Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 23

3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

Official reprint from UpToDate®   
www.uptodate.com ©2016 UpToDate®

Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

Author Section Editor Deputy Editor


Girish P Joshi, MB, BS, MD, Stephanie B Jones, MD Marianna Crowley, MD
FFARCSI 

All topics are updated as new evidence becomes available and our peer review process is complete.
Literature review current through: Feb 2016. | This topic last updated: Dec 04, 2015.
INTRODUCTION — The laparoscopic approach has become a standard of care for many abdominal surgical
procedures. Compared with laparotomy, laparoscopy can reduce postoperative pain, result in shorter recovery
time, allow smaller incisions, and reduce the postoperative stress response. Laparoscopy requires insufflation
of intraperitoneal or extraperitoneal gas, usually carbon dioxide (CO2), to create space for visualization and
surgical maneuvers.

Robotic surgery is usually performed laparoscopically and is commonly used for gynecologic and urologic
surgery.

Anesthetic concerns for patients undergoing laparoscopic and robotic surgery differ from those for patients
undergoing open abdominal surgery. They include the physiologic effects of the pneumoperitoneum, absorption
of CO2, and positioning required for surgery. In addition, some laparoscopic procedures take longer than the
open alternative.

This topic will discuss the anesthetic management of patients having laparoscopic and robotic abdominal
surgery. Advantages and disadvantages of laparoscopy and robotic surgery, technical aspects of these
techniques, and surgical complications are discussed separately. (See "Robot­assisted laparoscopy" and
"Complications of laparoscopic surgery" and "Instruments and devices used in laparoscopic surgery" and
"Laparoscopic cholecystectomy".)

SURGICAL TECHNIQUES — Laparoscopy requires creation of a pneumoperitoneum by insufflation of gas,
usually carbon dioxide (CO2), to open space in the abdomen for visualization and allow surgical manipulation.
CO2 insufflation can be performed blindly using a Veress needle or by placement of a port under direct vision
through a small subumbilical incision. The gas source is connected to the needle or port; intraabdominal
pressure (IAP) is monitored as gas is insufflated, aiming for a pressure ≤15 mmHg to minimize physiologic
effects. For laparoscopic prostatectomy, which is performed in steep Trendelenburg position, the European
Association for Endoscopic Surgery recommends IAP below 12 mmHg [1].

After insufflation, a port is placed, and the laparoscope is inserted. Under direct intraabdominal vision, further
instrument ports are placed. The surgeon uses a video monitor connected to the laparoscope to see
intraabdominal contents and perform the procedure.

In some cases, laparoscopy is used to assist dissection, after which an incision is made to complete the
procedure. In others, a larger port is placed to allow the surgeon to insert one hand to assist the procedure.

The most commonly used robotic system occupies a lot of space in the operating room, and consists of a
surgeon’s control console, a tower holding the optical system, and patient­side cart with robotic arms. For
robotic surgery, once the pneumoperitoneum is created, multiple ports are placed for insertion of the camera
and robotic arms, which are connected to the patient­side cart. The surgeon operates the camera and the
robotic arms from the control console, remote from the patient, while an assistant is at the patient’s side for
suctioning, retraction, and passage of suture or sponges in and out of the abdomen.

PREOPERATIVE EVALUATION — A medical history and anesthesia­directed physical examination should be
performed for all patients who undergo anesthesia. In anticipation of laparoscopy, we focus the preoperative
evaluation on those medical conditions that may affect the response to physiologic changes associated with
laparoscopy and the surgical procedure. The laparoscopic approach is used for surgical procedures with a
range of risks of perioperative cardiac and pulmonary adverse events and surgical complications. As examples,

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs=… 1/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

diagnostic laparoscopy may be a brief procedure with minimal tissue trauma, while laparoscopic radical
hysterectomy requires extensive dissection, may take a number of hours, and can result in significant blood
loss.

We believe that preoperative evaluation for laparoscopic procedures should be the same as it would be for the
equivalent open procedure. (See "Evaluation of preoperative pulmonary risk" and "Evaluation of cardiac risk
prior to noncardiac surgery".)

PHYSIOLOGIC EFFECTS OF LAPAROSCOPY

Cardiovascular changes — The cardiovascular changes during laparoscopy are variable and dynamic (table
1) [2­5]. These effects are generally well tolerated by healthy patients. However, significant intraoperative
cardiac dysfunction can occur in older patients and in those with cardiopulmonary disease (eg, congestive
heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, valvular heart disease). Studies of hemodynamic events during
laparoscopy in patients with significant cardiopulmonary disease have reported an increase in mean arterial
pressure (MAP), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and central venous pressure (CVP), with decreases in
cardiac output (CO) and stroke volume (SV) during peritoneal insufflation [6­10]. Compared with healthy
patients, those with cardiopulmonary disease may require more pharmacologic interventions and more
intensive monitoring to respond to these changes.

Cardiovascular changes during laparoscopy relate to the increase in intraabdominal pressure (IAP) associated
with carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflation, effects of positioning, and of absorption of CO2, as follows:

● Effects of pneumoperitoneum – Pneumoperitoneum and the associated increase in IAP result in
neuroendocrine and mechanical effects on cardiovascular physiology.

• Neuroendocrine effects – Increase in IAP results in catecholamine release and activation of the
renin–angiotensin system with vasopressin release [11­13]. This increases MAP in most patients
and may contribute to increases in SVR and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) [14].

Vagal stimulation, from insertion of the Veress needle or peritoneal stretch with gas insufflation, can
result in bradyarrhythmias. Bradycardia is common in this setting, while atrioventricular dissociation,
nodal rhythm, and asystole have been reported [15].

• Mechanical effects – Mechanical aspects of laparoscopy are dynamic; the resulting cardiovascular
effects depend on the patient’s preexisting volume status, insufflation pressure, and position.
Compression of arterial vasculature with pneumoperitoneum increases SVR and PVR, with variable
effects on CO and blood pressure (BP) [11­13].

Hypercarbia caused by CO2 absorption may also increase SVR and PVR; in most cases, minute
ventilation is increased to prevent hypercarbia, but the required increase in intrathoracic pressure
may further increase SVR and PVR.

Cardiovascular effects tend to resolve quickly as pneumoperitoneum is maintained. A study of
hemodynamic data in 38 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy reported decreases
in cardiac index, SV, and left ventricular (LV) end­diastolic volume after insufflation of CO2 to 15
mmHg, with normalization of all values within 15 minutes [16].

● Effects of positioning – Laparoscopic surgery is often performed in head­up (eg, for cholecystectomy) or
head­down (eg, pelvic surgery) positions to allow the intraabdominal organs to fall away from the surgical
field. Extremes of position can affect cardiovascular function.

• Head up – The head­up position (ie, reverse Trendelenburg) leads to venous pooling, tends to
reduce venous return to the heart [12,17], and may result in hypotension, especially in patients who
are hypovolemic.

• Head down – The­head down position (ie, Trendelenburg) position increases venous return and
cardiac filling pressures. A study of the hemodynamic effects of laparoscopy included 16 patients
who underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with 12 mmHg intraabdominal pressure and a 45
degree Trendelenburg position [5]. CVP, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and pulmonary capillary
http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs=… 2/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

wedge pressure increased two­ to threefold, and mean arterial BP (ABP) increased by 35 percent,
without changes in CO, heart rate (HR), or SV. Cardiac filling pressures normalized immediately
after surgery.

● Effects of hypercarbia – Absorption of CO2 during laparoscopy can have direct and indirect
cardiovascular effects. The direct effects of hypercarbia and associated acidosis include decreased
cardiac contractility, sensitization to arrhythmias, and systemic vasodilation. Indirect effects are the result
of sympathetic stimulation, and include tachycardia and vasoconstriction, which may counteract
vasodilation [12]. (See 'Pulmonary changes' below.)

Pulmonary changes — Pneumoperitoneum with CO2 and surgical positioning are associated with changes in
pulmonary function and gas exchange (table 2). These changes can result from increased IAP with
pneumoperitoneum and from absorption of CO2.

During laparoscopy, minute ventilation must be increased to compensate for absorption of CO2.
Hyperventilation may be difficult for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and
in morbidly obese patients, especially in Trendelenburg position. In patients with COPD and in older patients,
end­tidal CO2 (ETCO2) may not accurately reflect arterial partial pressure of CO2; in such patients, arterial
blood gases may be required to monitor ventilation.

The absorption and elimination of CO2 in the morbidly obese appears to be similar to nonobese patients [18].
Arterial oxygenation decreases and alveolar–arterial oxygen gradient increases in obese anesthetized patients
when placed in Trendelenburg position, though CO2 insufflation tends to slightly reverse these effects [19].

