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WINEMAKING RECIPES

ALMOND WINE (1)


 1-1/2 oz. bitter almonds

 1 lb. raisins

 3 lb. granulated sugar

 1 gallon water

 2 lemons

 Yeast and nutrient

Mince the almonds and raisins, then boil gently in 1 gallon water for an hour. Strain
the liquor onto the sugar in primary fermentation vessel, stirring until dissolved, then
add enough water to restore 1 gallon. Add lemon zest and juice and allow to cool to
70 degrees. Add yeast and nutrient, cover, and stir twice a day for 10 days. Strain
through fine-mesh sieve into fermenting bottle and fit airlock. Rack after 30 days,
then again after 6 weeks. Rack and bottle after an additional 6 weeks. Taste after 1
year. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's First Steps in Winemaking]

ALMOND WINE (2)


 2 oz. mixed sweet/bitter almonds

 1 lb. raisins

 2-1/2 lb. granulated sugar

 1 gallon water

 3 lemons

 Yeast and nutrient

Chop or mince the almonds and raisins, place in grain-bag with lemon zest, then boil
gently in 1 gallon water for an hour, adding sugar and stirring to dissolve near the end.
Allow to cool to 70 degrees. Remove grain-bag, squeezing firmly to extract liquor
into primary fermentation vessel. Add water to restore 1 gallon. Add lemon juice,
yeast and nutrient, cover, and stir twice a day for 10 days. Strain through fine-mesh
sieve into fermenting bottle and fit airlock. Rack after 30 days, then again after 6
weeks. Rack and bottle after an additional 6 weeks. Taste after 1 year. [Adapted from
C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

APPLE WINE (1) [Heavy bodied]


 24 lb. windfall apples, mixed varieties*

 3-6 lb. granulated sugar

 1 gallon water
 1 tsp. pectin enzyme

 Sauterne wine yeast and nutrient

Chop the apples into small pieces, put into primary fermentation vessel, add the pectin
enzyme and water and cover the mixture. The water will not cover the apples, so stir
several times a day to bring bottom apples to the top. After 24 hours, add the yeast
and nutrient. Keep covered (a bath towel held fast with a large rubber band works
well if the primary fermentation vessel doesn't have a lid) and in a warm place for 7-
10 days. When the vigorous fermentation of the pulp subsides, strain the juice from
the pulp and set aside, then press the juice from the pulp and add to the set-aside
liquor. Measure and add 3 lb. sugar per gallon of liquor. Put into carboy or gallon
secondary fermentation vessel and fit with airlock. Rack when clear, allow another 60
days, then rack again and bottle. Allow six months before tasting, one year for best
results. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's First Steps in Winemaking]
*For this and all apple wine recipes, unless varieties are specified, the more acid and
sour varieties are preferred and the sweeter eating varieties are to be avoided.

APPLE WINE (2) [Medium bodied]


 12 lb. windfall apples, mixed varieties

 3 lb granulated sugar

 1 gallon water

 1 tsp. pectin enzyme

 Sauterne wine yeast and nutrient

Quarter the apples and run them through a mincer. Bring pulp to simmer in 1 gallon
water, holding simmer for 15 minutes. Strain juice onto the sugar in primary
fermentation vessel, stirring well to dissolve, then reintroduce the strained pulp and,
when cool, the pectin enzyme, stirring well. Cover, set in a warm place for 24 hours,
then add yeast and nutrient, cover, and set in a warm place for four days, stirring
twice daily. Strain pulp and pour liquor into secondary fermentation vessel and fit
with airlock. Rack when clear and fermentation has ceased. Rack again in 30 days and
again in another 30 days, then bottle. Allow one year to age. [Adapted from C.J.J.
Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

APPLE WINE (3) [Light bodied]


 6 lb. windfall apples, mixed varieties

 1/2 lb. chopped golden raisins

 3 lb. granulated sugar

 1 lemon

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 yeast and nutrient


Chop the apples into small pieces and bring to simmer in 1 gallon water, holding
simmer for 15 minutes. Strain liquid onto the sugar in V, adding the zest of the lemon
and stirring well to blend. When nearly cool, add lemon juice and pectin enzyme, stir
well, cover, and set in warm place for 24 hours. Add yeast and nutrient, again stir
well, cover again, and set in warm place for an additional 24 hours. Strain again into
secondary fermentation vessel and fit with airlock. Rack after 30 days, add chopped
raisins, and allow to ferment under airlock for six months. Rack and bottle. Taste after
six months, or allow one year to mature.[Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's First Steps in
Winemaking]

APPLE WINE (4) [Heavy bodied]


 1 gallon pure apple juice (no preservatives)

 1 lb. granulated sugar

 1-1/2 tsp. acid blend

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1/4 tsp tannin

 1 crushed Campden tablet

 Champagne yeast and nutrient

Put juice, sugar, crushed Campden tablet, pectin enzyme, acid blend, and tannin into
primary fermentation vessel. Stir vigorously to dissolve solids and cover. After 24
hours, add yeast and nutrient and cover. Stir daily. When S.G. reaches 1.040 (3-5
days), rack into secondary fermentation vessel and fit airlock. Rack again after 30
days and again after two months. When wine is clear, rack again and bottle. Taste
after six months. [Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe
Handbook]

APPLE WINE (5) [Spiced]


 12 lb. mixed Fuji and Gala apples

 1 lb. chopped golden raisins

 2-1/2 lb granulated sugar

 1 gallon water

 1 oz. cloves

 2 3-inch cinnamon sticks, broken into pieces

 1 oz. shredded ginger root

 1 tsp. acid blend

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1 crushed Campden tablet

 Sauterne or Champagne wine yeast and nutrient


Quarter the apples and run them through a mincer. Put in primary fermentation vessel
with all ingredients except yeast and nutrient, cover, and set in warm place for 24
hours. Add yeast and nutrient, stir, and cover for four days, stirring twice daily. Strain
liquor into secondary fermentation vessel and fit airlock. Rack after 30 days and again
after two months. When clear, rack again and bottle. Taste after six months, but allow
one year for maturity. [Adapted from recipe obtained from Texas apple grower]

