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District 11 Plan for the Prevention of

Child Abuse, Neglect, and Abandonment


2005-2009
Cover Sheet: Local Child Abuse Prevention Plan
District Eleven

Counties included in plan Miami-Dade and Monroe

District Administrator Charles M. Hood III

Contact Person Chuck Hood

Address: 401 NW 2nd Avenue, Suite N-1007

Miami, Florida 33128

Phone: (305) 377-5055

e-mail: charles_hood@dcf.state.fl.us

List all members of your regional planning group and their affiliations (add more rows if
necessary):

Name Organization(s) Represented


Mark Zaher Miami-Dade County Public Schools
Monroe County Public Schools
Lilian Rivera Miami-Dade County Health Department
Mark Buckbinder Miami-Dade Alliance for Human Services
Manny Fermen Healthy Start
Paula Bender Miami Dade & Monroe Early Education
Coalition
Bobbie Ibarra Community Based Care Provider of Child
Welfare- Our Kids
Jean Logan The Children’s Trust
Daniella Levine Human Service Coalition
Ricka Poulaille Foster Child (Young Adult)
Gepsie Metallus Santa La Haitian (American Organization)
Joni Goodman Guardian Ad Litem
Trudy Petkovich Kristi House – Sexual Abuse Center
Imran Ali Miami-Dade County Children’s Advocate
David Raymond Homeless Trust
Edith Humes-Newbold South Florida Workforce
Isabel Afanador Department of Juvenile Justice
Randy Acevedo Monroe Schools Superintendent
Dr. Susan May Monroe Health Department
Michael Philip Monroe Healthy Start

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Karen Knight Monroe Our Kids Regional Manager
Alexa Leto Monroe Guardian Ad Litem
RaiEtte Avael Monroe Department of Juvenile Justice
Elmira Leto Monroe Homeless Coalition (SHAL)

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Developing the Five Year Plan for the
Prevention of
Child Abuse, Neglect, and Abandonment
2005 - 2009

A Workbook for the Local Planning


Process
November 2004

Developed by:
With guidance from:
Sponsored by: CEED, USF
The TEAM Florida
The Florida Department Lawton and Rhea Chiles
Partnership
of Children and Families Center for Healthy
Interprogram Task Force
Mothers and Babies

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Workbook for the Local Planning Process
November 2004

Table of Contents

Creating Your Local Plan ........................ 7


Overview of the Workbook ...................... 8
Step 1: Assemble Your Local Planning Team............................................................... 9
Step 2: Define the Magnitude of Child Abuse............................................................. 10
Step 3: Analyze Strengths and Protective Factors ........................................................ 12
Step 4: Analyze Challenges and Risk Factors ............................................................. 14
Step 5: Develop Community Priorities ........................................................................ 19
Step 6: Rank Community Priorities ............................................................................. 22
Step 7: Describe Programs in Your Community ......................................................... 23
Step 8: Define Goals, Objectives, and Strategies ........................................................ 29
Step 9: Request Local and Statewide Action............................................................... 33
Step 10: Describe the Planning Process....................................................................... 36
Step 11: Submit the Plan.............................................................................................. 36

Appendices
Appendix A: Definitions
Appendix B: Continuum of Services
Appendix C: Cover Sheet

Questions regarding the development of your Local Plan can be addressed to:

Dwanna Gregory
Phone: 850-487-0989
e-mail: Dgregor1@hsc.usf.edu

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Bobbi Markiewicz
Phone: 850-488-9979
e-mail: bmarkiew@hsc.usf.edu

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Creating Your Local Plan
This workbook is designed to help you develop your community’s five-year plan for
prevention of child abuse, abandonment, and neglect. It will cover five years, beginning
1 July 2005 and ending 30 June 2010. The plan you develop will serve two major
purposes: First, it will provide an integrated approach that will guide your community’s
efforts to create a better environment for its children. Second, your plan, along with all
the other local five-year prevention plans from around the state, will form the basis for
the statewide prevention plan being developed by the TEAM Florida Partnership
Interprogram Task Force, which is due to the Governor and the Legislature on June 30,
2005.

So that the Task Force can incorporate information from all the local plans in the
development of the statewide plan, your community’s plan must be submitted by
February 28, 2005. (See Appendix C for submission instructions).

The five-year plan will address the prevention continuum from primary prevention
through tertiary prevention or intervention/treatment. Appendix A contains definitions of
terms that are included in this workbook.

A word to the wise: Section 20.19(6)(b), F.S., holds Community Alliances


responsible for (among other things) “…joint planning for resource utilization in the
community…, needs assessment and establishment of community priorities for service
delivery, determining community outcome goals…, serving as a catalyst for
community resource development.” The plan your local prevention task force
develops should relate directly to the local Community Alliance’s plan regarding the
community’s need for services and allocation of service resources.

A recommended outline for your plan has been developed for your use. This outline has
been created to assist you in developing a local plan that will conform to state
requirements described in section 39.001, F.S. It has been developed with the guidance
of the TEAM Florida Partnership Interprogram Task Force. The outline below should
serve as a useful tool:

Outline: Local Plans for Prevention of Child Abuse,


Abandonment, and Neglect
2005-2009
I. The process used to develop the plan.
II. The magnitude of child abuse in the community.
III. Community protective factors and strengths.
IV. Community challenges and risk factors.
V. Prioritized community needs related to the prevention of child
abuse, neglect and abandonment.
VI. Goals, measurable objectives and strategies to achieve each
objective.
VII. Local and statewide action requests.

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Overview of the Workbook
7This workbook breaks the planning process into eleven steps. These steps include:

Step 1: Assemble Your Local Planning Team. This step helps you organize your
local planning team.
Step 2: Define the Magnitude of Child Abuse. This step will help you understand
the data related to child abuse in your community as a basis for writing section
II in the plan outline.
Step 3: Analyze Strengths and Protective Factors. This step will help you define
community strengths that you can draw on in the development of your
prevention plan. This information will help you write section III in the plan
outline.
Step 4: Analyze Challenges and Risk Factors. This step will help you identify
community challenges that will be addressed in your prevention plan and will
provide the basis for section IV in the plan outline.
Step 5: Develop Community Priorities. This step will assist you in deciding the
most important issues to be addressed in your prevention plan. It provides the
basis for Step 6.
Step 6: Rank Community Priorities. This step helps you decide which priorities are
the most important one to be addressed in your plan and forms the foundation
for the goals, objectives and strategies that will be defined in Step 8. In
addition, the information developed in this step will form the foundation for
section V in the plan outline.
Step 7: Describe Programs in Your Local Community. This step allows you to
identify existing local programs, their funding sources and funding levels. It
allows you to consider the need for these programs based on the community
priorities you identified in Step 6. Decisions you make in this step regarding
continued needs for existing programs will help you formulate strategies in
Step 8. The tables you develop in this step should be included as an appendix
in your local plan.
Step 8: Define Goals, Objective and Strategies. This is the heart of your plan.
These goals, objectives and strategies will serve as a basis for decisions about
services provided in your community within the next five years and for
section VI in the plan outline.
Step 9: Request Local and Statewide Actions. This step will allow you to make
requests for infrastructure, policy, legislative and funding changes that will
facilitate accomplishment of goals in your community. It will provide the
information you need for section VII of your plan outline.
Step 10: Describe the Planning Process. This step helps you know what to include in
a brief description of the process you used to create your community
prevention plan. The description will be included in Section I of your plan
outline.
Step 11: Submit the Plan. This section tells you how, when and to whom to submit
your community prevention plan.

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Step 1: Assemble Your Local Planning Team
Section 39.001(7)(b)6., F.S., specifies that the Department of Children and Families’
District Administrators will appoint the local planning team. Members of the team
should be representative of those who can leave “turf and program ” at the door and who
will be willing to work together to develop a plan for prevention of child abuse, neglect
and abandonment. At the very least, in order to comply with Section 39.001 of the
Florida Statutes, the planning team should include representation from:

• Community mental health centers;


• Guardian ad litem programs (or circuit courts or law enforcement); Joni Goodman
• School boards of the local school districts; Mark Zaher
• Local advocacy councils;
• Programs with expertise in working with children who are sexually abused,
physically abused, emotionally abused, abandoned, or neglected and with their
families; Trudy Petkovich
• Programs with expertise in maternal and infant healthcare;
• Multidisciplinary child protection teams;
• Child day care centers; and
• DCF district office personnel.

There are many more partners who can be instrumental with helping with the planning
process. Don’t limit your team membership to just those required in statute. Add to your
team as is appropriate for the region for which you are planning. For example, consider
adding representation from:

• Community Alliances; Alliance for Human Services


• Community Based Care Organizations;
• Tribal representatives;
• Parents;
• County social service representatives; and Imran Ali
• Local government. Homestead, Fl City, Miami, MB, Coral Gables, Opa Locka,
Hialeah

The local planning team needs to meet frequently enough to submit its plan to the TEAM
Florida Partnership Interprogram Task Force by February 28, 2005.

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Step 2: Define the Magnitude of Child Abuse

4.
2. Percent of
Child 3. Children 5.
1.
Maltreatment Least or Most Re-abused Least or Most
County
Rate Risk Based Within Six Risk
(2001-2002) Months
(09/03-03/03)
Dade 10.8 Least 6.5

Monroe 34.8 Most 13.0 Most

While the number of closed cases for Miami-Dade County is one of the 17 counties at
least risk on the child maltreatment rate (2001-02), the community is greatly
concerned about the amount of abuse that may go unreported. Of Miami-Dade’s 22
million residents, almost 56% of them were not born in the United States. As a result
of not being aware of our abuse reporting systems, language barriers and often
distrust of governmental in prevention, abuse reports may not be called in.

Monroe county’s child maltreatment rate (2001-02) was almost three times that of
Miami-Dade County, indicating that there is a significant problem of child abuse in
this county of only about 82,000 people.

In both communities child abuse is a potential problem or is already a problem.

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Introduction to Risk and Protective Factors

Prenatal Protective Factors Risk Factors Child Protective Factors Risk Factors
⊕ Good health − Congenital anomalies ⊕ Good health − Poor child health,
⊕ Practice of risk reducing − Respiratory disease ⊕ Outgoing or easy medical disorder
behaviors − Poor nutrition temperament − Difficult
⊕ Adequate nutrition − Prematurity ⊕ Positive or secure temperament,
⊕ Neurodevelopmental − Perinatal conditions attachment to mother behavior, or mood
intactness − Intrauterine drug use or other caregiver − Insecure parent-
⊕ Normal fetal development − Sexually transmitted disease ⊕ Developmentally child attachment
− Low and very low birth weight competent and − Developmental
− Poor maternal health independent delays or
− Maternal stress ⊕ Higher cognitive difficulties
− Multiple births functioning/normal − Cognitive
intelligence impairment/ low
⊕ Self-confident/high intellect
self-esteem − Low self-esteem
⊕ Gets along with − Difficulty getting
children and adults/has along with others
a large number of
friends
⊕ Warm and open
relationships with early
childhood teachers

Family Protective Factors Risk Factors Community Protective Factors Risk Factors
⊕ Economic security − Prolonged economic distress/low ⊕ Safe neighborhoods − Immigrant or
⊕ Employment consistency socioeconomic status ⊕ Stable and cohesive minority
⊕ Residence with both parents − Employment stress or neighborhood with status/cultural
⊕ Routines and consistency in unemployment strong informal isolation
family life − Single parent/teen parent networks of support − Unsafe
⊕ Family cohesiveness – − Blended families ⊕ Economic neighborhoods:
stable, organized, predictable − Rapid and stressful life changes opportunities and crime,
⊕ Emotional support from − Threats of or actual supports environmental
alternative caregiver separation/divorce ⊕ Accessible services hazards, transience
⊕ Parent available in times of − Marital/relationship discord ⊕ Accessible and − Social intolerance
stress − Lack of support from others (e.g., affordable health care or discrimination
⊕ Psychological well-being of extended family, friends, faith ⊕ Health education and − Neighborhood
parents community, support groups) outreach poverty
⊕ Satisfaction in parenting role − Lack of a positive adult role model ⊕ Community resources − Lack of adequate
⊕ Parent has high self-esteem − Parent(s) with mental disorder for recreation and housing
⊕ Parent provides positive role − Parent(s) with unrealistic enrichment − Lack of accessible
model expectations/ poor self-regulation ⊕ Quality, affordable and affordable
⊕ Parent provides supervision − Parent(s) with poor reasoning or child care health care
of child problem-solving ⊕ Good transportation − Lack of health
⊕ Higher level of maternal − Parent(s) with antisocial behavior services education
education − Poor adult supervision ⊕ Positive social − Lack of
⊕ networks and active recreational
Emotional closeness with − Low level of maternal education
and support from extended neighborhood groups facilities and
− Isolation
family and friends and organizations libraries
− Use of harsh, inconsistent discipline
⊕ Good social skills ⊕ Effective prevention − Lack of accessible
− Large number of children and affordable
⊕ Knowledge of methods for and early intervention
− Chronic parental illness child care
optimal birth spacing services
− Parental disability − Lack of
⊕ Good health − Parent(s) with substance abuse transportation
⊕ Health awareness − Homelessness/inadequate housing − Lack of effective
⊕ Positive social networks − Criminal behavior/ public education
⊕ Strong paternal role in − Incarceration and information on
child’s early life
services
− Lack of services for
young families

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Step 3: Analyze Strengths and Protective Factors

Protective Factor County County Florida Least or Most


Indicator Indicator Value Risk
Value
Percent of homes that are Dade 57.8 71.0% Most
owner occupied (2000)
71.0%
Monroe 62.4 71.0% Most
71.0%
Rate of job growth (2002) Dade 16.0 33.5%
33.5%
Monroe 23.6 33.5%
33.5%
Percent of kindergarten Dade 90.6 84.0% Least
children ready to learn
(2001-02)
84.0%
Monroe 81.4 84.0% Most
84.0%
Graduation rate (2001-02) Dade 55.7 67.9% Most
67.9%
Monroe 74.2 67.9%
67.9%
Health Insurance rate for Dade 85.1 88.7%
children under 19 (2000)
88.7%
Monroe 89.7 88.7%
88.7%
Percent of two-parent Dade 22.6 19.2%
households (2000)
19.2%
Monroe 14.8 19.2% Most
19.2%

Miami-Dade community members met on February 8, 2005 to discuss strengths, barriers,


gaps and trends/issues for children and their families. The strengths are listed below:

Over the past couple of years,

• Miami-Dade County approved establishing and funding The Children’s Trust.


The Children’s Trust provides more than $60 million a year for children’s

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programs that are targeted to improve the quality of life for children and their
families.
• Florida approved establishing and funding universal pre-kindergarten.
• The Children’s Trust has designated funding for the development of a 211
information line/database for children, youth and families issues.
• A new school superintendent has been hired and is interested in aggressively
improving the public school system. One of his first agenda items was to identify
the 39 “F” schools of the school district as an improvement zone, providing new
programming and assistance to those schools.
• The Children’s Trust is providing funds to develop a 5-star rating system for child
care providers
• A comprehensive, county-wide database of health and human service
providers/services (has reporting/case management improvement possibilities) is
being developed.
• There have been improvements in the collaboration of child advocacy issues and
the legislative agenda.
• Privatization of the Department of Children and Families is moving forward.
• The county manager has established a children’s advocate at the top level of
county government to coordinate children’s resources inside and outside of the
county government.
• The United Way has broken ground on the United Way’s Center for Excellence
in Early Education.
• There has been significant increase in faith-based organizations’ participation in
social services.
• Miami-Dade County recently opened The Lodge – a domestic violence shelter for
women and children – to have a total of 3 domestic violence shelters

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Step 4: Analyze Challenges and Risk Factors

Risk Factor Indicator County County Florida Least or Most


Indicator Value Risk
Value
Percent of crowded houses (2002) Dade 20.0% 6.5% Most
6.5%
Monroe 5.5% 6.5% Most
6.5%
Percent of population under age Dade 6.5% 5.7% Most
five (2002)
5.7%
Monroe 4.4% 5.7% Least
5.7%
Child poverty rate (1999) Dade 24.2% 18.5%
18.5%
Monroe 16.4% 18.5% Least
18.5%
Percent of “D” and “F” elementary Dade 15.9% 10.3% Most
schools (2001-02)
10.3%
Monroe 0.0% 10.3% Least
10.3%
Percent of elementary school-aged Dade 10.0% 15.1% Least
children in special education (2001-
02)
15.1%
Monroe 16.0% 15.1%
15.1%
Percent of students (K-12) with out- Dade 7.5% 8.3%
of-school suspensions (2002-03)
8.3%
Monroe 7.1% 8.3%
8.3%
Percent of children on waiting list Dade 3.5% 4.7%
for subsidized child care (2002-03)
4.7%
Monroe 1.4% 4.7% Least
4.7%

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Risk Factor Indicator County County Florida Least or Most
Indicator Value Risk
Value
Birth spacing (2002) Dade 32.5 36.3 Least
36.3
Monroe 45.0 36.3 Most
36.3
Rate of calls for domestic violence Dade 733.5 730.7
per 100,000 population (2002)
730.7
Monroe 608.8 730.7
730.7
Child death rate per 1,000 children Dade 1.4 1.9 Least
ages 1-4 (2002)
1.9
Monroe 1.1 1.9 Least
1.9
Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live Dade 5.8 7.3
births (2001)
7.3
Monroe 4.2 7.3 Least
7.3
Low birth weight rate (2001) Dade 7.6 8.2
8.2
Monroe 6.5 8.2 Least
8.2
Percent of children in lowest 5th Dade 5.1 6.0
percentile weight for height (2002)
6.0
Monroe 3.6 6.0 Least
6.0
Percent of pregnant women who Dade 1.0% 8.6% Least
smoked (2002)
8.6%
Monroe 9.8% 8.6% (Most)
8.6%
Sexually transmitted disease rate Dade 296.8 378.2
(2001)
378.2
Monroe 123.7 378.2 Least
378.2

