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Computer Training
Curriculum for Older Adults
A ‘train-the-trainer’ program for volunteers who teach older adults
how to use computer technologies.

Prepared by the Ottawa Public Library

www.BiblioOttawaLibrary.ca/infonet September 2014


Computer Training for Older Adults: a Curriculum for Instructors

1
Table of Contents

Introduction

Instructor’s Qualifications

Key to Using This Manual

Module 1: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS

Lesson Plan

Lesson 1: What is a Computer?


Lesson 2: Using a Mouse
Lesson 3: The Computer Keyboard

Classroom Handouts and Activities

Supplementary Resources and Activities

Module 2: INTRODUCTION TO WINDOWS

Lesson Plan

Lesson 1: What is Windows?


Lesson 2: What does a normal Windows program look like?
Lesson 3: Menu Bars
Lesson 4: Toolbars
Lesson 5: Help and FAQs

Classroom Handouts and Activities

Supplementary Resources and Activities

Module 3: INTRODUCTION TO WORD PROCESSING

Lesson Plan

Lesson 1: Using WordPad


Lesson 2: Highlighting and Cut, Copy and Paste
Lesson 3: Using Bold, Italic, Underline and the Colour Palette
Lesson 4: Making Changes to Typed Text

2
Lesson 5: Creating a Font for your Document
Lesson 6: Using Bullets and Tabs
Lesson 7: Inserting Graphics into a Document

Classroom Handouts and Activities

Supplementary Resources and Activities

MODULE 4: SAVING AND ORGANIZING FILES

Lesson Plan

Lesson 1: Files and Folders


Lesson 2: Saving Files
Lesson 3: Organizing Files
Lesson 4: Introducing Windows Explorer
Lesson 5: Creating Folders and Moving Files into Folders
Lesson 6: Copying, Opening and Deleting Files or Folders

Classroom Handouts and Activities

Supplementary Resources and Activities

MODULE 5: INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNET

Lesson Plan

Lesson 1: What is the Internet?


Lesson 2: Internet Explorer
Lesson 3: Viewing Multiple Pages with Windows and Tabs
Lesson 4: Using the Internet Explorer Toolbar for Navigation
Lesson 5: Printing with Internet Explorer
Lesson 6: Using the Find on the Page Function
Lesson 7: Using Text Size and Zoom Text
Lesson 8: Using View Source

Classroom Handouts and Activities

3
MODULE 6: EXPLORING THE INTERNET

Lesson Plan

Lesson 1: Searching the Internet


Lesson 2: Understanding the Results Screen
Lesson 3: Evaluating Your Results

Classroom Handouts and Activities

Supplementary Resources and Activities

MODULE 7: USING WEB BASED EMAIL

Lesson Plan

Lesson 1: Introduction to Web-Based Email


Lesson 2: Accessing Your Email
Lesson 3: Organizing Your Inbox
Lesson 4: Sending Messages
Lesson 5: Internet Safety
Lesson 6: Email Safety

Classroom Handouts and Activities

4
APPENDICES

Glossary

Appendix A: Alternate version of Module 5 using the Menu Bar for Lesson 3
(Windows and Tabs) and Lessons 5-8 (Printing, Find on this Page, Text Size and
Zoom Text and View Source)

Lesson Plan

Lesson 1: What is the Internet?


Lesson 2: Internet Explorer
Lesson 3: Viewing Multiple Pages with Windows and Tabs
Lesson 4: Using the Internet Explorer Toolbar for Navigation
Lesson 5: Printing with Internet Explorer
Lesson 6: Using the Find on the Page Function
Lesson 7: Using Text Size and Zoom Text
Lesson 8: Using View Source

Classroom Handouts and Activities

Appendix B: Favorites

Lesson Plan

Classroom Handouts and Activities

Supplementary Resources and Activities

5
INTRODUCTION

Computer Training Curriculum for Older Adults

The City of Ottawa held a Seniors Summit in October 2011 to help it develop an Older
Adult Action Plan. One of the issues identified during this summit was a strong need for
computer training for older adults. Since the library presently does some computer
training, we have undertaken to develop a curriculum for training Older Adults which can
be used to standardize the training being given across the library system as well as
provide support to other organizations which are facing similar demands for this type of
training.

In order to facilitate this project we have had to make some a few decisions as to what
should be included in basic training. As a result, we have decided to include the
following modules:

1. Introduction to Computers
2. Introduction to Windows
3. Introduction to Word Processing
4. Saving and Organizing Files
5. Introduction to the Internet
6. Exploring the Internet
7. Using Web-based Email (Gmail) ( includes Internet and Email Safety)

Although the future may be different with the introduction of Windows 8 and the
increasing popularity of tablets, the organizations which are being asked to provide
computer training have computers with a version of Windows that predates Windows 8.

Training material contains links that were active at the time of publication of this
material. Please be aware that links may become inactive or change without notice.

Future enhancements might include:

Advanced Internet (intermediate searching, editing photos, specialized subject


searching)

Social Media applications : Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, and Google+

Windows 8

Use of Tablets
Teaching Older Adults

As in any target group, there are no qualities that classify Older Adults as an entity.
However, there are certain characteristics that may be more prevalent among an older
adult population, including:

• Unfamiliarity with and fear of technology


• Difficulty concentrating
• Tremors, arthritis or other ailments which hamper mouse use
• Visual difficulties
• Auditory difficulties
• Physical difficulties requiring the use of canes and motorized transportation
devices
• Ailments such as strokes which can impede the ability to retain information
• A need to proceed slowly
• Formal learning ability is rusty and creates fear of ability to learn and inability to
learn many things at once

As a result, an instructor would have to demonstrate the following:

• Patience
• Continuous checking to see that students are keeping up. (Some older adults
may be reluctant to show that they are not following or may not want to bother
the instructor.)
• An ability to repeat the same information in different ways
• An ability to relate information to something non technical
• An ability to coach but not take over
• An ability to watch carefully for bad habits
• An ability to produce step-by-step instructions as handouts
KEY TO USING THIS MANUAL

This manual is divided into 7 modules. Each module will have: a “Lesson Plan” for the
instructor to use a section entitled “Classroom Handouts and Activities” which is to be
reproduced and given to the students; and in most cases, a section called
“Supplementary Resources and Activities” which is also to be reproduced and given to
the students. Students can use the “Classroom Handouts and Activities” handout to
follow along with the activities in class as well as practice at home. The “Supplementary
Resources and Activities” gives them other information sheets and activities which they
can do on their own.

Each module’s lesson plan will be subdivided into lessons which consist of Instructor’s
actions in purple, explanations in plain text, and student activities in red text. There will
also be some Instructor’s notes in italics which contain information applicable
specifically to teaching older adults.

It is recommended that instructors go through all of the student activity exercises before
they teach a lesson in order to make sure that the instructions make sense for the
specific computers being used, and that where web sites are involved, the specific
examples still work.

The manual also has a “Glossary” at the back which can be reproduced for the
students. When a word is used for the first time in the lesson plan, it is underlined so
that the instructor can remind the students that if they forget the meaning of that term,
they can find a definition in the glossary.

Appendix A consists of a “Lesson Plan” and a “Classroom Handouts and Activities”


section” which should be used instead of Module 5 if your version of Internet Explorer
does not include the Toolbar features outlined in lessons 3 and 5-8 of the module.
Appendix A shows how to access these features using the Menu Bar instead of
Toolbars.

Appendix B consists of a “Lesson Plan”, Classroom Handouts and Activities”, and a


“Supplementary Resources and Activities” section for teaching students how to create
Favourites. If this seems to be in demand by your students, you can teach this after
Module 5.
MODULE 1 : INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS

1-1
MODULE 1 : LESSON PLAN

1-2
MODULE 1: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS
This module introduces the student to computers, to a computer mouse, and to a
computer keyboard.

Lesson 1: What is a computer?

Notes to Instructor:

1. Before beginning this lesson ensure your student has a copy of the Classroom
Handouts and Activities section for this lesson as well as the Supplementary
Resources and Activities handouts and a copy of the Glossary. Note that any
new terms used will be underlined and will be found in the Glossary.
2. Before starting this lesson open a copy of WordPad and 2 copies of Internet
Explorer accessing the following web pages:
http://biblioottawalibrary.ca/en/databases/search
http://www.pbclibrary.org/mousing/intro3.htm
3. Minimize both programs.

Objective: To introduce your students to computers and describe the different


parts of a computer.

1. Explain what a computer is by describing it as a machine that can help you do a


variety of different things such as:

• writing letters to send via regular mail or typing lists of names and addresses for
an organization where you volunteer
• playing a variety of games
• watching DVDs
• editing pictures taken with your digital camera
• accessing the Internet to :
o send email and pictures to family and friends
o find information on a variety of subjects that interest you
o read newspapers, magazines or books
o chat with new friends
o do online banking

2. Describe the various parts of a computer and explain some basic computer terms,
making sure to point out and describe the items identified in Figure 1-1. Then have
your students do the activity where they will label the different parts of a computer.

1-3
Box or Tower or CPU
Screen or Monitor

CD-ROM/DVD Drive

Speakers
Mouse
Keyboard

Figure 1-1: Parts of a Computer

Student Activity 1: Labelling the Parts of a Computer

Write the following words in the correct boxes below, noting that some parts have more
than one label:

Box CD-ROM/DVD Drive CPU

Keyboard Monitor Mouse

Screen Speakers Tower

1-4
Partes de una
Computadora

_____ o ______ o _________


_________ o _______

_________________

________
________
______
3. Describe a laptop as a miniaturized, more portable version of the desktop
computer described earlier.

Figure: 1-3 A Laptop Computer

Student Activity 2: Identifying the Parts of a Computer

• Look at the diagram of the parts of a computer and find the equivalent parts on
the computer in front of you.
• Open and close the CD-ROM/DVD drive by pressing the button located just
below the drive.

4. Introduce the term Peripheral as a word that your students may hear someone talk
about. Describe it as:

• a piece of hardware that works with your computer but is not an essential part of
your computer.

Headphones Printer/Scanner
Flash drive Speakers

Figure 1-4: Examples of Peripherals

1-6
Student Activity 3: Labelling Some Examples of Peripherals

Peripherals are pieces of electronic hardware that work with your computer but are not
an essential part of it. Write the name of the peripheral in the blank box underneath the
correct picture.