APPLE AND BANANA DRY SHERRY


 2 lb. apples

 1 lb. bananas

 1-1/4 lb. granulated sugar

 1 pt. white grape concentrate

 1 oz. gypsum

 1/2 oz. cream of tartar

 1/2 oz. pectin enzyme

 1/4 tsp. tannic acid

 1 gallon water

 Sherry wine yeast and nutrient

Before beginning, core and chop apples and dissolve sugar in 1-1/2 cups boiling
water. Allow to cool and store in jar for future use. Slice bananas with skins and boil
in 4 pt. water for 30 minutes. Put apple pieces in primary fermentation vessel and
strain liquid from bananas over apples. Add grape concentrate, cover, and allow to
cool. When cool, add gypsum, cream of tartar, pectin enzyme, tannic acid, activated
yeast, and nutrient, stirring well. Cover and allow to ferment three days, stirring twice
daily. Strain off apples, add 1/2 cup sugar syrup, and continue fermentation. Add 1/2
cup sugar syrup each day until all has been used, then add sufficient water to bring to
one gallon. When fermentation is complete (additional 10-14 days), rack into large
enough secondary fermentation vessel (1-1/2 to 2 gallon) to allow fair amount of air
above wine. Plug opening with cotton. Normally, that is the only racking in sherry
production, but if pulp particles appear in sediment, rack again after two weeks and
plug again with cotton. Store secondary fermentation vessel in cool (55-60 degrees F.)
place and leave undisturbed. Flora may form in 3-4 weeks or as late as 4 months. If
flora forms, leave undisturbed until all flora has sunk to bottom. Carefully siphon off
lees through double layer of fine muslin into bottles. If flora does not form, allow to
sit six months, carefully siphon into clean gallon bottle, sweeten with sufficient white
grape concentrate or sugar water (1/3 lb. sugar dissolved in one cup water) to top up
to one gallon, and then bottle. Allow two or more years to mature. [Adapted from
Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan's Making Wines Like Those You Buy]

APPLE, PARSNIP, BANANA AND FIG SWEET SHERRY


 4 lb. apples

 1-3/4 lb. parsnips


 1 lb. bananas

 1 lb. figs

 1-1/2 lb. granulated sugar

 1 pt. white grape concentrate

 1/4 oz. pectin enzyme

 1/4 tsp. tartaric acid

 1 gallon water

 Sherry wine yeast and nutrient

Before beginning, scrub and chop parsnips, slice bananas (throw away skins), core
and slice apples, and wash figs, removing stems. Dissolve sugar in 1-1/2 cups boiling
water, allow to cool, and store in jar for future use. Boil the parsnips in 6 pt. for 10
minutes. Strain off pulp and boil bananas in same water for 30 minutes. Put apple
slices and figs in primary fermentation vessel and strain liquid from bananas over
apples and figs. Add tartaric acid, nutrient, and half the sugar syrup. Cover and allow
to cool, adding pectin enzyme and activated yeast. Cover and allow to ferment five
days, stirring daily. Strain liquor carefully through fine nylon sieve and add the grape
concentrate. After further 10 days, add 1/2 cup sugar syrup and repeat every three
days until all has been added. Add sufficient water to bring to one gallon. When
fermentation is complete (additional 10-14 days), rack into large enough secondary
fermentation vessel (1-1/2 to 2 gallon) to allow fair amount of air above wine. Plug
opening with cotton. Normally, that is the only racking in sherry production, but if
pulp particles appear in sediment, rack again after two weeks and plug again with
cotton. Store secondary fermentation vessel in cool (55-60 degrees F.) place and leave
undisturbed. Flora may form in 3-4 weeks or as late as 4 months. Flora should not
form, but if it does, leave undisturbed until all flora has sunk to bottom. Carefully
siphon off lees through double layer of fine muslin into bottles. If flora does not form,
allow to sit six months, carefully siphon into clean gallon bottle, sweeten with
sufficient white grape concentrate or sugar water (1/3 lb. sugar dissolved in one cup
water) to top up to one gallon, and then bottle. Allow at least four years to mature.
[Adapted from Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan's Making Wines Like Those You Buy]

APPLE, PARSNIP AND RAISIN DRY SHERRY


 2 lb. apples

 1 lb. parsnips

 1 lb. golden raisins

 2 lb. granulated sugar

 1 oz. gypsum

 1/2 oz. cream of tartar

 1/2 oz. pectin enzyme

 1/2 oz. tartaric acid


 1 gallon water

 Sherry wine yeast and nutrient

Before beginning, core and slice apples, scrub and chop parsnips, chop raisins.
Dissolve sugar in 2 cups boiling water. Allow sugar syrup to cool and store in jar for
future use. Boil parsnips in 5 pt. water for 10 minutes. Strain over sliced apples and
chopped raisins in primary fermentation vessel. Add all ingredients except yeast,
pectin enzyme and half the sugar syrup. Cover and allow to cool, then add pectin
enzyme and activated yeast, cover, and ferment on the pulp four days, stirring twice
daily. Strain through fine nylon sieve and add 1/2 cup sugar syrup. Cover and add
remaining sugar syrup in 1/2 cup increments whenever S.G. drops to 1.005 or less
(approximately every three days). When all sugar syrup is added, add sufficient water
to bring to one gallon. When fermentation is complete (additional 10-14 days), rack
into large enough secondary fermentation vessel (1-1/2 to 2 gallon) to allow fair
amount of air above wine. Plug opening with cotton. Normally, that is the only
racking in sherry production, but if pulp particles appear in sediment, rack again after
two weeks and plug again with cotton. Store secondary fermentation vessel in cool
(55-60 degrees F.) place and leave undisturbed. Flora may form in 3-4 weeks or as
late as 4 months. If flora forms, leave undisturbed until all flora has sunk to bottom.
Carefully siphon off lees through double layer of fine muslin into bottles. If flora does
not form, allow to sit six months, carefully siphon into clean gallon bottle, sweeten
with sufficient white grape concentrate or sugar water (1/3 lb. sugar dissolved in one
cup water) to top up to one gallon, and then bottle. Allow two or more years to
mature. [Adapted from Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan's Making Wines Like Those
You Buy]

APRICOT WINE (1)


 2-1/2 lb. apricots

 7 pints water

 2 lb. sugar

 1-1/4 tsp. acid blend

 1 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1/4 tsp. grape tannin

 1 crushed Campden tablet

 yeast and nutrient

In primary fermentation vessel, combine all ingredients except yeast and apricots,
stirring to dissolve sugar. Wash, pit and dice apricots. Place in grain-bag, tie top, and
squeeze as much juice as you can into vessel. Place grain-bag of pulp into vessel,
cover, and set in warm place for 24 hours. Add yeast, cover, and squeeze pulp daily to
extract more juice. Stir twice daily. After five days, strain juice from grain-bag,
discard pulp, transfer liquor to secondary fermentation vessel, and fit airlock. Rack
after 30 days and again after another 60 days. When clear, rack again and bottle.
Allow to age one year or longer. [Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's Winemaker's
Recipe Handbook]
APRICOT WINE (2)
 2 lb. apricots