● Changes in pulmonary mechanics – Pneumoperitoneum causes cephalad displacement of the
diaphragm and mediastinal structures, which reduces functional residual capacity (FRC) and pulmonary
compliance, resulting in atelectasis and increased peak airway pressures. These effects are exacerbated
with steep Trendelenburg positioning (eg, during pelvic surgery) and are reduced with reverse
Trendelenburg positioning (eg, during cholecystectomy and gastric surgery). The changes in pulmonary
compliance may be less with retroperitoneal insufflation (eg, during renal or adrenal procedures) compared
with intraperitoneal insufflation [20].

● CO2 absorption – CO2 is highly soluble and is rapidly absorbed into the circulation during insufflation for
laparoscopy. CO2 absorption increases quickly and reaches a plateau at approximately 60 minutes of
insufflation [20­22]. Ventilation must be increased to maintain normal end­tidal and arterial partial pressure
of CO2 (figure 1). (See 'Mechanical ventilation' below.)

Surgical technique may influence the degree of CO2 absorption. Multiple studies have found that
subcutaneous emphysema, a possible complication of laparoscopy, is associated with increased
absorption of CO2 [21­23]. (See 'Subcutaneous emphysema' below.)

Subcutaneous emphysema may be more common during retroperitoneal insufflation of CO2 compared
with intraperitoneal insufflation, but it is not clear whether the retroperitoneal approach itself increases
CO2 absorption. Findings from studies that compared CO2 absorption with these two techniques without
subcutaneous emphysema have reported conflicting results [21­24].

● Ventilation/perfusion matching – The reduction in FRC and atelectasis associated with laparoscopy
may theoretically lead to shunting and ventilation/perfusion mismatch; however, in healthy patients, these
effects are minimal and well tolerated, even with steep Trendelenburg positioning [4,5,25].

● Endotracheal tube – Pneumoperitoneum and Trendelenburg positioning may cause cephalad movement
of the carina, which can result in mainstem endobronchial migration of the endotracheal tube, hypoxia,
and high inspiratory pressure [26,27]. In addition, endotracheal tube cuff pressure increases in some
patients during laparoscopy [28].

Regional circulatory changes

● Splanchnic blood flow – The mechanical and neuroendocrine effects of pneumoperitoneum can
decrease splanchnic circulation, resulting in reduced total hepatic blood flow and bowel perfusion.

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs=… 3/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

However, hypercapnia can cause direct splanchnic vasodilatation. Thus, the overall effects on splanchnic
circulation are not clinically significant [29,30].

● Renal blood flow – The creation of a pneumoperitoneum results in reduction in renal perfusion and urine
output associated with renal parenchymal compression, reduced renal vein flow, and increased levels of
vasopressin [31­33]. When IAP is kept under 15 mmHg, renal function and urine output generally
normalize soon after pneumoperitoneum deflation, without histologic evidence of pathologic changes.

The effects of laparoscopy on renal function for patients with preexisting renal disease have not been
studied. In most cases, we believe that the benefits of a minimally invasive surgical approach outweigh
theoretical concerns about the effect of increased intraabdominal pressure on renal function.

● Cerebral blood flow – Increased intraabdominal and intrathoracic pressures, hypercarbia, and
Trendelenburg positioning can all increase cerebral blood flow (CBF) and intracranial pressures (ICP) [34].
In healthy patients undergoing prolonged pneumoperitoneum and steep Trendelenburg position, cerebral
oxygenation and cerebral perfusion remain within safe limits [35]. In patients with intracranial mass
lesions or significant cerebrovascular disorders (eg, carotid atherosclerosis and cerebral aneurysm), the
increase in ICP may have clinical consequences. Therefore, in this patient population, we maintain strict
normocapnia during laparoscopy.

● Intraocular pressure – Intraocular pressure (IOP) increases with pneumoperitoneum and increases
further when the patient is positioned in Trendelenburg [36­38]. A prospective observational study of IOP
in patients who underwent robotic laparoscopic prostatectomy in steep Trendelenburg position found that
IOP increased by an average of 13 mmHg from baseline at the end of the procedure (29 mmHg versus 16
mmHg, upper limit of normal 20 mmHg) [36]. The clinical implications of this degree of increase are
unknown, though increased IOP may play a role in the rarely reported postoperative visual loss in patients
with prolonged cases. (See 'Complications related to positioning' below and "Postoperative visual loss
after anesthesia for nonocular surgery", section on 'Postoperative ischemic optic neuropathy'.)

ANESTHETIC MANAGEMENT

Choice of anesthetic — In most cases, we perform general anesthesia for laparoscopy and robotic surgery.
For procedures performed in Trendelenburg position, general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation allows
optimal ventilatory control and support.

Others use spinal or epidural anesthesia for short procedures in the supine or head­up position (eg, diagnostic
laparoscopy, laparoscopic cholecystectomy) [39­42]. A sensory level of T4 to T6 is required for adequate
neuraxial anesthesia.

Monitoring and intravenous access — As for any anesthetic, standard American Society of
Anesthesiologists (ASA) monitors (eg, blood pressure [BP], electrocardiography, oxygen saturation,
capnography, and temperature) are applied prior to laparoscopy. Further monitoring (eg, continuous intraarterial
pressure) should be added as required by the patient’s medical condition, the expected blood loss, and the
duration of surgery.

All patients require placement of at least one venous catheter for anesthesia. The need for additional or high­
capacity venous access should be dictated by the expected blood loss.

Many robotic procedures and some laparoscopic procedures are performed with the patient’s arms tucked at
the sides, limiting access for blood sampling, placement of an arterial catheter, or additional venous access
during the procedure.

Induction of anesthesia — A variety of medications and techniques can be used for induction of anesthesia
and are chosen based on patient factors. For most adults, intravenous (IV) induction is performed. (See
"Induction of general anesthesia".)

After induction, the eyes should be closed and covered (ie, with tape or adhesive transparent dressing) to avoid
corneal damage. An orogastric tube should be placed and suctioned to decompress the stomach prior to needle
or trochar insertion and to minimize stomach injury.

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs=… 4/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

Choice of airway device — We place an endotracheal tube for airway management for laparoscopy, rather
than a supraglottic airway (SGA), to provide optimal control of ventilation for elimination of carbon dioxide
(CO2) and to protect against aspiration. A cuffed endotracheal tube allows the use of positive end expiratory
pressure (PEEP) and the high peak airway pressures that may be required during pneumoperitoneum,
especially with Trendelenburg positioning.

SGAs are commonly used for airway management for anesthesia and can be used with positive pressure
ventilation. The use of SGAs for laparoscopy is controversial. These devices do not fully protect against
aspiration of stomach contents and are ordinarily used with lower peak inspiratory pressures. However, there
are a number of studies and case reports describing the safe use of second­generation SGAs for laparoscopic
procedures [43­46]. Second­generation SGAs allow the use of higher airway pressure without leak and have
esophageal vents to minimize the chance of aspiration. (See "Techniques and devices for airway management
for anesthesia: Supraglottic devices (including laryngeal mask airways)", section on 'Choice of laryngeal mask
airway'.)

Positioning — Laparoscopy is often performed in extreme head­up (ie, reverse Trendelenburg) (eg, for
cholecystectomy or gastric surgery) or head­down (ie, Trendelenburg) (eg, pelvic surgery) positions to allow the
intraabdominal organs to fall away from the surgical field. In addition, any of the positions used for open
procedures may be required (ie, lithotomy, lateral decubitus, operating room [OR] table flexion or rotation). The
arms are often tucked at the patient’s sides for laparoscopic and robotic surgery. As for all longer surgical
procedures, a goal for positioning and padding is the prevention of injuries to peripheral nerves and bony
prominences. Pressure points should be padded, as should the plastic connectors on IV tubing and monitoring
devices. (See 'Complications related to positioning' below.)

Positioning devices are often used to avoid having the patient slide on the operating table with steep
Trendelenburg or reverse Trendelenburg positioning. A foot support attached to the end of the operating table is
used for laparoscopic cholecystectomy and other procedures that require reverse Trendelenburg positioning.

Nonslip padding, cross­body taping, and padded shoulder supports are options for steep Trendelenburg
positioning. We use nonslip padding with cross­body taping (ie, tape attached to the operating table from over
the shoulder to near the opposite hip). We test for sliding with maximal Trendelenburg positioning prior to
surgical prep and drape and confirm that taping does not restrict chest excursion or affect ventilation.

For robotic surgery, once the robotic device is docked with the arms connected to the instruments, the position
of the operating table must not be changed. With instruments in fixed position, patient movement can result in
injury to the abdominal wall and intraabdominal structures.

Maintenance of anesthesia

Use of nitrous oxide — As for open abdominal procedures, various inhalation and IV anesthetics can be
used for maintenance of general anesthesia for laparoscopy.

The use of nitrous oxide (N2O) for maintenance during laparoscopy is controversial. In our view, the balance of
the literature on the use of N2O along with prophylaxis for postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) for
laparoscopy supports its use when clinically indicated. For longer procedures, if the surgeon reports difficulty
with exposure related to bowel distention, N2O may be discontinued.

Concerns regarding the use of N2O for laparoscopy include an increase in PONV and bowel distention.