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Risk Factor Indicator County County Florida Least or Most
Indicator Value Risk
Value
Substance exposed newborns rate Dade 13.7% 13.5%
per 1,000 live births (1997)
13.5%
Monroe 8.7 % 13.5%
13.5%
Percent of adults using alcohol Dade 5.3% 7.5% Least
(2002)
7.5%
Monroe 14.8% 7.5% Most
7.5%
Rate of serious mental illness per Dade 11.7% 11.8%
1,000 adults (2002-03)
11.8%
Monroe 23.6% 11.8% Most
11.8%
Crude divorce rate (2002) Dade 6.0% 5.1% Most
5.1%
Monroe 6.7% 5.1% Most
5.1%

Challenges and Risk Factors

a. Lack of health insurance or minimal/insufficient health insurance for children


b. Cutbacks on immigrant services – eligibility for services has been made more
stringent
c. Critical shortage of teachers/therapists/specialists in certain areas (and yet FIU’s
Speech Pathology program is potentially closing)
d. Court funding is shifting from the County to the State (Article 5)
e. Financial support for foster care children ends at age 18
f. Legislative barriers – tend to focus on the minimum in order to meet the will of
voters (e.g., UPK, KidCare, class size initiatives)
g. Limited enrollment and outreach for KidCare
h. Shift from state to local funding to provide services (this is a negative in that
funds are being cut, but a positive because the county is stepping in to fill the
void, e.g., The Children’s Trust)
i. Need for education to access services remaining available (e.g., after Medicaid
cuts)
j. Widespread use of evidence-based practices is not occurring
k. Need for cultural sensitivity
l. Socio-economic barriers to access services (e.g., transportation, understanding of
how to identify and find services)

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m. FCAT preparation presents barriers to CBOs from entry to schools to provide
services
n. Lack of vocational/career education options
o. Individual recipients can present barriers – need to motivate/empower them to
take ownership of addressing their own needs and locating existing services
p. Complex systems require navigators to assist individuals find services/take
ownership
q. Mental health of children and families
r. Enable better capacity building for existing providers (technical assistance needs)
s. Overloading providers with requirements without providing sufficient funds to
meet requirements (unfunded mandates)
t. Child care workers’ and teachers’ salaries do not reflect their value
u. Overcrowding of schools
v. Lack of political accountability to constituency (perhaps due to redistricting?)
leads to lack of constituents’ advocacy
w. Addressing the proper balance between quality and quantity of services that can
be provided; First programs need sufficient funding to address quantity of need,
then can move toward quality (e.g., requirements placed on UPK providers)
x. Lack of widespread community will to address needs of children, youth and
families
y. Revenue maximization opportunities are not fully taken advantage of in Florida
z. Need for advocacy/legislative action (Center for Excellence in Early Education
will explore work/family balance issues)
aa. Access to all programs and continuum of care for special needs/disabled children
bb. Special needs children may remain unidentified and thereby have no access to
services
cc. Successful pilot programs can provide opportunities to bring change to other
levels (county to state to federal level) – lead by example – many successful
programs don’t receive the necessary marketing/publicity to be duplicated
dd. Lack of quality parenting skills training especially for teen and single mothers
ee. Lack of juvenile probation officers
ff. Lack of transitional housing for foster children
gg. Lack of programming for older youth and independent living skills
hh. Lack of services/trained professionals for infant mental health
ii. Lack of vocational/career training for older teens
jj. Hunger in community (particularly after school and summers)
kk. Lack of addressing teen dating violence, HIV testing and STD prevention (for
males in particular)
ll. Lack of fatherhood programs
mm. Lack of young men discussion groups (growing up issues) and mentors
nn. Lack of dental programs
oo. Grandparents raising children
pp. Minimum funds for prevention services/interventions with families for children
who then end up in foster care system
qq. Lack of after school programs for latchkey kids
rr. Lack of affordable housing – gentrification of inner cities/condo conversions

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ss. Lack of services for middle level students (50% of students that fall in the middle
“average” students)

HOUSING

Miami-Dade County’s percent of crowded houses (2002) is approximately three times


the state rate. The cost of real estate requires more relatives/people to share housing.
Combining the cost of real estate, the influx of immigrants and high poverty rate
forces people to live together in order to share expenses.

EDUCATION

The percent of “D” and “F” elementary schools (01-02) is significant for Miami-Dade
and is currently one of the new school superintendent’s high priorities. Monroe has
an opportunity to improve it’s good performance in this area as the county has
recently voted to add a property tax increase to fund public education.

NEWBORNS

While many of the birth indicators show Miami-Dade and Monroe as least important
overall, the two communities are working diligently with agencies like Healthy
Families, Healthy Start, and The Health Department. To improve all the gestation
and initial birth indicators.

ALCOHOL

Monroe County will continue to stress responsible alcohol consumption, but the
“festive” nature of the Keys makes this indicator an on going uphill battle.

MARRIAGE AND FAMILY PLANNING

The Faith-based organizations involvement in the two communities will be important


to develop preventive measures and family counseling to help reduce the divorce rate.

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Step 5: Develop Community Priorities

At “Least Risk” Neither Extreme At “Most Risk”


Indicators Counties Counties Counties
Economic
Percent of Homes
that are Owner-
Occupied Monroe Dade

Rate of Job Growth Dade, Monroe

Percent of Crowded
Houses Dade, Monroe

Percent of Population
Under Age Five Monroe Dade

Child Poverty Rate Monroe Dade


Education
Percent of
Kindergarten
Children Ready to
Learn Dade Monroe

Graduation Rate Monroe Dade


Percent of D and F
(K-5 Grade)
Elementary Schools Monroe Dade
Percent of
Elementary School
Aged Children in
Special Education Dade Monroe

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At “Least Risk” Neither Extreme At “Most Risk”
Indicators Counties Counties Counties
Education (Cont.)
Percent of Students
(K-12) with Out-of-
School Suspensions Dade, Monroe
Percent of Children
on Waiting List for
Subsidized Childcare Monroe Dade
Health and Safety
Health Insurance
Rate for Children
Under 19 Dade, Monroe

Birth-Spacing Monroe Dade


Rate of Calls to
Police for Domestic
Violence (per
100,000 Population) Dade Monroe

Child Death Rate (per


1,000 Children (1-4)) Dade, Monroe
Percent of Children
Enrolled in Children's
Medical Services
(CMS) Dade, Monroe
Infant Mortality Rate
(per 1,000 Live
Births) Monroe Dade

Low Birth weight


Rate Monroe Dade
Percent of Children in
Lowest 5th Percentile
Weight for Height Monroe Dade

Percent of Pregnant
Women who Smoked Dade, Monroe
Sexually Transmitted
Diseases Rate (per
100,000 Population) Monroe Dade

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At “Least Risk” Neither Extreme At “Most Risk”
Indicators Counties Counties Counties
Health and Safety
(Cont.)
Substance Exposed
Newborns Rate (per
1,000 Live Births) Dade, Monroe

Percent of Adults
Using Alcohol Dade Monroe
Rate of Serious
Mental Illness (per
1,000 Adults) Dade Monroe
Socio-emotional

Percent of Two-
Parent Households Monroe Dade
Crude Divorce Rate
(per 1,000
Population) Dade, Monroe

Analysis of Risk and Protective Factors

Economic
Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties have some of the highest real estate costs in the state.
To improve these indicators, the communities must work to create affordable housing.

Education
There are many opportunities for improvements in the “most risk” categories. The new
school superintendent in Miami-Dade, new tax dollars in Monroe, UPK and the merging
of the two school readiness coalitions should give all these indicators a serious boost.

Health and Safety


Birth indicators show Miami-Dade and Monroe to be performing better than state average
overall. The counties are working to further improve this area. There is clearly an
opportunity to improve an already good indicator.

Socio-Emotional
Like the “Health and Safety” indicators above, the two counties have opportunity to work
in the communities to continue to improve these indicators.

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Community Priorities

Strengths to Build on to Prevent Abuse, Neglect and Abandonment:

a. Work with The Children’s Trust and The Alliance for Human Services to
maximize positive outcomes for all children and their families as
demonstrated by increased protective factors and decreased risk factors.
b. Work with the Miami-Dade/Monroe Early Education Coalition and the United
Way to maximize the effectiveness of UPK.
c. Work with the new superintendent and the school system to improve the
quality of the education system.
d. Work with Our Kids, the new CBC provider, the GAL and the courts to
provide better front-end (prevention) service to families who have had a call
to the abuse hotline, but the children will remain in the home.

Challenges to Address in order to Prevent Abuse, Neglect and Abandonment:

a. Lack of health insurance or minimal/insufficient health insurance for children


b. Widespread use of evidence-based practices is not occurring
c. Shift from state to local funding to provide services (this is a negative in that
funds are being cut, but a positive because the county is stepping in to fill the
void, e.g., The Children’s Trust)
d. Overloading providers with requirements without providing sufficient funds to
meet requirements (unfunded mandates)
e. Overcrowding of schools
f. Addressing the proper balance between quality and quantity of services that
can be provided; first requires sufficient funding to address quantity of need,
then can move toward quality (e.g., requirements placed on UPK providers)
g. Lack of quality parenting skills training especially for teen and single mothers
h. Lack of transitional housing for foster children
i. Grandparents raising children
j. Lack of after school programs for latchkey kids
k. Lack of affordable housing – gentrification of inner cities/condo conversions

Step 6: Rank Community Priorities


To complete section V of your local plan, identify and rank gaps in services that represent
needs that must be met in your community.

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1. 2. 3. 4.
Community Any issues? Local Contact? Strategies to
Priorities in Rank Implement
Order from Most
to Least Important
Work with them as
The Children’s The number of Mo Abety they develop
Trust children to be served. Jean Logan programs
Working with
providers who will
provide scientifically,
outcome based,
quality programming.
Work with them as
Our Kids Start-up of a CBC and Bobbie Ibarra they roll out the
it’s providers Fran Allegra new system and
develop programs
Work with them in
School Readiness Getting buy-in from Paula Bender roll out of UPK
the provider and Star Quality
community to support Rating System for
the initiative and child care centers
promoting public
awareness.
Work with school
MDCPS Adequate funding and Mark Zaher system to improve
leadership to make Randy Acevedo troubled schools
the needed changes.

Step 7: Describe Programs in Your Community


We have not determined any additional resources that will be required at this time, work
is still be done to develop the scope work required in the four areas we have selected.

23
a. Describe programs in your community currently serving abused, abandoned, and neglected children and their families (make more copies of this page or, if completing
the table electronically, add rows if necessary). For each program, indicate whether it should be maintained at its currently level (keep), reduced somewhat (reduce), or
be expanded (increase).

2003 Budget in Number of Does This Address a


Keep, Increase, or
Program Dollars/Source(s) Children/Families Impact of Program Community
Reduce
of Funding Served in 2003 Priority? (Y or N)
Protective factors Risk factors
Children Families
increased decreased
The Center for Family and Child
Enrichment, Inc. -Supported Foster Care $461,177.48 70 Y K
& Recruitment
CHARLEE of Dade County, Inc. -
Supported Foster Care $2,260,132 347 Y K
& Recruitment
The Children's Home Society of Florida -
Supported Foster Care $2,798,356.96 384 Y K
& Recruitment
The Children's Home Society of Florida -
$495,769.68 59 Y K
Project SMILE
Citrus Health Network, Inc. - Supported
Foster Care $187,000 20 Y K
& Recruitment
Citrus Health Network, Inc. - Supported
Foster Care $185,835.6 50 Y K
& Recruitment
His House, Inc. - Supported Foster Care
$226,927.98 29 Y K
& Recruitment

24
Kristi House, Inc. - Case Coordination
$543,000 314 Y K
for Sexually Abused Children
Our Children Our Future, Inc.- Y K
$20,000 9
Reunification
The Urban League of Greater Miami, Inc. Y CUT
$250,000 33
- Neighborhood Replication Project
The Children's Home Society of Florida - Y K
$200,000 94
Family Visitation Center

Alliance for Human Services

Child Protection Team

Children’s Trust

Switchboard of Miami

Miami Dade Family and Victim Services

Children’s Psychiatric Center

Journey Institute

25
b. Describe programs in your community for the prevention of child abuse, abandonment and neglect (make more copies of this page or, if completing the table
electronically, add rows if necessary). For each program, indicate whether it should be maintained at its currently level (keep), reduced somewhat (reduce), or be
expanded (increase).

2003 Budget in Number of Impact of Program Does This Address a Keep, Increase, or
Program Dollars/Source(s) Children/Families Community Reduce
of Funding Served in 2003 Priority? (Y or N)
Children Families Protective factors Risk factors
increased decreased
The Abriendo Puertas Governing Board Y K
of East Little Havana, Inc. - $59,132.86 225
Neighborhood Center
Advocate Program, Inc. - Community Y CUT
$81,490 91
Based Prevention
The Center for Family and Child Y K
Enrichment, Inc. - Child Abuse $179,028.65 144
Protection Program (CAPP)
The Center for Family and Child Y K
Enrichment, Inc. - Intensive Crisis
$772,134.84 572
Counseling Program (ICCP)/
Family Builders
The Children's Home Society of Florida - Y K
$79,432.2 84
Neighborhood Center
The Children's Psychiatric Center, Inc. - Y K
$78,064 385
Adoption Mobile Crisis Team
City of Homestead - Neighborhood Y K
$107,674.76 120
Center

26
Family Counseling Services of Greater Y K
Miami, Inc. – Non-offending Parent $49,996.62 171
Sexual Abuse Counseling
Family Resource Center of South Florida, Y K
$250,000 215
Inc. - Family Builders
Family Resource Center of South Florida, Y K
$388,223.04 509
Inc. - Family Enhancement
Fanm Ayisyen Nan Miyami, Inc. - Y K
$90,520 33
Neighborhood Center
Florida International University - Y CUT
$350,000 118
Tutoring & Mentoring Services
Miami-Dade Community College - Y CUT
$370,000 170
Tutoring Services
New Horizons Community Mental Y K
Health Center, Inc. - Neighborhood $194,167.6 192
Center
Richmond Perrine Optimist Club, Inc. of Y K
$100,614.12 268
Miami, FL - Neighborhood Center
Trinity Church, Inc. - Community Based Y CUT
$323,784 162
Prevention
The Urban League of Greater Miami, Inc. Y K
$61,165.56 12
- Home Visitor for High-Risk Newborn

Alliance for Human Services

27
Total 2005-2006 $
Children’s Trust 57,870,070 TBD TBD TBD TBD Y I
see attachment
Children’s Trust 2005-2006 Approx. Approx. Y I
After-School $24,885,054 26,657 8,200

Healthy Families Miami Dade

Healthy Start Coalition of Miami Dade

28
Step 8: Define Goals, Objectives, and Strategies
To write the goals, objectives, and strategies section (section VI on the outline) of your
local plan -- the heart of the plan:

a. For each of the community priorities listed in the table from Step 6, develop a
goal statement, one or more measurable objectives related to the goal, and
several strategies that you will use to achieve each objective.
b. The goal should be a broad statement of the change you would like to effect.
Think of it as a headline you would like to see in your local newspaper at
some future date. An example of a goal might be: Create more employment
opportunities.
c. For each goal, identify one or more measurable objective(s). Objectives are
SMART. They 1. are very specific, stating exactly what will happen, 2. are
measurable, stating exactly what value of a particular indicator will be used as
a standard to measure progress towards the goal, 3. designate accountability,
stating who will be responsible for achieving the objective, 4. are realistic,
meaning they are attainable at least in an ideal world 5. are time-limited,
specifying the date by which the objective will be reached. Some possible
objectives related to the example goal might be: 1. By June 30, 2005, a
coalition including Enterprise Florida, the Workforce Development Board,
and county governments will have contacted 10 businesses not currently
located in the county about doing business in the region. Or 2. By June 2007,
reduce the unemployment rate in the community from x to y. Since objectives
are measurable and you are looking for a change in the value of the measure,
it is important to include some baseline value. For the first objective, you
could use the number of businesses approached during the previous fiscal year
as a baseline. For the second objective, you could use the average
unemployment rate for a predetermined month for all the counties in your
community as the baseline for the indicator. Monthly county unemployment
statistics can be accessed at the Labor Market Information website:
http://www.labormarketinfo.com/library/laus.htm . For other objectives, you
may be able to use the indicators (and their values) that are listed in Florida’s
Children: Needs Assessment 2003/2004. Instructions on how to obtain values
for each indicator in the future are contained in Appendices F and H of the
strengths/needs assessment.
d. For each objective, you need a plan of how you are going to facilitate the
accomplishment of the objective. Generally, if current circumstances are
related to poor outcomes, continuing to do the same things probably won’t
produce changes. These plans are called strategies and can take many forms.
You can draw on some of the strategies you developed in the table from Step
6 above. Some strategies you may consider but are not limited to:
• seeking funding to increase the number of people served by a
particular service or

29
• developing a means to hold service providers accountable for
outcomes or
• tying funding to customer satisfaction or
• creating ways to make better use of existing community assets or
• decreasing funding for one service so that others may be expanded or
• creating a multi-organization collaborations to create synergies and
avoid duplication or
• offering new services.

The possibilities are limited only by your group’s imagination (and your
resources), but since your next step is to implement the plan you develop, select
strategies that are reasonably attainable. Ordinarily, many strategies will be used
to address each objective. Strategies should include pursuing appropriate funding.
It is important to think about strategies that have been tried before and abandoned.
Such experiences can be very helpful in developing this plan.

You can use copies of the attached work sheet to record goals, objectives and
strategies.

30
Priority: Improve the lives of all children and families in Miami-Dade County.

Indicator (from the Strengths/needs Assessment)(if appropriate):

Percent of population under age five (Miami-Dade); percent of kindergarten children


ready to learn (Monroe)

Goal Statement(s):

Work with the Children’s Trust and community to effectively implement and administer
the funding and policies of the programs to improve the lives of all children and families
in Miami-Dade County. The Children’s Trust is currently managing a $60 million budget
aimed at providing various services to improve the lives of children. Attached is a copy
of one of their proposal.