 1/2 lb. chopped golden raisins

 3 lb. granulated sugar

 2 lemons, juice only

 7 pints water

 1 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1/4 tsp. grape tannin

 1 crushed Campden tablet

 Champagne wine yeast and nutrient

Combine all ingredients except apricots and yeast in primary fermentation vessel,
stirring to dissolve sugar. Wash, pit and finely dice apricots. Add to vessel, cover, and
set in warm place for 24 hours. Add yeast, cover and stir twice daily for seven days.
Strain into secondary fermentation vessel, pressing pulp lightly. Top to one gallon
with additional water, and fit airlock. Rack after 30 days and again after another 60
days. When clear, rack again and bottle. Taste after six months, but allow one year for
maturity. [Adapted from passed-on recipe, source unknown]

APRICOT WINE (3)


 2 lb. chopped dry apricots

 1 lb. chopped golden raisins

 2-1/2 lb. light brown sugar

 1-1/4 tsp. acid blend

 8 pints water

 1 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1/4 tsp. grape tannin

 1 crushed Campden tablet

 Champagne wine yeast and nutrient

Combine all ingredients except yeast in primary fermentation vessel, stir to dissolve
sugar, cover, and set in warm place for 24 hours. Add yeast, cover, and stir daily for
10 days. Strain into secondary fermentation vessel, pressing pulp lightly. Top to one
gallon with additional water, and fit airlock. Rack after 30 days and again after
another 60 days. When clear, rack again and bottle. Allow to age one year. [Adapted
from magazine-clipping recipe, source unknown]

APRICOT WINE (4)


 2 lb. chopped dry apricots
 1 lb. wheat, cracked

 3 lb. granulated sugar

 1 gallon water

 2 lemons, juice only

 1/4 tsp. grape tannin or 1/4 cup black tea

 Madeira wine yeast and nutrient

Bring apricots to boil in gallon of water, reduce to simmer, then strain into primary
fermentation vessel without pressing after one-half hour, discarding pulp. Add
remaining ingredients, except yeast and nutrient, and stir to dissolve sugar. When
cool, add yeast and nutrient, cover, and ferment in warm place for three weeks,
stirring daily. Strain into secondary fermentation vessel, top up to one gallon, and fit
airlock. Rack after one month. When clear, rack again and bottle. Taste after six
months, but allow one year for best quality and flavour. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's
First Steps in Winemaking]

APRICOT AND DATE WINE


 1 lb. chopped dried apricots

 2 lb. chopped dated

 1/2 lb. barley

 2 lb. 2 oz. light brown sugar

 2 oranges

 2 lemons

 6 pints to 1 gallon water

 Sauterne wine yeast and nutrient

Combine chopped apricots and dates, barley, and zest of oranges and lemons in 6
pints water, bring to boil, and simmer for 10 minutes. Strain onto sugar, add juice of
oranges and lemons, and stir well to dissolve sugar. Pour into secondary fermentation
vessel when cooled to 70 degree Fahrenheit, add yeast and nutrient, and fit airlock.
Top to one gallon in three weeks. Rack when clear, wait three additional months, then
rack again and bottle. Allow one year or more for maturity.[Adapted from C.J.J.
Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

APRICOT, RASPBERRY AND ELDERBERRY ROSÉ WINE


 3/4 lb. chopped dried apricots

 6 oz. raspberries

 3 oz. dried elderberries

 1-1/4 lb. granulated sugar

 1/2 pt. white grape concentrate


 1 cup mixed red and yellow rose petals

 1 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1 gallon water

 crushed Campden tablets

 Burgundy wine yeast and nutrient

Before you start, dissolve sugar in 6 pts. warm water, then chill the water overnight in
refrigerator. Chop or mince dried apricots and elderberries, crush raspberries, and mix
together in primary fermentation vessel with chilled sugar-water, nutrient, pectin
enzyme, and two crushed Campden tablets. Stir well, cover and set aside 24 hours.
Add activated Burgundy yeast, cover and ferment on pulp three days, stirring daily.
Strain pulp in fine nylon sieve and press lightly to extract juice without pulp particles.
Add grape concentrate, cover and ferment additional four days. Add rose petals and
ferment additional three days before straining and add sufficient water to bring
volume to 1 gallon. When S.G. drops to 1.000 or lower, add another crushed
Campden tablet and rack, without splashing, to secondary fermentation vessel as soon
as fermentation restarts or a heavy deposit of yeast forms, whichever is sooner. Fit
airlock and store bottle in cool place (65-70 degrees F.) without disturbing for three
months. However, check after two weeks and, if pulp debris is detected in sediment,
carefully rack again without splashing and add another crushed Campden tablet. After
total three months in secondary fermentation vessel, rack again, being careful to avoid
splashing, add one crushed Campden tablet, and top up with water before refitting
airlock. After additional three months, rack again as before, add another crushed
Campden tablet, top up with water, and bottle. May taste after six months but matures
at 18 months. [Adapted from Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan's Making Wines Like
Those You Buy]

APRICOT SHERRY
 1 lb. chopped dried apricots

 3 lb. granulated sugar

 1 cup strong, black tea

 1 tsp. pectin enzyme

 6 pints to 1 gallon water

 Sherry wine yeast and nutrient

Bring apricots in 6 pints water to simmer for 30 minutes without boiling. Strain off
liquor, add sugar and stir well to dissolve, and bring to boil for five minutes. Add tea,
and pour into secondary fermentation vessel. When cool, add pectin enzyme, cover,
and set in warm place for 24 hours. Add yeast culture and nutrient and fit airlock.
After 30 days, replace airlock with one devoid of water but plugged with cotton to
allow the Sherry yeast to “breathe.” Allow to sit undisturbed for six months, then rack
and return 2 tblsp. of cleanest yeast from lees to secondary fermentation vessel. Refit
dry airlock and bring into warm room (75-80 degrees Fahrenheit) for five days to
promote final fermentation. When fermentation is strong, top up with water and retire
to cool place for additional six months. Rack and bottle. Matures after one year but
improves after two.[Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BANANA WINE (1) [Heavy Bodied]


 4 1/2 lb. bananas

 1/2 lb. chopped golden raisins

 3 lb. granulated sugar

 1 lemon (juice only)

 1 orange (juice only)

 1 gallon water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Peel and chop bananas and their peels, placing both in grain-bag and tie closed. Place
grain-bag in large pan or boiler with water and bring to boil, then gently simmer for
30 minutes. Pour the hot liquor over sugar and lemon/orange juice in primary
fermentation vessel and stir to dissolve sugar. When cool enough to handle, squeeze
grain-bag to extract as much liquid as possible and add to vessel. When liquor cools to
70 degrees F., add yeast and nutrient. Cover and set aside in warm place one week,
stirring daily. Move to a cooler place (60-65 degrees F.) and allow to sit undisturbed
for two months. Siphon liquor off sediment into secondary fermentation vessel, add
chopped raisins, and fit airlock. Rack after four months and again in another four
months. Bottle and sample after six months. Improves with age. [Adapted from C.J.J.
Berry's First Steps in Winemaking]