Flash Drive Headphones

Printer and/or Scanner Speakers

_________ _________ _________ ________________

Figure 1-5: Some Peripherals to be Labeled by Students

New Vocabulary:
Box, CPU, Email, Flash Drive, Hardware, Internet, Laptop Computer, Monitor, Mouse,
Peripheral, Scanner, Screen, Tower

Outcome: The students now understand some of the things they can do with the
computer and are familiar with the various parts of the computer.

Lesson 2: Using a Mouse


Objective: To explain what a computer mouse is and how to use it.

1. Explain some of the basic terminology linked to using a computer mouse, making
sure to include the following points:

• A Mouse is a pointing device that moves a pointer or cursor around on the


screen and which allows you to select or move objects and highlight text.

1-7
• A Windows mouse must have 2 buttons, a right mouse button and a left mouse
button. It may also include additional optional buttons or wheels for added
functionality.
• When using a mouse people will use the phrase Point and click. This means that
you put the tip of the arrow in the middle of the item you are pointing at and click
once with the left mouse button.

• A Hyperlink is an element in an electronic document or web page that, when


clicked on, will bring you to a different page in a document or a different page on
the web. Hyperlinks in web pages are often in coloured and underlined text, but
not always. However, when you place your mouse on a hyperlink, the arrow will
change into a Hand.

2. Describe the different types of cursors that the student may encounter by using the
chart below. You may want to givestudents a copy of this chart.

Cursor Types

Arrow Select Tool


Hourglass Busy
I-beam ` Text Select Tool
Hand Activate Hyperlink

3. Show your students the recommended and alternate ways of holding the mouse,
while emphasizing the necessity to click lightly, hold the mouse firmly near the top,
and not take their hand off the mouse before they click the left mouse button with the
index finger.

Figure 1-6: Recommended Positioning while Holding a Mouse

1-8
Figure 1-7: Alternate Positioning while Holding a Mouse

Instructor’s Note:
Please read the instructor’s note at the end of this lesson before doing the mouse
tutorial as you should be helping your students complete the mouse tutorial by
correcting their hand positioning.

Student Activity 4: Using a Mouse


• Do a mouse tutorial.

Instructor’s Note:
Ideally the mouse tutorial should be the Gates Center for Technology Access tutorial
called Mouse Tutorial 2000 or 2002. If you do not have this tutorial, some other good
mouse tutorials online are:
• Mousing Around from the Palm Beach County Library
http://www.pbclibrary.org/mousing/intro.htm
• New User Tutorial from The Library Network in southeastern Michigan
http://tech.tln.lib.mi.us/tutor

Instructor’s Note: Points to Consider While Helping Your Students Use a Mouse.
1. Although the recommended hand positioning is the accepted hand positioning,
keep in mind that this positioning may not work for most older adults. Many
people have problems pressing with their index finger and not moving their 3rd
finger. This will cause frequent popping up of shortcut menus which will be
confusing and upsetting. A better but less ergonomic positioning would be to
place the thumb on the left-hand side of the mouse with the index finger on the
left button, and the 3rd, 4th and pinky finger on the right side of the mouse.
2. Righthanded people have the mouse positioned on the right-hand side of the
keyboard and lefthanded people on the left-hand side of the keyboard. Windows
1-9
will also let you switch the mouse button for left-handed people (Control Panel –
Mouse – Buttons – Button Configuration – Switch Primary and Secondary
Buttons); however, most left-handed people who are now older adults have
probably gotten used to doing things in a right-handed manner. Make sure you
ask them if they are left-handed and offer them options.
3. Whether your students are using the ergonomic or non-ergonomic way of
holding the mouse, make sure that they:
• place their hand near the top of the mouse and not the bottom for more
control
• press lightly on the mouse button, or else they may get no action or mouse
movement
• keep their hand on the mouse, since lifting it off and pressing the button will
cause the mouse to move
• rest the heel of their hand on the desk, to make using the mouse more
comfortable and to give them more control
• are not routinely double-clicking, which will give them unanticipated or no
results
• are not turning the mouse sideways, making it difficult to move the mouse to
where they want it to go
• are lifting the mouse up to reposition it when it starts falling off the mouse pad

New Vocabulary:
Cursor, Hyperlink, Point and Click, Windows Mouse.

Outcome: Students should now know what a mouse is and how to hold it. They
should have gotten some practice in moving the mouse around, clicking, double-
clicking and scrolling.

Lesson 3: The Computer Keyboard


Objective: To introduce students to the computer keyboard, making sure they
know the differences between the old fashioned typewriter and the keyboard. To
ensure that they are familiar with the major keys including the Alt and Ctrl keys.

1. Introduce your student(s) to the keyboard, making sure to include the following
points:

• The Shift key is pressed in conjunction with a letter to produce capital letters
• The Spacebar is pressed to create spaces in between words.
• The Numeric Keypad only has keys that are already available somewhere else
on keyboard. To use the numbers on the Numeric Keypad, you must turn “Num
Lock” on. Laptops often do not have a numeric keypad.

1-10
Teclado Típico de una Computadora 1-11
Student Activity 5: Labelling the Parts of a Computer Keyboard

Write the following words in the correct boxes on the picture of a typical computer
keyboard:

Alt Key Backspace Key Control Key

Delete Key Enter Key Escape Key

Function Keys Movement Keys Numeric Keypad

Shift Key Spacebar

A Typical Computer Keyboard

Figure 1-9: A Typical Computer Keyboard to be Labelled by Students

1-12
Student Activity 6: The Shift key and the Spacebar

• Looking at the Bar at the bottom of your screen, find the rectangle where it says
“Document – WordPad”, or, if using Windows 7, find the WordPad icon
and click.
• You should now be looking at a blank document.
• Type: My name is John Smith (using your own name instead of “John Smith”).
• When typing a capital letter, hold the Shift key down and press the letter on the
keyboard. Do not press the Caps Lock key as that will turn capital letters on for
every letter. If you do press the Caps Lock key, you can turn it off by pressing it
again.
• Don’t forget to place a space between words by pressing the spacebar at the
bottom of your keyboard.

2. Review the three different ways of scrolling and introduce your students to the
scrolling keys on the keyboard, making sure to include the following points:

• Use the up and down arrows on the scroll bar to move your screen up and down
just a little bit at a time
• Click in the light part of the scroll bar below the darker scroll button to scroll down
a whole screen at a time. Click on the light part of the scroll bar above the darker
scroll button to scroll up a whole screen at a time.
• Put your cursor on the darker scroll button, press the left mouse button down,
and keeping it down, drag the scroll button up and down to move quickly to the
top or bottom of the screen.
• The Movement Keys on the keyboard act like the up and down arrows on the
scroll bar. Pressing the Down Arrow key lightly will scroll down a few lines at a
time while pressing the Up Arrow key lightly will scroll up a few lines at a time.
• The Page Down key will scroll down a whole screen at a time.
• The Page Up key will scroll up a whole screen at a time.
• The Home key will bring you to the beginning of a document.
• The End key will take you to the end of a document.

Student Activity 7: Scrolling

• Looking at the Bar at the bottom of your screen, find the rectangle where it says
“Featured online res…”, or, if using Windows 7, find the Internet Explorer icon
and click
• Press Enter on the keyboard and note the scroll bar on the righthand side

Scroll button Up arrow

Click here to page down


Down arrow

Figure 1-10: Vertical Scroll Bar 1-13


• Click lightly on the down arrow at the bottom of the scroll bar to move the
screen down a couple of lines a time
• Click lightly on the up arrow at the top of the scroll bar to move the screen up a
couple of lines at a time
• Click once lightly on the pale part of the bar anywhere underneath the darker
scroll button to move down a screen at a time
• Click once lightly on the pale part of the bar anywhere above the darker scroll
button to move up a screen at a time
• Click in the middle of the darker Scroll button, and keeping the left button
down, move your mouse up and down the scroll bar to drag the scroll button up
and down the scroll bar. Note that this gets you quickly to the top and bottom of
the page.
• Press the up and down movement keys on the keyboard and watch the screen
move up and down a few lines at a time.
• Press the Page Down button to move the page down a screen at a time
• Press the Page Up button to move the page up a screen at a time
• Press Home to get to the beginning of the page or document
• Press End to get to the end of the page or document
Page Up will move the
Home will bring you to screen up a page at a time
the start of the page
Page Down will move the
screen down a page at a time
End will place you at Up movement key
the end of the page
Down movement key
Figure 1-11: Keyboard Scrolling Keys

New Vocabulary:
Address Bar, Internet Explorer, Scrolling

Outcome: Students are a little more comfortable with the keyboard and know how
to make upper case letters and insert spaces in between words.

1-14
MODULE 1: CLASSROOM HANDOUTS AND ACTIVITIES
Activity 1: Labelling the Parts of a Computer

Write the following words in the correct boxes below, noting that some parts have more
than one label:

Box CD-ROM/DVD Drive CPU

Keyboard Monitor Mouse

Screen Speakers Tower

Parts of a Computer

_____ or ______ or _________


_________ or _______

_________________

________
________
______
Activity 2: Identifying the Parts of a Computer

• Look at the diagram of the parts of a computer that you completed in Activity 1
and find the equivalent parts on the computer in front of you.
• Open and close the CD-ROM/DVD drive by pressing the button located just
below the drive.

Activity 3: Labelling Peripherals

Peripherals are pieces of electronic hardware that work with your computer but are not
an essential part of it. Write the name of the peripheral in the blank box underneath the
correct picture.

Flash Drive Headphones

Printer and/or Scanner Speakers

_________ _________ _________ ________________

Activity 4: Using a Mouse

• Do a mouse tutorial.
http://www.pbclibrary.org/mousing/intro.htm ;
http://tech.tln.lib.mi.us/tutor
Activity 5: Labelling the Parts of a Computer Keyboard

Write the following words in the correct boxes on the picture of a typical computer
keyboard:

Alt Key Backspace Key Control Key

Delete Key Enter Key Escape Key

Function Keys Movement Keys Numeric Keypad

Shift Key Spacebar

A Typical Computer Keyboard


Activity 6: The Shift Key and the Spacebar

• Looking at the Bar at the bottom of your screen find the rectangle where it says
“Document – WordPad”, or, if using Windows 7, find the WordPad icon
and click. (Outside of class, have someone help you open WordPad by
doing the following:
o Click on the Start button
o Move your cursor down to All Programs and click.
o Click on Accessories and move down the menu and click on WordPad)
• You should now be looking at a blank document.
• Type: My name is John Smith (using your own name instead of “John Smith”).
When typing a capital letter, hold the Shift key down and press the letter on the
keyboard. Do not press the Caps Lock key as that will turn capital letters on for
every letter. If you do press the Caps Lock key, you can turn it off by pressing it
again.
• Don’t forget to place a space between words by pressing the spacebar at the
bottom of your keyboard.