Measurable Objective(s):

Objectives will be based on the proposals placed in the community. See attached
resolution as an example.

Strategies:

What will be done? Who will Who will do Start date: Finish date:
oversee? it?
Serve on board and
committee to ensure District DA June 20, 2004 On-going
the objectives of the Administrator DDA
Children’s Trust are Deputy District PA
in the best interest of Administrator
children. FS Program
Director
(Genna Marx)

Strategies tried previously and abandoned (include the reason for abandonment):
None

31
32
Priority: Privatization of Child Welfare.

Indicator (from the Strengths/needs Assessment)(if appropriate):

Rates of calls to police for Domestic Violence (Monroe)

Goal Statement(s):

Work with new lead agency to improve services to children in child welfare.

Measurable Objective(s):

Improve all Child Welfare Integrated Quality Assurance standards by at least 20% within
eighteen months of initialing the contract.

Strategies:

What will be done? Who will Who will do Start date: Finish date:
oversee? it?
Improve all
CWIQA standards District District May 1, 2005 Jan 31, 2007
by at least 20% Administrator Administrator
within eighteen Contract Contract
months. Monitoring Monitoring
DDA
FS Program
Office

Strategies tried previously and abandoned (include the reason for abandonment):
None

33
Priority: Improve the quality of early care and education in Miami-Dade County.

Indicator (from the Strengths/needs Assessment)(if appropriate):

Percent of population under age five; percent of kindergarten children ready to learn
(Monroe)

Goal Statement(s):

Implement effective UPK programming and the Star Quality Rating System for child care
centers.

Measurable Objective(s):

Star Quality Rating System will be in place by December 2006 and increase parental
awareness of quality child care..

Strategies:

What will be done? Who will Who will do Start date: Finish date:
oversee? it?
Star Quality Rating
System will be in Early Learning Paula Bender Jan. 2005 Dec. 06
place to improve Coalition of Genna Marx
quality of child care Miami-
and promote parent Dade/Monroe
awareness of
quality.

Strategies tried previously and abandoned (include the reason for abandonment):
None

34
Priority: Improve performance of troubled schools.

Indicator (from the Strengths/needs Assessment)(if appropriate):

Percent of “D” & “F” graduation rate (Miami-Dade); Elementary schools; (Miami-Dade)

Goal Statement(s):

Raise the standard of schools that have “D” and “F” schools to improve students
performance.

Measurable Objective(s):

Work with school system to improve all “D” and “F” schools and children’s performance
in those schools. 39 schools to be impacted.

Strategies:

What will be done? Who will Who will do Start date: Finish date:
oversee? it?

Struggling schools Miami-Dade Miami-Dade On-going


will improve. County Public County Public
Schools Schools

Strategies tried previously and abandoned (include the reason for abandonment):
None

35
Step 9: Request Local and Statewide Action
To complete section VII of your local plan, take a look at your, goals, objectives and
strategies. Some of them may be difficult or impossible to implement given policies of
one or more state agency, budget or infrastructure limitations, and/or the provisions of
statutes or rules. In this section, list requests for changes in agency policies or
procedures, funding or infrastructure changes, and for statutory or rule changes that
would make your goals easier to attain. Each requested change should be justified based
on a documented negative impact on what you want to accomplish in your local plan.

Step 10: Describe the Planning Process


To complete section I of your local plan, describe the process you used to develop it.
Some ideas of what to include are:

• Who participated?
• Who lead the effort?
• When was the first meeting?
• How many meetings did you have?

To help make the planning effort easier next time, you may want to included suggestions
about how the planning process and/or the workbook can be improved.

Step 11: Submit the Plan


By February 28, 2005, complete the attached cover sheet (Appendix C of this document)
and submit your local plan to:

Julie Helter
Community Enhancement and Educational Development
The Chiles Center
1310 Cross Creek Circle, Suite A
Tallahassee, FL 32301

36
Appendix A

Workbook Definitions
Indicators: Quantitative or numerical measures that show whether outcomes are
improving, holding steady or worsening. Some examples of outcome indicators are:
percent of entering class graduating from high school; percent of births that are low birth
weight.

Needs: Gaps between current results and required or desired results. Also, gaps in
services needed to produce required or desired results. Some examples of needs are:
Lack of available and affordable health care; high juvenile delinquency rate with
inadequate prevention services available in the community.

Outcomes: Changes (short- or long-term) in the person or the person’s circumstances


that occur as a result of services provided or delivered. Also, statements about desired
conditions of well-being for children, adults, families or communities. Some examples of
outcomes are: violent crime rate (an outcome that might be impacted with a program that
increases law enforcement activities); truancy rate (an outcome that might be affected by
a program enhancing communications between schools and parents).

Outputs: Products or units of service of a program’s activities such as number of


brochures distributed, number of children provided a service. Some examples of outputs
are: number of expectant parents attending prenatal parenting classes; number of
teenagers attending after school recreation programs.

Primary Prevention: With respect to prevention of child abuse and neglect, any
intervention directed at the population at large and designed to prevent child abuse before
it occurs. Some examples of primary prevention programs are: after school enrichment
programs; pre-natal parent education offered to the population of all expectant parents.

Protective factors: Community, family or other factors that have been associated with
positive school and life outcomes. Some examples of protective factors are: a high
percentage of kindergarten children ready to learn; a high percentage of children covered
by health insurance.

Risk factors: Community, family or other factors that have been associated with poor
school and life outcomes. Some examples of risk factors are: a high rate of low birth
weight babies; a high divorce rate.

Secondary Prevention: With respect to prevention of child abuse and neglect, any
intervention directed at populations or persons identified as at risk for child abuse and
designed to prevent child abuse before it occurs. Some examples of secondary
preventions are: home visitation programs for targeted populations; prenatal programs
for targeted populations.

A-1
Strengths or assets: Tangible and intangible strengths and capabilities. Tangible
strengths include buildings, services and people. Intangible assets include skills,
knowledge, contacts and individual capacities. Strengths or assets are similar to
protective factors and include: parks and recreation facilities and the prevalence of
exposure to higher education among residents.

Tertiary Prevention: With respect to prevention of child abuse and neglect, any
intervention or service provided to families and children after an incident of neglect or
abuse has occurred. The intervention is designed to prevent future incidents of abuse,
neglect or abandonment. Some examples of tertiary prevention are: adoption
recruitment; emergency shelters used after an abuse incident.

A-2
Appendix B -Continuum of Services

Primary Prevention Secondary Prevention Tertiary Prevention


Direct Services Direct Services Information or Education Information or Education
Developmental Screening/Evaluation Child Care/Therapeutic Care Fatherhood Initiatives Adoption Promotion
Mentoring/Tutoring Services Child Support Enforcement GED Adoption Recruitment
Prenatal/Perinatal Services Early Intervention Programs Health and Nutrition Education Information and Referral
Emergency Shelter Healthy Marriages Neighborhood Partnership Referrals
Information or Education: Food Stamps Information and Referral Post-Adoptive Workshops
After School Enrichment/Recreation Front Porch Neighborhood Partnership
Child Care Services Healthy Families Community Activities Individual direct services
Delinquency Prevention Healthy Start Parenting Education and Training Adoption Support Services
HIV/AIDS Prevention and Education Home Delivered Meals Teen parent/pregnancy programs Child Care/Therapeutic Care
Lead Poisoning Prevention Programs Home Visiting Activities and Services Workforce Development Crisis and Intervention Services
Neighborhood Partnership Individual, Family or Group Crisis/Respite Care
Community Activities Counseling Oversight functions Emergency Shelter
Parenting Education and Training Job Services Case Management Family Visitation Services (Services
Pre-Kindergarten Program Kid Care instead of Center)
Medicaid Planning tools Family Conferencing/ICA
Programs for service providers: Mental Health Services Community Mapping/Development Follow-Up Care to Families
Public Awareness and Education Mentoring/Tutoring Services Foster Care
Activities Parent Support Groups Independent Living
Tobacco Prevention and Control Prenatal/Perinatal Services Individual, Family or Group
Training/Technical Assistance Respite Care Counseling
Workshops/Seminars School Lunch and Breakfast Intensive Family Preservation
Planning tools Programs Services
Community Mapping/Development Self-Help Groups/Support Groups Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities
Senior Activities and Services Mental Health Services
TANF Self-Help Groups/Support Groups
Transportation Transportation
Treatment Services Treatment Services
Urgent/Emergency Services Urgent/Emergency Services
WIC

B-1
Due Date: February 28, 2004
Submit to:
Julie Helter
Community Enhancement and Educational Development
The Chiles Center
1310 Cross creek Circle, Suite A
Tallahassee, FL 32301

C-1

C-1
Questions regarding the development of your Local Plan: Can be addressed to:

Dwanna Gregory
Phone: 850-487-0989
e-mail: Dgregor1@hsc.usf.edu

Bobbi Markiewicz
Phone: 850-488-9979
e-mail: bmarkiew@hsc.usf.edu

C-2
LIST OF FUNDED PROGRAMS

The Children's Trust


Program Funding FY 2003-04
(and 1st quarter 2004-05)
Program Description

Time of Their Lives! 2004 Summer Programs


Quality summer programs across the county targeting
children and youth who are out of school during the
2004 summer recess –
June 14 through August 13. Programs emphasized
reading, physical fitness, nutrition and social skills.
Priority was assigned to p

Youth Experiencing Success through Out-of-School Programs


Initiative that expands the availability of out-of-school
programs for school-aged children by increasing the
capacity of existing services,
developing new programs in areas where no quality
programs existed, and/or providing quality
enhancements to exi

5-Star Quality Improvement System


5-Star Quality Improvement System was awarded
during the summer of 2004 and is expected to be
completed by April 2005. This program will design a
system of rating child care enters providing them with
incentives and support with the goal of improving the

Promotion & Prevention Programs


Promotion & Prevention Programs target positive youth
development and enrichment activities for children,
build parenting skills, support advocacy for children and
families, and increase parental involvement on behalf of
children and their families.

5-STAR
SUMMER YES (design) omotion & Prevention
Contracted
# Of # Of Contracted # Of
Children Target Amount Children To Target Amount Amount Children To Be Target Amount
AGENCY Served Population Funded Be Served Population Funded Funded Served Population Funded
General Population General Population Ages 4 –
Abriendo Puertas 100 Ages 5 – 12 147840 90 18 225757.53
General Population
AME Enterprises 60 Ages 4 -11 47256
General Population Ages 6
Arts for Learning 1175 - 18 157009
General Population Ages 11 – General Population Ages
Aspira of Florida 100 13 391500 150 11 – 18 289566

General Population/ Children


with disabilities Ages 6 wks-5 Children with disabilities
Association for Retarded Citizens 156 yrs 236800 91 Ages 5 – 15 500000
General Population Children with disabilities
Ayuda Inc. 60 Ages 4 -11 57214 80 Ages 6 wks – 8 yrs 249836.2
Children with disabilities Children with disabilities
Bertha Abess Children's Center 75 Ages 6 – 12 168846 75 Ages 5 – 13 347786.41
Outreach & Advocacy
Big Brothers, Big Sisters of Greater Miami 2500 Ages 0 -18 200000
General Population Ages 0 – General Population
Boys and Girls Club of Miami 700 13 170149 100 Ages 5 – 13 263790.99
General Population Ages 0 – General Population
Catholic Charities – Child Care 492 13 455952.8 220 Ages 0 -5 92373

General Population Ages 6


Child Assault Prevention Project of South Florida 26950 – 12 197196
General Population Ages 11 –
Children Home Society of Florida 35 15 135827.7
General Population Ages 5 – General Population Ages 3 –
City of Miami Beach 130 17 126500 350 17 500000

General Population Ages 3 –


City of Miami Parks and Recreation Department 17
General Population Ages 6 – General Population Ages 5 – General Population Ages 6 -
Communities in Schools 300 17 169373 125 14 277692.95 500 18 88465.4
Community committee for Developmental Handicaps, General Population Ages 0
Inc. 1420 - 18 185547
General Population Ages 11 – General Population Ages 11 –
Concerned African Women 300 15 292320 300 17 424461.58
General Population Ages 0 – General Population Ages 3 –
Cool Kids Learn, Inc. 400 17 304384 190 13 500000
General Population
Dave & Mary Alper Jewish Community Center 40 Ages 6 – 10 40100
General Population Ages 6 –
Daily Bread Food Bank 1220 17 287355

The Children's Trust Funded Programs 2004 page 1


LIST OF FUNDED PROGRAMS

5-STAR
SUMMER YES (design) omotion & Prevention
Contracted
# Of # Of Contracted # Of
Children Target Amount Children To Target Amount Amount Children To Be Target Amount
AGENCY Served Population Funded Be Served Population Funded Funded Served Population Funded
Children with disabilities
Department of Human Services 30 Ages 5 – 17 119073
General Population Ages 5 –
Dominican American National Foundation 25 15 84090.08
Early Learning Coalition of Miami-Dade and Monroe
County 337651
Children with disabilities Children with disabilities
Easter Seals Miami-Dade 180 Ages 0 – 14 313665 420 Ages 5 – 11 448265
General Population Ages 4 – General Population Ages 6 –
Family and Children Faith Coalition 845 14 784160 135 13 425000
General Population Ages 0
Family Central, Inc.(Nurturing Parents) 270 –5 341725
General Population Ages 0
Family Central, inc. (Hippy) 252 –5 387685
General Population Ages 3 –
Family Christian Association of America, Inc. 173 13 186848
General Population Ages 6
Family Counseling Services of Greater Miami, Inc. 400 – 12 300000
Family Counseling Services of Greater Miami, Inc. General Population Ages 6
(FAST) 240 – 12 238470
General Population Ages 6 –
Fanm Ayisyen nan Myami 50 13 125000

Florida International University - Center for Urban General Population Ages 6 – General Population Ages 6
Education & Innovation 160 14 367467.71 205 – 12 390392

Outreach & Advocacy


Foster Care Review, Inc. 1000 Ages 0 -18 300000
General Population Ages 6 –
Girl Scout Council of Tropical Florida 25 17 87594
General Population Ages 6 – General Population Ages 11 –
Greater Goulds Optimist 200 17 180000 25 15 63669.24
General Population Ages 6 – General Population Ages 6 –
Greater Miami Tennis Foundation 100 17 112640 71 17 228428
Outreach & Advocacy
Haitian Neighborhood Center – Sant La 99725 Ages 6 -18 186522
General Population Ages 5 – General Population Ages 3 -
Hands in Action 45 12 52371 30 13 81978.04
Outreach & Advocacy
Hands on Miami 1500 Ages 13 -18 239270
Children with disabilities
Head Start/Early Head Start Program 70 Ages 3 – 17 296056
General Population Ages 0
Health Choice Network 2000 - 18 261832
Outreach & Advocacy
Healthy Start Coalition of Miami-Dade 3740 Ages 0-5 188090
Healthy Start Coalition of Miami-Dade – Reach Out, General Population Ages 0
Read Miami 22000 –5 264350
Outreach & Advocacy
Human Services Coalition of Dade County, Inc. 13200 Ages 6 -18 300000
General Population Ages
Informed Families/The Florida Partnership 3700 06 – 18 250822
Outreach & Advocacy
Jackson Health Systems – Florida Kidcare Program 5040 Ages 0 -18 200000
Jackson Health Systems – Injury Free Coalition for General Population Ages 0
Kids 9000 – 12 269167

General Population Ages 11 – General Population Ages 8 – General Population Ages 6


James E. Scott Community Association 40 17 40560 50 11 148615.76 96 – 12 199966

General Population Ages


Jewish Community Services of South Florida, Inc. 90 06 – 18 217802
General Population Ages 4 –
Liberty City Optimist Club 100 15 100000
General Population Ages 8 –
Little Haiti Housing Corporation 60 14 29111
General Population Ages 8 – General Population Ages 6 –
Miami Children Museum 120 11 78708.79 40 13 160000
Miami Dade College - Entrepreneurial Education General Population Ages
Center 100 13 - 18 198506

General Population/
Children with disabilities
Miami Dade County Park and Recreation 460 Ages 6 – 17 534356
Children with disabilities
Miami Dade County Park and Recreation 53 Ages 6 – 13 500000
General Population
Miami Dade County Park and Recreation 260 Ages 6 – 13 410949

The Children's Trust Funded Programs 2004 page 2


LIST OF FUNDED PROGRAMS

5-STAR
SUMMER YES (design) omotion & Prevention
Contracted
# Of # Of Contracted # Of
Children Target Amount Children To Target Amount Amount Children To Be Target Amount
AGENCY Served Population Funded Be Served Population Funded Funded Served Population Funded
General Population Ages 6 –
Miami Dade College 70 10 89173.94

Miami Dade College School of Entertainment and Design General Population Ages 11 –
Technology 100 17 318093