BANANA WINE (2) [Heavy Bodied]


 3-1/2 lb. bananas

 1 lb. chopped golden raisins

 2 lb. granulated sugar

 1-1/4 tsp. acid blend

 1 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1/4 tsp. grape tannin

 1 gallon water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Slice bananas into thin discs, leaving skins on fruit. Put into grain-bag, tie top, and
place in 6 pints water. Bring to boil, reduce heat, and simmer for 30 minutes. Remove
grain-bag to bowl to catch drippings while pouring liquor over sugar in primary
fermentation vessel and stirring well to dissolve sugar. Add acid blend, pectin enzyme
and tannin, stirring again. When grain-bag cools, squeeze to extract as much liquid as
possible and add liquid and drippings to liquor, discarding pulp. When liquor cools to
70 degrees Fahrenheit, add yeast and nutrient. Cover and set in warm place for seven
days, stirring daily. Pour into secondary fermentation vessel, fit airlock, and move to
cooler place, leaving undisturbed for two months. Siphon off sediment, add chopped
raisins, and add water to bring to one gallon. Ferment another four months. Rack and
allow to clear. Rack again and bottle. May taste after six months, but matures at two
years. [Adapted from passed-on recipe, source unknown]

BANANA WINE (3) [Medium Bodied]


 12-16 oz. dried bananas

 1/2 lb. chopped raisins

 2 tsp. citric acid

 2-1/4 lb. light brown sugar

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1 gallon water

 Sherry yeast and nutrient

Simmer dried bananas in pressure cooker with 1/2 the water for 10 minutes. Pour over
sugar, chopped raisins and citric acid in primary fermentation vessel and stir to
dissolve sugar. When cool (70 degrees F.) add pectin enzyme, remaining water, and
cover well. Set aside for 24 hours and add yeast and nutrient. Stir daily for one week,
keeping well covered. Strain into secondary fermentation vessel, top to one gallon
with water, fit airlock, and move to cooler (60 degrees F.) place. Rack after 30 days
and again after another 60 days. When clear, rack and bottle. May taste after six
months, but requires one year to mature. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New
Winemaking Recipes]

BANANA WINE (4) [Medium Bodied]


 3 1/2 lb. bananas

 1/4 lb. chopped golden raisins

 2 lb. granulated sugar

 1 lemon

 1 orange

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1 gallon water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Peel and chop bananas and their peels, placing both in grain-bag with zest from lemon
and orange. Tie closed and place in large pan or boiler with 5-1/2 pints water and
bring to boil, then gently simmer for 30 minutes. Pour hot liquor over sugar and
lemon/orange juice in primary fermentation vessel and stir to dissolve sugar. When
cool enough to handle, squeeze grain-bag to extract as much liquid as possible and
add to vessel. When liquor cools to 70 degrees F., add pectin enzyme, yeast and
nutrient. Cover well and leave in warm place for one week, stirring daily. Move to a
cooler place (60-65 degrees F.) and allow to sit undisturbed for two months. Siphon
liquor off sediment into secondary fermentation vessel, add chopped raisins, top up to
one gallon with water, and fit airlock. Rack after four months and again in another
four months. Bottle and sample after six months. Improves with age. [Adapted from
C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BANANA WINE [Spiced] (1)


 3 lb. bananas

 1/2 lb. chopped golden raisins

 2-1/2 lb. light brown sugar

 1 oz. cloves

 1 oz. shredded ginger

 1 3-in cinnamon stick, broken

 1/2 oz. citric acid

 1 tsp. grape tannin

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 3 qt. water

 Sherry yeast and nutrient

Thinly slice the bananas in their peels. Place in primary fermentation vessel with
sugar, chopped raisins, cloves, ginger, and cinnamon. Pour in boiling water and stir to
dissolve sugar. When cool (70 degrees F.), add citric acid, grape tannin, and pectin
enzyme. Cover well and set in warm place for 24 hours. Add yeast and nutrient and
stir twice daily for 10 days. Strain into secondary fermentation vessel, add one pint
water, fit airlock, and move to cooler (60-65 degrees F.) place. Rack after two months
and again after additional two months. When clear, rack again and bottle. May taste
after six months, but improves with age. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New
Winemaking Recipes]

BANANA WINE [Spiced] (2)


 3 lb. bananas

 8 oz. white grape concentrate

 2-1/2 lb. granulated sugar

 1 oz. cloves

 1 oz. shredded ginger

 1 3-in cinnamon stick, broken

 2-1/2 tsp. acid blend

 1/2 tsp. grape tannin

 7 pts. water
 Sherry yeast and nutrient

Thinly slice the bananas in their peels, put in grain-bag, and tie closed. Place in 1-1/2
qts. water, bring to boil, then simmer for 30 minutes. Remove grain-bag, allowing to
drip-drain only (don't squeeze). Pour liquor in primary fermentation vessel over
remaining water and ingredients except yeast and nutrient. Stir to dissolve sugar.
When cool (70-75 degrees F.), add Sherry yeast and nutrient, cover well, and stir daily
for 5 days. Strain into secondary fermentation vessel, fit airlock, and move to cooler
(60-65 degrees F.) place. Rack after one month and again after additional two months.
When clear, rack again and bottle. May taste after six months, but improves with age.
[Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]

BANANA AND APRICOT MADEIRA-TYPE WINE


 2 lb. bananas

 1 lb. chopped dried apricots

 1 pt. white grape concentrate

 2 lb. granulated sugar

 1 gallon water

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 Madeira wine yeast and nutrient

Peel bananas and slice thinly, discarding the skins. Place banana slices and chopped
apricots in nylon grain-bag, tie end, and boil in 5 pts. water for 30 minutes. Pour juice
into primary fermentation vessel and suspend grain-bag over primary fermentation
vessel to drain until cool enough to press lightly to extract additional juice, but not
pulp. When liquor cools to lukewarm (70-75 degrees F.), add pectin enzyme, yeast
and nutrients. Cover well and set aside for two days. Meanwhile, dissolve sugar into 1
pt. boiling water, making syrup. When cool, pour into sterile bottle and set aside.
After liquor has sat for two days, add grape concentrate and mix, then pour into
secondary fermentation vessel. Add sufficient syrup to bring volume up to 7 pts., then
fit airlock. Hereafter, check specific gravity daily and add 1/2 cup syrup each time s.g.
drops to 1005 or less. When fermentation ceases completely, allow wine to settle
additional 3-4 days, then siphon off sediments. Place secondary fermentation vessel
(with airlock attached, in very warm place (100-110 degrees F.). After two days, top
up with water and store in this very warm place for 6 months, checking water level in
airlock periodically to prevent it from going dry. After 6 months, rack into fresh
gallon bottle, add 1 oz. granulated charcoal, cover securely (rubber stopper or plastic
wrap secured with rubber band), and allow to return to room temperature for three
days. Rack off charcoal and bottle. Allow to age for two years to produce a sweet
Madeira-type wine. [Adapted from Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan's Making Wines
Like Those You Buy]

