim 4 • Target A

Stimulus

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Mathematics Training Guide Item 21564
Grade HS Teen Driving Restrictions Claim 4 • Target A

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publishers. Do not post publicly and do not reproduce for commercial purpose.
Page 3 of 9
Mathematics Training Guide Item 21564
Grade HS Teen Driving Restrictions Claim 4 • Target A

Grade 11 Teen Driving Restrictions


Claim 4: Modeling and Data Analysis - Students can analyze complex, real-world
scenarios and can construct and use mathematical models to interpret and solve
problems.

Target A: Apply mathematics to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the
workplace.
Content Domain(s): Number and Quantity, Statistics and Probability, Ratios and Proportional
Relationships

Item ID 21564 Calculator Yes


Score Maximum Points 3

Item Stem

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Mathematics Training Guide Item 21564
Grade HS Teen Driving Restrictions Claim 4 • Target A

Dependent Item 21560

Dependent Item 21562

Item Rubric
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publishers. Do not post publicly and do not reproduce for commercial purpose.
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Mathematics Training Guide Item 21564
Grade HS Teen Driving Restrictions Claim 4 • Target A

Full-credit Response:
Score 3 The student has demonstrated a full and complete understanding of all
mathematical content and practices essential to this task. The student has addressed the
task in a mathematically sound manner. The response contains evidence of the student’s
competence in problem solving, reasoning, and/or modeling to the full extent that the
processes relate to the specified task. The response may, however, contain minor flaws
that do not detract from the demonstration of full understanding.
- Award 3 points if the student makes a recommendation including all 4
requirements and offers full and complete mathematical justification for this
recommendation. The times for the requirements must also fall sequentially (i.e.
permit age of 15, holding their permit time for 18 months and licensing age 16 years
and 6 months)
Score 2 The student demonstrated a reasonable understanding of the mathematical
content and practices essential to this task. The student has addressed most of the task in
a mathematically sound manner. The response contains sufficient evidence of the
student’s competence in problem solving, reasoning, and/or modeling, but not enough
evidence to demonstrate a full understanding of the processes he/she applies to the
specified task. The response may contain minor errors that can be attributed to the
misinterpretation of the prompt; errors attributed to insufficient, non-mathematical
knowledge; and errors attributed to careless execution of mathematical processes or
algorithms.
- Award 2 points if the student makes a recommendation including all 4
requirements and offers reasonable mathematical justification for this
recommendation. The times for the requirements must also fall sequentially.
Score 1 The student has demonstrated partial understanding of the mathematical
content and practices essential to this task. The student’s response contains some of the
attributes of an appropriate response but lacks convincing evidence that the student fully
comprehends the essential mathematical ideas addressed by this task. Such deficits
include evidence of insufficient mathematical knowledge; errors in fundamental
mathematical procedures; and other omissions or irregularities that bring into question the
student’s competence in problem solving, reasoning, and/or modeling related to the
specified task.
- Award 1 point if the student makes a recommendation including all 4 requirements
and offers partial or no mathematical justification for this recommendation. The
times for the requirements must also fall sequentially.
OR
- Award 1 point if the student gives a partial recommendation and offers some
mathematical justification for their recommendation.
Note: a partial recommendation involves 2 or 3 valid requirements (i.e. valid requirements
include times that fall sequentially and increase: the age to obtain a permit, the length of
the permit time, the amount of practice time, and the age to obtain a license).

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publishers. Do not post publicly and do not reproduce for commercial purpose.
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Mathematics Training Guide Item 21564
Grade HS Teen Driving Restrictions Claim 4 • Target A

Score 0 The student has demonstrated merely an acquaintance with the topic, or a
completely incorrect or uninterpretable response. The student’s response may be
associated with the task in the item but contains few attributes of an appropriate
response. There are significant omissions or irregularities that indicate a lack of
comprehension in regard to the mathematical content an practices essential to this
task. No evidence is present that demonstrates the student’s competence in
problem solving, reasoning and/or modeling related to the specified task.