● PONV – Findings from studies of the relationship between N2O and PONV after laparoscopy have been
inconsistent, with some showing an increase in PONV with N2O and others not [47­49]. A metaanalysis
of randomized trials that investigated PONV after general anesthesia with and without N2O found a higher
incidence of PONV with N2O, but the absolute difference was small (33 versus 27 percent) [50].
Intraoperative administration of propofol and prophylactic antiemetic medication eliminated the emetic
effect of N2O.

● Bowel distention – N2O diffuses into air­containing closed spaces over time and can lead to bowel
distention, which can theoretically impair surgical exposure and dissection [51]. Based on small studies,
N2O does not appear to affect operating conditions during relatively short procedures. A surgeon­blinded
http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs=… 5/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

study of operating conditions during laparoscopic cholecystectomy lasting an average of 75 minutes with
and without N2O found no difference in technical difficulty with N2O administration [47]. Similarly, a
surgeon­blinded study of the effects of N2O during 50 laparoscopic gastric bypass surgeries found no
noticeable bowel distention during 90 minutes of anesthesia [52]. In both of these studies, the surgeons
correctly determined that N2O was being used less than half of the time.

Bowel distention with laparoscopy may be a more significant concern during longer procedures since
diffusion of N2O into gas­filled spaces increases over time. In a surgeon­blinded study of approximately
350 patients who underwent colon surgery lasting 3 to 3.5 hours, surgeons were asked to rate
intraoperative bowel distention at the end of surgery [53]. Moderate or severe bowel distention occurred
more than twice as often when N2O was administered compared with air (23 percent versus 9 percent),
but there was no reported bowel distention in the majority of cases in both groups.

Neuromuscular blockade — Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) are administered during abdominal
surgery to facilitate endotracheal intubation and to improve surgical conditions. At the end of surgery,
neuromuscular blockade is reversed either by metabolism and excretion of the NMBA or by administration of
reversal medication. The speed of reversal with neostigmine depends on the degree of block; if deep block is
maintained until the end of the procedure, reversal may not be complete after the brief wound closure of most
laparoscopic procedures, and emergence and extubation may be delayed. Where sugammadex is available,
even deep block can be reversed quickly. As with any general anesthetic, reversal of NMBAs must be
confirmed objectively prior to tracheal extubation, preferably with a quantitative train­of­four monitor.

The literature regarding the need for and optimal level of neuromuscular blockade during laparoscopic
procedures is inconsistent. Some studies show improved surgical exposure in this setting with deep block

(ie, train­of­four twitch count of zero but posttetanic count of 1 to 2) compared with moderate block (ie, train­of­
four twitch count of ≥1) [54­58]. A review of the literature found methodologic flaws in most studies and
concluded that there was no evidence to support deep compared with moderate neuromuscular block for
laparoscopy [54].

We administer NMBAs as required by the clinical situation, aiming for the least degree of block necessary for
the clinical situation. The need for neuromuscular blockade may depend on the surgical procedure, positioning,
and the patient’s body habitus. As examples, exposure during laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a lean patient
may be adequate with minimal neuromuscular block, while laparoscopic deep­pelvic surgery may require
relatively deep block to optimize surgical conditions.

During robotic procedures, deep neuromuscular block should be maintained as long as the robotic device is
docked with intraabdominal instruments attached. In this setting, any degree of unexpected patient movement
can result in injury.

Mechanical ventilation — The dynamic changes in pulmonary function during laparoscopy require
intraoperative adjustment of mechanical ventilation. (See 'Pulmonary changes' above.)

Modes of ventilation — We follow a lung­protective intraoperative ventilatory strategy, using a tidal
volume of 6 to 8 mL/kg ideal body weight and 5 to 10 cmH2O PEEP. Such a strategy may reduce
postoperative pulmonary complications and improve oxygenation during laparoscopy [59­62]. We prefer to
increase the respiratory rate, rather than the tidal volume, to increase minute ventilation and compensate for
CO2 absorption while avoiding barotrauma.

Various modes of ventilation have been used in an attempt to reduce peak inspiratory pressure during
laparoscopy. While pressure support ventilation may reduce the chance of high inspiratory pressure compared
with volume control, changes in intraabdominal pressure (IAP) during surgery can result in varied minute
ventilation with pressure control settings. Pressure support with volume guarantee, where available, can be
used to limit peak airway pressure while maintaining constant ventilation [63].

We accept mild hypercapnia (ie, end­tidal CO2 [ETCO2] approximately 40 mmHg) if necessary to maintain
peak airway pressures under 50 cmH2O in order to avoid barotrauma. In addition, mild hypercarbia can improve
tissue oxygenation by increasing cardiac output (CO) and vasodilation, and a shift to the right of the

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs=… 6/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve [64­66].

Increasing the inspiratory to expiratory (I:E) ratio may be beneficial in steep Trendelenburg position during
laparoscopy. A study of ventilatory strategy in 80 patients who underwent robotic laparoscopy found that an I:E
ratio of 1:1 reduced peak inspiratory pressure compared with a ratio of 1:2, without a change in CO, though
there was no difference in oxygenation [67].

Our strategy for ventilation — We ventilate with a starting fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) of 0.5,
tidal volume of 6 to 8 mL/kg ideal body weight, and with PEEP of 5 to 10 cmH2O, at a respiratory rate of 8
breaths/minute, adjusted to maintain ETCO2 at approximately 40 mmHg and oxygen saturation (SaO2) >90
percent.

For patients who develop the following complications, we modify ventilation during laparoscopy as follows:

● For peak pressures over 50 mmHg, we ventilate with pressure control with volume guarantee. If peak
pressure remains over 50 mmHg, we set the I:E ratio at 1:1.

● For hypoxia (ie, SaO2 <90 percent), we auscultate breath sounds bilaterally to rule out bronchospasm and
endobronchial intubation. We increase the FiO2 and perform a recruitment maneuver (maintain peak
airway pressures at 30 cmH2O for 20 to 30 seconds if arterial BPs [ABPs] permit); if oxygenation
improves, we increase PEEP values and perform periodic recruitment maneuvers (eg, every 30 minutes).
(See 'Pulmonary complications' below.)

● If hypoxemia and/or high peak airway pressures persist, for patients in Trendelenburg position, we reduce
the degree of tilt and/or reduce the insufflation pressure (eg, from 15 to 12 mmHg).

● For hypercarbia (ie, ETCO2 >50 mmHg) despite hyperventilation, we examine for signs of subcutaneous
emphysema. (See 'Subcutaneous emphysema' below.)

● If hypercarbia and/or hypoxia persist, we discuss conversion to open surgery.

Fluid management — Perioperative fluid therapy is one of the major factors known to influence
postoperative outcomes after abdominal surgery [68,69]. Restrictive fluid therapy with avoidance of fluid
excess improves outcome after major gastrointestinal surgery, with avoidance of bowel edema and interstitial
fluid accumulation. Intraoperative fluid therapy is discussed in greater depth separately. (See "Intraoperative
fluid management".)

In patients undergoing robotic surgery in prolonged steep head­down position, excessive fluid administration
may result in facial, pharyngeal, and laryngeal edema. In this setting, restrictive or goal­directed fluid therapy is
essential. Traditional indicators used to guide fluid therapy (eg, heart rate [HR], ABP, central venous pressures
[CVPs], and urine output) are unreliable [68]. Therefore, dynamic indicators such as stroke volume (SV) or
systolic pressure variation are preferred. Optimization of dynamic indicators can be achieved by administration
of small fluid boluses as necessary. Use of invasive or noninvasive monitors for goal­directed therapy in
laparoscopic procedures remains controversial. The cardiopulmonary changes resulting from intraabdominal
CO2 insufflation interfere with interpretation of the dynamic variables (eg, SV variation, pulse pressure
variation, systolic pressure variation). We use these monitors or place arterial lines selectively in patients with
significant cardiopulmonary disease.

Nausea and vomiting prophylaxis — Laparoscopy has been identified as a risk factor for PONV [70].
Although risk­based approaches for antiemetic therapy have been proposed, the compliance with these
strategies is poor [70]. Therefore, routine prophylactic multimodal antiemetic therapy should be utilized in all
patients undergoing laparoscopic/robotic surgery. The number of antiemetic combinations can be based on the
patient’s level of risk. Our approach to antiemetic prophylaxis in this setting is as follows:

● All patients – We administer dexamethasone (4 to 8 mg IV after induction) and 5­HT3 antagonists (eg,
ondansetron 4 mg at the end of surgical procedure).

● High­risk patients – For patients at very high risk of PONV (eg, history of motion sickness, history of
previous PONV, high opioid requirements for pain relief), we administer additional antiemetic therapy with
preoperative transdermal scopolamine or a neurokinin1 (NK1) antagonist [70,71]. In addition, we use total
http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs=… 7/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

IV anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol.

● Rescue therapy – For rescue therapy in the immediate postoperative period, we administer low­dose
promethazine (6.25 mg IV, slowly) or dimenhydrinate (1 mg/kg IV).