General Population/ Children


with disabilities
Miami Lighthouse for the Blind 60 Ages 6 – 13 64452

General Population Ages 3 –


Miami Urban Ministries of the United Methodist Church 40 13 66930
General Population Ages 0 –
Mujeres Unidad en Justicia Educacion 380 13 295670
Children with disabilities
New Horizons Community Mental Health Center, Inc. 50 Ages 11 – 13 325000
Children with disabilities
Neytz HaChochma 30 Ages 6 – 17 89352.73
General Population Ages 0 –
Opa Locka North Dade Front Porch 150 13 207000
General Population Ages 7 – General Population Ages 4 –
Overtown Youth Center 460 14 216640 225 17 500000
Outreach & Advocacy
Parent to Parent of Miami, Inc. 2900 Ages 0 -18 300000
General Population Ages 0
Peace Education Foundation 9169 –5 465354
Juveline Offenders/at risk
students
Private Industry: Jobs for Miami 285 Ages 11 – 17 484209.96
General Population Ages 4 –
Regis House 85 15 91250
Children with disabilities
Sandor Wiener School of Opportunities 40 Ages 3 – 10 260000
General Population General Population
Children with disabilities Children with disabilities
Shake-A-Leg Miami 120 Ages 6 – 17 363633 510 Ages 6 – 18 192258.47
General Population Ages 11 –
South Florida After-School All Stars 480 17 500000
General Population Ages
Switchboard of Miami, Inc. 320 13 - 18 325600
General Population Ages 11 –
The Biscayne Institute Inc. 30 17 16704
General Population Ages 6 – General Population Ages 6 – General Population Ages 0 -
The Richmond Perrine Optimist Club 120 13 105000 160 17 424461.58 750 5 478722
General Population Ages 0 – General Population Ages 3 –
Trinity Church 300 13 222720 70 14 87382.1
General Population Ages 3 –
Touching Miami with Love Ministries 70 13 150515
Children with disabilities Children with disabilities
United Cerebral Palsy 70 Ages 6 mths-4 yrs 174993 72 Ages 6 – 13 390000

General Population/
Children with disabilities
University of Miami Debbie Institute 137 Ages 0 -10 94921

University of Miami – Dept. of Pediatrics/Families General Population Ages 0


First 4928 –5 500000

General Population Ages 0


University of Miami – Linda Ray Center 350 –5 200000
General Population Ages 6 –
Urgent, Inc. 30 12 30000
General Population Ages
Victim Services Center 100 13 - 18 166000

General Population Ages 5 –


Vision to Victory Human Services Corp. 45 11 45000
General Population Ages 6 –
We care of South Dade Inc. 250 17 424461.58

General Population Ages 6 –


Westcoast School for Human Development 25 17 100000
General Population Ages 11 – General Population Ages 11 –
World Literacy Crusade 20 13 23400 40 13 119501.21

The Children's Trust Funded Programs 2004 page 3


LIST OF FUNDED PROGRAMS

5-STAR
SUMMER YES (design) omotion & Prevention
Contracted
# Of # Of Contracted # Of
Children Target Amount Children To Target Amount Amount Children To Be Target Amount
AGENCY Served Population Funded Be Served Population Funded Funded Served Population Funded
General Population Ages 0 – General Population Ages 3 –
YMCA of Greater Miami 245 17 180929.2 766 17 500000
General Population Ages 11 – General Population Ages
Youth Co-Op Inc. 80 17 160000 200 13 – 18 400000
General Population Ages 6 –
Youth of America Inc. 55 17 54995

General Population Ages 3 – General Population Ages 0


YWCA of Greater Miami & Dade County, Inc. 696 18 500000 360 –5 222069

Total 7220 6355154.73 7972 13600582.35 337651 215,060 9194758.87

Please see the Evaluation Report (p. 7) for more detailed information on attendance.

The Children's Trust Funded Programs 2004 page 4


2004-2007 NOFA FUNDED COMMUNITY BASED ORGANIZATIONS

ORGANIZATION PC Address1 PC Address2 PC Phone PC Ext PC Fax PC Email PROJECT FUNDING AWARD

Basic Needs
Serves Hispanic victims of domestic violence and Hispanic immigrants who are unemployable due to their
CASA - Colombian American Service Assn 8500 SW 8th Street, Suite 218 Miami, FL 33144 (305) 448-2272 105 (305) 448-0178 emartinez@casa-usa.org immigration status through legal counseling, representation, guidance and referral.
60,000.00
This project will provide immigration legal services to vulnerable immigrants living in Miami. Such services will
include, but are not limited to, competent legal assistance and representation in applying for asylum, legal
Catholic Legal Immigration Network Inc 7300 Biscayne Boulevard, Suite 304 Miami, FL 33138 (305) 789-9907 3 (305) 789-9936 jsheldon@cliniclegal.org permanent residence, work authorization and citizenship. 75,000.00
COFFO will provide surplus perishable/nonperishable food products to needy people in crisis and refer families in
Coalition of Florida Farmworkers Organization Inc 778 West Palm Drive Florida City, FL 33034 (305) 247-4779 (305) 246-2445 coffo@algxmail.com highest need to other community resources for needed assistance.
50,000.00
The Legal Aid Society's South Dade Domestic Violence Project, will provide free legal services regardless of
immigration status to victims of domestic violence and their children with a priority given to residents of Homestead
Dade County Legal Aid Society 123 NW 1st Ave, Suite 220 Miami, FL 33128 (305) 579-5733 2225 (305) 372-7693 brivera@dadelegalaid.org and Florida City. 65,000.00
Twenty-one agencies will be earmarked to collect their allotted distribution of food and other grocery products plus
Daily Bread Food Bank 5850 NW 32nd Avenue Miami, FL 33142 (305) 633-9861 (305) 633-0036 jgatti@dailybread.org produce and bread on a monthly basis.
30,000.00
Trains residents/consumers on how to use the Internet and other information tools, to become optimally
Dominican American National Foundation 2885 NW 36th Street Miami, FL 33142 (305) 637-8337 (305) 637-9474 doliveira1@bellsouth.net knowledgeable about available resources in their own community, countywide, and beyond the county.
17,500.00
The program is a Food Distribution Program, which provides over 5,000 medically appropriate meals per week to
Faithful Friend Center 1198 W 32 St Hialeah, FL 33012 (305) 554-6030 (305) 554-6030 marysegovia59@hotmail.com 250 Disabled, Indigent Dialysis Patients in Dade County.
30,000.00
Provides a web-based information and referral directory of faith-based social services which will link to
Family & Children Faith Coalition 14748 SW 56 St., Suite 107 Miami, FL 33185 (305) 228-3986 (305) 228-6686 fcfcfl@aol.com Switchboard of Miami Help Pages.
30,000.00
Provides free comprehensive legal services, including direct representation, outreach and education, referrals and
Fanm Ayisyen Nan Miyami, Inc. 8340 NE 2nd Ave, Suite 212 Miami, FL 33138 (305) 756-8050 (305) 756-8150 marleinebastien@hotmail.com case management services in Miami-Dade County Haitian communities.
50,000.00
Provides free immigration legal services to low-income immigrants of all nationalities, including domestic violence
Florida Immigrant Advocacy Ctr. 3000 Biscayne Blvd, Suite 400 Miami, FL 33137 (305) 573-1106 1340 (305) 576-6273 gwright@fiacfla.org victims, and conducts community outreach presentations.
75,000.00
Guardianship Program of Dade County, Inc. will provide reliable guardianship services to indigent adults,
Guardianship Program of Dade County 7950 NW 53rd. St., Suite 301 Miami, FL 33166 (305) 592-7642 (305) 592-6737 sfraser@gpdconline.com adjudicated incapacitated, in Miami-Dade County.
45,000.00
Provides residents of Little Haiti and Northeast Dade with 24-hour access to accurate information about community
Haitian Neighborhood Center Sant La 5000 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 110 Miami, FL 33137 (305) 573-4871 (305) 573-4875 santla@bellsouth.net resources.
50,000.00
Hope for the Community will distribute perishable and non-perishable food and referrals to other neighbor
Hope for Community 1750 W 8th Avenue Hialeah, FL 33012 (786) 337-6112 (305) 888-7013 ob5165@hotmail.com services; these services will be given to low income families.
32,500.00
HSC proposes to coordinate a countywide outreach and screening program to combat hunger and poverty in three
Human Services Coalition 260 NE 17th Terr., Suite 200 Miami, FL 33132 (305) 576-5001 30 (305) 576-1718 lorend@hscdade.org targeted neighborhoods, working through neighborhood councils and organizations.
175,000.00
Provides 24-hour professional on-call and information services to 85 Hispanic/Russian/Newly Arrived Entrants, and
JCS - Jewish Community Services 735 NE 125 St. N Miami, FL 33161 (305) 899-1587 113 (305) 899-6367 sgoldsmith@jcsfl.org refers them appropriately to community resources.
30,000.00
The Basic Needs Legal Assistance Project provides the full range of civil legal representation in the areas of
housing, employment and economic security, family and special education law to low income people throughout
Legal Services of Greater Miami 3000 Biscayne Blvd, Suite 500 Miami, FL 33137 (305) 438-2505 (305) 576-5112 rochelleh@lsgmi.org Miami-Dade County. 65,000.00
The primary goal of this project is to increase community awareness of available resources in Homestead/Florida
MUJER, Inc. 28905 S. Dixie Highway Homestead, FL 33030 (305) 247-1388 (305) 247-1362 kametrad@hscdade.org City through an information and referral network.
52,100.00
Provides legal services to foreign nationals and promotes economic self-sufficiency through education and
St Thomas University - Human Rights Institute 16400 NW 32nd Ave Miami, FL 33054-6492 (305) 628-6737 (305) 628-6742 mdomingu@stu.edu orientation programs that contribute to immigrants effective re-settlement in as short a period as possible.
90,000.00
The Helpline provides trilingual 24-hour Information, Referral and Crisis Intervention services via the telephone and
Switchboard of Miami 701 SW 27th Ave., Suite 1000 Miami, FL 33135 (305) 358-1640 104 (305) 377-2269 tlabrousse@switchboardmiami.org an internet-based I & R directory available to service providers and consumers.
100,000.00
The program is a Food Distribution Program, which provides over 5,000 medically appropriate meals per week to
The Johan deVries Foundation. 290 174 St., Suite 2012 Sunny Isles Beach, FL 33160 (305) 937-1118 (305) 937-2598 lorettaldv@aol.com 250 Disabled, Indigent Dialysis Patients in Dade County.
32,500.00
Provides comprehensive legal advocacy to 135 child victims and/or witnesses to protect them from the trauma of
Voices for Children 1500 NW 12th Ave, Suite 1117 Miami, FL 33136 (305) 324-5678 16 (305) 324-5978 trodriguez@voicesgal.org criminal court proceedings. 65,000.00

Children and Adults with Disabilities


The Caregiver Support Program provides in-home respite support to patients who have been diagnosed with a
Catholic Hospice 14160 Palmetto Frontage Road, SuiteMiami Lakes FL 33016 (305) 822-2380 250 (305) 824-0665 estorch@catholichospice,org terminal illness and have a life expectancy of six months or less.
100,000.00
Project is an independent living and advocacy program that will increase academic and life skills to a group of 40
Center for Independent Living of South Florida 6660 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33138 (305) 751-8025 (305) 751-8944 alvarez@soflacil.org people with disabilities while increasing their access to services and supports in the community.
48,850.00
Provides family support and educational services to a minimum of 670 individuals with physical, developmental
Community Committee for Developmental Handicaps 8585 Sunset Drive, Suite 75 Miami, FL 33143 (305) 596-1160 (305) 596-6196 hgood@ccdh.org and sensory disabilities and their families.
185,000.00
Utilizes a consumer-directed care model, and will provide 12,750 hours of in-home supports to 85 children and
adults with developmental disabilities living in their own or family homes. Case management and wrap around
Community Committee for Developmental Handicaps 8585 Sunset Drive, Suite 75 Miami, FL 33143 (305) 596-1160 (305) 596-6196 hgood@ccdh.org services will also be provided. 158,700.00
Provides in and out-of-home physical, occupational, behavioral and/or speech and language evaluations and
Community Committee for Developmental Handicaps 8585 Sunset Drive, Suite 75 Miami, FL 33143 (305) 596-1160 (305) 596-6196 hgood@ccdh.org therapies to a minimum of 40 children and adults with developmental disabilities.
77,500.00
The Education and Advocacy Program will assist deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals to achieve a more
Deaf Services Bureau 1250 NW 7 St., Suite 207 Miami, FL 33125 (305) 560-2866 (305) 560-2864 deafsvc@bellsouth.net independent lifestyle by helping them gain equal access to social services.
50,000.00
Improves the quality of life for people with epilepsy by coordinating a comprehensive program of supportative
services to maximize seisure control, create and maintain partnerships that meet the needs of persons with
Epilepsy Foundation So Florida 7300 North Kendall Dr., Suite 700 Miami, FL 33156 (305) 670-4949 210 (305) 670-0904 jclauser@epilepsysofla.org epilepsy; increases public awareness. 70,000.00
Provides direct infant mental health intervention in on-site community based child care facilities, or in the child's
home. Uses therapy, developmental tutoring, and/or behavioral therapy as intervention modalities, addressing
Family Central 840 SW 81st Avenue North Lauderdale, FL 33068 (954) 724-7574 (954) 724-4063 wsalomon@familycentral.org social, emotional and developmental needs. 90,000.00
Provides free, comprehensive information, referral and case management to Haitian families with a child or family
member with developmental, physical or sensory disability. Support group, outreach and educational services are
Fanm Ayisyen Nan Miyami, Inc. 8340 NE 2nd Ave, Suite 212 Miami, FL 33138 (305) 756-8050 (305) 756-8150 aline_msw@yahoo.com included. 60,000.00
Provides at least 70 developmentally disabled or delayed clients with 1,750 speech-language and occupational
Hearing and Speech Center of Florida 9425 SW 72 St., Suite 261 Miami, FL 33173-5457 (305) 271-7343 (305) 271-7949 dknox@hearingandspeechcenter.org therapy sessions.
68,100.00
Provides families with the information and the tools necessary to participate in the decision making process and
Parent to Parent of Miami 7990 SW 117 Ave, Suite 201 Miami, FL 33183 (305) 271-9797 (305) 271-6628 ldemoya@ptopmiami, org other systems of supports in the community.
20,000.00
Provides families who have children and adults with disabilities, who do not qualify for services, with one-time
Parent to Parent of Miami 7990 SW 117 Ave, Suite 201 Miami, FL 33183 (305) 271-9797 (305) 271-6628 rramos@ptopmiami.org assistance, with the cost-related to respite and aftercare.
75,000.00
Maximizes access to services and community inclusion for individuals with physical, developmental or sensory
disabilities and their families/caregivers, by increasing community and professional awareness and knowledge of
SCLAD - Spinal Cord Living-Asistance Development, Inc 240 E 1st Ave, Suite 122 Hialeah, FL 33010 (305) 887-8838 (305) 884-7606 prodriguez@sclad.org disabilities. 30,000.00
Provide Case Management and In-Home Services to assist developmentally disabled adults with their activities of
United Home Care Services 5255 NW 87 Ave., Suite 400 Miami, FL 33178 (305) 328-0870 (305) 599-3111 eellsworth@unitedhomecare.com daily living in order to prevent premature institutionalization.
80,000.00
Establish “registry” database of Personal Care Aides to enable disabled clients and their families recruit, interview
United Home Care Services 5255 NW 87 Ave., Suite 400 Miami, FL 33178 (305) 716-0776 (305) 599-3111 sherman@unitedhomecare.com and hire homecare workers to meet their individual needs. 67,400.00
2004-2007 NOFA FUNDED COMMUNITY BASED ORGANIZATIONS

ORGANIZATION PC Address1 PC Address2 PC Phone PC Ext PC Fax PC Email PROJECT FUNDING AWARD