BANANA AND DRIED ELDERBERRY WINE


 3 lb. bananas

 1-1/2 lb. dried elderberries


 3 lb. granulated sugar

 1/2 oz. citric acid

 1/8 tsp. grape tannin

 1 gallon water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Thinly slice bananas, with skins, and place in primary fermentation vessel with dried
elderberries and sugar. Pour in boiling water and stir to dissolve sugar. When cool,
add citric acid, tannin, wine yeast, and nutrient. Cover well and ferment 10 days,
stirring daily. Strain into secondary fermentation vessel, top up to bottom of neck, and
fit airlock. Rack after two months, then again after additional two months. Set aside
for additional six months, then rack and bottle. May be sampled in three months, but
improves with age. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BANANA AND DRIED FIG WINE


 2-1/2 lb. bananas

 2-1/2 lb. chopped dried figs

 3 lb. granulated sugar

 1/2 oz. citric acid

 1/8 tsp. grape tannin

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1 gallon water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Thinly slice bananas, with skins, and place in primary fermentation vessel with
chopped dried figs and sugar. Pour in boiling water and stir to dissolve sugar. When
cool, add citric acid, tannin and pectin enzyme. Cover and set aside 24 hours. Add
wine yeast and nutrient. Cover again and ferment on the pulp 10 days, stirring daily.
Strain into secondary fermentation vessel, top up to bottom of neck, and fit airlock.
Rack after two months, then again after additional two months. Set aside for
additional six months, then rack and bottle. May taste in six months, but improves
with age. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BANANA, PEACH, FIG, AND RAISIN SWEET SHERRY


 2 lb. bananas

 2 lb. peaches

 1 lb. figs

 1 lb. raisins

 1-1/2 lb. granulated sugar

 1 pt. white grape concentrate


 1/4 oz. pectin enzyme

 1/2 tsp. tartaric acid

 1 gallon water

 Sherry wine yeast and nutrient

Before beginning, slice bananas (throw away skins), stone and slice peaches and wash
raisins. Remove stems, wash figs, and cut in half. Dissolve sugar in 2 cups boiling
water, allow to cool, and store in jar for future use. Boil the banana slices in 4 pt.
water for 30 minutes. Put peaches, figs and raisins in primary fermentation vessel and
strain liquid from bananas over fruit. Add tartaric acid, nutrient, and one cup sugar
syrup. Cover and allow to cool, adding pectin enzyme and activated yeast. Cover and
allow to ferment three days, stirring daily. Strain liquor carefully through fine nylon
sieve and add the grape concentrate. After further 10 days, add 1/2 cup sugar syrup
and repeat every three days until all has been added. Add sufficient water to bring to
one gallon. When fermentation is complete (additional 10-14 days), rack into large
enough secondary fermentation vessel (1-1/2 to 2 gallon) to allow fair amount of air
above wine. Plug opening with cotton. Normally, that is the only racking in sherry
production, but if pulp particles appear in sediment, rack again after two weeks and
plug again with cotton. Store secondary fermentation vessel in cool (55-60 degrees F.)
place and leave undisturbed. Flora may form in 3-4 weeks or as late as 4 months.
Flora should not form, but if it does, leave undisturbed until all flora has sunk to
bottom. Carefully siphon off lees through double layer of fine muslin into bottles. If
flora does not form, allow to sit six months, carefully siphon into clean gallon bottle,
sweeten with sufficient white grape concentrate or sugar water (1/3 lb. sugar
dissolved in one cup water) to top up to one gallon, and then bottle. Allow two or
more years to mature. [Adapted from Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan's Making Wines
Like Those You Buy]

BARLEY WINE (1)


 1 lb. barley

 1 lb. golden raisins

 2-1/2 lb. granulated sugar

 2 lemons

 1 orange

 1 gallon water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Wash the grain and soak overnight in one pint lukewarm water. Strain grain and
mince with raisins. Pour 7 pints boiling water over minced grain/raisins, sugar and
lemon/orange zest, stirring well to dissolve sugar. Cover well and when lukewarm
(70-75 degrees F.) add lemon/orange juice, wine yeast and nutrient. Cover well and
set aside in warm place for seven days, stirring daily. Strain into secondary
fermentation vessel, top up with water and fit airlock. Rack when clear and again in 3
months before bottling. Allow to age one year before tasting. [Adapted from C.J.J.
Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]
BARLEY WINE (2)
 1 lb. barley

 1 pt. white grape concentrate

 1-1/2 lb. granulated sugar

 2 tsp. acid blend

 1/4 tsp. grape tannin

 1 crushed Campden tablet

 6 pt. water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Wash grain and soak 24 hours in 1 qt. water. Strain, crush grain, and pour grain and 6
pt. water through grain-bag over primary fermentation vessel.. Tie grain-bag and
leave in primary fermentation vessel. Add all other ingredients except yeast to
primary fermentation vessel, stir well to dissolve sugar, cover well, and add wine
yeast after 24 hours. Set in warm place, covered, for five days, stirring daily. Strain
juice from grain-bag, siphon liquor off sediment into secondary fermentation vessel
and fit airlock. Rack after three weeks and again in two months. Dissolve 1/4 lb. sugar
with 1/2 tsp. wine stabilizer in 1 pt. water and add to wine. When clear, rack again
and bottle. Allow to age one year before tasting. [Adapted from Raymond
Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]

BEET WINE (1) [Heavy Bodied]


 4 lb. young beets

 2-1/2 lb. granulated sugar

 4-6 cloves

 1/2 oz. shredded ginger

 1 lemon

 1 gallon water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Use only young, well washed beetroot, slicing thinly and bringing to boil in 6 pints
water with lemon zest, cloves and ginger. Simmer until beetroot is tender, but not
mushy. Strain liquid over sugar in primary fermentation vessel, stirring well to
dissolve sugar. When lukewarm (70 degrees F.), add lemon juice, yeast and nutrient.
Cover well and set in warm place for two days. Pour into dark secondary fermentation
vessel (dark glass, or colourless glass wrapped in brown paper), top with remaining
water, fit airlock, and move to a cooler place (60-65 degrees F.). Siphon liquor off
sediments after two months and again when clear. Bottle in dark glass to preserve
colour, store in dark place, and sample after one year. Improves with age. [Adapted
from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BEET WINE (2) [Medium Bodied]