Plan for postoperative pain management — The origins of pain after laparoscopic and robotic surgical
procedures may be both somatic (ie, from port­site incisions) and visceral (ie, from peritoneal stretch and
manipulation of abdominal tissues). The degree of pain after laparoscopic and robotic surgery is usually low to
moderate [72,73] and is less than the corresponding open procedure, but the degree of pain depends on the
specific surgery. For example, laparoscopic nephrectomy can result in pain that requires parenteral opioids in
the absence of regional analgesia [74]. (See "Management of acute perioperative pain".)

We follow a procedure­specific, multimodal approach to the management of postoperative pain, starting prior to
and continuing in the OR. We aim to minimize postoperative administration of opioids. Pain after laparoscopy
can often be managed effectively with acetaminophen, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or
cyclooxygenase2 (COX2)­specific inhibitors, and dexamethasone [75­80]. We routinely infiltrate the incisions
with local anesthetic (LA) at the time of wound closure. In the postoperative period, if necessary, low­ to
moderate­intensity pain may be treated with weak opioids (eg, tramadol), and moderate­ to high­intensity pain
may be treated with strong opioids (eg, hydrocodone and oxycodone) [76].

For hybrid or laparoscopy­assisted surgical procedures with longer incisions, regional analgesia with a
transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block may be beneficial [76]. (See "Nerve blocks of the scalp, neck, and
trunk: Techniques", section on 'Transversus abdominis plane block'.)

For most laparoscopic and robotic surgical procedures, neuraxial analgesia (ie, epidural analgesia and
intrathecal morphine) is unnecessary and may not be beneficial [76]. A review of registry data from an
enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol for colon surgery found that, while the laparoscopic approach
reduced the hospital length of stay (odds ratio [OR] 0.83), the addition of epidural analgesia to laparoscopy
modestly increased the length of stay (OR 1.1) [81]. Epidural analgesia can be considered for laparoscopic
assisted procedures, which may include a significant abdominal incision.

Intraperitoneal instillation of LAs (eg, bupivacaine and ropivacaine) may reduce the intensity of
postlaparoscopic pain [82], but the concentration and dose of the LA, as well as optimal timing of
administration, remain unknown. Management of postoperative pain is discussed in more depth separately.
(See "Management of acute perioperative pain".)

INTRAOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS — Complications during laparoscopy include those related to the
physiologic effects of the laparoscopic approach (eg, hemodynamic compromise, respiratory decompensation),
surgical maneuvers (eg, access­related injury; vascular, solid­organ, or bowel injury; carbon dioxide [CO2]
spread to subcutaneous and intrathoracic spaces; gas embolism), and patient positioning [83­88]. The impact
of intraoperative complications on the anesthetic management of patients is discussed in the following
sections. Further details regarding the complications of laparoscopic surgery are discussed separately. (See
"Complications of laparoscopic surgery".)

Hemodynamic complications — Hypotension, hypertension, and arrhythmias can occur during laparoscopy
as a result of the physiologic effects of the technique. (See 'Cardiovascular changes' above.)

● During insufflation – Surgical injury during abdominal access (eg, gas embolism, vascular or solid organ
injury with hemorrhage) can cause rapid cardiovascular decompensation. Initial abdominal insufflation is a
time for hypervigilance with regard to blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), peak inspiratory pressures,
end tidal CO2 (ETCO2), and oxygen saturation. Changes in vital signs should be immediately discussed
with the surgeon to allow reevaluation of the position of the needle or port and possible release of the
pneumoperitoneum.

(table 3)Treatment of hemodynamic dysfunction includes confirmation that intraabdominal pressure (IAP)
is within acceptable limits; exclusion of treatable causes; and supportive therapy including reduction in
anesthetics, fluid administration, and pharmacologic interventions. If supportive therapy is ineffective,
deflation of the abdomen may be necessary. After cardiopulmonary stabilization, cautious, slow re­

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs=… 8/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

insufflation may then be attempted using lower IAP. However, with persistent signs of significant
cardiopulmonary impairment, it may be necessary to convert to an open procedure.

● During surgery – During surgery, hemodynamic instability can occur for a variety of reasons and may be
more likely in patients with cardiac comorbidities. (See 'Cardiovascular changes' above.)

• Hemorrhage – Hemorrhage may be less obvious during laparoscopic procedures because of the
limited and focused surgical field. Unexplained hypotension should be discussed with the surgeon.

• Hyperventilation – When ventilation is increased to compensate for CO2 absorption, venous return
to the heart may be compromised and result in hypotension, especially with the use of positive end­
expiratory pressure (PEEP). Fluid administration and/or change in ventilatory settings may improve
BP. (See 'Mechanical ventilation' above.)

• Positioning – Head­up positioning can cause venous pooling and reduced venous return to the
heart. Vasopressor administration (eg, phenylephrine) and/or fluid administration may be required.

Pulmonary complications — Pulmonary complications during laparoscopy, including hypercarbia and
hypoxemia, can relate to the physiologic effects of the technique (eg, altered respiratory mechanics, CO2
absorption, ventilation perfusion mismatch) or surgical injury (eg, diaphragm or lung injury).

● Hypercarbia – It may be necessary to increase ventilation during laparoscopy to compensate for CO2
absorption. When hypercarbia or an increase in ETCO2 occurs despite increase in ventilation, causes for
increased absorption or decreased elimination of CO2 should be considered, including both those that
may occur during any anesthetic and those specific to laparoscopy.

When severe hypercarbia occurs during laparoscopy, the patient should be examined for signs of
subcutaneous emphysema (ie, crepitus over the abdomen, chest, clavicles and neck). (See
'Subcutaneous emphysema' below.)

When high ETCO2 persists despite aggressive hyperventilation (eg, peak airway pressures >50 cmH2O),
reduced insufflation pressure or conversion to open surgery may be required.

● Hypoxia – Oxygen desaturation can occur during laparoscopy as a result of the physiologic changes of
the technique, surgical positioning, or for reasons that hypoxia can occur during any anesthetic.

The chest should be auscultated for the quality and presence of bilateral breath sounds to rule out
bronchospasm and endobronchial intubation. Initial treatment includes an increase in inspired oxygen
concentration. Unless the patient is hypotensive, a recruitment maneuver should be performed (ie,
manual breath with plateau pressure 30 cmH2O, held for 20 to 30 seconds duration, if BP permits), and
PEEP should be optimized. If refractory hypoxemia occurs, the pneumoperitoneum should be released.

Carbon dioxide insufflation

Subcutaneous emphysema — Subcutaneous emphysema can occur during laparoscopy when CO2 is
insufflated into subcutaneous tissues. This can occur during intraperitoneal insufflation with an improperly
placed Veress needle or trocar, during extraperitoneal laparoscopy (eg, renal surgery), or during upper
abdominal laparoscopy (eg, Nissen fundoplication) [23,89]. In rare cases, gas can track into the thorax and
mediastinum, thereby resulting in capnothorax, capnomediastinum, and capnopericardium [90]. (See
'Capnothorax' below.)

The following have been identified as risk factors for subcutaneous emphysema during laparoscopy [91]:

● Surgery lasting longer than 200 minutes
● The use of six or more surgical ports
● Patient age >65
● Nissen fundoplication surgery

Multiple studies have found that subcutaneous emphysema is associated with increased absorption of CO2
[21­23]. When hypercarbia occurs despite hyperventilation, the patient should be examined for signs of

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs=… 9/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

subcutaneous gas over the abdomen, chest, and neck. If crepitus or swelling is found, the surgeon should be
notified; readjustment of ports, reduction of insufflation pressure, or conversion to open surgery may be
required.

In most cases, subcutaneous emphysema resolves after the abdomen is deflated, and no specific intervention
is required. When crepitus or swelling occurs in the head, neck, or upper chest, the potential for airway
compromise after extubation is increased, especially for patients who may be edematous after prolonged
procedures in Trendelenburg position. In most cases, subcutaneous CO2 is superficial and does not
compromise the airway lumen. When external swelling is severe, options include the following:

● Laryngoscopy to assess airway edema while the patient is anesthetized.
● Extubation over a tube changer. (See "Management of the difficult airway for general anesthesia", section
on 'Extubation'.)
● Delayed extubation for several hours, with the patient positioned head­up, to allow resorption of CO2.

Absorption of CO2 from subcutaneous emphysema may continue for up to several hours after surgery [92].
Healthy patients are able to increase ventilation to eliminate CO2, but those with chronic lung disease or with
opioid­induced respiratory depression can remain hypercarbic and acidotic early in the postoperative period.
Somnolence, hypertension, and tachycardia may occur.

For symptomatic patients with subcutaneous emphysema of the head and neck region, a postoperative chest
radiograph should be performed to rule out capnothorax. Patients with significant subcutaneous emphysema
should be observed in the post­anesthesia care unit (PACU) for several hours, until swelling begins to subside
and vital signs are normal.