Activity 7: Scrolling

• Looking at the Taskbar at the bottom of your screen, find the rectangle where it
says “Featured online res…”, or, if using Windows 7, find the Internet Explorer
icon and click. (Outside of class, have someone help you open the database
section of the library’s webpage by:
o Clicking on the icon for Internet Explorer in the
Quick Launch section of your Taskbar
o Clicking in the address bar and typing the following web address:
“biblioottawalibrary.ca/en/databases/search” )
• Press Enter on the keyboard and note the scroll bar on the righthand side

Up arrow
Scroll button

Click here to page down


Down arrow
Figure: Vertical Scroll Bar

• Click lightly on the down arrow at the bottom of the scroll bar to move the
screen down a couple of lines at a time
• Click lightly on the up arrow at the top of the scroll bar to move the screen up a
couple of lines at a time
• Click once lightly on the pale part of the bar anywhere underneath the darker
scroll button to move down a screen at a time
• Click once lightly on the pale part of the bar anywhere above the darker scroll
button to move up a screen at a time
• Click in the middle of the darker Scroll button, and keeping the left button
down, move your mouse up and down the scroll bar to drag the scroll button up
and down the scroll bar. Note that this gets you quickly to the top and bottom of
the page.
• Press the up and down movement key on the keyboard and watch the screen
move up and down a few lines at a time.
• Press the Page Down button to move the page down a screen at a time
• Press the Page Up button to move the page up a screen at a time
• Press Home to get to the beginning of the page or document
• Press End to get to the end of the page or document
Page Up will move the
Home will bring you to screen up a page at a time
the start of the page
Page Down will move the
screen down a page at a time
End will place you at Up movement key
the end of the page
Down movement key
Figure: Keyboard Scrolling Keys
MODULE 1 : SUPPLEMENTARY RESOURCES AND
ACTIVITIES
Older Adults Training Curriculum

Module 1: Lesson 1 Some Books, Videos and Websites on Using Computers

Books

Using Computers

Stokes, Abby. “Is this thing on?” : a Computer Handbook for Late Bloomers,
Technophobes, and the Kicking & sScreaming
004.16 S874i

Muir, Nancy C. Computers for Seniors for Dummies


004.160846 MUIR
Laptops for Seniors for Dummies
004.160846 M953L

Reeves, Bob. Confident Computing for the Over 50s


004.160846 R332

Windows

McFedries, Paul. Teach Yourself Visually Windows 7


005.446 M143ts

Matthews, Martin S. Windows 7 for Seniors Quicksteps


005.446 MATTH

Stuur, Addo, Windows XP for Seniors : for Everyone who Wants to Use the Computer at
a Later Age
005.4460846 S937

Windows Vista for Seniors : for Everyone who Wants to Learn to Use the Computer at a
Later Age
005.4460846 W765

Arnold, Adrian. Windows 8 for the Older and Wiser : Get Up and Running on your
Computer
005.446 ARNOL
Using the Internet and Email

Internet and E-mail for Seniors with Windows Vista 004.6780846 I61

Internet and E-mail for Seniors with Windows XP 004.678 S937

Reeves, Bob. The Internet and Email for the Over 50s 004.678 R332

McFedries, Paul. Internet Simplified


004.678 M143

Google for Seniors : Getting Acquainted with Free Google Applications


025.04252 G658

Biersdorfer, J.D. The Internet: the Missing Manual


Ebook

Safety on the Internet

Ligthart, Jolinda. Protect, Clean up and Speed up your Computer for Seniors
004.0846 PROTE

McFedries, Paul. The Facebook Guide for People over 50


006.7540846 MCFED

Criddle, Linda. Using the Internet Safely for Seniors for Dummies
004.6780846 C928

Videos

Using Computers

Basic Computers (Parts 1-4) [videorecording (DVD)]


004.160846 B3112 – 004.160846 B3115

A Senior’s Guide to Using a Computer [videorecording] by Michael Gorzka (Windows


XP)
004.0846 S477

Using Windows

Microsoft Windows 7 : Level 1 [videorecording]


005.446 M626
Windows 7 Basics [videorecording] : Part 1 A Step-by-step Guide for the Computer Shy
005.43 WINDO
005.446 G675x (Windows XP)
005.446 G675v (Windows Vista)

Using the Internet and Email

How to use Firefox: a Step-by-Step Guide for the Computer Shy


005.71376 H847

How to use Internet Explorer 8 for Seniors


004.678 H8475

Internet for Seniors: a Step-by-step Guide for the Computer Shy


DVD 004.6780846 I615

Internet Survival Guide, Part 1 DVD


004.678 I617

The Internet, Part 1, Searching the Internet


004.678 I61s

Gmail for the Computer Shy DVD


005.713 G111

Email for Seniors : a Step-by-Step Guide for the Computer Shy


004.6920846 E535

Internet Sites

www.jegsworks.com/Lessons/index.html
www.gcflearnfree.org/computerbasics

Using the Mouse


www.pbclibrary.org/mousing/intro.htm
tech.tln.lib.mi.us/tutor
www.mesalibrary.org/research/mouse/page01.htm
www.seniornet.org/howto/mouseexercises/mousepractice.html
Using Windows
www.top-windows-tutorials.com/windows-7.html
www.homeandlearn.co.uk/BC/BeginnersComputing.html#win7
www.free-computer-tutorials.net/windows-vista-desktop.html
www.helpwithpcs.com/courses/windows-xp-tutorial-desktop.htm

File management/Windows Explorer


www.homeandlearn.co.uk/BC/bcs1p6.html
www.jegsworks.com/lessons/win/filesandfolders/index.html

Using the Internet and Email

Net Tutor
liblearn.osu.edu/tutor

Internet Explorer 7
www.free-computer-tutorials.net/internet-explorer.html

Internet 101: The Fundamentals Every Internet User Should Know


netforbeginners.about.com/od/internet101

Learn the Net


www.learnthenet.com/web-at-a-glance/what-is-the-web/index.php (is.gd/TYD6E8)

Internet Explorer 8 and Internet Explorer 11 Tutorial


www.gcflearnfree.org/internetexplorer

Gmail Tutorials
www.freeemailtutorials.com/googleMailGmailTutorials

Email Basics from the Goodwill Community Foundation


www.gcflearnfree.org/emailbasics

A variety of articles on using email from About.com


email.about.com/cs/beginningemail

Safety on the Internet

Senior’s Guide to Computers


www.seniorsguidetocomputers.com

Internet Safety (Goodwill Community Foundation)


www.gcflearnfree.org/internetsafety
Internet Security (RCMP)
is.gd/tXIBZf
MODULE 2 : INTRODUCTION TO WINDOWS

2-1
MODULE 2 : LESSON PLAN

2-2
MODULE 2: INTRODUCTION TO WINDOWS
This module introduces the student to the Windows Operating System and its very basic
functions.

Lesson 1: What is Windows?

Note to Instructor: Before beginning this lesson ensure your student has a copy of
“Classroom Handouts and Activities” section for this lesson as well as the
Supplementary Resources and Activities” handouts so they may refer to it while you are
discussing the Windows interface and while they are doing the student activities.

Objective: To explain what Windows is and why we need it, and to introduce the
Windows desktop.

1. Explain the difference between hardware and software in order to help the student
understand what an operating system is. When describing an operating system,
make sure to cover the following points:

• To operate a computer you need the hardware described in Module 1 and the
software or computer programs (a set of instructions written in computer
language) that allow you to use your computer to do things like accessing the
internet and editing photos.
• In order for you to use the software you need something called an operating
system which is a type of software:
o that is the link between you and the programs on your computer, and
o that is the link between your computer programs and the internal working
of the computer.
Note to Instructor: You may want to make an analogy here and describe the operating
system as being similar to the brain in that it controls all the functions of the body in the
same way the operating system controls the functions of the computer.

2. Explain that although there are many different operating systems, the 2 most
common ones are: Windows, used with IBM type PCs, and Mac, used with
Macintosh computers. In this curriculum we will be talking about Windows only.
Since this is not an in-depth Windows course, everything covered should apply to all
versions of Windows up to Windows 7. We will not be covering the Windows 8
interface, which is quite different, but there will still be some correlations with
Windows 8.

3. Describe the basic Windows Interface, making sure you include the following points:

• The Desktop is what’s displayed on your screen when you turn on your
computer (It’s called a desktop because it has all the main objects you might

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need to complete an electronic task, in the same way that a physical desk has
the items you may need to complete a physical task).,
• The Taskbar is a bar usually appearing at the bottom of the desktop showing
which programs are open and running.
• The Start button (also called the Start globe in Windows 7) is the button or globe
you click on in the bottom left-hand corner of the screen to launch the Start
menu.
• The Start menu is the menu that appears when you click on the Start button or
globe and provides, among other things, access to all the programs you have on
your computer and the various methods for shutting down your computer.
• The desktop icons are graphical representations or pictures which, when double-
clicked, will open a program or bring you to a specific place on the computer.

Icons

Start
Menu

Start Button Program Task Buttons Taskbar

Figure 2-1: Windows Desktop Desktop

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Student Activity 1: Labeling the parts of a Windows Desktop

Write the following words in the correct boxes below:

Desktop Icons Program Task Buttons


Start Button Start Menu Taskbar

Figure 2-2: Parts of a Standard Desktop Diagram to be Labelled by Students

Student Activity 2: Opening Programs From the Start Menu and the Desktop

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• Click on the Start button.
• Move your cursor down to All Programs to have a look at the list of programs
available on the computer.
• Find Internet Explorer in the Programs menu and click on it once to open it.
• Close the program by clicking the X in the top right-hand corner.
• Find Internet Explorer on the desktop.
• Open it by using a double click, as opposed to the single click used when
opening it from the Start menu.
• Close the program by clicking the X in the top right-hand corner.