Criminal Justice
Reduces the likelihood of involvement in the juvenile justice system via a series of after school and workshop,
support groups, counselling, educational enrichment and case management to 76 juvenile offenders and their
ADGAM Inc 3050 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 504 Miami, FL 33137 (305) 573-1136 (305) 573-1176 adgam@bellsouth.net families. 95,000.00
This project is designed to provide the necessary training to local providers to implement the specialized,
reasearch-proven intervention and programs based on the real needs of the childrens in the system, that many
Advocate Program Inc. 5040 NW 7th. St., Suite 120 Miami, FL 33126-3425 (305) 704-0109 (305) 704-0155 mdmphd@advocateprogram.com providers lack. 62,000.00
Reduces juvenile crime in the neighborhood by reducing risk factors, and increasing community protective factors
Aspira of Florida 3650 N Miami Ave Miami, FL 33127 (305) 576-1572 32 (305) 576-0810 arafky@fl.aspira.org that lead to a healthy behavior among youth.
85,000.00
Encourages DJJ referred students at Booker T. Washington High School to stay at school, improve academically,
Aspira of Florida 3650 N Miami Ave Miami, FL 33127 (305) 576-1572 32 (305) 576-0810 arafky@fl.aspira.org and not to commit crimes.
75,000.00
Reduces recidivism and empowers parents to recognize their ability to improve their quality of life and nurture thir
Ayuda Inc. 7118 Byron Ave Miami Beach, FL 33141 (305) 992-5437 (305) 864-1020 ayudakids@aol.com children's potential. Improves family bonding and relationships among their members.
95,000.00
The Positive Transition Program is a cognitive / behavioral training and job placement program for juvenile
offenders who are completing a residential delinquency program and who are entering the aftercare or re-entry
Brown Schools Foundation / Troy Academy 3300 NW 27 Ave Miami, FL 33142 (305) 903-9792 (305) 638-0208 jjys56@aol.com phase of their rehabilitation. Services continue up to one year after discharge. 95,000.00
The project offers after school and evening services and activities twelve months per year to youths and their
Concerned African Women 1405 NW 167th Street, Suite 235 Miami, FL 33169 (305) 621-3700 (305) 621-0690 caw98@bellsouth.net families.
95,000.00
A neighborhood empowerment project in Liberty City offering after school and evening services and activities,
Concerned African Women 1405 NW 167th Street, Suite 235 Miami, FL 33169 (305) 621-3700 (305) 621-0690 caw98@bellsouth.net twelve months a year, to youths and their families.
85,000.00
Prevents recividism, helps transitioning during probation, and ensures re-entry into society by working with the
Dominican American National Foundation 2885 NW 36th Street Miami, FL 33142 (305) 637-8337 (305) 637-9474 danf1@bellsouth.net family to reduce the familial risk factors that encourage delinquency in high risk areas of Allapattah and Melrose.
50,000.00
DFYIT’s “Saturday Club” provides neighborhood, family and school-based substance abuse prevention services.
The program targets 76 current DFYIT club members and their families who reside within the boundaries of S.W.
Drug Free Youth in Town 16201 SW 95 Ave., Suite 205 Miami, FL 33157 (305) 971-0607 (305) 971-4632 bzohlman@dfyit.org 4th Street to 8th Street and South Flagler Avenue to S.W. 6 th Avenue. 80,000.00
Provides 2 Stay-in-School Counselors in order to expand case management services to youths involved in the
Easter Seals Miami-Dade, Inc 1475 NW 14 Avenue Miami, FL 33125-1616 (305) 547-4729 (305) 325-0578 carabbito@aol.com Juvenile Justice System, and their families.
75,000.00
Implements early prevention/intervention services for children, six to twelve, who are at risk of developing
Family Counseling Services of Greater Miami 10651 N Kendall Dr, Suite 100 Miami, FL 33176 (305) 271-9800 108 (305) 279-3319 npagan@familycounseling.org emotional and behavioral disorders, as a result of family or community violence.
75,000.00
A tutoring/homework program; crime prevention/intervention; improvement of readings skills and an increse in the
Greater Goulds Optimist Club 11025 SW 223 St Goulds FL 33170 (305) 255-9747 (305) 255-7010 ggoc@bellsouth.net sense of attachment to the neighborhood.
50,000.00
Promotes awareness and skills development among refugee parents raising families in high crime neighborhoods
Haitian Organization of Women, Inc 162 SW First Ave Homestead, FL 33030 (305) 245-8158 (305) 235-9062 how_w@bellsouth.net to empower them to recogmize their ability to improve their quality of life.
95,000.00
Provides tutoring services, individual and group counselling sessions, parenting group and recreational
activities/field trips, in order to improve youth's academic performance, decision-making skills, parent-child
Institute of Black Family Life 16405 NW 25th Avenue Miami, FL 33054 (305) 628-4354 (305) 628-2195 n.a. relationships and no re-offense and re-arrest of youths. 49,500.00
The program conforms to the Social Development Strategy Model by giving participants skills and oportunities to
JCS - Jewish Community Services 735 NE 125 St. N Miami, FL 33161 (305) 445-0555 (305) 446-7191 jlieber@jcsfl.org enhance the protective factors and reduce the risk factors in their lives and the life of the family.
95,000.00
Provides a series of services and activities to pre-identified at-risk youth involved with the juvenile justice system,
using outreach, recruitment, assessment, intensive and/or group counseling, referral to community resources,
Jobs for Miami 7900 NE 2nd Ave, 6th Floor Miami, FL 33138 (305) 759-6511 (305) 759-7639 lindav@jfmiami.org tutoring, monitoring and follow-up, towards a change of attitude and behavior. 95,000.00
Provides Stay-in-School counselors at 6 Miami-Dade Public Senior High Schools with grade D or F status.
Provides services and/or activities to pre-identified at-risk youth with involvement with the Juvenile Justice System.
Jobs for Miami 7900 NE 2nd Ave, 6th floor Miami, FL 33138 (305) 759-6511 (305) 759-7639 neillr@jfmiami.org Outreach, recruitment, assessment, intensive or group counseling, referral, tutoring and follow-up. 225,000.00
A crime-prevention program that provides intervention and prevention services to high risk offenders and their
families. Primary goal objective is to reduce the impact of familial risk factors that contribute to delinquency and to
New Horizons Community Mental Health Center Inc 1313 NW 36th St., Suite 400 Miami, FL 33142-5555 (305) 635-0366 1 (305) 635-6378 nhcmhc@bellsouth.net empower parents to improve their families quality of life. 95,000.00
Enhances the existing Family Empowerment Program to serve 76 juvenile offenders and their families, and adding
Regis House, Inc 2885 NW 36 St Miami, FL 33142 (305) 642-7600 210 (305) 642-6898 jknowles@regishouse.org a weekly parent-child support group, providing tutoring by a certified teacher and transportation assisstance.
95,000.00
A 12 month program to provide community protective factors through basic life skills, such as individual and family
Richmond Perrine Optimist Club 9955 West Indigo Street Perrine, FL 33157 (305) 233-9325 (305) 232-7815 richprrn@bellsouth.net counseling, tutoring, recreation, work experience, etc., in order to reduce community risk factors.
80,000.00
CJC Stay in School proposes to serve students from Jackson and Homestead High Schools who are referred by
Juvenile Probation Offices, in order to eliminate recidivism, reduce absenteeism, improve behavior, increase
SER Jobs for Progress Inc. P.O. Box 661597 Miami, FL 33266-1597 (305) 871-2820 111 (305) 871-5643 jlcela@serflorida.org learning achievement and keep students in school through graduation. 75,000.00
A positive youth development project addressed to gay, lesbian, bi, transgendered and questioning youth.
Switchboard of Miami 701 SW 27th Ave., Suite 1000 Miami, FL 33135 (305) 358-1640 122 (305) 377-2269 mdentato@switchboardmiami.org 95,000.00
A Youth Gang Hotline for parents, youth and community leaders that will operate 24/7 in three languages
(English, Spanish and Creole). It will provide callers with access to information on resources and available
Switchboard of Miami, Inc 701 SW 27th Ave., Suite 1000 Miami, FL 33135 (305) 358-1640 104 (305) 377-2269 tlabrousse@switchboardmiami.org assistance relevant to youth gangs, their members and the community at large. 40,000.00
The Residential Family Empowerment Program will provide youth and family with groups, therapy, psycho-
educational training, parenting skills, case management, linkage to services, conflict-resolution training and
The Children's Psychiatric Center 15490 NW 7th. Ave., Suite 200 Miami, FL 33169 (305) 685-0381 216 (305) 681-4208 qesinfo@aol.com community resources. 95,000.00
Continues to provide neighborhood empowerment services to part of Carol City community; it will offer activities
The Children's Psychiatric Center 15490 NW 7th. Ave., Suite 200 Miami, FL 33169 (305) 685-0381 216 (305) 681-4208 qesinfo@aol.com addressed to individuals, family and other group services, for community children.
85,000.00
The Youth Gang Resource Center will provide education and community awareness concerning gangs, provide
training about local gangs for youth workers and social service providers, seek new gang funding for itself and
The Children's Psychiatric Center 15490 NW 7th Avenue, Suite 200 Miami, FL 33169 (305) 685-0381 216 (305) 685-4208 qesinfo@aol.com other local entities, and advocate for gang prevention/intervention services. 146,674.00
The Gang Unit Exit Strategies Service (GUESS) will focus on providing gang members, their siblings, and their
The Children's Psychiatric Center 15490 NW 7th Avenue, Suite 200 Miami, FL 33169 (305) 685-0381 216 (305) 685-4208 qesinfo@aol.com parents with all the necessary skills to extricate themselves from the gang culture.
100,200.00
The CJC Gang Prevention/Intervention Activities Coordination initiative will provide education and community
awareness on gangs, attend Multi-Agency Gang Task Force meetings, provide training on local gangs for youth
The Children's Psychiatric Center 15490 NW 7th Avenue, Suite 200 Miami, FL 33169 (305) 685-0381 216 (305) 685-4208 qesinfo@aol.com workers and social service providers, and advocate for prevention/intervention activities. 105,001.00
Evaluation of 3 Youth Gang Prevention and Intervention priorities: Hotline, Resource Center and the GUESS
The Thurston Group, Inc. 1175 NE 125th Street, Suite 614 North Miami, FL 33161 (305) 899-1639 (305) 891-3834 mthurston@ttconsulting.com Program.
28,687.00
Evaluation of 27 youth crime prevention programs in 3 focus areas.
The Thurston Group, Inc. 1175 NE 125 St, Suite 614 N Miami, FL 33161 (305) 899-1639 mthurston@ttgconsulting.com 200,253.00
Reduces recidivism by increasing protective factors and intensively working with the family unit to insure that the
youth stays in school. Serves Juvenile offenders enrolled in the schools eligible for SIS program and referred by a
Youth Co-Op, Inc 3525 NW 7th Street Miami, FL 33125 (305) 643-6730 121 (305) 643-2739 mrodriguez@ycoop.org Florida Dept. of Juvenile Justice/Juvenile probation Officer. 74,100.00
Provides conflict resolution, self esteem enhancement, basic life skills, computer education skills, tutoring,
YWCA of Greater Miami & Dade Cty 351 NW 5th St Miami, FL 33128-1615 (305) 377-9922 200 (305) 373-9922 jwilliams@ywca-miami.org leadership and self-empowerment so that each participant is given the opportunity to improve their quality of life.
85,000.00
Provides intensive follow-up for youth-at-risk of dropping out of school. 90% of the youth will thus remain in
YWCA of Greater Miami & Dade Cty 351 NW 5th St Miami, FL 33128-1615 (305) 377-9922 200 (305) 373-9922 jwilliams@ywca-miami.org school, not to be suspended, and will have no more absences than permited. 74,335.00

Children, Youth and Families


This project will serve children needing tutoring to strengthen academic performance and will provide quality,
Abriendo Puertas, Inc 1401 SW 1st. St., Suite 209 Miami, FL 33135 (305) 649-6449 280 (305) 649-1459 edominguez@abriendopuertas.org positive recreational, cultural and artistic activities for low income children.
57,500.00
Provides outreach about the Neighborhood Resource Center, formalizes the governance of the Little Havana
Community Partnership and trains the Service Provider Network members and natural helpers in Family Team
Abriendo Puertas, Inc 1401 SW 1st. St., Suite 209 Miami, FL 33135 (305) 649-6449 250 (305) 649-1459 jise@abriendopuertas.org (Group) Conferencing. 75,000.00
2004-2007 NOFA FUNDED COMMUNITY BASED ORGANIZATIONS

ORGANIZATION PC Address1 PC Address2 PC Phone PC Ext PC Fax PC Email PROJECT FUNDING AWARD
The Abstinence Between Strong Teens Project seeks to increase awareness in our program participants about the
dangers associated with having sex outside of marriage and how choosing a sex-free lifestyle can result in a
Abstinence Between Strong Teens 18151 SW 98 Ct. Miami, FL 33157 (305) 969-7829 (786) 242-1891 abst@bellsouth.net successful future. 41,000.00
Provides one-on-one HIV/AIDS prevention, intervention and testing services in Little Haiti, West Little River and
ADGAM Inc 3050 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 504 Miami, FL 33137 (305) 573-1136 (305) 573-1176 adgam@bellsouth.net North Miami to eighty high-risk women ages 15-22.
45,000.00
Project Find promotes quality child care in Homestead/Florida City through staff/parent trainings, referrals of
ARC - Association for Retarded Citizens 5555 Biscayne Blvd Miami, FL 33137-1333 (305) 759-8500 149 (305) 754-9223 aline44@aol.com children with special needs, family support services and staff education enhancement.
40,000.00
The ASPIRA South Academic Support program provides GED, ESOL, computer literacy, and career development
Aspira of Florida 3650 N Miami Ave Miami, FL 33127 (305) 576-1512 25 (305) 576-0810 arafky@fl.aspira.org to hard-to-serve minority youth/young adults in South Dade.
80,000.00
The ASPIRA Stay in School Program will encourage 75 at-risk students at Booker T. Washington High School to
Aspira of Florida 3650 N Miami Ave Miami, FL 33127 (305) 576-1512 25 (305) 576-0810 arafky@fl.aspira.org stay in school and graduate.
77,500.00
This program will increase literacy skills among parents and children and will assess family literacy activities, and
support services. Also, it will focus on literacy skills, reading for parents and children and shared reading activities
Aspira of Florida 14116 SW 288 Street Homestead, FL 33033 (305) 246-1111 221 (305) 246-3898 jpascual@fl.aspira.org for children and parents (Intergenerational Reading). 65,000.00
Provides in-home counseling and assistance to low-income families, in order to reduce child abuse and neglect.
Educates parents and children through parenting skills, training and support. Prevents child abuse and neglect
Ayuda Inc. 7118 Byron Ave Miami Beach, FL 33141 (305) 864-7557 (305) 866-5690 ayudakids@aol.com by providing parents with classes and one-on-one assistance on anger management. 41,000.00
The Academy for Better Communities provides technical assistance for the development and implementation of
Barry University - Academy for Better Communities, School of11300 NE 2nd Ave. Miami, FL 33161 (305) 899-4042 (305) 899-4783 pmillenbach@mail.barry.edu the six Neighborhood Resource Team/Centers funded by the Alliance for Human Services during 2004-2005.
100,000.00
BIG Expressions is a positive youth development program for Haitian youth involving mentoring, the Teen
Big Brothers, Big Sisters 701 SW 27 Ave., Suite 800 Miami, FL 33135-3026 (305) 644-0066 242 (305) 649-6358 lydiaim@bbbsmiami.org Outreach curriculum, and the backdrop of art and popular culture.
65,000.00
The PAC project provides at-risk youth and their families with a cognitive/behavioral curriculum that facilitates
Brown Schools Foundation 3300 NW 27 Ave Miami, FL 33142 (305) 903-9792 (305) 638-0208 jjys56@aol.com improvement in literacy, communication skills, and family functioning.
41,000.00
The link program at Centro Mater provides individual tutoring to after school children (5-13) and is based on close
CC - Centro Mater West 418 SW 4th. Ave. Miami, FL 33130 (305) 545-6049 (305) 324-6162 mrodriguez@catholiccharitiesadm.org collaboration with their teachers in the Mater Academy Charter School.
55,000.00
The project will impact literacy and early learning by engaging 60 preschoolers, including special needs children
CC - Centro Mater West 8298 NW 103 St Hialeah Gardens, FL 33016 (305) 827-4040 (305) 827-4033 mroman@catholiccharitiesadm.org in an optimum print rich and cognitively stimulating environment.
60,000.00
To provide access to healthcare for uninsured and high risk children who are residents of Homestead and Liberty
CC - Healthy Start 3675 South Miami Ave Miami, FL 33133 (305) 854-9712 310 (305) 854-9748 ncoletti@catholiccharitiesadm.org City.
70,000.00
Clinical art therapist will follow a curriculum for At Risk Youth. Therapist provides the children with lectures on the
CC - New Life Family Center ( f/k/a Catholic Home) 9401 Biscayne Blvd. Miami Shores, FL 33138 (30) 557-3333 (305) 576-5111 wescarmant@catholiccharitiesadm.org use, abuse and addition of alcohol and drugs.
45,000.00
The Home Visiting Program provides access to health care through home visits, health education, Medicaid, and
CC - Notre Dame 9401 Biscayne Blvd. Miami Shores, FL 33138 (305) 751-6778 (305) 751-6959 abarthelemy@cathloiccharitiesadm.org KidCare enrollment for families and children of Little Haiti.
75,000.00
The program will reduce the incidents of family violence, child abuse and neglect throughout the Haitian
CC - Pierre Toussaint Center 9401 Biscayne Blvd. Miami Shores, FL 33138 (305) 759-3050 (305) 754-7423 eviard@catholiccharitiesadm.org community and provide alternate forms of positive discipline techniques.
70,000.00
The center plans to provide services to 8 new infants and toddlers including children with special needs. Will
CC - Sagrada Family Center 970 SW 1st. St., Suite 204 Miami, FL 33130 (305) 324-5424 (305) 324-4967 gpalacios@catholicchaririesadm.org provide quality enhancement training to staff.
50,000.00
Provides entitled services to children between the ages of 6 weeks through 5 years of age in their natural
CC - South Dade Child Care Center 28520 SW 148 Ave Leisure City, FL 33033 (305) 245-0979 (305) 245-8796 rinserni@catholicchiritiesadm.org environment, who have been diagnosed or suspected of having a delay or an established condition.
60,000.00
The Special Needs Day Care serves children ages 18 months to 5 years. It provides specialized educational
interventions and services, developmental and social activities for HIV symptomatic, asymptomatic and affected
Children's Home Society of Florida 800 NW 15th. St Miami, FL 33136 (305) 755-6500 473 (305) 325-2630 randy.escoffery@chsfl.org children. 70,000.00
Addressed to students 11 to 14 having 2 hrs. of tutoring per week, will improve grades from 1st. Quarter to last; to
Coalition of Florida Farmworkers Organization Inc 778 West Palm Drive Florida City, FL 33034 (305) 246-0357 (305) 246-2445 coffo@algxmiami.org train more teachers to improve capability in developmentally appropriates activities.
50,000.00
52 sessions with referred 5th and 6th graders to include parent participation for early intervention/prevention of
Coalition of Florida Farmworkers Organization Inc 21 South Krome Ave Homestead, FL 33030 (305) 247-4779 (305) 242-0701 harold@coffo.org pregnancy and to increase knowledge of risk behavior..
75,000.00
COFFO’s literacy project supplements parents and the educational system, helping reading, math, and writing
Coalition of Florida Farmworkers Organization Inc 778 West Palm Drive Florida City, FL 33034 (305) 247-4779 n.a. challenged students; it provides adult basic education classes for literacy-challenged parents.
65,000.00
The CIS YET Center will serve 200 students in after and summer school programs that provide tutoring and
Communities in Schools of Miami 11900 SW 128 St Miami, FL 33186 (305) 252-5444 304 (305) 252-4664 elizabethcis@hotmail.com technology, health, and cultural arts educational programs.
47,500.00
IYHEP provides HIV prevention education, behavioral modification, HIV counseling and testing, and linkage to care
Community AIDS Resource, INC d/b/a/ Care Resource 3510 Biscayne Blvd., 3rd Floor Miami, FL 33137 (305) 576-1234 290 (305) 571-2220 istrawn@caresource.org for young Black and Hispanic males in Miami-Dade County jails.
85,000.00
DANF serves clients by assisting young Hispanics and their parents in achieving English literacy, developing a
Parent and Child Together program for parents and their children and giving parent training in child development
Dominican American National Foundation 2885 NW 36th Street Miami, FL 33142 (305) 637-8337 (305) 637-9474 danf1@bellsouth.net and parenting. 41,000.00
Drug Free Youth In Town provides school-based substance abuse prevention/positive youth development
activities. Program targets students ages 10 to 15 attending Herbert Ammons Middle, George Washington Carver
Drug Free Youth in Town 16201 SW 95 Ave., Suite 205 Miami, FL 33157 (305) 971-0607 (305) 971-4632 gcadima@dfyit.org Middle, Jose de Diego Middle, and Ruben Dario Middle schools. 65,000.00
Provides HIV outreach, prevention and early intervention to high-risk Black (including Haitian) young (age 16-25)
Empower U, Inc. 8309 NW 22 Ave Miami, FL 33147 (786) 318-2337 (786) 318-2339 empower9@bellsouth.net men who have sex with men.
50,000.00
The Sweetwater Coalition will focus mainly on the identification, mobilization and coordination of resources in the
community for the purpose of providing primary prevention and early intervention services to strengthen families
Families R Us Care Center 11865 SW 26th Street, G-10 Miami, FL 33175 (305) 559-8333 (305) 559-5333 familiesrus@bellsouth.net and thus the Sweetwater community. 49,060.00
The Parent Education Program is a 12-week community-based, culturally and linguistically sensitive, voluntary
Family Resource Center 4770 Biscayne Blvd, Suite 610 Miami, FL 33137 (305) 576-6190 21 (305) 572-1735 owunderman_frc@yahoo.com nurturing program for parents and adolescents, designed to prevent the occurrence or recurrence of child abuse.
70,000.00
Project LEAP: Leadership Development, Enrichment, Acculturation, & Prevention” promotes Haitian cultural
development by enabling participating Haitian youth through a leadership program, life skills training, a youth
Galata HCESE Inc 239-241 West Palm Drive Florida City, FL 33034 (305) 242-7060 (305) 242-8040 gn66@hotmail.com retreat, and volunteer activities. 65,000.00
The Girl Scout Daily Migrant Academic After School Program, is licensed to tutor, mentor and serve150 children
Girl Scouts - Council of Tropical Florida Inc 11347 SW 160 St. Miami, FL 33157-2703 (305) 253-4841 238 (305) 253-2132 prussell@girlscoutfl.org ages 4-10, in three Florida City / Homestead schools.
70,000.00
Girl Scout Decisions for Your Life offers early comprehensive teen pregnancy prevention programming for 800 pre-
Girl Scouts - Council of Tropical Florida Inc 11347 SW 160 St. Miami, FL 33157-2703 (305) 253-4841 238 (305) 253-2132 prussell@girlscoutfl.org adolescent girls, grades K-6, from high-risk, low-income neighborhoods.
60,000.00
Grace Holistic Center of Grace Haitian United Methodist Grace Haitian United Methodist Church proposes to reduce child abuse and neglect in the Little Haiti
Church 6501 N Miami Ave Miami, FL 33150 (305) 757-7632 (305) 757-7030 prevalflorea@aol.com neighborhoods by intensive in-home education programs.
45,000.00
Provides high-risk parents with high-intensity, short-term home care and parenting skills education and training to
Gulf Coast Community Care 3550 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 401 Miami, FL 33137 (305) 637-1000 358 (305) 637-1047 eduardo@gcjfs.org reduce the potential for child abuse and neglect.
70,000.00
Identifies, mobilizes, and aligns neighborhood assets and resources for improved social and economic conditions
Haitian Neighborhood Center Sant La 5000 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 110 Miami, FL 33137 (305) 573-4871 (305) 573-4875 santla@bellsouth.net for Little Haiti residents.
75,000.00
A faith- and community-based program to improve the health and quality of life of children with asthma through
Health Choice Network, Inc 3900 NW 79 Ave, Suite 500 Miami, FL 33166 (305) 599-1015 (305) 599-1336 tgreer@hcnetwork.org education, environmental home assessment and case management.
75,000.00
This project provides early childhood language development training to at least 135 child care center workers and
Hearing and Speech Center of Florida 9425 SW 72 St., Suite 261 Miami, FL 33173-5457 (305) 271-7343 (305) 271-7949 mheckstall@hearingandspeechcenter.orgat least 24 teenage mothers at COPE-South. 60,000.00
Academic Support Services for 35 hard-to-serve, at-risk youths, 16-22, living in North/North Central Miami Dade in
JCS - Jewish Community Services 735 NE 125 St. N Miami, FL 33161 (305) 899-1587 175 (305) 899-9964 pnctff@yahoo.com need of vocational and educational programs.
70,000.00
2004-2007 NOFA FUNDED COMMUNITY BASED ORGANIZATIONS