Capnothorax — Capnothorax, although rare, can be potentially life­threatening [84,93]. Capnothorax should
be suspected in the setting of an unexplained increase in airway pressure, hypoxemia, and hypercapnia,
especially during Nissen fundoplication. Other signs suggestive of capnothorax include subcutaneous
emphysema of the head and neck, inequality in chest expansion, reduced air entry, and a bulging diaphragm
(visualized by directing the videoscope towards the diaphragm) [94]. If necessary, a chest radiograph or
transthoracic ultrasound can confirm the diagnosis of capno­ or pneumothorax [95].

In this setting, treatment depends on the patient’s hemodynamic and respiratory status and the stage of the
surgery. If stable, reduction of insufflation pressure, hyperventilation, and increase in PEEP may be sufficient;
CO2 is resorbed quickly after even large capnothorax. In one reported case of near total capnothorax during
Nissen fundoplication, the gas resorbed within one hour postoperatively, with no specific treatment [94].

However, hemodynamic compromise can occur, requiring placement of an intrathoracic needle or a chest tube
for decompression and to allow completion of surgery [96­99]. If tension capnothorax persists despite these
measures, conversion to open surgery may be required.

Capnomediastinum and capnopericardium — Capnomediastinum and capnopericardium, although rare,
can be associated with significant hemodynamic compromise. Risk factors for these complications are similar
to the risk factors for capnothorax. The diagnosis is made by chest radiograph (ie, air is visible in the
mediastinum or pericardium). Management depends on the degree of hemodynamic compromise. In most
patients, deflation of the pneumoperitoneum and close observation is adequate, while others might require
supportive therapy along with hyperventilation.

Gas embolism — Venous gas embolism is extremely common during laparoscopy, though clinically
significant emboli are rare. Studies using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during laparoscopic surgery
have reported an incidence of subclinical gas embolism between 17 and 100 percent [100­103].

In this setting, gas embolism can occur via two mechanisms. Rarely, direct venous injection of CO2 with the
Veress needle can result in rapid, high­volume CO2 embolism at the time of abdominal insufflation.
Alternatively, CO2 entrainment is possible if a vein is severed or disrupted during surgery, allowing the gas
under pressure access to the circulation.

Signs of gas embolism include unexplained hypotension, abrupt reduction of ETCO2, hypoxemia, and
arrhythmias. The electrocardiogram (ECG) may show right heart strain with a widened QRS complex.
http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs… 10/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

Paradoxical embolism through a patent foramen ovale (PFO) or atrial septal defect (ASD) can occur, with
cerebral or coronary ischemia.

If gas embolism is suspected, the abdomen should be deflated to reduce CO2 entrainment, and ventilation
should be increased to reduce the size of CO2 bubbles, though hyperventilation may worsen hypotension.
Since gas embolism results from a vascular injury, hemorrhage is possible when the intraabdominal pressure is
reduced. Therefore, re­insufflation or open surgery may be required to stop hemorrhage if hemodynamic
instability persists.

Treatment is otherwise supportive, with fluid and vasopressor administration and, if necessary,
cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The left­lateral, head­down position may allow the gas bubble to float to the
apex of the right heart, away from the pulmonary artery.

Complications from surgical instrumentation — Complications of surgical instrumentation can occur during
abdominal access or during the surgical procedure. The complications of most concern to the anesthesiologist
include vascular and abdominal organ injury, both of which can result in significant hemorrhage.

Up to half of serious surgical complications occur during placement of the Veress needle or an access port
[104]. Therefore, significant injury and major hemorrhage can occur even during relatively low­risk procedures
(eg, diagnostic laparoscopy, laparoscopic appendectomy). In this setting, surgical access to a bleeding vessel
or organ may take time; BP should be supported with IV fluid and vasopressor administration, as necessary.

As with open surgical procedures, injury to intraabdominal structures can occur during dissection. Bleeding
may be less obvious during laparoscopy than it is during open procedures. The view of the surgical field is
limited, and blood can pool away from the surgical field when patients are in head­up or head­down position.
Signs of hypovolemia (ie, hypotension, tachycardia) may suggest occult bleeding and should be brought to the
surgeon’s attention.

The incidence, risk factors, and technical aspects of surgical complications are discussed in more detail
separately. (See "Complications of laparoscopic surgery".)

Complications related to positioning — Prolonged steep Trendelenburg positioning can cause conjunctival,
nasal, and laryngopharyngeal edema and may result in increased upper airway resistance [26] and, rarely,
postextubation laryngospasm and airway obstruction.

Both minor (ie, corneal abrasion) and significant (ie, ischemic optic neuropathy) ocular injuries have been
reported after laparoscopy performed in steep Trendelenburg position. Postoperative visual loss and ocular
injury are discussed in more detail separately. (See "Postoperative visual loss after anesthesia for nonocular
surgery".)

As for other long surgical procedures, patients who undergo prolonged laparoscopy are at risk for position­
related nerve injury and even compartment syndrome [105,106]. Pressure points, plastic tubing connectors,
monitoring cables, and leg supports for lithotomy positioning should all be padded. With steep Trendelenburg
positioning, the arms should be positioned without caudad pull on the shoulders in order to reduce the chance
of brachial plexus stretch injury.

Shoulder braces may be used to prevent sliding during Trendelenburg positioning; their use has been
associated with brachial plexus injury in this setting, though the incidence is unknown [107].

SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS

● The laparoscopic approach has become the standard of care for many surgical procedures. Robotic
surgery is typically performed laparoscopically; anesthetic concerns for conventional laparoscopy and
robotic surgery are similar.

● Laparoscopy requires insufflation of CO2 to create space for visualization and surgical maneuvers. The
associated increase in intraabdominal pressure (IAP), along with absorption of CO2 and effects of
surgical positioning, result in neuroendocrine and mechanical changes that affect cardiopulmonary
function. (See 'Physiologic effects of laparoscopy' above.)

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs… 11/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

Cardiopulmonary physiologic changes include the following:

• Cardiovascular changes – Increased systemic vascular resistance (SVR), arterial blood pressure
(ABP), and cardiac filling pressures. (See 'Cardiovascular changes' above.)

• Pulmonary changes – Increased intrathoracic pressure, reduced functional residual capacity (FRC),
and increased airway pressures. (See 'Pulmonary changes' above.)

● We perform general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation for laparoscopy, though others have used
regional anesthesia safely for short laparoscopic procedures. (See 'Choice of anesthetic' above.)

● When indicated, we administer nitrous oxide (N2O) as part of a balanced general anesthetic, along with
prophylaxis for postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). (See 'Use of nitrous oxide' above.)

● For laparoscopy, we administer neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) based on clinical need, aiming
for the least degree of block necessary for the clinical situation. For robotic surgery, we maintain deep
neuromuscular blockade (ie, one twitch with train­of­four peripheral nerve stimulator) until the robotic
device is undocked. (See 'Neuromuscular blockade' above.)

● We ventilate with a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) of 0.5, a starting tidal volume of 6 to 8 mL/kg ideal
body weight, with positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5 to 10 cmH2O, and at a respiratory rate of
8 breaths/minute, adjusted to maintain end tidal CO2 (ETCO2) at approximately 40 mmHg and oxygen
saturation (SaO2) >90 percent. We modify ventilation during laparoscopy as follows:

• For peak pressures over 50 mmHg, we ventilate with pressure control with volume guarantee. (See
'Mechanical ventilation' above.)

• For hypoxia (ie, SaO2 <90 percent), we increase the FiO2, auscultate bilaterally for breath sounds,
and perform a recruitment maneuver (maintain peak airway pressures at 30 cmH2O for 20 to 30
seconds if ABPs permit); if oxygenation improves, we increase PEEP values and perform periodic
recruitment maneuvers (eg, every 30 minutes). (See 'Pulmonary complications' above.)

• If hypoxemia and/or high peak airway pressures persist, for patients in Trendelenburg position, we
reduce the degree of tilt and/or reduce the insufflation pressure (eg, from 15 to 12 mmHg).

• For hypercarbia (ie, ETCO2 >50 mmHg) despite hyperventilation, we examine for signs of
subcutaneous emphysema. (See 'Subcutaneous emphysema' above.)

• If hypercarbia and/or hypoxia persist, we discuss conversion to open surgery.

● Laparoscopic surgery results in less pain than the corresponding open procedure. We follow a multimodal
approach to postoperative pain control, including acetaminophen, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs,
and local/regional analgesia, with the addition of opioid medication only as necessary. (See 'Plan for
postoperative pain management' above.)

● We suggest prophylaxis for PONV for all patients who undergo laparoscopy (Grade 2C). We use the
following approach (see 'Nausea and vomiting prophylaxis' above):

• All patients – We administer dexamethasone (4 to 8 mg IV after induction) and 5­HT3 antagonists
(eg, ondansetron 4 mg at the end of surgical procedure).