4. Show your students how to shut down their computer as well as the options for
restarting or hibernating, making sure to include the following points:

• Windows does need a complete shutdown every now and then to keep working
efficiently.
• You often get other options like Hibernate, Sleep or Standby. If you choose one
of these options, Windows will not shut down completely:
o Even though your computer appears to be off, you will still be using a
minimal amount of electricity.
o When your computer turns back on, it will be quicker than a new startup
after your computer was completely shut down.
o When your computer does turn on, you will still have open everything that
you had previously opened.
• Another shutdown option is to log off. This in no way shuts your computer down.
If you have more than one person using a computer, it shuts down your personal
profile and allows someone else to log on with their profile.
• Another option in the “Shut down” menu is Restart. This is used when you feel
that your computer has slowed down or a program is not working properly. This
does a complete Windows shutdown and immediately restarts it again.

Note to Instructor: Have your students follow the instructions below to shut down the
computer if time permits or wait until the end of the lesson to practice this activity.

Student Activity 3: Computer Shut Down

• Click on the Start button.


• Click on Shut down (or, if using Windows XP, and you see something that looks
like the illustration below, click on the down arrow and choose Shut down).

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Down arrow

Figure 2-3: Shut Down Box in Windows XP

Clicking on side
arrow beside the
Shut Down Shut Down
Button Button brings
other options.
Figure 2-4: Windows 7 Shutdown

New Vocabulary:
Desktop, Operating System, Software, Start Button, Start Menu, Taskbar, Word
Processing

Outcome: Students are now familiar with what a Windows desktop looks like.
They can open programs from the desktop as well as from the Start menu and
know how to properly shut down a Windows computer.

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Lesson 2: What does a normal Windows program look like?
Objective: To introduce the Windows look to students. To make sure they know
about the different parts of the Windows screen and to emphasize that all
programs have a similar look.

1. Describe the parts of the WordPad screen as displayed below making sure to
emphasize that all Windows programs have this same look. Pay special attention to
the icons in the top right-hand corner and describe their function as explained below
(Figure 2-6). Then have your students do activity 4 to label the parts of the screen.

Menu Bar Toolbar Format Bar


Title Bar

Ruler

Start
Button

Status Bar Taskbar

Figure 2-5: Normal Windows Program Screen

Close Program
Minimize Button Button

Maximize Button

Figure 2-6: Buttons in the Top Right-Hand Corner of the Title Bar of all
Windows Programs
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• The Minimize button takes the program off your desktop but keeps it open on
your Taskbar.
• The Maximize button increases the size of a window to take over the whole
desktop. Once “Maximized”, the button changes into 2 interlocked boxes
Pressing this button will restore the window to its previous size.
• The X is the Close Program button and it is used to close down a program.

Student Activity 4: Labelling the Parts of a Normal Windows Program Screen


Write the following words in the correct boxes in the next 2 diagrams:
Close Program Button Format Bar Maximize Button
Menu Bar Minimize Button Ruler
Start Button Status Bar Taskbar
Title Bar Toolbar

Figure 2-7: Copy a Normal Windows Screen to be Labelled by Students 2-9


2. If your students have access to a computer running Windows 7, the WordPad
Screen will be similar to the standard Microsoft Office Screen that Microsoft started
using in 2007. If your students are running Windows 7, go over this Microsoft Word
Screen and tell your students that they will find a copy of it in the supplementary
activities that you have given them.
Menu Menu Bar
Button Quick Access Toolbar Title Bar

Ribbon

Ruler

Start
Globe
Status Bar Word Task Taskbar
Button B

Figure 2-6: Standard Microsoft Program Screen in


Windows 7

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Student Activity 5: Using the Minimize, Maximize and Close Buttons

• Click on the Start button.


• Move your cursor down to All Programs and look at the menu opening to the
right.
• Move your cursor over to the side menu and move up to Accessories and click.
• Move your cursor across or down to the Accessories menu and click on
WordPad.
• Click on the Minimize button (the first button in the top right-hand corner that
looks like a minus sign).
• You will have your Windows desktop back. Retrieve WordPad from the Taskbar
by clicking on the WordPad Task button.
• Click on the middle button to maximize or restore the screen.
• Click on the middle button a second time to maximize or restore the screen.
• Click on the Close button (the third button with the X) to close the program.

New Vocabulary:
Menu Bar, Ribbon, Toolbar

Outcome: Students can now identify the different parts of the classic Windows
screen look and be comfortable with using the Minimize, Maximize and Close
buttons in the top right-hand corner.

Lesson 3: Menu Bars


Objective: To introduce students to the Windows Menu Bar.

1. Describe the Windows Menu Bar, making sure to cover the following points:

• All Windows programs have a Menu Bar and traditionally everything you can
do with a program can be done using the menus.
• There are some menus that are common to all Windows programs (with the
exception of new Microsoft Office programs) and they are File, Edit, View and
Help. Other menu items differ from program to program.
• To access an item in a menu, click on the menu item in the Menu Bar. Then
move your mouse down the drop-down menu and click on the action you
want to perform, noting that as you go up and down the drop-down menu
different actions will be highlighted.
• To get rid of a drop-down menu, you can:
o Move your cursor to a different item in the Menu Bar to access a
different drop-down menu.
o Click on the menu item you just clicked on to produce the drop-down
menu.
o Click anywhere on the screen on a non-clickable item.

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To open a document you saved
previously, point and click on the word
File in the Menu Bar. Move down the
drop-down menu until you highlight
Open and click.

Figure 2-7: File Drop-Down Menu

Instructor’s Note:
Make sure to emphasize that when clicking on a menu heading , the tip of the arrow
cursor has to be in the middle of the heading. Students will often have the tendency to
click below the item, which will mean accessing the Toolbar instead of the Menu Bar.

By using the example displayed above, you can also point out that on a computer
keyboard, numbers and letters are not interchangeable. If any of your students have
used typewriters in the past, they may be used to using an O instead of a 0 and an l
instead of a 1.

New Vocabulary:
Drop-Down Menu

Outcome: Students will be able to find the Menu Bar, open a drop-down menu
and click on something in the drop-down menu.

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Lesson 4: Toolbars
Objective: To introduce students to the Windows Toolbar.

1. Describe the Windows Toolbar as a series of icons or graphics located below the
Menu Bar which are normally shortcuts to actions that you can do through using the
Menu Bar. Make sure to include the following points:

• Toolbar icons vary from program to program,but a few common ones include:
New
Open
Save
Print

Figure 2-8: Some Common Toolbar Icons

• Some programs have more than one toolbar (WordPad has the regular Toolbar
and a specialized Format Toolbar).
• If one does not know what a Toolbar icon stands for, they can place their mouse
over the item (MAKING SURE NOT TO CLICK) and they will see a description of
the icon as in the example below. This is generally called a mouseover.

Mouseover here produces

Figure 2-9: Example of a Mouseover

Student Activity 6 : Using Menu Bars and Toolbars

• Open any program from the Desktop by double-clicking on the icon.


• Click on the word File in the Menu Bar, ensuring that the tip of the arrow is on the
word “File”.
• Choose New from the “File” menu.
• Choose whatever the default is.
• Place the mouse on top of an icon with which you are unfamiliar to see what it is.
• Close the program by clicking the X in the top right-hand corner.

New Vocabulary:

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Default, Mouseover

Outcome: Students now understand what the Toolbar is used for and know how
to identify what an item on the Toolbar stands for.

Lesson 5: Help and FAQs


Objective: To introduce the student to Help pages and the term FAQ, and to
provide them with some basic troubleshooting tips.

1. Introduce your students to Help pages for Windows programs, making sure to
include the following points:

• All programs compatible with the Windows operating system have detailed Help
pages.
• In most Windows programs you will see Help as the last item in the Menu Bar
• For Windows programs without a Menu Bar, pressing F1 will open the Help
screens.
• Most programs have a variety of different ways of providing help including asking
questions and providing context-sensitive help suggestions.
• Practically all Windows program have at the very minimum the help options
controlled by the classic Windows Help Dialog box with 3 tabs:
o Contents Tab – Information is arranged like the Table of Contents of a
book.
 Clicking on the book beside a Contents heading will expand the
Table of Contents heading.
 Clicking on the actual heading, sometimes called Topic, will provide
the step-by-stepinstructions on how to do what you clicked on.

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Index tab
Table of Contents tab

Help topics

Figure 2-10: Classic Help Dialog Box, Contents Tab

o Index Tab – all significant keywords are presented when you start typing a
word. Choose one to display the topic you want to know more about. (This
option only appears in Windows XP.)
o Search Tab – Enter a keyword(s) to retrieve a list of topics which include that
keyword. Click on the topic to receive step-by-step instructions.

Enter keywords

Search
tab

Click on List
Topics button

Select topic

Click on Display

Figure 2-11: Classic Help Dialog Box, Search Tab

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Step-by-step
instructions displayed

Figure 2-12: Classic Help Dialog Box, Step-by-step instructions

2. Explain what a FAQ is, making sure to include the following points:

• FAQ stands for Frequently Asked Questions.


• FAQ is referred to by the individual letter F A Q or pronounced as an acronym
(fack).
• It exists on many websites and in many programs and acts as another form of
help.
• It gives the answers to a list of questions that many users of a program or
website may have.

3. Go over this sample FAQ on computer problems troubleshooting with your students
so that they can feel more confident about doing their own troubleshooting. Tell them an
Information Sheet with this information is in their “Classroom Resources and Activities”
handout.

Q1. I’ve turned on the power button on my computer but nothing is happening Why?

• If you have a power bar, make sure that the power bar is on.
• Make sure that the computer is plugged in.
• Make sure that the power button is turned on on both the CPU (sometimes
called Tower) and the Monitor.

Q2. I am waiting for my computer to do something and nothing is happening. Why?

• Press the Enter key if you do not see a busy cursor.

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• If that does not work, examine your screen closely to see if there is an
information box you have not dealt with.
o You must always respond to an information box or you will not be able
to continue.

Information
box
indicator

Figure 2-13: Example of an Information Box

• If you don’t see an information box, look down at your Taskbar to see if you
have a program Task button which is orange in colour. This may indicate that
you have ignored an information box in another program.

Q3. My computer is very slow. What do I do?

• This might mean that one of your programs has stopped running properly for
no particular reason.
• Use the ALT+CTRL+Delete key combination.
• Click on Task Manager.
• Make sure the “Applications” tab is open.