ORGANIZATION PC Address1 PC Address2 PC Phone PC Ext PC Fax PC Email PROJECT FUNDING AWARD
The program provides counseling at three Senior High Schools to 78 GLBT youth to foster positive youth
JCS - Jewish Community Services 300 41st/ St. # 216 Miami Beach, FL 33140 (305) 672-8080 (305) 672-0030 hebe89@aol.com development/personal resiliency and reduce risk of depression/suicide.
65,000.00
The full day developmentally appropriate activities for toddlers ensures a program of health, nutrition affective and
JESCA - James E Scott Community Assoc 2400 NW 54th Street Miami, FL 33142 (305) 637-1011 (305) 637-1047 jescaecd@bellsouth.net cognitive education to promote each child’s maximum potential growth.
40,000.00
The Model Cities Youth Streetworker Teenage Pregnancy Prevention and intervention program is designed to
target 45 brothers and sisters ages 8 - 18 years of age, who reside in the home with pregnant and/or parenting
JESCA - James E Scott Community Assoc 2400 NW 54th Street Miami, FL 33142 (305) 637-1000 (305) 637-1039 ccccherry@aol.com teens. 60,000.00
This funding is for 12 slots in “Gold Seal” accredited KIDCO sites and employment of the child care provider and
Kidco Child Care 3630 NE 1st Ct Miami, FL 33137 (305) 576-6990 (305) 576-5321 rosa@kidco-childcare.org clerk/registrar in this project.
40,000.00
Develops and implements planning process for Neighborhood Resource Center; improves outcomes for children,
youth and families. Focuses on primary and early intervention; promotes safe and secure environment for children
New Horizons Community Mental Health Center Inc 1313 NW 36th St., Suite 400 Miami, FL 33142-5555 (305) 635-0366 (305) 635-6378 nhcmhc@bellsouth.net and youth. 50,000.00
Provides after-school care; cultural, educational and recreational programming.
One Art Inc 1 NE 40 St, 2nd Floor Miami, FL 33137 (305) 576-6565 (305) 274-3252 joseoneart@aol.com 30,350.00
Aims to reduce teen pregnancy rates and STDs, especially HIV/AIDS, through a holistic abstinence-only and
Re Capturing the Vision Int'l, Inc 9950 Hibiscus St Miami, FL 33137 (305) 232-6003 (305) 232-6092 recap7@aol.com prevention program for 70 youth, ages 12-19.
80,000.00
The Healthy Outreach Program aims to improve access to health care by providing outreach, health screenings,
Regis House, Inc 2885 NW 36 St Miami, FL 33142 (305) 642-7600 210 (305) 642-6898 jknowles@regishouse.org information and referrals, and comprehensive follow up using a home-visiting model.
75,000.00
The Richmond-Perrine Optimist Club provides afterschool services including recreation, tutoring, FCAT
Richmond Perrine Optimist Club 9955 West Indigo Street Perrine, FL 33157 (305) 233-9325 (305) 232-7815 richperrn@bellsouth.net preparation and special events to West Perrine youth 6-14 years old.
50,000.00
The Richmond-Perrine Optimist Club will provide in home parenting services along with emergency assistance to
Richmond Perrine Optimist Club 9955 West Indigo Street Perrine, FL 33157 (305) 233-9325 (305) 232-7815 richperrn@bellsouth.net families referred from DCF or other entities.
60,000.00
Switchboard, GLSEN and 10 high schools with (GLBTQ) student support groups is implementing the Teen
Switchboard of Miami 701 SW 27th Ave., Suite 1000 Miami, FL 33135 (305) 358-1640 122 (305) 377-2269 mdentato@switchboardmiami.org Outreach Program (TOP), a science-based positive youth development program.
65,000.00
Increases the number of students participating in after-school care and tutoring. Students will demonstrate
improvement in grades from the first quarter to the last, documented by report cards, progress reports, and FCAT
Teen UpWard Bound, Inc 1210 Peri Street Opa Locka, FL 33054 (305) 681-2685 (305) 681-8559 rssll@aol.com scores. 31,000.00
An after school program providing therapy and tutoring services to children performing below grade level.
The Children's Psychiatric Center 430 W 66 St. Hialea, FL 33012 (305) 558-2480 254 (305) 558-0008 cpc_ipiloto@hotmail.com 67,500.00
A county-wide parenting skills program that provides trainings and workshops to increase parents' knowledge of
The Children's Psychiatric Center 430 W 66 St. Miami, FL 33012 (305) 558-2480 254 (305) 558-0008 cpc_ipiloto@hotmail.com parenting skills and prevent child abuse and neglect.
70,000.00
Provides youth ages 13-16, with mental health and physical disabilities, the opportunity to participate in a youth
The Children's Psychiatric Center 15490 NW 7th. Ave., Suite 200 Miami, FL 33169 (305) 685-0381 216 (305) 681-4355 qesinfo@aol.com development program. CPC will implement youth and parent groups, and volunteer/work community activities.
60,000.00
The pilot project provides a Life Mentor who acts as a surrogate parent to approximately 20 young adults ages
The Children's Psychiatric Center 13200 SW 128 St., Suite D-1 Miami, FL 33186 (305) 235-8105 19 (305) 235-7801 cpc_jptamargo@hotmail.com eighteen to twenty-two.
62,500.00
A training program for licensed community mental health providers throughout the community to increase the
The Children's Psychiatric Center 430 W 66 St. Hialeah, FL 33012 (305) 558-2480 254 (305) 558-0008 cpc_ipiloto@hotmail.com number of competent professionals working with children age 0-5.
80,000.00
The Village Boys 2 Boys Project provides culturally appropriate HIV/AIDS/drug prevention and intervention
The Village South, Inc. 3180 Biscayne Blvd Miami, FL 33137 (305) 571-2620 (305) 571-1435 lthompson@villagesouth.com services to minority Young Men who have Sex with Men (16 to 24 years).
65,000.00
The Trinity Peacemaker Family Center's After Care program increases the number of childcare slots availables,
and improves the quality of the resulting childcare programming available to working poor families in the North
Trinity Church P.O. Box 680820 Miami, FL 33168 (305) 685-8577 (305) 688-9129 rbarrios@peacemakers.com Miami target area. 40,000.00
The Trinity Peacemaker Family Center's After Care program increases the number of after care children enrolled,
increases the number of students attending 2 hours of tutoring per week, and to improve the academic
Trinity Church P.O. Box 680820 Miami, FL 33168 (305) 685-8577 (305) 688-9129 linda_freeman@stanfordalumni.org performance of these students available to working poor families in the North Miami target area. 57,500.00
Delivers “Dare To Be You”- a program that focuses on reducing teen pregnancy and HIV/AIDS through a multi-
Trinity Church P.O. Box 680820 Miami, FL 33168 (305) 685-8577 (305) 688-9129 rbarrios@peacemakers.com level primary prevention model-in partnership with the Elijah Network.
50,000.00
Trinity Church Peacemakers Family Center is developing and implementing a community planning process that
will strengthen families and communities in North Miami high-need area, through a series of strategic goals
Trinity Church P.O. Box 680820 Miami, FL 33168 (305) 685-8577 (305) 688-9129 rolandobarrios@msn.com designed to identify, mobilize, coordinate and evaluate services for children, youth amd families. 50,000.00
Preventing Abuse through Responsive Parenting consists of a 10-module group-based parent educational
intervention and a 20-session individualized psychotherapeutic intervention designed to change high-risk caregiver-
UM - Mailman Center for Child Development 1601 NW 12th Avenue Miami, FL 33136 (954) 322-1107 (305) 243-3410 rnatale@med.miami.edu child interactions. 60,000.00
The program aims to prevent child maltreatment by improving parenting skills and knowledge, reducing stress,
and strengthening parent-child interaction and self-sufficiency through the provision of at least 10 individually-
UM - Perinatal CARE Program P.O. Box 016960 (M-808) Miami, FL 33101 (305) 243-2030 (305) 243-4080 cmorrow@med.miami.edu tailored, intensive home-based parenting sessions. 70,000.00
The Rites of Passage Pregnancy Prevention Project increases core competencies in girls. It includes social
competence, conflict resolution, negotiation and decision making skills and self-efficacy, as means of reducing
Urgent, Inc 1600 NW 3rd Avenue, Bldg. D Miami, FL 33136 (305) 573-8217 (305) 573-2329 taung@urgentinc.org teenage pregnancy, HIV/AIDS, STD infections and substance/alcohol abuse. 41,000.00
A comprehensive program reparing foster teens for a successful transition to adulthood through the provision of
and access to independent living skills, housing, education/employment, counseling, leadership opportunities and
Voices for Children 1500 NW 12th Ave, Suite 1117 Miami, FL 33136 (305) 324-5678 16 (305) 324-5978 trodriguez@voicesgal.org permanent adult relationships. 62,500.00
WeCare’s Neighborhood Network’s continued vision is to increase communication to and between providers, the
community and government; increase collaboration among providers; enhance coordination efforts to build the
We Care of South Dade 1350 SW 4th. St. Homestead, FL 33030 (305) 247-9693 (305) 247-8187 kametrad@hscdade.org capacity of agencies and the community. 75,000.00
The YMCA will provide scholarships for before and after-school services to 54 youth. Tutoring services will be
YMCA of Greater Miami 1200 NW 78 Ave., Suite 200 Miami, FL 33126 (305) 357-4000 (305) 357-6633 n.a. provided to 70 youth who are performing below grade level.
75,000.00
Serves as an "educational/counseling link" between at-risk youth, the educational institution and the family by
creating an avenue for the achievement of academic progress and career goal seting. Will serve the youth
Youth Co-Op, Inc 3525 NW 7th Street Miami, FL 33125 (305) 643-6730 120 (305) 643-2739 cpb@ycoop.org attending Booker T. Washington Senior High. 50,000.00
The 20-week YWCA Enhanced Tutorial Component (homework assistance tutoring and FCAT preparation skills)
is proposed for five elementary schools: Allapattah, Citrus Grove, Florida City, Earlington Heights, and Phyllis
YWCA of Greater Miami & Dade Cty 351 NW 5th St Miami, FL 33128-1615 (305) 377-9922 200 (305) 373-9922 teverett@ywca-miami.org Wheatley. 55,000.00
th
An after-school program focused on teen pregnancy prevention targeting 6 grade students at Henry Filer Middle
YWCA of Greater Miami & Dade Cty 351 NW 5th St Miami, FL 33128-1615 (305) 377-9922 212 (305) 373-9922 jwilliams@ywca-miami.org School in Hialeah. 75,000.00

Elder Services
Implements and evaluates a multidiscuplinary, multiorganizational intervention that will interrupt the cycle of
violence, increase safety of victims and offer more effective and acceptable solutions than currently available for
Advocate Program Inc. 5040 NW 7th. St., Suite 120 Miami, FL 33126-3425 (305) 704-0109 (305) 704-0155 mdmphd@advocateprogram.com older adults at Miami-Dade County who experience domestic violence, sexual assault and abuse. 90,000.00
The program provides meals, recreation, education and supportive activities to impoverished elderly resident in
Allapattah Community Action, Inc. 2257 NW North River Dr. Miami, FL 33125 (305) 633-0466 (305) 638-5868 acai@bellsouth.net Miami-Dade.
60,000.00
Casemanagement services will be given to 25 clients in Overtown. Ten of the most frail clients will receive
Ayuda Inc. 7118 Byron Ave Miami Beach, FL 33141 (305) 864-7557 (305) 866-5690 ayudakids@aol.com homemaker services twice monthly until stabilized.
50,000.00
This project responds to the needs of Miami-Dade County elders through training opportunities that enhance
Barry University - School of Adult & Cont Edu 11300 NE 2nd Ave Miami, FL 33161 (305) 899-3300 (305) 899-2937 jcdyer@mail.barry.edu service providers’ abilities to deliver culturally relevant services built on best practices.
70,000.00
Allows seniors to remain living independently in their community for as long as possible.
CC - Services for the Elderly 9900 NE 2 Ave Miami Shores, FL 33138 (305) 751-5203 (305) 758-4972 lsantos@catholiccharitiesadm.org 80,000.00
Provides Nutrition and Recreational/Social Services to 112 low-income Haitian elderly persons residing in the
CC - Services for the Elderly 9900 NE 2 Ave Miami Shores, FL 33138 (305) 751-5203 (305) 758-4972 lsantos@catholiccharitiesadm.org community of Little Haiti.
50,000.00
2004-2007 NOFA FUNDED COMMUNITY BASED ORGANIZATIONS

