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NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

Name Date

1.
35 35
a. What is the decimal expansion of the number ? Is the number rational or irrational? Explain.
7 7

4 4
b. What is the decimal expansion of the number ? Is the number rational or irrational? Explain.
33 33

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


186
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NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

2.
a. Write 0. ̅̅̅̅̅
345 as a fraction.

b. ̅̅̅̅ as a fraction.
Write 2.840

2
c. Brandon stated that 0.66 and are equivalent. Do you agree? Explain why or why not.
3

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


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NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

d. Between which two positive integers does √33 lie?

e. For what integer 𝑥 is √𝑥 closest to 5.25? Explain.

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


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NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

3. Identify each of the following numbers as rational or irrational. If the number is irrational, explain how
you know.

a. √29

b. 5. ̅39
̅̅̅

12
c.
4

d. √36

e. √5

3
f. √27

g. 𝜋 = 3.141592…

h. Order the numbers in parts (a)–(g) from least to greatest, and place them on a number line.

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


189
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NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

4. Circle the greater number in each of the pairs (a)–(e) below.

a. Which is greater, 8 or √60?

b. Which is greater, 4 or √26?

3
c. Which is greater, √64 or √16?

3
d. Which is greater, √125 or √30?

e. Which is greater, −7 or −√42?

3
f. Put the numbers 9, √52, and √216 in order from least to greatest. Explain how you know which
order to put them in.

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


190
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NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

5.

a. Between which two labeled points on the number line would √5 be located?

b. Explain how you know where to place √5 on the number line.

c. How could you improve the accuracy of your estimate?

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


191
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NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

6. Determine the positive solution for each of the following equations.

a. 121 = 𝑥 2

b. 𝑥 3 = 1000

c. 17 + 𝑥 2 = 42

d. 𝑥 3 + 3𝑥 − 9 = 𝑥 − 1 + 2𝑥

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


192
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NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

e. The cube shown has a volume of 216 cm3 .

i. Write an equation that could be used to determine the length, 𝑙, of one


side.

ii. Solve the equation, and explain how you solved it.

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


193
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NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

A Progression Toward Mastery


STEP 1 STEP 2 STEP 3 STEP 4
Assessment Missing or incorrect Missing or incorrect A correct answer A correct answer
Task Item answer and little answer but with some evidence supported by
evidence of evidence of some of reasoning or substantial
reasoning or reasoning or application of evidence of solid
application of application of mathematics to reasoning or
mathematics to mathematics to solve the problem, application of
solve the problem. solve the problem. OR an incorrect mathematics to
answer with solve the problem.
substantial
evidence of solid
reasoning or
application of
mathematics to
solve the problem.
1 a–b Student makes little or Student identifies one or Student identifies both Student identifies both
no attempt to respond both numbers as numbers as rational. numbers as rational.
to either part of the rational. Student may Student correctly writes Student correctly writes
8.NS.A.1 problem. not write the decimal the decimal expansion of the decimal expansion of
OR expansions of the each number. Student 35
as 5.000…, or 5, and
Student answers both numbers and does not may not reference the 7
parts incorrectly. reference the decimal decimal expansion in his 4
as 0.121212…, or
expansions of the explanation but uses 33
̅̅̅̅. Student explains
0. 12
numbers in her another explanation
explanation. (e.g., the numbers are that the numbers are
quotients of integers). rational by stating that
every rational number
has a decimal expansion
that repeats eventually.
Student references the
35
decimal expansion of
7
with the repeating
decimal of zero and the
4
decimal expansion of
33
with the repeating
decimal of 12.

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


194
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NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

2 a–b Student does not Student is able to write Student is able to write Student correctly writes
attempt the problem or one of the parts (a)–(b) both parts (a)–(b) both parts (a)–(b) as
writes answers that are correctly as a fraction. correctly as fractions. fractions. Part (a) is
8.NS.A.1 incorrect for both parts. OR OR 115
written as 0. ̅̅̅̅̅
345 =
Student answers both Student writes one part 333
(or equivalent), and part
parts incorrectly but correctly but makes
(b) is written as
shows some evidence of computational errors
understanding how to leading to an incorrect ̅̅̅̅ = 2812
2.840
990
convert an infinite, answer for the other (or equivalent).
repeating decimal to a part.
fraction.