• High­risk patients – For patients at very high risk of PONV (eg, history of motion sickness, history
of previous PONV, high opioid requirements for pain relief), we administer additional antiemetic
therapy with preoperative transdermal scopolamine or a neurokinin1 (NK1) antagonist. In addition,
we use total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol.

• Rescue therapy – For rescue therapy in the immediate postoperative period, we administer low­dose
promethazine (6.25 mg IV, slowly) or dimenhydrinate (1 mg/kg IV).

● Rare but significant complications can occur during laparoscopy, including traumatic vascular and organ
injury, CO2 embolism, capnothorax, and capnomediastinum. Treatment requires supportive measures and
may require release of the pneumoperitoneum and conversion to open surgery. (See 'Intraoperative
http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs… 12/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

complications' above.)

Use of UpToDate is subject to the Subscription and License Agreement.

REFERENCES

1. Neudecker J, Sauerland S, Neugebauer E, et al. The European Association for Endoscopic Surgery
clinical practice guideline on the pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic surgery. Surg Endosc 2002;
16:1121.
2. Joshi GP, Cunningham AJ. Anesthesia for laparoscopic and robotic surgery. In: Clinical Anesthesia, 7th
ed, Barash PG, Cullen BF, Steolting RK, et al. (Eds), Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia 2013.
p.1257.
3. Meininger D, Westphal K, Bremerich DH, et al. Effects of posture and prolonged pneumoperitoneum on
hemodynamic parameters during laparoscopy. World J Surg 2008; 32:1400.
4. Kalmar AF, Foubert L, Hendrickx JF, et al. Influence of steep Trendelenburg position and CO(2)
pneumoperitoneum on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory homeostasis during robotic
prostatectomy. Br J Anaesth 2010; 104:433.
5. Lestar M, Gunnarsson L, Lagerstrand L, et al. Hemodynamic perturbations during robot­assisted
laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in 45° Trendelenburg position. Anesth Analg 2011; 113:1069.
6. Hein HA, Joshi GP, Ramsay MA, et al. Hemodynamic changes during laparoscopic cholecystectomy in
patients with severe cardiac disease. J Clin Anesth 1997; 9:261.
7. Harris SN, Ballantyne GH, Luther MA, Perrino AC Jr. Alterations of cardiovascular performance during
laparoscopic colectomy: a combined hemodynamic and echocardiographic analysis. Anesth Analg 1996;
83:482.
8. Kraut EJ, Anderson JT, Safwat A, et al. Impairment of cardiac performance by laparoscopy in patients
receiving positive end­expiratory pressure. Arch Surg 1999; 134:76.
9. Safran D, Sgambati S, Orlando R 3rd. Laparoscopy in high­risk cardiac patients. Surg Gynecol Obstet
1993; 176:548.
10. McLaughlin JG, Scheeres DE, Dean RJ, Bonnell BW. The adverse hemodynamic effects of laparoscopic
cholecystectomy. Surg Endosc 1995; 9:121.
11. O'Malley C, Cunningham AJ. Physiologic changes during laparoscopy. Anesthesiol Clin North America
2001; 19:1.
12. Gutt CN, Oniu T, Mehrabi A, et al. Circulatory and respiratory complications of carbon dioxide
insufflation. Dig Surg 2004; 21:95.
13. Myre K, Rostrup M, Buanes T, Stokland O. Plasma catecholamines and haemodynamic changes during
pneumoperitoneum. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 1998; 42:343.
14. Joris JL, Noirot DP, Legrand MJ, et al. Hemodynamic changes during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
Anesth Analg 1993; 76:1067.
15. Carmichael DE. Laparoscopy­cardiac considerations. Fertil Steril 1971; 22:69.
16. Zuckerman RS, Heneghan S. The duration of hemodynamic depression during laparoscopic
cholecystectomy. Surg Endosc 2002; 16:1233.
17. Hirvonen EA, Poikolainen EO, Pääkkönen ME, Nuutinen LS. The adverse hemodynamic effects of
anesthesia, head­up tilt, and carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
Surg Endosc 2000; 14:272.
18. Nguyen NT, Wolfe BM. The physiologic effects of pneumoperitoneum in the morbidly obese. Ann Surg
2005; 241:219.
19. Meininger D, Zwissler B, Byhahn C, et al. Impact of overweight and pneumoperitoneum on
hemodynamics and oxygenation during prolonged laparoscopic surgery. World J Surg 2006; 30:520.
20. Giebler RM, Kabatnik M, Stegen BH, et al. Retroperitoneal and intraperitoneal CO2 insufflation have
markedly different cardiovascular effects. J Surg Res 1997; 68:153.
21. Kadam PG, Marda M, Shah VR. Carbon dioxide absorption during laparoscopic donor nephrectomy: a
comparison between retroperitoneal and transperitoneal approaches. Transplant Proc 2008; 40:1119.
22. Ng CS, Gill IS, Sung GT, et al. Retroperitoneoscopic surgery is not associated with increased carbon
dioxide absorption. J Urol 1999; 162:1268.

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs… 13/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

23. Wolf JS Jr, Monk TG, McDougall EM, et al. The extraperitoneal approach and subcutaneous emphysema
are associated with greater absorption of carbon dioxide during laparoscopic renal surgery. J Urol 1995;
154:959.
24. Mullett CE, Viale JP, Sagnard PE, et al. Pulmonary CO2 elimination during surgical procedures using
intra­ or extraperitoneal CO2 insufflation. Anesth Analg 1993; 76:622.
25. Schrijvers D, Mottrie A, Traen K, et al. Pulmonary gas exchange is well preserved during robot assisted
surgery in steep Trendelenburg position. Acta Anaesthesiol Belg 2009; 60:229.
26. Rajan GR, Foroughi V. Mainstem bronchial obstruction during laparoscopic fundoplication. Anesth Analg
1999; 89:252.
27. Chang CH, Lee HK, Nam SH. The displacement of the tracheal tube during robot­assisted radical
prostatectomy. Eur J Anaesthesiol 2010; 27:478.
28. Wu CY, Yeh YC, Wang MC, et al. Changes in endotracheal tube cuff pressure during laparoscopic
surgery in head­up or head­down position. BMC Anesthesiol 2014; 14:75.
29. Hatipoglu S, Akbulut S, Hatipoglu F, Abdullayev R. Effect of laparoscopic abdominal surgery on
splanchnic circulation: historical developments. World J Gastroenterol 2014; 20:18165.
30. Kawanaka H, Akahoshi T, Kinjo N, et al. Laparoscopic Splenectomy with Technical Standardization and
Selection Criteria for Standard or Hand­Assisted Approach in 390 Patients with Liver Cirrhosis and Portal
Hypertension. J Am Coll Surg 2015; 221:354.
31. Nguyen NT, Perez RV, Fleming N, et al. Effect of prolonged pneumoperitoneum on intraoperative urine
output during laparoscopic gastric bypass. J Am Coll Surg 2002; 195:476.
32. Chiu AW, Chang LS, Birkett DH, Babayan RK. The impact of pneumoperitoneum,
pneumoretroperitoneum, and gasless laparoscopy on the systemic and renal hemodynamics. J Am Coll
Surg 1995; 181:397.
33. Schäfer M, Krähenbühl L. Effect of laparoscopy on intra­abdominal blood flow. Surgery 2001; 129:385.
34. Halverson A, Buchanan R, Jacobs L, et al. Evaluation of mechanism of increased intracranial pressure
with insufflation. Surg Endosc 1998; 12:266.
35. Closhen D, Treiber AH, Berres M, et al. Robotic assisted prostatic surgery in the Trendelenburg position
does not impair cerebral oxygenation measured using two different monitors: A clinical observational
study. Eur J Anaesthesiol 2014; 31:104.
36. Awad H, Santilli S, Ohr M, et al. The effects of steep trendelenburg positioning on intraocular pressure
during robotic radical prostatectomy. Anesth Analg 2009; 109:473.
37. Grosso A, Scozzari G, Bert F, et al. Intraocular pressure variation during colorectal laparoscopic surgery:
standard pneumoperitoneum leads to reversible elevation in intraocular pressure. Surg Endosc 2013;
27:3370.
38. Yoo YC, Shin S, Choi EK, et al. Increase in intraocular pressure is less with propofol than with
sevoflurane during laparoscopic surgery in the steep Trendelenburg position. Can J Anaesth 2014;
61:322.
39. Das W, Bhattacharya S, Ghosh S, et al. Comparison between general anesthesia and spinal anesthesia
in attenuation of stress response in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A randomized prospective trial. Saudi
J Anaesth 2015; 9:184.
40. Sinha R, Gurwara AK, Gupta SC. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy under spinal anesthesia: a study of
3492 patients. J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A 2009; 19:323.
41. Bessa SS, Katri KM, Abdel­Salam WN, et al. Spinal versus general anesthesia for day­case
laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a prospective randomized study. J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A 2012;
22:550.
42. Agrawal M, Verma AP, Kang LS. Thoracic epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy using
either bupivacaine or a mixture of bupivacaine and clonidine: A comparative clinical study. Anesth
Essays Res 2013; 7:44.
43. Lim Y, Goel S, Brimacombe JR. The ProSeal laryngeal mask airway is an effective alternative to
laryngoscope­guided tracheal intubation for gynaecological laparoscopy. Anaesth Intensive Care 2007;
35:52.
44. Mukadder S, Zekine B, Erdogan KG, et al. Comparison of the proseal, supreme, and i­gel SAD in
gynecological laparoscopic surgeries. ScientificWorldJournal 2015; 2015:634320.
45. Viira D, Myles PS. The use of the laryngeal mask in gynaecological laparoscopy. Anaesth Intensive Care
2004; 32:560.