 3 lb. beets

 3 lb. granulated sugar

 6 cloves

 1/2 oz. shredded ginger

 1 lemon

 1 gallon water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Wash beetroot well and dice, unpeeled, into 1/4 inch cubes. Bring to boil in half the
water with zest of lemon and simmer until beet is tender but not mushy. Strain onto
sugar, lemon juice, cloves, and ginger, add rest of water in primary fermentation
vessel, and stir well to dissolve sugar. When cooled to 70 degrees F., add yeast and
nutrient, cover well, and set in warm place for three days, stirring daily. Strain
through coarse muslin into dark secondary fermentation vessel and fit airlock. Rack
when clear and bottle in dark glass. Store in dark place and taste after one year.
[Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's First Steps in Winemaking]

BEET WINE (3) [Light Bodied]


 2-1/2 lb. beets

 2-1/4 lb. granulated sugar

 2 tsp. acid blend

 1/4 tsp. grape tannin

 1 crushed Campden tablet

 1 gallon water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Wash and peel beets, then dice into 1/4 inch cubes. Place in grain-bag, tie top, and
gently boil in 2 qts. water until tender but not mushy. Pour hot liquor over sugar in
primary fermentation vessel and stir well to dissolve sugar. Put grain-bag and all
remaining ingredients except yeast into liquor, cover, and set aside for 24 hours. Add
yeast, cover well, and stir daily for 5 days. Strain juice lightly from grain-bag and
siphon liquor off sediments into dark secondary fermentation vessel and fit airlock.
Rack after 3 weeks and again after another 2 months. When clear, rack final time, add
1/2 tsp. wine stabilizer and 1/4 lb. sugar, and bottle in dark glass. Allow to age one
year in dark place. [Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe
Handbook]

BEET [Sugar] WINE


 2-1/2 lb. sugar beets

 1/2 lb. chopped raisins

 1-3/4 lb. granulated sugar


 2 tsp. acid blend

 1/4 tsp. grape tannin

 1 crushed Campden tablet

 1 gallon water

 Wine yeast

Wash and peel sugar beets, then slice thinly. Place in grain-bag, tie top, and gently
boil in two qts. water until tender but not mushy. Pour over sugar in primary
fermentation vessel and stir well to dissolve sugar. Put grain-bag and all remaining
ingredients except yeast in primary fermentation vessel, cover, and set aside for 24
hours. Add wine yeast, cover well, and stir daily for 5 days. Strain juice lightly from
grain-bag and siphon liquor off sediments into dark secondary fermentation vessel, fit
airlock, and move to cooler (60-65 degrees F.) place. Rack after 3 weeks and again
after additional 2 months. When clear, rack and bottle in dark glass. Allow one year to
age in dark place. [Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's Winemakers Recipe
Handbook]

BEET, APRICOT AND RAISIN DRY SHERRY


 3 lb. beets

 12 oz. dried apricots

 1/2 lb. golden raisins

 1-1/4 lb. granulated sugar

 1 pt. white grape concentrate

 1 oz. gypsum

 1/2 oz. cream of tartar

 1/4 oz. pectin enzyme

 1 gallon water

 Sherry wine yeast and nutrient

Before beginning, scrub and chop beets, apricots and raisins. Dissolve sugar in 1-1/4
cups boiling water. Allow sugar syrup to cool and store in jar for future use. Boil
beets in 6 pt. water for 30 minutes. Strain over chopped apricots and raisins in
primary fermentation vessel. Add cream of tartar, gypsum, nutrient, and 1/2 cup sugar
syrup. Cover and allow to cool, then add pectin enzyme and activated yeast, cover,
and ferment on the pulp four days, stirring twice daily. Strain through fine nylon
sieve, pressing lightly, and add grape concentrate. After 10 days, add 1/2 cup sugar
syrup and then another 1/2 cup sugar syrup whenever S.G. drops to 1.005 or less
(approximately every three days). When all sugar syrup is added, add sufficient water
to bring to one gallon. When fermentation is complete (additional 10-14 days), rack
into large enough secondary fermentation vessel (1-1/2 to 2 gallon) to allow fair
amount of air above wine. Plug opening with cotton. Normally, that is the only
racking in sherry production, but if pulp particles appear in sediment, rack again after
two weeks and plug again with cotton. Store secondary fermentation vessel in cool
(55-60 degrees F.) place and leave undisturbed. Flora may form in 3-4 weeks or as
late as 4 months. If flora forms, leave undisturbed until all flora has sunk to bottom.
Carefully siphon off lees through double layer of fine muslin into bottles. If flora does
not form, allow to sit six months, carefully siphon into clean gallon bottle, sweeten
with sufficient white grape concentrate or sugar water (1/3 lb. sugar dissolved in one
cup water) to top up to one gallon, and then bottle in dark glass and store in dark
cabinet. This sherry must age three years before tasting, but will improve with further
aging. [Adapted from Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan's Making Wines Like Those You
Buy]

BEET AND PARSNIP WINE


 2 lb. beets

 2 lb. parsnips

 2-1/2 lb. granulated sugar

 2 lemons

 2 oranges

 1/4 tsp. grape tannin

 1 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1 gallon water

 Sauterne wine yeast and nutrient

Wash and thinly slice the beets and parsnips. Bring to boil in 6 pts. water and simmer
until tender but not mushy. Strain liquor into primary fermentation vessel over sugar
and stir to dissolve. When cool, add all remaining ingredients except yeast. Cover and
in 24 hours add yeast, stir, cover well, and set aside two days to begin fermentation.
Pour into dark secondary fermentation vessel, fit airlock, and move to cooler place.
Siphon off sediments after two months and again when clear. Bottle in dark glass and
allow to age in dark place for one year. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New
Winemaking Recipes]

BLACKBERRY WINE (1) [Heavy Bodied]


 6 lb. blackberries

 2-1/2 lb. granulated sugar

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 7 pts. water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Wash berries thoroughly in colander, then crush in bowl, transfer to primary


fermentation vessel, and pour 7 pts. boiling water over must. Allow to seep for two
days, then strain through nylon sieve onto the sugar. Stir well to dissolve sugar, add
pectin enzyme, cover well, and set aside for 24 hours. Add yeast and nutrient, cover,
and set aside 5-6 days, stirring daily. Pour into secondary fermentation vessel of dark
glass (or wrap clear glass with brown paper), adding water bring to shoulder, and fit
airlock. Place in cool (60-65 degrees F.) dark place for three months. Rack, allow
another two months to finish, then rack again and bottle in dark glass. Allow 6 months
to age, a year to mature. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BLACKBERRY WINE (2) [Medium Bodied Dry]