c Student agrees with Student does not agree Student does not agree Student does not agree
Brandon or writes an with Brandon. Student with Brandon. Student with Brandon. Student
explanation unrelated to writes a weak writes an explanation writes an explanation
8.NS.A.1 the problem. explanation defending that shows why the that shows 0.66 does
his position. equivalence was 2 2
not equal and that
incorrect, reasoning that 3 3
2 does not equal 0.66.
0.66 does not equal or
3
2
that does not equal
3
0.66, but fails to include
both explanations.

d–e Student does not Student is able to answer Student is able to answer Student correctly
attempt the problem or at least one of the parts both parts (d)–(e) answers both parts
writes answers that are (d)–(e) correctly. correctly. Student may (d)–(e); for part (d),
8.NS.A.2 incorrect for both parts Student may or may not or may not provide a √33 is between positive
(d)–(e). provide a weak justification for answer integers 5 and 6; for part
justification for answer selection. The (e), 𝑥 ≈ 28.
selection. explanation includes Student provides an
some evidence of explanation that includes
mathematical reasoning. solid reasoning related
to rational
approximation.

3 a–f Student does not Student correctly Student correctly Student correctly
attempt the problem or identifies three or four identifies five or six parts identifies all seven parts
writes correct answers parts of (a)–(g) as of (a)–(g) correctly as of (a)–(g); (a) irrational,
8.NS.A.1 for one or two parts of rational or irrational. rational or irrational. (b) rational, (c) rational,
8.EE.A.2 (a)–(g). Student may or may not Student may provide an (d) rational, (e) irrational,
provide a weak explanation for those (f) rational, and
explanation for those numbers that are (g) irrational. Student
numbers that are irrational but does not explains parts (a), (e),
irrational. refer to their decimal and (g) as irrational by
expansion or any other referring to their decimal
mathematical reason. expansion or the fact
that the radicand was
not a perfect square.

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


195
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NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

h Student correctly places Student correctly places Student correctly places Student correctly places
zero to two numbers three or four of the five of the six numbers all six numbers on the
correctly on the number numbers on the number on the number line. number line. (Correct
8.NS.A.2 line. line. answers are noted in
blue below.)

4 a–e Student correctly Student correctly Student correctly Student correctly


identifies the larger identifies the larger identifies the larger identifies the larger
number zero to one time number two to three number four times in number in all of parts
8.NS.A.2 in parts (a)–(e). times in parts (a)–(e). parts (a)–(e). (a)–(e); (a) 8, (b) √26,
8.EE.A.2 (c) numbers are equal,
(d) √30, and (e) −√42.

f Student does not Student may correctly Student correctly orders Student correctly orders
attempt the problem or order the numbers from the numbers from least the numbers from least
3
responds incorrectly. greatest to least. to greatest. Student to greatest: √216,
8.NS.A.2 Student does not provide Student may or may not provides a weak √52, 9. Explanation
8.EE.A.2 an explanation. provide a weak explanation for how she includes correct
explanation for how he put the numbers in mathematical vocabulary
put the numbers in order. (e.g., square root, cube
order. root, between perfect
squares).

5 a–c Student makes little or Student may or may not Student places √5 Student correctly places
no attempt to do the have placed √5 correctly correctly on the number √5 between 2.2 and 2.3
problem. on the number line for line for part (a). For on the number line for
8.NS.A.2 OR part (a). For parts (b)– parts (b)–(c), student part (a). For parts
Student may or may not (c), student may or may may provide a weak (b)–(c), student explains
place √5 correctly on the not provide a weak explanation for how the the method of rational
number line for part (a). explanation for how the number was placed. approximation to locate
For parts (b)–(c), student number was placed. Student may provide a the approximate position
does not provide an Student may or may not weak explanation for of √5 on the number
explanation. provide a weak how to improve accuracy line. Student explains
explanation for how to of approximation. how to continue the
improve accuracy of Student references the rational approximation
approximation. method of rational to include increasing
approximation. smaller intervals to
improve the accuracy of
the estimate.