ORGANIZATION PC Address1 PC Address2 PC Phone PC Ext PC Fax PC Email PROJECT FUNDING AWARD
Provides Nutrition and Recreational/Social Services to 150 low-income elderly persons residing in the Round
CC - Services for the Elderly 9401 Biscayne Blvd. Miami Shores, FL 33138 (305) 751-5203 (305) 758-4972 n.a. Towers HUD facility located in the community of Allapattah.
65,000.00
Provides center-based services including congregate meals, socialization, education, information and referral,
De Hostos Senior Center 2902 NW 2nd Ave Miami, FL 33127 (305) 573-6220 (305) 573-2193 dhscenter@aol.com counseling, and health screenings to 100 elders in Wynwood
65,000.00
Easter Seals provides extended hours and weekend adult day care to frail older adults and people afflicted with
Easter Seals Miami-Dade, Inc 1475 NW 14 Avenue Miami, FL 33125-1616 (305) 547-4721 (305) 325-0578 essdade@aol.com dementia and related disorders residing in Miami-Dade.
85,000.00
GALATA Senior Center – 60+ bridging the Gap Program is to continue the identification of clients needing
Galata HCESE Inc 239-241 West Palm Drive Florida City, FL 33034 (305) 242-7060 (305) 242-8040 galatainc@hotmail.com services, and help them access those services available to them.
75,000.00
GALATA’s Special Transportation Project will allow seniors free and reliable transportation. With a new state-of the-
art 25-passenger van, GALATA’s Senior Transportation Service is answering the cry of the elderly for safe,
Galata HCESE Inc 239-241 West Palm Drive Florida City, FL 33034 (305) 242-7060 (305) 242-8040 galatainc@hotmail.com affordable transportation. (G.S.T.P.) 65,000.00
The project is designed to provide temporary home based services and assisstance to 25 elders in Little Haiti, to
HAFI - Haitian American Found Inc 5080 Biscayne Blvd Miami, FL 33137 (305) 758-3338 (305) 758-3238 ralucas7@aol.com reincorporate them into socialization and nutritional programs offered by an elder center.
45,000.00
The Enhanced Nutritional Services Project is designed to provide temporary home-based services and assistance
to 25 elders in Little Haiti to reincorporate them into socialization and nutritional program offered by en elder
HAFI - Haitian American Found Inc 5080 Biscayne Blvd Miami, FL 33137 (305) 758-3338 (305) 758-3238 ringocayard@yahoo.com center. 50,000.00
Assists the elderly to live as independently at home as possible. Coordinates services for health, respite care,
transportation, food services, home repairs, crisis intervention, social services, recreation and socialization activities
Holy Temple Human Services Inc 2341 NW 143 St Opa Locka, FL 33054 (305) 681-7883 (305) 953-0537 yellowbrd12@cs.com with early intervention and prevention. 49,000.00
Provides health, wellness and activities of a preventive nature to approximately 65 elders daily, providing 600 client
JCS - Jewish Community Center Mia Bch Sr Ctr 610 Española Way Miami Beach, FL 33139 (305) 673-6060 (305) 673-2522 joyce@ccje.com contacts (classes/activities) throughout the year.
85,000.00
Provides 60 frail elderly home-bound clients with short-term care management services, volunteers and follow up
JCS - Jewish Community Services 18999 Biscayne Blvd. Aventura, FL 33180 (305) 933-9820 (305) 933-9843 snjcs@bellsouth.net to enhance their activities of daily living.
80,000.00
Provides in-home repairs to 87 people within district 8 & 9 for elderly/indigent so they may independently age in
JCS - Jewish Community Services 18999 Biscayne Blvd. Aventura, FL 33180 (305) 933-9820 (305) 933-9843 snjcs@bellsouth.net place.
69,900.00
Offers a home-based nutrition assessment, counseling and meals on a temporary basis, to elders confined to their
JCS - Senior Meals Program 4200 Biscayne Blvd Miami, FL 33137 (305) 576-1660 (305) 576-1665 ela@ccje.com homes, for a limited period of time. Will serve 8,200 units of service (meals) to an estimated census of 205 clients.
90,000.00
This grant provides 50 impaired elders with nursing, social services and 260 activities of an interactive nature on
JCS - Seymour Gilbert 11025 SW 84th. St., Suite 12 Miami, FL 33173 (305) 270-2979 (305) 270-4957 ablair@ccje.com an annual basis, assisting clients to live purposeful lives and remain in their homes.
85,000.00
Provides assistance to frail, homebound elderly persons who are temporarily confined to their homes through the
provision of a nutritionally balanced meal delivered on a daily basis, as well provides nutrition education and other
JESCA - James E Scott Community Assoc 2350 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33142 (305) 638-5500 (305) 633-8969 n.a. support services to approximately 40 eligible persons annually. 50,000.00
The Old Friends Senior Center provides a comprehensive community-based socialization program for elders
Little Brothers - Friends of the Elderly 5599 SW 8 St Miami, FL 33134 (305) 969-9299 (305) 969-9252 aguerrero.mia@littlebrothers.org where caring staff and volunteers monitor their quality of life and well-being.
75,000.00
The Transportation Program provides much-needed, highly personalized (specialized), caring, and cost-free
transportation to low-income, homebound, isolated elders who are without aid from family or caregivers (or limited
Little Brothers - Friends of the Elderly 5599 SW 8 St Miami, FL 33134 (305) 969-9299 (305) 969-9252 jsantamaria.mia@littlebrothers.org care). 52,000.00
The “HomeAid” Program responds in a sensitive, timely manner to referrals for emergency home repairs for elderly
Little Brothers - Friends of the Elderly 5599 SW 8 St Miami, FL 33134 (305) 969-9299 (305) 969-9252 jsantamaria.mia@littlebrothers.org without the means to manage these tasks on their own.
35,000.00
Provides center-based activities nature including arts and crafts classes, music appreciation and an exercise
classes that will promote interaction, socialization and recreation to help maintain the elderly physical and mental
Little Havana Activities + Nutrition Centers 700 SW 8 St. Miami, FL 33130 (305) 858-0887 221 (305) 854-2226 rpd@lhanc.org health. 90,000.00
Provides nutritionally balanced congregate meals at its senior center/s to low-income elderly 60+ years old.
Little Havana Activities + Nutrition Centers 700 SW 8 St. Miami, FL 33130 (305) 858-0887 221 (305) 854-2226 rpd@lhanc.org Supportive services will also be available at the centers to these elderly at no additional cost to funding source.
45,000.00
Provides 93 frail elderly persons with culturally and linguistically competent case management; home-delivered
Little Havana Activities + Nutrition Centers 700 SW 8 St. Miami, FL 33130 (305) 858-0887 229 (305) 854-2226 lalby@lhanc.org meals and personal care and/or homemaking services.
150,000.00
Provides 42 people with 3,360 hours of home health services to assist clients in achieving maximum independence
Masada Home Care Inc 757 West Ave Miami Beach, FL 33139 (305) 672-2648 (305) 672-0133 teresa@ccje.com and remain at home.
70,000.00
Helps blind and visually-impaired elders through rehabilitation, diabetes and low-vision education; counseling;
Miami Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired 601 SW 8 Ave Miami, FL 33130 (305) 856-2288 234 (305) 285-6967 elly@miamilighthouse.com community outreach/support to senior centers and innovative access to services.
85,000.00
Program for Center-Based Socialization and Recreational Services is designed to increase the self-esteem,
Nanay, Inc 659 NE 125 St N Miami, FL 33161 (305) 981-3232 (305) 981-3131 bennie_t_jr@yahoo.com encourage socialization and enhance the quality of life of the elders in Miami-Dade County.
70,000.00
The Specialized Transportation and Escort services program of NANAY are designed to complement the other
services offered by NANAY and to empower elders to access specialized transport for their personal, health and
Nanay, Inc 659 NE 125 St N Miami, FL 33161 (305) 981-3232 (305) 981-3131 bennie_t_jr@yahoo.com social needs. 48,000.00
Provides prevention and intervention to 100 socially isolated low-income elders who are not already accessing
elder services. Our Social worker will provide short- and long-term case management as well as referrals to
Nanay, Inc 659 NE 125 St N Miami, FL 33161 (305) 981-3232 (305) 981-3131 bennie_t_jr@yahoo.com appropriate resource agencies. 57,000.00
Neighborhood Family Services provides the following services to 85 elderly clients 60 years of age and older:
recreational activities; health support; transportation; screening; and, assessment and counseling. The project is
New Horizons Community Mental Health Center Inc 1313 NW 36th St., Suite 400 Miami, FL 33142-5555 (305) 635-0366 (305) 635-6378 nhcmhc@bellsouth.net located in Allapattah (District 3). 85,000.00
Provides frail seniors who reside in Northeast Miami-Dade with round-trip transportation to grocery stores,
North Miami Foundation for Senior Citizens' Services 620 NE 127 St N Miami, FL 33161 (305) 893-1450 (305) 899-1505 dk@nmf620.org pharmacies, doctors, and social/recreational activities.
25,000.00
Promotes optimum health and safety by improving nutrition, reducing social isolation and assisting in the
North Miami Foundation for Senior Citizens' Services 620 NE 127 St N Miami, FL 33161 (305) 893-1450 (305) 899-1505 dk@nmf620.org completion of independent activities of daily living.
77,000.00
The North Miami Foundation Early Intervention/Prevention Program matches elderly clients with volunteers for
North Miami Foundation for Senior Citizens' Services 620 NE 127 St North Miami, FL 33161 (305) 893-1450 (305) 899-1505 dk@nmf620.org telephone reassurance calls, friendly visits, and escort to doctors and grocery stores.
17,500.00
Seniors come to the Senior Friends Activity Center to socialize and receive education in West Perrine with the goal
Rainbow of Hope Dream Center Inc 17623 Homestead Avenue Miami, FL 33157 (786) 293-3939 (305) 574-0120 dwolffe@rainbowofhopedc.org of helping them to maintain healthy and independent lifestyles.
50,000.00
The Stay-In-Touch program assigns volunteers to interact with home-based seniors south of Kendall to Florida
Rainbow of Hope Dream Center Inc 17623 Homestead Avenue Miami, FL 33157 (786) 293-3939 (305) 574-0120 dwolffe@rainbowofhopedc.org City with the goal of helping them to maintain healthy and independent lifestyles.
50,000.00
Provides nutritional (congregate and home delivered meals) social, educational and transportation services to low-
Southwest Social Services Program 25 Tamiami Blvd Miami, FL 33144 (305) 261-6202 (305) 266-8110 swss@bbsector.net income elderly in southwest Miami-Dade. Goal is to assist elderly to age in place.
85,000.00
This service is intended to provide older persons with nutritionally balanced meals at home. To promote better
health among the older segment of the population, offering them a greater independenceat home, rather than in
Southwest Social Services Program 25 Tamiami Blvd Miami, FL 33144 (305) 261-6202 (305) 266-8110 swss@bbecctor.net an institution. 80,000.00
In 2004 -2005, St. Anne’s Senior Day Services Program will provide adult daycare service to 9 South Dade frail
St Anne's Nursing Center, St Anne's Residence, Inc 11855 Quail Roost Dr. Miami, FL 33177 (305) 252-4000 (305) 651-3313 duncangadc@aol.com elders in crisis.
85,000.00
The STEPS Emergency Home Repair Project is designed to meet minor home repairs or environmental
Steps in the Right Direction Inc. 1840 W 49 St., Suite 222-02 Hialeah, FL 33012 (305) 231-9936 (786) 621-3991 salemb@bellsouth.net improvement needs of 35 low income frail or homebound elders in Hialeah.
35,000.00
Provides case management and a variety of in-home services to frail elderly in order to maintain community tenure
United Home Care Services 5255 NW 87 Ave., Suite 400 Miami, FL 33178 (305) 716-0440 (305) 599-3111 eellsworth@unitedhomecare.com and support family care-giving.
150,000.00
Through the Crisis Care for Frail Elders Program, Villa Maria will provide 8 slots for frail elders in North Dade.
Villa Maria Nursing and Rehabilitation 20855 NW 9th. Ct N Miami, FL 33169 (305) 651-0034 (305) 651-3313 duncangadc@aol.com 85,000.00

Immigrants and New Entrants


2004-2007 NOFA FUNDED COMMUNITY BASED ORGANIZATIONS

ORGANIZATION PC Address1 PC Address2 PC Phone PC Ext PC Fax PC Email PROJECT FUNDING AWARD
The goal of the American Dream Achievement Project (ADAP) is to implement a service program providing an
array of quality of life improvement services included but not limited to case management, referral base for
Galata HCESE Inc 239-241 West Palm Drive Florida City, FL 33054 (305) 242-7060 (305) 242-8040 galatainc@hotmail.com increased utilization of existing services providers. 30,000.00
Addresses the needs of adults over 55 years old who emigrated from Central and South America and are in need
Miami Behavioral Health Center Inc 2686 SW 87 Av Miami, FL 33165 (305) 757-0602 (3005) 757-2387 obarranco@spectrumprograms.com of socialization and acculturation services.
55,000.00
Provides socialization and adaptation services to immigrants and new entrants to assist in adapting to life in the
The Children's Psychiatric Center 430 W 66 St. Hialeah, FL 33012 (305) 558-2480 254 (305) 558-0008 cpc_ipiloto@hotmail.com United States. Program will link with other community organizations.
57,500.00
The “Haitian Community Guardian Program” assists Haitian Immigrants and New Entrants to become more self-
CC - Pierre Toussaint Center 130 NE 62nd. St., 2nd. Floor Miami, FL 33138 (305) 759-3050 (305) 754-7423 eviard@catholiccharitiesadm.org sufficient and establish linkages with services available in the community.
60,000.00
Provides academic, vocational, and upgrade services to immigrants and entrants who do not qualify for any
Jobs for Miami 7900 NE 2nd Ave, 6th Floor Miami, FL 33138 (305) 512-9012 (305) 512-0081 laurai@jfmiami.org federally-funded programs.
42,500.00
Prepares foreign-born nurses for employment in the United States. Promotion of social welfare, charity and
Saber, Inc 3990 West Flagler St., Suite 500 Miami, FL 33134 (305) 443-7601 (305) 443-8441 saber@saberinc.com educational purposes.
42,500.00
Helps immigrants in their transition into self-sufficiency by increasing their social, vocational and academic abilities
Dominican American National Foundation 2885 NW 36th Street Miami, FL 33142 (305) 637-8337 (305) 637-9474 danf1@bellsouth.net through in-house counseling and referrals to academic and vocational programs.
17,500.00
Promotes community prosperity through public education and outreach to immigrantas and new entrants,
Florida Immigrant Advocacy Ctr. 3000 Biscayne Blvd, Suite 400 Miami, FL 33137 (305) 573-1106 1430 (305) 576-6273 tzamorano@fiacfla.org addresses systematic policy barriers and supplies information about individual rights. 29,600.00