Applications Status
Tab

End Task

Figure 2-14: Windows Task Manager


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• Under “Status”, check for a program saying “Not Responding”.
• Highlight that program and click on the End Task button.
• If this does not help try rebooting your computer by
o Clicking on the Start button.
o Clicking on Shut down or the arrow beside Shut down in Windows
Vista and Windows 7.
o Selecting the option for Restart.

Q4. My mouse is not working. What should I do?

• Follow the same procedures outlined in question 3.


• Also check the mouse connection on the back of your box or tower.

Q5. What does “default” mean?

• “Default” refers to an original setting for a computer or program.


• It is also the setting that will be used automatically unless it is changed by the
user. So for example, in some computers the default Font setting for
WordPad is the font called Times New Roman.

Q6. I clicked on something and nothing is happening. Why?

• Make sure that what you clicked on is a clickable item.


 On the internet, your arrow will have turned into the hand.
 In a program, you will have to have clicked on an item in a menu, on an
icon, or on a button in a Windows dialogue box.
• Make sure you are not clicking too hard. If you see something that looks like
this: you are pressing too hard.
• Check your Taskbar to see if there is something that is already open
displaying what you clicked on.

Note to Instructor:
If you have practiced the Alt +Ctrl +Delete earlier, you can opt to just have the student
reboot the computer.

Student Activity 7: Alt +Ctrl + Delete

• Use the key combination Alt +Ctrl +Delete by pressing down the Alt key and
while keeping it pressed down, pressing down the Ctrl key and while keeping
that button down, pressing the Delete key.
• Click on the button labelled Task Manager.

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• Check the status of the programs you have opened to ensure they all say
“Running” instead of “Not responding”.
• Close the “Task Manager” by clicking on the X in the top right-hand corner,
making sure it is the Task Manager box that you are closing.

Student Activity 8: Rebooting the Computer

• Click on the Start button.


• Click on Shut down or, if there is a side arrow beside Shut down, click on the
side arrow.
• Choose the Restart option to reboot your computer.
• Click on the OK button in Windows XP.

New Vocabulary:
FAQ, Reboot, Task Manager

Outcome: Students now know where to look for help when using a Windows
program, understand the term FAQ, and feel more comfortable and better
equipped to handle basic computer problems.

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MODULE 2 : CLASSROOM HANDOUTS AND ACTIVITIES
Activity 1: Labelling the parts of a Windows Desktop

Write the following words in the correct boxes below:

Desktop Icons Program Task Buttons

Start Button Start Menu Taskbar

The Standard Windows Desktop


Activity 2: Opening Programs from the Start Menu and the Desktop

• Click on the Start button.


• Move your cursor down to All Programs to have a look at the list of programs
available on the computer.
• Find Internet Explorer in the Programs menu and click on it once to open it.
• Close the program by clicking the X in the top right-hand corner.
• Find Internet Explorer on the desktop.
• Open it by using a double click, as opposed to the single click used when
opening it from the Start menu.
Close the program by clicking the X in the top right-hand corner.

Activity 3: Computer Shut Down

• Click on the Start button.


• Click on Shut down (or, if using Windows XP and you see something that looks
like the illustration below, click on the down arrow and choose Shut down).

Down arrow

Figure: Shut Down Box in Windows XP

Clicking on side
Shut Down arrow beside the
Button Shut Down
Button brings
other options

Figure: Windows 7 Shutdown


Activity 4: Labelling the Parts of a Normal Windows Program Screen
Write the following words in the correct boxes in the next 2 diagrams:

Close Program Button Format Bar Maximize Button

Menu Bar Minimize Button Ruler

Start Button Status Bar Taskbar

Title Bar Toolbar


Activity 5: Using the Minimize, Maximize and Close Buttons

• Click on the Start button.


• Move your cursor down to All Programs and look at the menu opening to the
right.
• Move your cursor over to the side menu and move up to Accessories and click.
• Move your cursor across or down to the “Accessories” menu and click on
WordPad.
• Click on the Minimize button (the first button in the top right-hand corner that
looks like a minus sign).
• You will have your Windows desktop back. Retrieve WordPad from the Taskbar
by clicking on the WordPad Task button.
• Click on the middle button to maximize or restore the screen.
• Click on the middle button a second time to maximize or restore the screen.
• Click on the Close button (the third button with the X) to close the program.

Activity 6: Using Menu Bars and Toolbars

• Open any program from the Desktop by double clicking on the icon.
• Click on the word File in the Menu Bar, ensuring that the tip of the arrow is on the
word “File”.
• Choose New from the “File” menu.
• Choose whatever the default is.
• Place the mouse on top of an icon with which you are unfamiliar to see what it is.
• Close the program by clicking the X in the top right-hand corner.
INFORMATION SHEET

Computer Training for Older Adults Troubleshooting FAQ

1. I’ve turned on the power button on my computer but nothing is happening.


Why?

• If you have a power bar, make sure that the power bar is on.
• Make sure that the computer is plugged in.
• Make sure that the power button is turned on on both the CPU (sometimes
called Tower) and the Monitor.

2. I am waiting for my computer to do something and nothing is happening. Why?

• Press the Enter key if you do not see a busy cursor.


• If that does not work, examine your screen closely to see if there is an
information box you have not dealt with.
o You must always respond to an information box or you will not be able
to continue.

Information
box
indicator

Figure 2-7: Example of an Information Box

• If you don’t see an information box, look down at your Taskbar to see if you
have a program task button open which is orange in colour. This may
indicate that you have ignored an information box in another program.

3. My computer is very slow. What do I do?

• This might mean that one of your programs has stopped running properly for
no particular reason.
• Use the ALT+CTRL+Delete key combination.
• Click on Task Manager.
• Make sure the “Applications” tab is open.

Windows Task Manager

Applications
Status

End Task

• Under “Status”, check for a program saying “Not Responding”.


• Highlight that program and click on the End Task button.
• If this does not help try rebooting your computer by
o Clicking on the Start button.
o Clicking on Shut down or the arrow beside Shut down in Windows
Vista and Windows 7.
o selecting the option for Restart.

4. My mouse is not working. What should I do?

Follow the same procedures outlined in question 3.


Also check the mouse connection on the back of your box or tower.

5. What does “default” mean?

• “Default” refers to an original setting for a computer or program.


• It is also the setting that will be used automatically unless it is changed by the
user. So for example, in some computers the default Font setting for
WordPad is the font called Times New Roman.

6. I clicked on something and nothing is happening. Why?

• Make sure that what you clicked on is a clickable item.


 On the internet, your arrow will have turned into the hand.
 In a program, you will have to have clicked on an item in a
menu, on an icon, or on a button in a Windows dialogue box.
• Make sure you are not clicking too hard. If you see something
that looks like this:

you are pressing too hard.


• Check your Taskbar to see if there is something that is already
open with what you clicked on.
Activity 7: Alt +Ctrl + Delete

• Use the key combination Alt +Ctrl +Delete by pressing down the Alt key, and
while keeping it pressed down, pressing down the Ctrl key, and while keeping
that button down, pressing the Delete key.
• Click on the button labelled Task Manager.
• Check the status of the programs you have opened to ensure they all say
“Running” instead of “Not responding”.
• Close the “Task Manager” by clicking on the X in the top right-hand corner,
making sure it is the “Task Manager” box that you are closing.

Activity 8: Rebooting the Computer

• Click on the Start button.


• Click on Shut down or, if there is a side arrow beside “Shut down”, click on
the side arrow.
• Choose the Restart option to reboot your computer.
• Click on the OK button in Windows XP.
MODULE 2 : SUPPLEMENTARY RESOURCES AND
ACTIVITIES
INFORMATION SHEET

Illustration of a Standard Microsoft Office Program Screen


Older Adults Training Curriculum

Module 2: Lesson 2 Opening WordPad and Practicing Maximize, Minimize and Closing
Programs.

1. Open WordPad at home or in the training room

• Go to Start button (globe for Windows 7).


• Click once with left button.
• Move cursor up to “Programs” or down to “All Programs” (do not click).
• Move cursor straight across and move up to Accessories. (Do not click unless
you are using Windows Vista or Windows 7, at which point you may have to
click.)
• Move cursor straight across and down to WordPad.
• Click once.
OR

1b. Open WordPad on the public computers in the library

• Log on to computer.
• Click on down arrow beside “Choose Your Preference”.
• Select Unfiltered if available; if not, select ”Filtered”.
• Scroll down the scrollable menu (many scrolls) until you get to “WordPad”.
• Click on WordPad with left mouse button and click on the Start button.

2. Practice reducing the size of the screen and increasing the size of the screen

• Point and click on the middle icon of the three icons in top right-hand corner of
WordPad
(One single square enlarges the screen. When the square has two
overlapping squares clicking on the square will reduce the size of the
screen)

3. Type something
4. Minimize screen

• Point and click on the first icon of the three icons in the top right-hand corner of
WordPad. (Looks like a minus sign). The document will disappear and you will
see the desktop.

5. Retrieve WordPad from the Taskbar

• Move cursor down to the Taskbar and click on the rectangle which says
Documentor Document – WordPad (This will place your document back on the
desktop.) In Windows 7 only, move your mouse over the square labeled WordPad on
the Taskbar and you will see a thumbnail of the open screen.
• Move your cursor to the thumbnail of the page you are looking for and click on it.

6. Close WordPad without saving it

• Click on the X button in the top right hand corner of the screen.
• When you are asked if you want to save the document click on the No button.
MODULE 3 : INTRODUCTION TO WORD PROCESSING

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MODULE 3 : LESSON PLAN

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MODULE 3 – INTRODUCTION TO WORD PROCESSING

This module introduces students to basic word processing using WordPad and helps
them become more familiar with a typical Windows program.

Lesson 1: Using WordPad


Objective: To introduce students to word processing and to make sure they know
how to find WordPad and start a document.

Note to the Instructor: Before beginning this lesson, please give students a copy of the
“Classroom Handouts and Activities” section for this lesson as well as the
“Supplementary Resources and Activities” handout.

1. Explain the term “word processor” by describing it as a program which allows you
to create, edit, and save or print documents. Tell them that as long as they are
using Windows they have a very basic word processor called WordPad.

2. Demonstrate the difference between the I-beam (which your cursor turns into when
you are in a place where text is expected), and the flashing bar, (which you need
before you start typing). Make sure to include the following points:

• You should always be aware of where your flashing bar is in a word processing
document, since that is where whatever you are trying to do will happen.
• In other applications when you see the I-beam, you may have to click
somewhere to get the flashing bar (eg. text boxes on the internet).