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs… 14/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

46. Saraswat N, Kumar A, Mishra A, et al. The comparison of Proseal laryngeal mask airway and
endotracheal tube in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgeries under general anaesthesia. Indian J
Anaesth 2011; 55:129.
47. Taylor E, Feinstein R, White PF, Soper N. Anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Is nitrous oxide
contraindicated? Anesthesiology 1992; 76:541.
48. Muir JJ, Warner MA, Offord KP, et al. Role of nitrous oxide and other factors in postoperative nausea and
vomiting: a randomized and blinded prospective study. Anesthesiology 1987; 66:513.
49. Lonie DS, Harper NJ. Nitrous oxide anaesthesia and vomiting. The effect of nitrous oxide anaesthesia on
the incidence of vomiting following gynaecological laparoscopy. Anaesthesia 1986; 41:703.
50. Fernández­Guisasola J, Gómez­Arnau JI, Cabrera Y, del Valle SG. Association between nitrous oxide
and the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting in adults: a systematic review and meta­
analysis. Anaesthesia 2010; 65:379.
51. EGER EI 2nd, SAIDMAN LJ. HAZARDS OF NITROUS OXIDE ANESTHESIA IN BOWEL
OBSTRUCTION AND PNEUMOTHORAX. Anesthesiology 1965; 26:61.
52. Brodsky JB, Lemmens HJ, Collins JS, et al. Nitrous oxide and laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Obes Surg
2005; 15:494.
53. Akca O, Lenhardt R, Fleischmann E, et al. Nitrous oxide increases the incidence of bowel distension in
patients undergoing elective colon resection. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 2004; 48:894.
54. Kopman AF, Naguib M. Laparoscopic surgery and muscle relaxants: is deep block helpful? Anesth Analg
2015; 120:51.
55. Martini CH, Boon M, Bevers RF, et al. Evaluation of surgical conditions during laparoscopic surgery in
patients with moderate vs deep neuromuscular block. Br J Anaesth 2014; 112:498.
56. Dubois PE, Putz L, Jamart J, et al. Deep neuromuscular block improves surgical conditions during
laparoscopic hysterectomy: a randomised controlled trial. Eur J Anaesthesiol 2014; 31:430.
57. Staehr­Rye AK, Rasmussen LS, Rosenberg J, et al. Surgical space conditions during low­pressure
laparoscopic cholecystectomy with deep versus moderate neuromuscular blockade: a randomized
clinical study. Anesth Analg 2014; 119:1084.
58. Chassard D, Berrada K, Tournadre J, Boulétreau P. The effects of neuromuscular block on peak airway
pressure and abdominal elastance during pneumoperitoneum. Anesth Analg 1996; 82:525.
59. Gertler R, Joshi GP. Modern understanding of intraoperative mechanical ventilation in normal and
diseased lungs. Adv Anesth 2010; 28:15.
60. Güldner A, Kiss T, Serpa Neto A, et al. Intraoperative protective mechanical ventilation for prevention of
postoperative pulmonary complications: a comprehensive review of the role of tidal volume, positive end­
expiratory pressure, and lung recruitment maneuvers. Anesthesiology 2015; 123:692.
61. Serpa Neto A, Hemmes SN, Barbas CS, et al. Protective versus Conventional Ventilation for Surgery: A
Systematic Review and Individual Patient Data Meta­analysis. Anesthesiology 2015; 123:66.
62. Meininger D, Byhahn C, Mierdl S, et al. Positive end­expiratory pressure improves arterial oxygenation
during prolonged pneumoperitoneum. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 2005; 49:778.
63. Choi EM, Na S, Choi SH, et al. Comparison of volume­controlled and pressure­controlled ventilation in
steep Trendelenburg position for robot­assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. J Clin Anesth 2011;
23:183.
64. Joshi GP. The role of carbon dioxide in facilitating emergence from inhalation anesthesia: then & now.
Anesth Analg 2012; 114:933.
65. Hager H, Reddy D, Mandadi G, et al. Hypercapnia improves tissue oxygenation in morbidly obese
surgical patients. Anesth Analg 2006; 103:677.
66. Fleischmann E, Herbst F, Kugener A, et al. Mild hypercapnia increases subcutaneous and colonic
oxygen tension in patients given 80% inspired oxygen during abdominal surgery. Anesthesiology 2006;
104:944.
67. Kim MS, Kim NY, Lee KY, et al. The impact of two different inspiratory to expiratory ratios (1:1 and 1:2)
on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation during volume­controlled ventilation in robot­assisted
laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a randomized controlled trial. Can J Anaesth 2015; 62:979.
68. Joshi GP. Intraoperative fluid restriction improves outcome after major elective gastrointestinal surgery.
Anesth Analg 2005; 101:601.
69. Miller TE, Raghunathan K, Gan TJ. State­of­the­art fluid management in the operating room. Best Pract
Res Clin Anaesthesiol 2014; 28:261.

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs… 15/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

70. Gan TJ, Diemunsch P, Habib AS, et al. Consensus guidelines for the management of postoperative
nausea and vomiting. Anesth Analg 2014; 118:85.
71. Diemunsch P, Joshi GP, Brichant JF. Neurokinin­1 receptor antagonists in the prevention of postoperative
nausea and vomiting. Br J Anaesth 2009; 103:7.
72. Woldu SL, Weinberg AC, Bergman A, et al. Pain and analgesic use after robot­assisted radical
prostatectomy. J Endourol 2014; 28:544.
73. Leitao MM Jr, Malhotra V, Briscoe G, et al. Postoperative pain medication requirements in patients
undergoing computer­assisted (“Robotic”) and standard laparoscopic procedures for newly diagnosed
endometrial cancer. Ann Surg Oncol 2013; 20:3561.
74. Poulakis V, Skriapas K, de Vries R, et al. Quality of life after laparoscopic and open retroperitoneal lymph
node dissection in clinical Stage I nonseminomatous germ cell tumor: a comparison study. Urology 2006;
68:154.
75. Magheli A, Knoll N, Lein M, et al. Impact of fast­track postoperative care on intestinal function, pain, and
length of hospital stay after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. J Endourol 2011; 25:1143.
76. Joshi GP, Schug SA, Kehlet H. Procedure­specific pain management and outcome strategies. Best
Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol 2014; 28:191.
77. Maund E, McDaid C, Rice S, et al. Paracetamol and selective and non­selective non­steroidal anti­
inflammatory drugs for the reduction in morphine­related side­effects after major surgery: a systematic
review. Br J Anaesth 2011; 106:292.
78. Ong CK, Seymour RA, Lirk P, Merry AF. Combining paracetamol (acetaminophen) with nonsteroidal
antiinflammatory drugs: a qualitative systematic review of analgesic efficacy for acute postoperative
pain. Anesth Analg 2010; 110:1170.
79. Srinivasa S, Kahokehr AA, Yu TC, Hill AG. Preoperative glucocorticoid use in major abdominal surgery:
systematic review and meta­analysis of randomized trials. Ann Surg 2011; 254:183.
80. Waldron NH, Jones CA, Gan TJ, et al. Impact of perioperative dexamethasone on postoperative
analgesia and side­effects: systematic review and meta­analysis. Br J Anaesth 2013; 110:191.
81. ERAS Compliance Group. The Impact of Enhanced Recovery Protocol Compliance on Elective
Colorectal Cancer Resection: Results From an International Registry. Ann Surg 2015; 261:1153.
82. Joshi GP, Bonnet F, Kehlet H, PROSPECT collaboration. Evidence­based postoperative pain
management after laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Colorectal Dis 2013; 15:146.
83. Joshi GP. Complications of laparoscopy. Anesthesiol Clin North America 2001; 19:89.
84. Coelho JC, Campos AC, Costa MA, et al. Complications of laparoscopic fundoplication in the elderly.
Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech 2003; 13:6.
85. Pareek G, Hedican SP, Gee JR, et al. Meta­analysis of the complications of laparoscopic renal surgery:
comparison of procedures and techniques. J Urol 2006; 175:1208.
86. Fischer B, Engel N, Fehr JL, John H. Complications of robotic assisted radical prostatectomy. World J
Urol 2008; 26:595.
87. Coelho RF, Palmer KJ, Rocco B, et al. Early complication rates in a single­surgeon series of 2500
robotic­assisted radical prostatectomies: report applying a standardized grading system. Eur Urol 2010;
57:945.
88. Lasser MS, Renzulli J 2nd, Turini GA 3rd, et al. An unbiased prospective report of perioperative
complications of robot­assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Urology 2010; 75:1083.
89. Siu W, Seifman BD, Wolf JS Jr. Subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum and bilateral
pneumothoraces after laparoscopic pyeloplasty. J Urol 2003; 170:1936.
90. Stern JA, Nadler RB. Pneumothorax masked by subcutaneous emphysema after laparoscopic
nephrectomy. J Endourol 2004; 18:457.
91. Murdock CM, Wolff AJ, Van Geem T. Risk factors for hypercarbia, subcutaneous emphysema,
pneumothorax, and pneumomediastinum during laparoscopy. Obstet Gynecol 2000; 95:704.
92. Hall D, Goldstein A, Tynan E, Braunstein L. Profound hypercarbia late in the course of laparoscopic
cholecystectomy: detection by continuous capnometry. Anesthesiology 1993; 79:173.
93. Phillips S, Falk GL. Surgical tension pneumothorax during laparoscopic repair of massive hiatus hernia: a
different situation requiring different management. Anaesth Intensive Care 2011; 39:1120.
94. Hawasli A. Spontaneous resolution of massive laparoscopy­associated pneumothorax: the case of the
bulging diaphragm and review of the literature. J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A 2002; 12:77.
95. Ueda K, Ahmed W, Ross AF. Intraoperative pneumothorax identified with transthoracic ultrasound.
http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs… 16/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