 4 lb. blackberries

 2-1/4 lb. granulated sugar

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1/2 tsp. acid blend

 crushed Campden tablet

 7 pts. water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Pick fully ripe, best quality berries. Wash thoroughly and place in nylon jelly-bag.
Mash and squeeze out all juice into primary fermentation vessel. Tie jelly-bag and
place in primary fermentation vessel with all ingredients except yeast. Stir well to
dissolve sugar, cover well, and set aside for 24 hours. Add yeast, cover, and set aside
5 days, stirring daily. Strain juice from jelly-bag and siphon off sediments into
secondary fermentation vessel of dark glass (or wrap clear glass with brown paper),
adding water to bring to shoulder, and fit airlock. Place in cool (60-65 degrees F.)
dark place for three weeks. Rack, allow another two months to finish, then rack again
and bottle in dark glass. Allow a year to mature to a nice semi-sec. [Adapted from
Raymond Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]

BLACKBERRY WINE (3) [Medium Bodied Sweet]


 4 lb. blackberries

 3 lb. granulated sugar

 1 gallon water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Pick fully ripe, best quality berries. Wash thoroughly in colander, then crush in bowl,
transfer to primary fermentation vessel, and add gallon of boiling water, mixing
thoroughly. When lukewarm (70 degrees F.), add yeast, cover, and set in warm (70-75
degrees F.) place 4-5 days, stirring daily. Strain through very fine nylon sieve or
double thickness of muslin onto sugar and nutrient. Stir well to dissolve sugar and
pour into secondary fermentation vessel of dark glass (or wrap clear glass with brown
paper) to shoulder, and fit airlock. Ferment excess liquor in small bottle fitted with
airlock or covered with plastic wrap held by rubber band. After all foaming has
ceased (6-7 days), top up with excess liquor and place in cool (60-65 degrees F.) dark
place for three months. Rack, allow another two months to finish, then rack again and
bottle in dark glass. Allow 6 months to age, a year to mature. [Adapted from C.J.J.
Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]
BLACKBERRY WINE (4) [Light Bodied Sweet]
 3 lb. blackberries

 2-3/4 lb. granulated sugar

 7 pts. water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Pick fully ripe, best quality berries. Wash thoroughly in colander, then crush in bowl,
transfer to primary fermentation vessel, and add water, mixing thoroughly. Allow to
seep overnight, then strain through nylon sieve onto the sugar. Stir well to dissolve
sugar, add yeast and nutrient, cover, and set in warm (70-75 degrees F.) place one
week, stirring daily. Pour into secondary fermentation vessel of dark glass (or wrap
clear glass with brown paper), adding water to bring to shoulder, and fit airlock. Place
in cool (60-65 degrees F.) dark place for three months. Rack, allow another two
months to finish, then rack again and bottle in dark glass. Allow 6 months to age, a
year to mature. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's First Steps in Winemaking]

BLACKBERRY AND BANANA MADEIRA-TYPE WINE


 6 lb. blackberries

 2 lb. bananas

 1 pt. white grape concentrate

 2 lb. granulated sugar

 1 gallon water

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 Madeira wine yeast and nutrient

Peel bananas and slice thinly, discarding the skins. Boil the banana slices in 5 pts.
water for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, crush the blackberries in primary fermentation
vessel. Strain the hot liquor over the crushed blackberries into primary fermentation
vessel and add nutrient. When liquor cools to lukewarm (70-75 degrees F.), add pectin
enzyme and yeast. Cover well and ferment on the pulp for two days. Meanwhile,
dissolve sugar into 1 pt. boiling water, making syrup. When cool, pour into sterile
bottle and set aside. After must has fermented two days, strain through fine nylon
sieve add press pulp lightly. Add the grape concentrate and mix, then pour into
secondary fermentation vessel. Add sufficient syrup to bring volume up to 7 pts., then
fit airlock. Hereafter, check specific gravity daily and add 1/2 cup syrup each time s.g.
drops to 1005 or less. When fermentation ceases completely, allow wine to settle
additional 3-4 days, then siphon off sediments. Place secondary fermentation vessel
(with airlock attached, in very warm place (100-110 degrees F.). After two days, top
up with water and store in this very warm place for 6 months, checking water level in
airlock periodically to prevent it from going dry. After 6 months, rack into fresh
gallon bottle, add 1 oz. granulated charcoal, cover securely (rubber stopper or plastic
wrap secured with rubber band), and allow to return to room temperature for three
days. Rack off charcoal and bottle. Allow to age for two years to produce a sweet
Madeira-type wine. [Adapted from Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan's Making Wines
Like Those You Buy]

BLACK CURRANT WINE (1) [Full Bodied]


 3 lb. black currants

 4 lb. granulated sugar

 1 gallon water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Strip currants of stems and leafy matter. Wash thoroughly and crush well in primary
fermentation vessel. Boil water and add sugar, stirring to dissolve while returning to
boil. Pour over currants and when lukewarm (70-75 degrees F.) add yeast and
nutrient. Cover well and set in warm place for 5 days, stirring daily. Strain and press
pulp well to extract liquid. Pour into secondary fermentation vessel, fit airlock, and let
stand three months. Rack, then again in two months and bottle. May taste after one
year, but improves remarkably with age (3-4 years). [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's
First Steps in Winemaking]

BLACK CURRANT WINE (2) [Medium Bodied]


 1 gallon black currants

 3-1/2 lb. granulated sugar per gallon of juice

 1 gallon water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Strip currants of stems and leafy matter. Wash thoroughly and crush well in primary
fermentation vessel. Cover with boiling water, cover well, and allow to seep
overnight. Strain and press pulp well to extract all juice. Measure juice and add sugar
in proportion indicated. Stir well to dissolve sugar, add yeast and nutrient, pour into
secondary fermentation vessel, and fit airlock. When all fermentation has ceased and
liquor cleared, siphon liquor off lees, return to secondary fermentation vessel, and
cork securely. After nine months, rack and bottle. May taste after one year, but
improves remarkably after two. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's First Steps in
Winemaking]

BLACK CURRANT WINE (3) [Light Bodied Dry]


 2-1/2 lb. black currants

 2-1/4 lb. granulated sugar per gallon of juice

 7 pt. water

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 crushed Campden tablet

 wine yeast and nutrient


Strip currants of stems and leafy matter. Put currants in nylon jelly-bag and mash or
press juice into primary fermentation vessel. Tie jelly-bag and put in primary
fermentation vessel. Add all ingredients except yeast, stir well to dissolve sugar, cover
well, and set aside 24 hours. Add yeast, cover again, and put in warm place 5 days,
stirring daily. Strain juice well from jelly-bag and siphon liquor off sediments into
secondary fermentation vessel. Fit airlock and set in cooler place (60-65 degrees F.)
one month. Rack, then again in two months. Rack again when clear and bottle. Taste
after one year. Improves with age. [Adapted from Raymond Massaccesi's
Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]