Student Activity 1: Opening WordPad

• Click on the Start globe.


• Move your cursor down to All Programs and click.
• Click on Accessories and move down the menu and click on WordPad.
• Move your cursor from the big white text box to the menus and back again, and
note that your cursor changes from an arrow when accessing the menus to an I-
beam when it is in the text box.
• Note the flashing bar in the text box, which means you can start typing.
• Type: My name is John Smith (using your own name instead of John Smith)
Use capital letters for the first letters of your name by pressing the Shift key
and the letter at the same time. Insert spaces between your words.

Outcome: Students now know where to find WordPad and can open WordPad and
start a new document.

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Lesson 2: Highlighting and Cut, Copy and Paste

Objective: To teach students how to highlight text and to use it to cut and paste
and copy and paste.

1. Explain the concept of highlighting text, making sure to inform your students that
they have an Information Sheet in the “Classroom Handouts and Activities”
handout on this topic. Be sure to cover the following points:

• Place your cursor to the left of the text that you want to use, ensuring that
your cursor is still an I-beam.
• Left-click on the mouse once and hold the button down.
• While continuing to hold down the left mouse button, drag the cursor over all
of the text that you wish to change.
• After you have highlighted what you want, release the mouse button. The
selected text will still be highlighted.
• If you highlighted too much or too little, you can change this by moving the
mouse AS LONG AS YOU HAVE NOT LET GO OF THE MOUSE BUTTON.
If you have let it go, click anywhere on the page to get rid of the highlight and
start over.

Student Activity 2: Highlighting Text and Cut and Paste

• Place your cursor on the first letter of your name and click with the left mouse
button.
• Keeping the left mouse button pressed, move your mouse to the right so that
your name is highlighted.
• Once you have your name highlighted, let go of the mouse button.
• Click on Cut in the “Clipboard” section of the WordPad Ribbon. (Your name
should disappear.)
• Press the Enter key on your keyboard to move to the next line.

Instructors Note: Make sure to emphasize that the line they are on is determined by
where the flashing bar is located. To move to a new line in a document, they should
press the Enter key.

• Click on Paste in the clipboard section of the WordPad Ribbon. (Your name
should reappear on the next line.)

Student Activity 3: Copy and Paste

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• Place your cursor at the end of the first line of your document (on the s in the
word “is”) and click.
• Keep the left mouse button depressed and move your mouse from right to left
until you have the whole line highlighted.
• Let go of the left mouse button.
• Click on Copy in the “Clipboard” section of the WordPad Ribbon.
• Click on the second line of your document after your name so that you see
the flashing bar after your name.
• Press the Enter key on the keyboard Your flashing bar is now on a new line.
• Click on the word Paste in the “Clipboard” section of the WordPad Ribbon.
• This is what you should see:

My name is
[your name]
My name is

2. Explain the difference between Cut and Paste and Copy and Paste.

Instructor’s Note
This is a particularly difficult concept, and at this point, it is advisable to make an
analogy to something physical. Perhaps compare it to creating a scrapbook of pictures
of Ottawa. If you have a magazine and don’t need it anymore, you can cut the pictures
out and paste them in a scrapbook (Cut and paste). If you then want to continue with
your scrapbook, you may have to borrow magazines from the library. At that point, you
cannot cut up the magazines, so you will have to copy (photocopy) them first and then
paste them (Copy and paste.)
Once the students understand the concept, let them know that they can cut and paste
and copy and paste not only in one document, as described above, but from one
document to another, or from one program to another.

Outcome: Students can now highlight and know how to use Cut and Paste and
Copy and Paste.

Lesson 3: Using Bold, Italic, Underline and the Colour Palette

Objective: To introduce your students to the Bold, Italic Underline and Colour
icons, and ensure that they know how to turn them on and off.

1. Explore the Bold, Italic, and Underline buttons in the Toolbar, pointing out that
after clicking on one of these buttons, the letter is surrounded by white, as if it
was actually a button that was pushed in.

3-5
Student Activity 4: Bold, Italic and Underline Buttons

• Click after the second “My name is” so that the flashing cursor is after “My
name is” on the 3rd line.
• Skip a line by pressing the Enter key on your keyboard twice.
• Type: How now brown cow
• Click on the B button in the “Font” section of the WordPad Ribbon.
• Type: Brown cow
• Note the difference between regular type and bold type
• Click on the I and type: how now
• Note that what you are typing is now in bold and italics
• Click on the B button to turn bold off and type: What a pretty
• Click on the U for underline and type: brown cow
• Click again on the I and the U to turn off underline and italics and type: you
are
• This is what you should have:

How now brown cow Brown cow how now What a pretty brown cow you are.

2. Talk about the Colour button, making sure to include the following points:

• Using colour can be good for emphasis, but if you plan to print the document
in black and white, youshould never use colour. The print will just look
uneven.
• Even if youare printing in colour or sending it as an attachment, you should:
o Make sure that the colour will show up. (e.g. yellow is very hard to
read).
o Not use a lot of different colours, as this can be more confusing than
helpful.

Student Activity 5: Using the Colour Button

• Click on the down arrow beside the capital A with the black line underneath it
and choose a colour from the drop-down menu.
• Type: How now brown cow
• Click on the down arrow beside the capital A with the colour you selected
underneath it, and select black”.

Lesson 4: Making Changes to Typed Text

Objective: To show students how to make changes to text that they’ve already
typed.

3-6
1. Explain how to make a correction to something you have typed previously,
making sure to include the following points:

• In order to make a change you must move your flashing cursor to where you
want to make the correction.
• If you need to delete or erase some letters, you use the Backspace key to
erase to the left of the flashing bar and the Delete key to erase to the right of
the flashing bar

Student Activity 6: Using Backspace and Delete to Make Corrections to Something


Previously Typed

• Change the first “brown cow” into “green crow” by clicking before the c in cow
and using the Delete key to erase the c.
• Type: cr.

• Use the left arrow in the movement keys to move the cursor to the
end of the word “brown” and use the Backspace key to delete “brown”.
• Type: green.
• You should now have:

How now green crow Brown cow how now What a pretty brown cow you are

2. Explain that when they used the bold, italic underline and colour icons in the
previous lesson, they only dealt with what they were going to type next, but that it
is possible to change something that they’ve already typed. Make sure to include
the following points:

• If you want to change something that you previously typed, you must highlight
it first.
• If the text that you highlighted was typed in bold, the Bold button will be on (i.e.
surrounded by white).
• If it is normal text that you want to bold, the B will not be highlighted, but if you
click on the B, Bold will turn on and your highlighted text will be bolded.
• If the text you want to change is only partially bolded or underlined, the Bold
and Underline buttons will be greyed out. You must click on them to turn the
features on for all of the highlighted text before you click on them again to turn
them off.

Student Activity 7: Changing the Formatting of Text that has Already Been Typed

• In the sentence:

3-7
How now green crow Brown cow how now What a pretty brown cow you are

• Highlight how now What a pretty as shown above.


• Click on the B button twice (once to bold everything and again to turn the bold
off) and you should now have:

How now green crow Brown cow how now What a pretty brown cow you are

Outcome: Students now know how to make corrections to previously typed text
by using Backspace and Delete and highlighting text and changing the
formatting.

Lesson 5: Creating a Font for Your Document

Objective: To introduce students to the term “font” and to show them how to
choose a font for their document.

1. Explain that the font determines what the lettering in your document will look like,
and show your students how to set the font as follows:

• In all versions of WordPad prior to Windows 7:

o Click on Format in the Menu Bar.


o Click on Font and note the long scrollable list of fonts.
o Note that in the box labelled “Size” you can determine how large your
lettering will be. (The bigger the number, the larger the letters.)
o Note the “Sample” box where you can see what the letters “aby” and
“z” will look like in the font you have chosen.
o Note the box labelled “Script” which says “Western”, which will
probably be all that you will be using. However, if you choose a font
only available in a different script, the script may change and the next
font you choose may not look right until you change the script back to
Western.

3-8
List of
fonts Choose size of
font (letters)

Sample Box (what


the font looks like)

Figure 3-1: Choosing Font in WordPad in Windows XP


Click on Down
Arrow to change
script
• In Windows 7:

o You change the font by clicking on the down arrow in the textbox in
the WordPad ribbon.
Click here to get list of fonts

Figure 3-2: List of Fonts in WordPad in Windows 7

o There is no sample box to compare fonts, but all of the fonts listed in
the drop-down menu will be written in the fonts listed.

2. Explain that all word processing programs, including WordPad, have something
called a default font, which is the font that will be used if you do not change it to
something else. Be sure to include the following points:

• The first thing that you should do when creating a word processing document
is to choose your font.
• Sometimes, even if the first thing that you do is to choose a font, there may be
occasions when your document will revert back to the default font.

3-9
• If that happens, it is usually better to not keep changing it back, but to wait
until you have finished your document. Then, you can change your whole
document by:
o clicking on Select All in the Edit menu in the Windows XP version of
WordPad; or
o clicking on Select All in the Editing Section of the WordPad Ribbon in
the Windows 7 version of WordPad.

Student Activity 8: Changing the Font of a Previously Typed Document

• Click on Select All in the Editing section of the WordPad Ribbon .


• Click on the down arrow beside the name of your font in the Font section of
the WordPad ribbon.
• Scroll down the long list of fonts until you get to Tahoma and click on it. (Note
that as you scroll down, the look of your document changes to reflect the font
that is highlighted.)
• Click on the down arrow beside the number indicating the size of the font and
click on 12 in the drop-down menu.
• You should see that the letters in your document look different.

New Vocabulary:
Font

Outcome: Students now understand the term “font” and know how to choose a
font when using WordPad.

Lesson 6: Using Bullets and Tabs

Objective: Introducing students to bullets and tabs.

1. Explain that Bullets is a common feature used to emphasize items in a list. Be


sure to include the following points:

• Clicking on the Bullets icon once will turn bullets on.


• Clicking on the Bullets icon once it is on will turn it off.
• When you turn Bullets off, make sure that you are on a new line, since the
bullet will disappear from the line on which your flashing bar is located.

Student Activity 9: Using Bullets

• Click on the Bullets icon in the “Paragraph” section of the WordPad Ribbon.