Special Needs
Increasing the level of safety for Florida citizens, continuing research on promising practices, updating data and
Advocate Program Inc. 5040 NW 7th. St., Suite 120 Miami, FL 33126-3425 (305) 704-0109 (305) 704-0155 mdmphd@advocateprogram.com disseminate information. Training and providing a forum for community partners to make system changes.
96,500.00
Community awareness activities regarding domestic violence, rape and sexual assault targeting Haitian, Hispanic,
Advocate Program Inc. (305) 704-0109 (305) 704-0155 mdmphd@advocateprogram.com elderly, same sex couples and persons with disabilities.
30,000.00
The SPECIAL NEEDS Cross Systems Training enhances providers’ abilities to deliver culturally relevant services
Barry University - School of Adult & Cont Edu 11300 NE 2nd Ave - ACE Bldg. Miami, FL 33161 (786) 344-5206 (305) 899-2937 jcolyer@mail.barry.edu for case managers including resource sharing and collaborative opportunities.
70,000.00
The "WITH IT" project utilizes the Transition to Independence Process model to provide transition services to 45
Bertha Abess Children's Center, Inc 5801 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33137 (305) 756-7116 (305) 756-8864 virginia.gomez@baccinc.org adolescents with severe emotional disturbances.
78,000.00
Humanitarian services to the poor and homeless population of Miami-Dade County. Provides over 2,000 contacts a
Camillus House 27940 S Dixie Hwy Naranja, FL 33032 (305) 247-1949 (305) 246-0025 charlesd@camillus.org year with homeless persons and transitional housing to 70 persons in 20 families, on an annual basis.
40,000.00
Case management, referrals and general social services to homeless individuals and families. Serves about 2,400
Camillus House 726 NE 1st. Ave Miami, FL 33132 (305) 374-1065 413 (305) 374-2093 aundray@camillus.org clients and makes about 9,800 contacts a year.
45,000.00
The new Camillus Life Center South program offers outpatient substance abuse treatment services to homeless
Camillus House 336 NW 5th St Miami, FL 33128 (305) 374-1065 331 (305) 372-1402 tom@camillus.org persons living at the Camillus Airbase Transitional Housing.
86,400.00
Provides comprehensive supportive services to the 76 formerly homeless adults residing at Rivermont. These
Carrfour Supportive Housing 155 S Miami Ave., Suite 1150 Miami, FL 33131 (305) 371-8300 327 (305) 371-1376 sberman@carrfour.org services will empower self-sufficiency, independent living and residential stability.
40,000.00
The New Life Family Center provides homeless families with food, clothing and transitional housing. It provides
CC - New Life Family Center 3620 NW 1st. Ave. Miami, FL 33126 (305) 573-3333 (305) 576-5111 newlife@catholiccharitiesadm.org homeless families with tools to attain self-sufficiency, financial stability and transition into permanent housing.
40,000.00
Shaman began in 1995 and serves homeless adults who are dually diagnosed of mental illness and substance
abuse disorders, from throughout Miami-Dade County. Progam is designed as a low-demand model for individuals
Citrus Health Network Inc 3380 NW 79 St. Miami, FL 33147 (305) 835-0300 (306) 836-8063 mannys@citrushealth.com and couples who have fallen below the safety net and are not amenable to other treatment programs. 40,000.00
Kiva is one of only two Safe Havens in existence in Miami-Dade County. The target population is dually diagnosed
Citrus Health Network Inc 1339 SE 9th. Ave. Hialeah, FL 33010 (305) 884-1382 (305) 884-8628 mannys@citrushealth.com individuals who have been homeless for long periods of time and are frequently resistant to services.
40,000.00
Provides 1000 outreach contacts with homeless, to place 300 homeless persons in shelter, 150 to 300 placements
City of Miami - Miami Homeless Program 444 SW 2nd Avenue Miami, FL 33130 (305) 575-2029 (305) 575-2034 bwsimon@ci.miami.fl.us for 7 days and emergency weather services to at least 15 persons per incident.
40,000.00
Concept House’s Concept Ambassador Prevention Project delivers a culturally adapted model program in Haitian
Concept House Inc 162 NE 49th. St. Miami, FL 33137 (305) 751-6501 22 (305) 756-8906 nkoenig@villagesouth.com Kreole to 150 students and parents at North Miami Beach Senior.
87,000.00
Provides for the continuation of its adult mental health treatment capacity including aftercare case management
services for acutely and chronically mentally ill adults who require repeated inpatient hospitalizations due to poor
Douglas Gardens Community Mental Health Center 701 Lincoln Rd. Miami Beach, FL 33139 (305) 531-5341 (305) 532-5322 dquick@dgcmhc.org outpatient treatment compliance upon discharge into the community. 53,750.00
Provides school-based prevention activities designed to decrease ATOD use and abuse. Program targets
members of Haitian origin attending North Miami Middle and Thomas Jefferson Middle, Miami Edison Middle and
Drug Free Youth in Town 16201 SW 95 Ave., Suite 205 Miami, FL 33157 (305) 971-0607 (305) 971-4632 gcadima@dfyit.org Senior High schools. 67,000.00
This project provides early prevention and intervention services to children age four to twelve, who are at risk of
developing emotional and/or behavioral disorders as a result of family or community violence. It has two key
Family Counseling Services of Greater Miami 10651 N Kendall Dr, Suite 100 Miami, FL 33176 (305) 271-9800 (305) 279-3319 components: case management and mental health services. 90,000.00
Proposes expanding its outpatient treatment programming targeting 90 clients, ages 18 and up, from low-
Here's Help Inc 9016 SW 152nd. Street Miami, FL 33157 (786) 229-5348 (305) 685-0158 footysauce@aol.com socioeconomic backgrounds without the financial means to pay for such services.
82,000.00
Comprehensive Vocational Services (Countywide): Day labor training, vocational training, and job development
JCS - Jewish Community Services 735 NE 125 St. N Miami, FL 33161 (305) 899-1587 175 (305) 899-9964 tfleischmann@jcsfl.org and placement for 400 homeless individuals referred from emergency and transitional housing facilities.
44,600.00
Homeless Prevention Case Management to a minimum of 60 special needs customers to enhance employment
JCS - Jewish Community Services 735 NE 125 St. N Miami, FL 33161 (305) 899-1587 113 (305) 899-6367 sgoldsmith@jcsfl.org with the purpose of promoting sustained housing and preventing homelessness.
55,000.00
The program targets families who are below the threshold of homelessness. The goal is to assist individuals and
families in developing a plan that is competent in providing support, structure, planning and appropriate financial
JESCA - James E. Scott Community Association 10555 NW 21 Ave. Miami, FL 33147 (305) 694-2175 (305) 694-8237 jescatns@bellsouth.net accountability in order to reduce the potential for homelessness. 61,500.00
Kristi House provides the wrap around case coordination and outpatient treatment service needed to assist
children and non-offending family members to successfully recover from the trauma of sexual abuse. Kristi
Kristi House Inc. 1265 NW 12th Ave Miami, FL 33136 (305) 547-6834 (305) 547-6837 dthompson@kristihouse.org House is targeting the areas of Homestead and Liberty City. 50,000.00
New Beginnings is a family transitional housing program using six homes in South Miami-Dade. LSF provides
LS - Lutheran Services Florida, Inc. 16201 SW 95th. Ave., Suite 105 Miami, FL 33157 (786) 293-6110 (786) 293-6106 bvonwerne@lsfact.org support to help these families attain self-sufficiency.
38,500.00
The Partners for Home is a permanent housing program that provides case management, clinical supervision, and
LS - Lutheran Services Florida, Inc. 16201 SW 95th. Ave., Suite 109 Miami, FL 33157 (305) 969-7030 (786) 293-6108 ssantiago@lsfact.org direct financial assistance for homeless individuals and their families.
25,000.00
MBHC serves a minimum of 45 unduplicated, Indigent children/families residing in South Dade with mental health
and/or behavioral problems. Enrolled clients will receive psychiatric service, case management and therapeutic in-
Miami Behavioral Health Center Inc 11301 NE 6th Ave Miami, FL 33161-7182 (305) 757-0602 (305) 757-2387 obarranco@spectrumprograms.com home/onsite services to facilitate continued enrollment in school, less restrictive environment, and decreased
absenteeism
90,000.00
Serves 45 indigent children/families residing in East Little Havana, Wynwood, Allapattah and Coconut Grove who
have mental health problems due to living in a violent home or witnessing violence in the community. The
Miami Behavioral Health Center Inc 11301 NE 6th Ave Miami, FL 33161-7182 (305) 757-0602 (305) 757-2387 obarranco@spectrumprograms.com program intends to identify children, reduce domestic violence, assist children in remaining in school and provide
needed mental and psychiatric treatment
90,000.00
Miami Behavioral Health Center provides training, psychoeducation, supported employment, family and individual
counseling, and targeted case management to 41 unduplicated clients who are diagnosed with co-occurring
Miami Behavioral Health Center Inc 11301 NE 6th Ave Miami, FL 33161-7182 (305) 757-0602 (305) 757-2387 obarranco@spectrumprograms.com disorders. 82,195.00
Services victims of domestic violence, targeting the families of farmworkers or w/ agricultural backgrounds.
Referral, counseling, transportation, community education, oureach and hotline services are among those
Mujer, Inc. 28905 S. Dixie Highway Homestead, FL 33030 (305) 247-1388 (305) 247-1362 susan@mujerfla.org provided. 96,500.00
The program assists individuals suffering from co-occurring disorders to achieve and maintain optimum
Psychosocial Rehabilitation Center Inc d/b/a Fellowship House5711 S Dixie Hwy South Miami, FL 33143-3694 (305) 667-1036 1220 (305) 667-4938 rsmith-hoel@fellowshiphouse.org functioning and independence by providing a seamless system of workforce development services.
82,195.00
Project SUCCESS prevents and reduces substance use among high-risk, multi-problem 14-18 year olds through a
Switchboard of Miami 701 SW 27th Ave., Suite 1000 Miami, FL 33135 (305) 358-1640 122 (305) 377-2269 mdentato@switchboardmiami.org prevention/education series; individual assessment; individual/group counseling; parent programs and referral.
87,000.00
2004-2007 NOFA FUNDED COMMUNITY BASED ORGANIZATIONS

ORGANIZATION PC Address1 PC Address2 PC Phone PC Ext PC Fax PC Email PROJECT FUNDING AWARD
The BACC WITH IT Project utilizes the Transition to Independence Process model to provide transition services to
The Children's Psychiatric Center 15490 NW 7th. Ave., Suite 200 Miami, FL 33169 (305) 685-0381 216 (305) 681-4355 qesinfo@aol.com 45 adolescents with severe emotional disturbances.
90,000.00
The Early Intervention, Prevention and Treatment Program provides comprehensive mental health and case
The Children's Psychiatric Center 15490 NW 7th. Ave., Suite 200 Miami, FL 33169 (305) 685-0381 216 (305) 681-4355 qesinfo@aol.com management services to 80 children and their families residing throughout Miami-Dade County.
90,000.00
The Specialized Therapeutic Foster Care Program provides placement for severely-emotionally disturbed foster
The Children's Psychiatric Center 13200 SW 128 St., D-1 Miami, FL 33186 (305) 235-8105 19 (305) 235-7801 cpc-pjtamargo@hotmail.com care children in trained, licensed and supervised foster homes.
72,500.00
The Village provides integrated and coordinated substance abuse and mental health treatment for adults, 18
The Village South, Inc. 3180 Biscayne Blvd Miami, FL 33137 (305) 571-2620 (305) 576-1348 valerajg@aol.com years or older, who are receiving residential substance abuse treatment.
96,500.00
Provides aftercare for 25 women and their children annually who completed residential treatment. Services include
The Village South, Inc. 3180 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33137 (305) 571-2620 (305) 576-1348 lthompson@villagesouth.com individual and group therapy, in-home support, and case management.
86,060.00
A neighborhood Based Outreach One-Stop Center for Victims of Domestic Violence Rape and Sexual Assault in
Women's Shelter of Hope, Inc. P.O. Box 133024 Hialeah, Fl 33013 (305) 888-5011 (305) 863-8348 womenssh@aol.com the Hialeah Area. 45,000.00

Workforce Development
Provides treatment, housing and services continuum to local addicted. Assesses clients/residents, prepares them
Better Way of Miami, Inc. 800 NW 28th Street Miami, FL 33127 (305) 634-3409 122 (305) 635-3524 betterwaymiami@aol.com for work, assures job placement and job retention towards a self-sufficient life in recovery.
78,700.00
Provides direct services to 200 students with disabilities at 3 technical education centers in Miami-Dade that result
Center for Independent Living of South Florida, Inc. 6660 Biscayne Boulevard Miami, FL 33138 (305) 751-8025 (305) 751-8944 alvarez@soflacil.org in retention, graduation and competitive employment.
323,000.00
Provides job training and placement services to ex-offenders who are ineligible to be served under federal
Transition, Inc. 390 NW 2nd Street Miami, FL 33128 (305) 374-1987 (305) 539-9141 jandrews@southfloridaworkforce.com Workforce Investment Act funding guidelines. 221,300.00
2005 STATE LEGISLATIVE PACKAGE

GUIDING PRINCIPLES

UNFUNDED MANDATES: OPPOSE legislation requiring local jurisdictions to perform services or to fund programs
not funded by the state and not approved by local jurisdictions.

REVENUE STREAMS: SUPPORT adequate levels of funding for programs affecting children and families. SUPPORT
efforts to increase Florida’s revenue streams, particularly legislation which facilitates revenue maximization efforts and
the ability to leverage federal funds for children’s programs.

EARLY EDUCATION AND PREVENTION: SUPPORT programs which prioritize early education and prevention
services.

CRITICAL ISSUES

These are the highest priority issues that require The Children's Trust to take a leading role. This
involves proactive, intensive advocacy through research, testimony, network building and active
lobbying..

UNIVERSAL PRE-KINDERGARTEN: SEEK sufficient funding and additional quality improvements for successful
implementation and operation of the new Universal Pre-Kindergarten Program for all 4 year olds in Florida in school
year 2005, as intended by the Constitutional Amendment approved in 2002.

CHILDREN’S HEALTH/KIDCARE: SEEK policy changes to the Florida KidCare Program which remove harmful
barriers to enrollment and the punitive policies that encourage dis-enrollment incurred by passage of SB 2000 during
the 2004 legislative session. In addition, provide full funding to the KidCare program for children of all immigrants.

INDEPENDENT LIVING/FOSTER CARE: ENSURE that Florida provides the support options for the foster care
system available under the Federal Chafee Foster Care Independent Living Act. This includes optional extended foster
care placement, comprehensive planning and preparation for independent living and Medicaid services for the entire
post-18 former foster care population. ENSURE that Road to Independence Act stipend amounts are not eliminated
or curtailed. ENSURE that foster care parents continue to receive funding for children who are still in high school after
their 18th birthday. Extend jurisdiction beyond the age of 18 for high risk children.

MAJOR ISSUES

These issues are major areas of emphasis for The Children's Trust's legislative advocacy efforts, involving
active lobbying , research and work with other entities/coalitions.

GUARDIAN AD LITEM/FOSTER CARE REVIEW: SUPPORT full funding of the Guardian ad Litem (GAL) and Foster
Care Review (FCR) programs so that Florida can provide guardians and lawyers to represent every child in foster care.
SUPPORT the expansion of community involvement and volunteerism in the child welfare arena.

COMMUNITY BASED CARE: CONTINUE to monitor the overall operation of the community-based care system.
REVIEW the risk pool study results and support implementation of the recommendations that will ensure a safety net
for providers and clients. SEEK adequate funding to make certain that every CBC operates at a satisfactory level.
MAINTAIN current funding levels for larger counties/hold them harmless while reaching parity through increased
funding levels for all other CBC agencies.

JUVENILE JUSTICE FUNDING: SEEK funding for front-end prevention programs that have proven track records and
best practice results. SUPPORT a program that ensures funding for prevention programs in high crime areas; ensures
adequate funding for respite care for juveniles, preserves funding for Juvenile Assessment centers (JACs) in areas with
high need and utilization; and that provides sufficient redirection program funds for juveniles who violate their terms
of probation or other forms of community supervision.
CHILDREN'S HEALTH/CMS/MENTAL HEALTH/SCHOOL HEALTH AND CHILDREN’S NUTRITION: OPPOSE state
reductions in funding for Children’s Medical Services (CMS) programs, including funding for children with serious
medical and mental health disorders and disabilities. SEEK the expansion of the newborn Screening (NBS) program to
include screening for all 9 infant metabolic conditions. SEEK sufficient funding for infant, child and adolescent mental
health programs. SUPPORT the appropriate funding of school health and legislation that prevents the development of
obesity in children. SUPPORT legislation that promotes the use of United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
funding for nutrition programs.

MEDICAID REFORM: ENSURE that any changes to Florida’s Medicaid program allow for meaningful public
participation, are inclusive of evidenced-based research, and do not result in the capping of needed benefits for
Florida’s most vulnerable population.

CHILD SAFETY: SUPPORT legislation which treats the failure to wear seat belts as a primary offense.

OTHER ISSUES

These are issues that require monitoring and reactive strategies, involving research, letters and alerts to
our network. These issues will be accomplished primarily through work with coalitions.

RELATIVE CAREGIVERS: IMPROVE Florida’s Relative Caregiver Program by increasing the monthly relative
caregiver stipend, streamlining the application process and expanding relative caregiver benefits to relatives who
obtain custody outside of the family court system.

JUVENILE SENTENCING: SUPPORT legislation which reinstates the Department of Juvenile Justice’s (DJJ’s) blended
sentencing program and allows for increased judicial flexibility and discretion by allowing juveniles to be sentenced to
juvenile sanctions or to a combination of juvenile and adult sanctions. SUPPORT amending the juvenile sentencing
statute to give judges authority to sentence youth to specific commitment programs with specified time limits.

2005 STATE LEGISLATIVE PACKAGE


STRATEGY

TRAVEL TO TALLAHASSEE
– Staff
– Board Members
– Advocates

ADVOACY NETWORKS
– Universal Pre-K
– Children's Health
– Child Welfare System
– Juvenile Justice
– Child Safety

PARTNERSHIPS/COALITIONS/COLLABORATIONS
– Florida Children's Services Council (FCSC) – The Firm
– United Way Policy Group
– Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce Legislative Committee
– League of Cities
– Miami-Dade County
– Florida Association of Counties
– Florida Association of Intergovernmental Relations (FAIR)
– South Florida Health Voices
– Other Organizations dedicated to Children and Families
– Organizations dedicated to Health and Human Services

COMMUNITY AWARENESS
- Website – legislative developments
- Legislative alerts
- Tallahssee times
– E-advoacy letters
– Community partner meetings
– Media – print and electronic
- Educational Forums, e.g. Medicaid Forum

2005 STATE LEGISLATIVE SESSION


BOARD MEMBER VOLUNTEERS

ISSUE BOARD MEMBER AVAILABILITY (Choose from the


following)
- TRAVEL TO TALLAHASSEE
- RESOURCE/TECHNICAL EXPERT
- EMAIL/LETTERS/PHONE CALLS
__________________________________________________________________
UPK

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

CHILDREN”S HEALTH/KIDCARE
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

INFANT MENTAL HEALTH


___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

MEDICAID REFORM

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
INDEPENDENT
LIVING/FOSTER CARE

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

GUARDIAN AD LITEM/
FOSTER CARE REVIEW
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

COMMUNITY BASED CARE

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

JUVENILE JUSTICE

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

CHILD SAFETY

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
Resolution 2005-18

RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE CHIEF


EXECUTIVE OFFICER TO ISSUE A REQUEST
FOR PROPOSAL (RFP) FOR PROMOTION
AND PREVENTION SERVICES FOR NEW
PROGRAMS AT A COST OF $4,195,635

RECOMMENDATION

ACTION REQUESTED:
Authority for the President/CEO to issue a request for proposal (RFP) for promotion
and prevention services for new programs at a cost of $4,195,635

BUDGET IMPACT:
A total of $8,760,327.94 is available in FY 2005-06 for Promotion and Prevention
Services. Six-month extensions of contracts with current providers through July
2006 will be funded at the level of $4,564,692.44. Funding for new programs is
available at the level of $4,195,635.

Extending the current contracts, which end on December 31, 2005, will result in all
Promotion and Prevention Services ending in July, 2006, and detailed program
monitoring data will be available at that time to determine which programs will
receive multi-year funding.

PROGRAM IMPACT:
The attached program summary describes in detail the proposed
programs to be funded.
RESOLUTION NO. 2005-18

RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE


OFFICER TO ISSUE A REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP)
FOR PROMOTION AND PREVENTION SERVICES FOR NEW
PROGRAMS AT A COST OF $4,195,635

WHEREAS, this Board desires to accomplish the purpose outlined in the

accompanying Program Summary for promotion and prevention services, a copy of

which is incorporated herein by reference, and

WHEREAS, the adopted budget and five-year strategic framework include

funding for these programs, and

WHEREAS, the Board has been apprised of the areas that will be

addressed by the new promotion and prevention services in the attached Board

Summary, and the Board is in agreement with the goals and program described

therein;.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE BOARD OF THE CHILDREN’S

TRUST, MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA that this Board authorizes the Chief

Executive Officer to issue an Request for Proposal (RFP) for promotion and

prevention services at a cost of $4,195,635.00.

The foregoing resolution was offered by__________________________, who

moved its adoption. The motion was seconded by _______________________ and

upon being put to a vote, the vote was as follows:

The vote was recorded as in the attached roll call sheet.

The Chairperson thereupon declared the resolution duly passed and adopted

this 14 day of March, 2005.


THE CHILDREN’S TRUST
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA

BY_______________________________
SECRETARY

Approved by County Attorney as to form and legal sufficiency. _________________

21