BLACK BERRY WINE


 4 lb. Black berries

 2-1/2 lb. granulated sugar

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1/2 tsp. acid blend

 crushed Campden tablet

 7 pts. water

 wine yeast and nutrient

Pick fully ripe, best quality berries. Wash thoroughly and place in nylon jelly-bag.
Mash and squeeze out all juice into primary fermentation vessel. Tie jelly-bag and
place in primary fermentation vessel with all ingredients except yeast. Stir well to
dissolve sugar, cover well, and set aside for 24 hours. Add yeast, cover, and set aside
5 days, stirring daily. Strain juice from jelly-bag and siphon off sediments into
secondary fermentation vessel of dark glass (or wrap clear glass with brown paper),
adding water to bring to shoulder, and fit airlock. Place in cool (60-65 degrees F.)
dark place for one month. Rack, then again in another two months, and again after
three weeks before bottling in dark glass. Allow a year to mature. [Adapted from
Raymond Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]

BLUEBERRY WINE (1) [Full Bodied]


 2 lb. blueberries

 1 lb. raisins

 2 lb. granulated sugar

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1-1/2 tsp. acid blend

 1/2 tsp. yeast energizer

 1 gallon water

 crushed Campden tablet

 wine yeast
Bring water to boil, then set aside. Wash and crush blueberries and put in primary
fermentation vessel with all ingredients except yeast. Add hot water and stir to
dissolve sugar. Cover well and allow to cool to 70-75 degrees F., then add yeast. Stir
daily for 5-6 days or until specific gravity is 1.040. Strain out fruit pulp and press.
Siphon into secondary fermentation vessel and fit fermentation trap. Rack in three
weeks and again in three months. When wine is clear and stable, rack again and
bottle. Allow a year to mature. Improves with age. [Adapted from Stanley F.
Anderson and Raymond Hull's The Art of Making Wine]

BLUEBERRY WINE (2) [Full Bodied Semi Sec]


 2 lb. blueberries

 1/2 pt. red grape concentrate

 1-3/4 lb. granulated sugar

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1-1/2 tsp. acid blend

 1/2 tsp. yeast energizer

 1/2 tsp. wine stabilizer

 7 pt. water

 crushed Campden tablet

 wine yeast

Wash and crush blueberries in nylon straining bag and strain juice into primary
fermentation vessel. Tie top of nylon bag and place in primary fermentation vessel.
Stir in all other ingredients except yeast and red grape concentrate. Stir well to
dissolve sugar, cover well, and set aside for 24 hours. Add yeast, cover, and daily stir
ingredients and press pulp in nylon bag to extract flavour. When specific gravity is
1.030 (about 5 days), strain juice from bag and siphon liquor off sediments into glass
secondary fermentation vessel. Fit fermentation trap. Rack in three weeks and again in
two months. When wine is clear and stable, rack again, add stabilizer and red grape
concentrate, and bottle. Allow a year to mature. [Adapted from Raymond
Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]

BLUEBERRY PORT WINE


 6 lb. blueberries

 1/2 pt. red grape concentrate

 1/2 c. light dry malt

 1-3/4 lb. granulated sugar

 1/2 tsp. pectin enzyme

 1-1/2 tsp. acid blend

 1/2 tsp. yeast energizer


 1/2 tsp. wine stabilizer

 4 pt. water

 crushed Campden tablet

 wine yeast

Wash and crush blueberries in nylon straining bag and strain juice into primary
fermentation vessel. Tie top of nylon bag and place in primary fermentation vessel.
Stir in all other ingredients except yeast and red grape concentrate. Stir well to
dissolve sugar, cover well, and set aside for 24 hours. Add yeast, cover, and daily stir
ingredients and press pulp in nylon bag to extract flavour. When specific gravity is
1.030 (about 5 days), strain juice from bag and siphon liquor off sediments into glass
secondary fermentation vessel. Fit fermentation trap. Rack in three weeks and again in
two months. When wine is clear and stable, add red grape concentrate and wine
stabilizer, rack again and bottle. Allow a year to mature. [Adapted from Raymond
Massaccesi's Winemaker's Recipe Handbook]

BROOM WINE (1) [Sweet]


 1 gallon broom (heads only)

 3 lb. granulated sugar

 2 oranges (peel and juice)

 2 lemons (peel and juice)

 1 tsp. yeast nutrient

 1 gallon water

 wine yeast

Bring 6 pints water to boil and add sugar, stirring to dissolve. Put peel of oranges and
lemons (no white pith) into crock and pour hot sugar water over it. Allow to cool to
70 degrees F. (hot water will spoil the flowers and resulting wine) before adding
flowers, juice of oranges and lemons, yeast nutrient and yeast. Cover well and leave
in a warm place for seven days, stirring daily. Strain through nylon sieve or muslin
into secondary fermentation vessel, top up with water to bottom of the neck, and fit a
fermentation trap. Leave in warm place for three months and siphon off the lees into
clean jar, leaving for another three months. Rack again and bottle. May taste after six
months. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's First Steps in Winemaking]

BROOM WINE (2) [Medium]


 1 gallon broom (heads only)

 2-1/2 lb. granulated sugar

 2 oranges (peel and juice)

 1 lemon (peel and juice)

 1 tsp. yeast nutrient


 1 gallon water

 wine yeast

Bring 6 pints water to boil and add sugar, stirring to dissolve. Put peel of oranges and
lemon (no white pith) into crock and pour hot sugar water over it. Allow to cool to 70
degrees F. (hot water will spoil the flowers and resulting wine) before adding flowers,
juice of oranges and lemon, yeast nutrient and yeast. Cover well and leave in a warm
place for seven days, stirring daily. Strain through nylon sieve or muslin into
secondary fermentation vessel, top up with water to bottom of the neck, and fit a
fermentation trap. Leave in warm place for three months and siphon off the lees into
clean jar, leaving for another three months. Rack again and bottle. May taste after six
months. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]

BROOM WINE (3) [Dry]


 1 gallon broom (heads only)

 2 lb. granulated sugar

 2 oranges (peel and juice)

 1 lemon (peel and juice)

 1 tsp. yeast nutrient

 1 gallon water

 wine yeast

Bring 6 pints water to boil and add sugar, stirring to dissolve. Put peel of oranges and
lemon (no white pith) into crock and pour hot sugar water over it. Allow to cool to 70
degrees F. (hot water will spoil the flowers and resulting wine) before adding flowers,
juice of oranges and lemon, yeast nutrient and yeast. Cover well and leave in a warm
place for seven days, stirring daily. Strain through nylon sieve or muslin into
secondary fermentation vessel, top up with water to bottom of the neck, and fit a
fermentation trap. Leave in warm place for three months and siphon off the lees into
clean jar, leaving for another three months. Rack again and bottle. May taste after six
months. [Adapted from C.J.J. Berry's 130 New Winemaking Recipes]