• Type a list of at least five food items, pressing the Enter key after each item
(For example, milk, Enter, cheese, Enter)

3-10
• After the last item, press the Enter key again.
• Click on the Bullets icon in the WordPad Ribbon again to turn bullets off.

2. Show your students how to create a phone list using tabs so that they can have
three columns of text properly spaced. Be sure to include the following points:

• You click on the ruler to create the tabs where you want your columns to start.
• You use the Tab key on your keyboard to move from tab to tab or column to
column.
• You use the Enter key on your keyboard to start a new entry.
• If you press the Tab key too hard, your cursor will skip a tab.
• If you want the text that you are typing to show up in a previous tab, you can
place your cursor at the beginning of your text and use the Backspace key to
move it to a previous tab.
• If you are making a tabbed list, do not use spaces to get to the next tab. Your
columns will be uneven.

Student Activity 10: Using Tabs to Create Perfectly Aligned Columns

• Click on the ruler on 5.5 cm. (2.25 in.) and on 10 cm (5 in.).


• Press Enter to get to the next line.
• Type: Name.
• Press the Tab key (just to the left of the letter Q).
• Type: Address.
• Press the Tab key.
• Type: Phone.
• Press the Enter key on the keyboard.
• Type: [your own name]
• Press the Tab key.
• Type: [your own address]
• Press the Tab key.
• Type: [your own phone number] (Note how nicely the columns line up.)
• Press the Enter key on the keyboard to get to a new line.

3. Show students how to delete the tabs by clicking on the corner of the tab
marker and dragging it off the ruler

Student Activity 11: Deleting Tabs

• Find the corner of the tab marker shown in the illustration below and click on
it.
• Keep the mouse button pressed down and move your mouse down to drag
the marker off the ruler.

3-11
Tab Marker

Figure 3-3: Phone List Created Using Tabs

New Vocabulary:
Bullets

Outcome: Students now know how to create a tabbed list and how to insert and
delete bullets.

Lesson 7: Inserting Graphics into a Document

Objective: To introduce students to the idea of adding pictures to their


documents.

1. Explain that there are many ways to insert pictures or clip art into documents,
making sure to include the following points:

• You can copy and paste a picture as long as you have a copy of the picture
and the right to use it.
• You can insert a picture file from the My Pictures folder into your My
Documents if you are using Windows 7.
• You can download some free clipart from the Microsoft Office website and
copy and paste it into your document. (The instructions for doing this will be
found in the “Supplementary Resources and Activities” handout.)

Student Activity 12 (for Windows 7 only): Inserting a Picture into a Document

• With WordPad already open, click on the Menu button.


• Click on New in the drop-down menu.
• Click on the Don’t Save button when you are asked if you want to save your
document.
• Click on Picture in the” Insert” section of the WordPad Ribbon.
• Click on the folder labelled “Sample Pictures” and then click on the Open
button.

3-12
• Click on a picture that you would like to insert into your document and then
click on the Open button.
• Close WordPad by clicking on the red X in the top right-hand corner and
clicking on the Don’t Save button when Windows asks if you want to save the
changes to your document.

New Vocabulary:
Clipart

Outcome: Students now know how to add graphics to their document.

3-13
MODULE 3 : CLASSROOM HANDOUTS AND ACTIVITES

1
Activity 1: Opening WordPad

• Click on the Start Globe.


• Move your cursor down to All Programs and click.
• Click on Accessories and move down the menu and click on WordPad.
• Move your cursor from the big white text box to the menus and back again,
and note that your cursor changes from an arrow when accessing the menus
to an I-beam when it is in the text box.
• Note the flashing bar in the text box, which means you can start typing.
• Type: My name is John Smith (using your own name instead of John
Smith). Use capital letters for the first letter of your name by pressing the
Shift key and the letter at the same time. Insert spaces between your words
by pressing the space bar.

2
INFORMATION SHEET

Instructions for Highlighting Text


• Place your cursor to the left of the text that you want to use, ensuring your
cursor is still an I-beam.

• Left-click on the mouse once and hold the button down.

• While continuing to hold down the left mouse button, drag the cursor over all
of the text that you wish to change.

• After you have highlighted what you want, release the mouse button. The
selected text will still be highlighted.

• If you highlighted too much or too little, you can change this by moving the
mouse AS LONG AS YOU HAVE NOT LET GO OF THE MOUSE BUTTON.
If you have let it go, click anywhere on the page to get rid of the highlight and
start over.

3
Activity 2: Highlighting Text and Cut and Paste

• Place your cursor on the first letter of your name and click with the left mouse
button.
• Keeping the left mouse button pressed, move your mouse to the right so that
your name is highlighted.
• Once you have your name highlighted, let go of the mouse button.
• Click on Cut in the Clipboard section of the WordPad ribbon. (Your name
should disappear.)
• Press the Enter key on your keyboard to move to the next line.
• Click on Paste in the clipboard section of the WordPad ribbon. (Your name
should reappear on the next line.)

Activity 3: Copy and Paste

• Place your cursor at the end of the first line of your document (on the s in the
word “is”) and click.
• Keep the left mouse button depressed and move your mouse from right to left
until you have the whole line highlighted.
• Let go of the left mouse button.
• Click on Copy in the “Clipboard” section of the WordPad Ribbon..
• Click on the second line of your document after your name so that you see
the flashing bar after your name.
• Press the Enter key on the keyboard. Your flashing bar is now on a new line.
• Click on the word Paste in the “Clipboard” section of the WordPad Ribbon.
This is what you should see:

My name is
[your name]
My name is

Activity 4: Bold, Italic and Underline Buttons

• Click after the second “My name is” so that the flashing cursor is after “My
name is” on the 3rd line.
• Skip a line by clicking the Enter key on your keyboard twice.
• Type: How now brown cow
• Click on the B button in the “Font” section of the WordPad Ribbon.
• Type: Brown cow
• Note the difference between regular type and bold type
• Click on the I and type: how now
• Note that what you are typing is now in bold and italics
• Click on the B button to turn bold off and type: What a pretty

4
• Click on the U for underline and type: brown cow
• Click again on the I and the U to turn off underline and italics and type: you
are
• This is what you should have:

How now brown cow Brown cow how now What a pretty brown cow you are.

Activity 5: Using the Colour Button

• Click on the down arrow beside the capital A with the black line underneath it
and choose a colour from the drop-down menu.
• Type: How now brown cow
• Click on the down arrow beside the capital A with the colour you selected
underneath it, and select black.

Activity 6: Using Backspace and Delete to Make Corrections to Something Previously


Typed

• Change the first “brown cow” into “green crow” by clicking before the c in cow
and using the Delete key to erase the c
• Type cr.

• Use the left arrow in the movement keys to move the cursor to
the end of the word “brown” and use the Backspace key to delete “brown”.
• Type: green.
• You should now have:

How now green crow Brown cow how now What a pretty brown cow you are

Activity 7: Changing the Formatting of Text that has Already Been Typed

• In the sentence:

How now green crow Brown cow how now What a pretty brown cow you are

• Highlight how now What a pretty as shown above.


• Click on the B button twice (once to bold everything and again to turn the bold
off). You should now have:

How now green crow Brown cow how now What a pretty brown cow you are

5
Activity 8: Changing the Font of a Previously Typed Document

• Click on Select All in the “Editing” section of the WordPad Ribbon.


• Click on the down arrow beside the name of your font in the “Font” section of
the WordPad Ribbon.
• Scroll down the long list of fonts until you get to Tahoma and click on it. (Note
that as you scroll down, the look of your document changes to reflect the font
that is highlighted.)
• Click on the down arrow beside the number indicating the size of the font and
click on 12 in the drop-down menu.
• You should see that the letters in your document look different.

Activity 9: Using Bullets

• Click on the Bullets icon in the “Paragraph” section of the WordPad Ribbon.

• Type a list of at least five food items, pressing the Enter key after each item.
(For example, milk, Enter, cheese, Enter)
• After the last item, press the Enter key again.
• Click on the Bullets icon in the WordPad Ribbon again to turn bullets off.

Activity 10: Using Tabs to Create Perfectly Aligned Columns

• Click on the ruler on 5.5 cm. (2.25 in.) and on 10 cm (5 in.).


• Press Enter to get to the next line.
• Type: Name.
• Press the Tab key (just to the left of the letter Q).
• Type: Address.
• Press the Tab key.
• Type: Phone.
• Press the Enter key on the keyboard.
• Type: [your own name]
• Press the Tab key.
• Type: [your own address].
• Press the Tab key.
• Type: [your own phone number] (Note how nicely the columns line up.)
• Press the Enter key on the keyboard to get to a new line.

Activity 11: Deleting Tabs

• Find the corner of the tab marker shown in the illustration below and click on
it.
• Keep the mouse button pressed down and move your mouse down to drag
the marker off the ruler.

6
Phone List Created Using Tabs

Tab Marker

Activity 12 (for Windows 7 only) : Inserting a Picture in a Document

• With WordPad already open, click on the Menu button.


• Click on New in the drop-down menu.
• Click on the Don’t Save button when you are asked if you want to save your
document.
• Click on Picture in the “Insert” section of the WordPad Ribbon.
• Click on the folder labelled “Sample Pictures” and then click on the Open
button.
• Click on a picture that you would like to insert into your document and then
click on the Open button.
• Close WordPad by clicking on the red X in the top right-hand corner and
clicking on the Don’t Save button when Windows asks if you want to save the
changes to your document.

7
MODULE 3 : SUPPLEMENTARY RESOURCES AND
ACTIVITIES

1
Older Adults Training Curriculum

Module 3: Lesson 6 Creating a Phone List Using Tabs

• Create Your Tabs in Windows XP and earlier versions of Windows

• Click on Format.
• Mover the cursor down until Tabs is highlighted and left-click.
• In the box under the words “Tab stop position”, put in a number to
correspond to the place on your ruler where you want your tab stop. (If your
ruler is in inches, choose 2.25; if it is in centimetres, choose 5.5)
• Press the Enter key on your keyboard. (The number will move to below the
box, and you will have an empty text box with a flashing cursor.)
• Type 5 if your ruler has inches or 10 if it has centimetres.
• Press Enter on your keyboard. You should see two marks on your ruler that
look like this .
• Click on theOK.