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


196
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NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

6 a–b Student makes little or Student writes the Student solves at least Student solves both
no attempt to solve correct answer for one one of the equations equations correctly for
either equation or writes of the equations but correctly or solves both parts (a)–(b); (a) 𝑥 = 11,
8.EE.A.2 incorrect answers for does not write the correctly but does not and (b) 𝑥 = 10.
both. answer in the write the answer in the
appropriate form appropriate form (i.e.,
(i.e., 11 or 10 instead of 11 and 10 instead of
𝑥 = 11 or 𝑥 = 10). 𝑥 = 11 and 𝑥 = 10).

c–d Student makes little or Student may solve one Student solves one of Student solves both
no attempt to solve equation correctly. the equations correctly equations correctly for
either equation or writes OR but makes parts (c)–(d); (c) 𝑥 = 5,
8.EE.A.2 incorrect answers for Student uses properties computational errors and (d) 𝑥 = 2.
both. of rational numbers to leading to an incorrect
transform the equations answer for the other
but cannot determine equation.
the correct value of 𝑥 or
makes computational
errors leading to
incorrect solutions for 𝑥.

e Student makes little or Student may state that Student states that the Student states that the
no attempt to solve the the length of one side of length of one side of the length of one side of the
problem. the cube is 6 cm but cube is 6 cm. Student cube is 6 cm. Student
8.EE.A.2 does not write an correctly writes and correctly writes and
equation or solve it. solves an equation but solves the equation.
provides a weak Student provides a clear
explanation for solving it. and complete
explanation for solving
the equation that
includes some reference
to cube roots and why
3
√216 = 6.

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


197
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NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

Name Date

1.
35 35
a. What is the decimal expansion of the number ? Is the number rational or irrational? Explain.
7 7

4 4
b. What is the decimal expansion of the number ? Is the number rational or irrational? Explain.
33 33

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


198
This work is derived from Eureka Math ™ and licensed by Great Minds. ©2015 Great Minds. eureka-math.org This work is licensed under a
This file derived from G8-M7-TE-1.3.0-10.2015 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

2.
a. Write 0. ̅̅̅̅̅
345 as a fraction.

b. ̅̅̅̅ as a fraction.
Write 2.840

2
c. Brandon stated that 0.66 and are equivalent. Do you agree? Explain why or why not.
3

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


199
This work is derived from Eureka Math ™ and licensed by Great Minds. ©2015 Great Minds. eureka-math.org This work is licensed under a
This file derived from G8-M7-TE-1.3.0-10.2015 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

d. Between which two positive integers does √33 lie?

e. For what integer 𝑥 is √𝑥 closest to 5.25? Explain.

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


200
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This file derived from G8-M7-TE-1.3.0-10.2015 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

3. Identify each of the following numbers as rational or irrational. If the number is irrational, explain how
you know.

a. √29

b. 5. ̅39
̅̅̅

12
c.
4

d. √36

e. √5

3
f. √27

g. 𝜋 = 3.141592…

h. Order the numbers in parts (a)–(g) from least to greatest, and place them on a number line.

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


201
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NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

4. Circle the greater number in each of the pairs (a)–(e) below.

3
f. Put the numbers 9, √52, and √216 in order from least to greatest. Explain how you know which
order to put them in.

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


202
This work is derived from Eureka Math ™ and licensed by Great Minds. ©2015 Great Minds. eureka-math.org This work is licensed under a
This file derived from G8-M7-TE-1.3.0-10.2015 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

5.

a. Between which two labeled points on the number line would √5 be located?

b. Explain how you know where to place √5 on the number line.

c. How could you improve the accuracy of your estimate?

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


203
This work is derived from Eureka Math ™ and licensed by Great Minds. ©2015 Great Minds. eureka-math.org This work is licensed under a
This file derived from G8-M7-TE-1.3.0-10.2015 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

6. Determine the positive solution for each of the following equations.

a. 121 = 𝑥 2

b. 𝑥 3 = 1000

c. 17 + 𝑥 2 = 42

d. 𝑥 3 + 3𝑥 − 9 = 𝑥 − 1 + 2𝑥

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


204
This work is derived from Eureka Math ™ and licensed by Great Minds. ©2015 Great Minds. eureka-math.org This work is licensed under a
This file derived from G8-M7-TE-1.3.0-10.2015 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
NYS COMMON CORE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM Mid-Module Assessment Task 8•7

e. The cube shown has a volume of 216 cm3 .

i. Write an equation that could be used to determine the length, 𝑙, of one


side.

ii. Solve the equation, and explain how you solved it.

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry


205
This work is derived from Eureka Math ™ and licensed by Great Minds. ©2015 Great Minds. eureka-math.org This work is licensed under a
This file derived from G8-M7-TE-1.3.0-10.2015 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.