Anesthesiology 2011; 115:653.
96. Joris JL, Chiche JD, Lamy ML. Pneumothorax during laparoscopic fundoplication: diagnosis and
treatment with positive end­expiratory pressure. Anesth Analg 1995; 81:993.
97. Venkatesh R, Kibel AS, Lee D, et al. Rapid resolution of carbon dioxide pneumothorax (capno­thorax)
resulting from diaphragmatic injury during laparoscopic nephrectomy. J Urol 2002; 167:1387.
98. Harkin CP, Sommerhaug EW, Mayer KL. An unexpected complication during laparoscopic herniorrhaphy.
Anesth Analg 1999; 89:1576.
99. Day CJ, Parker MR, Cloote AH. Pneumothorax during fundoplication. Can J Anaesth 1995; 42:556.
100. Derouin M, Couture P, Boudreault D, et al. Detection of gas embolism by transesophageal
echocardiography during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Anesth Analg 1996; 82:119.
101. Hong JY, Kim JY, Choi YD, et al. Incidence of venous gas embolism during robotic­assisted
laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is lower than that during radical retropubic prostatectomy. Br J
Anaesth 2010; 105:777.
102. Hong JY, Kim WO, Kil HK. Detection of subclinical CO2 embolism by transesophageal
echocardiography during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Urology 2010; 75:581.
103. Kim CS, Kim JY, Kwon JY, et al. Venous air embolism during total laparoscopic hysterectomy:
comparison to total abdominal hysterectomy. Anesthesiology 2009; 111:50.
104. Magrina JF. Complications of laparoscopic surgery. Clin Obstet Gynecol 2002; 45:469.
105. Mathews PV, Perry JJ, Murray PC. Compartment syndrome of the well leg as a result of the
hemilithotomy position: a report of two cases and review of literature. J Orthop Trauma 2001; 15:580.
106. Ikeya E, Taguchi J, Ohta K, et al. Compartment syndrome of bilateral lower extremities following
laparoscopic surgery of rectal cancer in lithotomy position: report of a case. Surg Today 2006; 36:1122.
107. American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Prevention of Perioperative Peripheral
Neuropathies. Practice advisory for the prevention of perioperative peripheral neuropathies: an updated
report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on prevention of perioperative peripheral
neuropathies. Anesthesiology 2011; 114:741.

Topic 100120 Version 4.0

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs… 17/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

GRAPHICS

Cardiovascular changes during laparoscopy

Parameters Change Causes

Systemic vascular resistance Increased Hypercarbia


and Neuroendocrine response
mean arterial pressure (ie, increased
catecholamines,
vasopressin, and cortisol)
Mechanical factors (ie,
direct compression of
aorta)

Cardiac filling pressures Increased Increased intrathoracic


pressure secondary to
pneumoperitoneum
Increased sympathetic
output due to
neuroendocrine response
and hypercarbia

Cardiac filling volumes Variable; increased or no Interaction among:


change Increased intravascular
volume resulting from
compression of liver and
spleen
Reduced preload and
venous return
Positioning
Patient's preexisting
status

Cardiac index Variable; decreased or no Interaction among:


change Increased afterload
Decreased venous
return
Decreased cardiac filling
Increased intravascular
volume
Positioning
Patient's preexisting
status

Cardiac rhythm Bradyarrhythmias Peritoneal stretch ­ vagal

Tachyarrhythmias Hypercarbia
Hypoxia
Capnothorax
Pulmonary embolism

Adapted from: Joshi G, Cunningham A. Anesthesia for laparoscopic and robotic surgeries. In: Clinical
Anesthesia, 7th ed, Barash PG, Cullen BF, Stoelting RK, et al (Eds), Lippincott Williams & Wilkins,

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs… 18/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

Philadelphia 2013.

Graphic 105517 Version 1.0

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs… 19/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

Pulmonary changes during laparoscopic and robotic surgery

Parameter Change Causes

Lung volume (ie, functional Decrease Elevation of diaphragm


residual capacity) Increased intraabdominal
pressure
Positioning

Lung compliance Decreased Elevation of diaphragm


Increased pleural Increased intraabdominal
pressure pressure
Increased airway
pressure

PCO 2 Increased, depending on CO 2  absorption


ventilation

PO 2 Variable Interaction among:
Atelectasis
Hypoxic pulmonary
vasoconstriction
Preoperative pulmonary
status

Tracheal position Cephalad displacement, Increased intraabdominal


possible mainstem intubation pressure
Trendelenburg position

PO 2 : partial pressure of oxygen; PCO 2 : partial pressure of carbon dioxide; CO 2 : carbon


dioxide.

Adapted from: Joshi G, Cunningham A. Anesthesia for laparoscopic and robotic surgeries. In: Clinical
Anesthesia, 7th ed, Barash PG, Cullen BF, Stoelting RK, et al (Eds), Lippincott Williams & Wilkins,
Philadelphia 2013.

Graphic 105522 Version 1.0

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs… 20/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

CO 2  absorption during laparoscopy

Mean CO 2  elimination versus time in patients with transperitoneal and retroperitoneal
laparoscopic approaches.

CO 2 : carbon dioxide; VCO 2 : mean CO 2  elimination.

Reproduced from: Kadam PG, Marda M, Shah VR. Carbon Dioxide Absorption During Laparoscopic Donor
Nephrectomy: A Comparison Between Retroperitoneal and Transperitoneal Approaches. Transplant Proc
2008; 40:1119. Illustration used with the permission of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Graphic 105217 Version 1.0

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs… 21/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

Differential diagnosis of hemodynamic collapse during
laparoscopy

Decreased cardiac preload:
Hemorrhage

Positional blood pooling

Gas embolism

Excessive intraabdominal pressure

Capnothorax

Cardiac tamponade due to capnomediastinum or capnopericardium

Decreased cardiac contractility:
Anesthetic medication effect

Myocardial ischemia or infarction

Acidosis due to hypercarbia

Decreased SVR:
Anesthetic overdose

Acidosis due to hypercarbia

Anaphylaxis

Sepsis

Bradycardia:
Vagal stimulation

SVR: systemic vascular resistance.

Adapted from: Joshi G, Cunningham A. Anesthesia for laparoscopic and robotic surgeries. In: Clinical
Anesthesia, 7th ed, Barash PG, Cullen BF, Stoelting RK, et al (Eds), Lippincott Williams & Wilkins,
Philadelphia 2013.

Graphic 105520 Version 1.0

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs… 22/23
3/30/2016 Anesthesia for laparoscopic and abdominal robotic surgery in adults

Disclosures
Disclosures: Girish P Joshi, MB, BS, MD, FFARCSI Speaker's Bureau: Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals [pain management
(intravenous acetaminophen)]; Baxter [pain management (desflurane)]. Consultant/Advisory Boards: Pacira Pharmaceuticals [pain
management (bupivacaine)]. Stephanie B Jones, MD Nothing to disclose. Marianna Crowley, MD Nothing to disclose.
Contributor disclosures are reviewed for conflicts of interest by the editorial group. When found, these are addressed by vetting
through a multi­level review process, and through requirements for references to be provided to support the content. Appropriately
referenced content is required of all authors and must conform to UpToDate standards of evidence.
Conflict of interest policy

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/anesthesia­for­laparoscopic­and­abdominal­robotic­surgery­in­adults?topicKey=ANEST%2F100120&elapsedTimeMs… 23/23