Exemplar Student Response

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publishers. Do not post publicly and do not reproduce for commercial purpose.
Page 7 of 9
Mathematics Training Guide Item 21564
Grade HS Teen Driving Restrictions Claim 4 • Target A

Condition Smarter Balanced Condition Code Category


Codes
B Blank
No response provided
I Insufficient
Student has not provided a meaningful response. Some examples:
• Random keystrokes
• Undecipherable text
• I hate this test.
• I don’t know, IDK.
• I don’t care.
• I like pizza! (in response to a reading passage about helicopters)
• Response consists entirely of profanity.

L Non-Scorable Language
Mathematics: Language other than English or Spanish

Alert or Sensitive Responses


Student responses that indicate “troubled students” or cheating can require urgent attention
prior to the completion of hand-scoring. A student response to any hand-scored test item that
may be of a sensitive nature should be assigned a score and identified as an “Alert.” Possible
alert types are listed below.

Troubled Student Alerts include, but are not limited to, the following:
• Suicide • Extreme depression • Self-harm or intent
• Criminal activity • Violence to harm others
• Alcohol or drug use • Rape, sexual, or • Neglect
physical abuse

Testing Irregularities include, but are not limited to, the following:
• Assistance/Intervention: The student admits to having received assistance during
the test administration.

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publishers. Do not post publicly and do not reproduce for commercial purpose.
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Mathematics Training Guide Item 21564
Grade HS Teen Driving Restrictions Claim 4 • Target A

Mathematics• Claims 2, 3, and 4 Targets


NOTE:
• Claim 1 targets are grade specific and are drawn from the cluster headings of the Common
Core State Standards for Mathematical Content.

• Claims 2, 3, and 4 targets are the same across all grade levels.
Claim 2: Students can solve a range of complex well-posed problems in pure and applied mathematics,
making productive use of knowledge and problem solving strategies.
Apply mathematics to solve well-posed problems in pure mathematics and those arising in
Target A everyday life, society, and the workplace. (DOK 2, DOK 3)
Target B Select and use appropriate tools strategically. (DOK 1, DOK 2)
Target C Interpret results in the context of a situation. (DOK 2)
Identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships (e.g., using
Target D diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts, or formulas). (DOK 1, DOK 2, DOK 3)
Claim 3: Students can clearly and precisely construct viable arguments to support their own reasoning
and to critique the reasoning of others.
Target A Test propositions or conjectures with specific examples (DOK 2)
Construct, autonomously, 1 chains of reasoning that will justify or refute propositions or
Target B conjectures. (DOK 3, DOK 4)2
Target C State logical assumptions being used. (DOK 2, DOK 3)
Target D Use the technique of breaking an argument into cases. (DOK 2, DOK 3)
Distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in the
Target E argument—explain what it is. (DOK 2, DOK 3, DOK 4)
Base arguments on concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions.
Target F
(DOK 2, DOK 3)
At later grades, determine conditions under which an argument does and does not apply.
Target G (For example, area increases with perimeter for squares, but not for all plane figures.)
(DOK 3, DOK 4)
Claim 4: Students can analyze complex, real-world scenarios and can construct and use mathematical
models to interpret and solve problems.
Apply mathematics to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace.
Target A
(DOK 2, 3)
Construct, autonomously, 1 chains of reasoning to justify mathematical models used,
Target B interpretations made, and solutions proposed for a complex problem. (DOK 2, 3, 4)2
Target C State logical assumptions being used. (DOK 1, 2)
Target D Interpret results in the context of a situation. (DOK 2, 3)
Analyze the adequacy of and make improvements to an existing model or develop a
Target E mathematical model of a real phenomenon. (DOK 3, 4)
Identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships (e.g., using
Target F diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts, or formulas). (DOK 1, 2, 3)
Identify, analyze and synthesize relevant external resources to pose or solve problems.
Target G (DOK 3, 4)
1By “autonomous” w e mean that the student responds to a single prompt, w ithout further guidance within the task.

2
At the secondary level, these chains should typically take a successful student 10 minutes to complete. Times will be
somew hat shorter for younger students, but still giving them time to think and ex plain. For a minority of these tasks, subtasks
may be constructed to facilitate entry and assess student progress towards expertise. Even for such “apprentice tasks,” part of
the task w ill involve a chain of autonomous reasoning that takes at least 5 minutes.

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publishers. Do not post publicly and do not reproduce for commercial purpose.
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