OR

(In Windows 7 and other editions of Windows)


• Click on your ruler at the tab stops that you would like to create. Choose 2.25
and 5 if your ruler is in centimeters and 5.5 and 10 if your ruler is in inches.

Create Your Phone List

• Type: Name
• Press the Tab key. Your flashing bar or cursor should move to the next tab.
• Type: Address
• Press the Tab key to get to the second tab marker.
• Type: Phone
• Press the Enter key to get to a new line.
• Type your name and then press Tab.
• Type your address and then press Tab again.
• Type your phone number and press Enter. Remember that if you press the Tab
key too heavily, it will skip by the tab and go to the next one. Before you type
anything, make sure that your flashing bar is in the right place.
• Do another line of names, addresses and phone numbers

2
Delete Your Tabs
• Find the marks on your ruler that represent the tabs
• Place the tip of your cursor on the corner of the mark
• Click with left mouse button, and keeping the left mouse button depressed, drag
it off the ruler.
• Do the same thing with the other tab mark.

3
Older Adults Training Curriculum

Module 3: Lesson 7 Using Microsoft Office Online to Insert Pictures into your
Document

Making sure that you are connected to the Internet, open your browser (Internet
Explorer)

To Find a Picture
• Click on the Address Bar.
• Type: is.gd/pPZLzK
• Click in the white box which says “Search images and more” and type in your
keyword. (eg. Cats)
• Press Enter or click on the Search button.
• Find the picture that you want. (If it isn’t on the first page, click on Next to go to
the next page of results.
• Place your cursor over the picture.You should see the word “Download”. Click
on Download. (If the computer says that you must install Active X add-on, click
on the band at the top of the page, allowing your browser to install the add-on.)
• Click on Open and choose Paint or Windows Photo viewer.
• Click on File, Save as (in Paint) or File and Make a copy (in Windows Photo
viewer).
• Make sure that you save it in My Documents, My Pictures. Give it a name and
save it as jpeg format.

To Insert a Picture in a Document in Windows 7


• Open WordPad.
• In the part of the ribbon labeled “Insert”, click on Picture.
• Find the picture you saved and click on it.
• Click on Open.

OR (in other versions of Windows)

• Open WordPad.
• Right-click on the Start button.
• Click on Explore.
• Find the folder in which you saved your picture and click on it.
• On the right-hand side, click on the picture that you want to insert into your
document.
• Click on File and scroll down the drop-down menu until you get to “Open with”.
• Click on Windows Picture and Fax viewer.
• Right-click on the picture:
o If you get the option to copy, click on Copy.

4
o if you don’t get the option to copy, click on the icon beneath the picture
which says “Closes this program and opens the image for editing”. Then
right-click on the picture and click on Copy.
• Click on Document – WordPad on the Taskbar.
• Click on Edit and then on Paste.

5
MODULE 4 : SAVING AND ORGANIZING FILES

4-1
MODULE 4 : LESSON PLAN

4-2
MODULE 4: SAVING AND ORGANIZING FILES

This module introduces the student to saving and organizing files by using Windows
Explorer.

Instructor’s Note: Before starting this module, it is important to have created some
folders and files on the computers which are being used for training. Create a file
entitled “Opening Windows Explorer” with the following content:

Ways to open Windows Explorer


• Right-click on the Start button and left-click on Explore.
Or
• Left-click on the Start button and left-click on My Computer and click on
folders in the Toolbar .
Or
• Left-click on the Start button and find Windows Explorer under All Programs
 Accessories (not available in all versions of Windows).

Save in a folder called “Classroom Files” inside the folder “My Documents”.

Lesson 1: Files and Folders


Objective: To introduce the concept of files and folders and to make sure that
your students know the difference.

1. Discuss the difference between files and folders, making sure to include the
following points:

• A file is a document, picture, or program that you want to save to your


computer or flash drive so that you can retrieve it later.
• A file saved to your computer or flash drive takes up space on your hard
drive or flash drive.
• A folder is a placeholder or container where you put that file.
• The space -which a folder occupies on your hard drive is equal to the space
occupied by the files that the folder contains.

Outcome: Students can now picture the difference between a file and a folder.

4-3
Lesson 2: Saving Files
Objective: To introduce students to saving files and to make sure that they
understand the difference between Save and Save As.

1. Explain how to save a file, making sure to include the following points:

• “Save” and ”Save As” are menu items in the File menu.
• When saving a file for the first time, use “Save As”.
• The three crucial parts to saving a file are:
o Make sure that you are saving it in the right place in the correct folder.
o Make sure that you are naming it with a name that you will recognize if
you want to find it again.
o Make sure that you are saving it as the right file type. This is a good
time to explain about file formats. Look at the WordPad formats and
explain the difference between text files and rich text files.
 Rich Text files have formatting (such as bolding, paragraphs,
etc.) and must be opened by a word processing program.
 Text Files have no formatting and can be opened by any
program.
 More sophisticated word processors have many more file types.

Student Activity 1: Saving a Document Using Save As

• Click on the Start button.


• Move your cursor down to All Programs and click.
• Click on Accessories. Move down the menu and click on WordPad.
• Type: My class file.
• Click on the File menu (or Menu button in Windows 7) and click on Save As.
• Ensure that the box beside “Save” ( in Windows XP) says “My Documents”
or that the box underneath “Save As” (in Windows 7) says Libraries >
Documents.
• Click in the box beside “File Name” and type the words Class File.
• Click in the box beside “Save as type” and choose the file format Rich Text
Document.
• Click Save.

2. Explain the difference between Save and Save As, making sure to include the
following points:

• “Save” and “Save As” can be found in the File menu in most programs or in
the Menu button in WordPad in Windows 7.
• Use “Save” when you are saving a document that you had previously saved
and want to replace the original document with the updated document.

4-4
• Use “Save As” when:
o you are saving a document for the first time; or
o when you are saving a document that you had previously saved
and want to save the new version and keep the original one.

Note to Instructor: Find a good example for using “Save As”, as this is a difficult
concept. Judge your audience. Some possibilities are:

• If you send a letter to everyone you know at Christmas/New Year’s time you
might want to create a sample letter and save it. You may then want to open
it and delete or add information because you are sending it to a particular
person. You may then want to use “Save As” to save the new letter and
keep the sample letter.
• Another example also works with someone who may be applying for jobs and
creating résumés for particular jobs from a sample resume.

Outcome: Students know where you go to save a document and understand


when you may want to use Save As as opposed to Save.

Lesson 3: Organizing Files

Objective: To explain the principle behind organizing files.

1. Explain why you need to organize your files, making sure to cover the following
points:

• what a file is and why you might want to keep it (eg. a letter you write using
word processing, a picture, or a program)
• keeping all your files in one place
• organizing your files into folders and subfolders

Note to Instructor:
1. It is important to make sure that the student knows what a file is, why you might want
to save it, and why you need to organize your files into folders so you can find things
when you need them.
2. It helps to relate saving electronic files or documents to saving important paper
documents. One way of doing this is to explain that they have a place where they
put physical pieces of paper they need to save. It may be filing cabinet, a drawer, an
expanding or accordion file, or even a shoebox.
3. You can then introduce the concept of organization by explaining that wherever they
keep their papers, they also probably separate them into drawers, folders or
envelopes to keep different types of things together (eg. house-related items
separate from tax items or identification papers.) They need to do the same thing
with electronic files, which is why they need to create folders and subfolders.

4-5
4. Try to think of a physical document which they may want to keep that could also be
electronic. One example might be a letter written to a landlord. Show the parallel
between keeping the physical and electronic documents. For example, the physical
pieces of paper may be saved in a folder or enevelope in which you keep various
house-related documents. Electronically, you can keep the same letter in the same
folders or categories that you used for your physical letter.

Outcome: Students understand the concept of a file as well as the need to


organize their files.

Lesson 4: Introducing Windows Explorer

Objective: To introduce Windows Explorer as the tool Microsoft created to help


you organize your files, and to describe how to access it and what it looks like.

1. Introduce Windows Explorer as the vehicle Windows created to help you manage
your files and folders.

2. Explain again the difference between a file and a folder, making sure to include
the following points:

• a file is a document, a picture, or a program


• a folder is just a place, a way of separating your files

3. Open Windows Explorer and describe it, making sure to include the following
points:

• There are 2 sides or panes.


• The left side lists places and folders only (ie. places where files or documents
can be stored, for example a folder or your USB flash drive)
o + signs (or the white side arrows that appear in Windows 7 when you
place your mouse in the left-hand pane) indicate that a folder has
subfolders that you are not seeing.
o - signs (or black down arrows that appear in Windows 7) indicate that
you are looking at the subfolders, although one of those subfolders
could still have a sub-subfolder.
• The right side displays contents of the item on the left side which has been
clicked on. (tThus, the right side can list subfolders of the folder that you
clicked on, as well as documents or files which have not been placed in
subfolders.)

4-6
Subfolders for
Practice Folder
USB flash
drive

Figure 4-1: Click on the folder “Practice Folder” (on left side) to show the
contents ofPractice Folder (on right side) in Windows Explorer (in XP)

Folders
displayed

Has
subfolders

Figure: 4-2 Plus and Minus signs in Windows XP

4-7
Folders
Displayed

Has
Subfolders

Figure 4-3: Click on “Practice Folder” (on left side) to show the contents of Practice
Folder (on -right side) in Windows Explorer (in Windows 7)

4. Describe the three ways of opening Windows Explorer as:

• Right-clicking on the Start button and left-clicking on Explore


Or
• Left-clicking on the Start button, left-clicking on Computer, and clicking on
folders in the Toolbar
Or
• Left-clicking on the Start button and finding Windows Explorer under All
Programs  Accessories (only in certain versions of Windows)

4-8
Student Activity 2: Opening and Using Windows Explorer to Display Folders and To
View the Contents of a Folder

• RIGHT-click on the Start button or globe and left-click on Explore to open


Windows Explorer.
• Click on the plus sign (Windows XP) or white arrow (Windows 7) beside
“My Documents” to display the subfolder “Classroom Files”.

Note to Instructor: Depending on the computers that you are using, if there is nothing in
My Documents, the + sign will just disappear, or you may have folders like My Pictures
or My Media. However, if you have followed the instructions found at the beginning of
this module, you will have a subfolder called “Classroom Files”.

• Click on the words Documents on the left-hand side. (On the right-hand side
you should see the contents of “Documents”, which should include a
subfolder called “Classroom Files”) – see Figure: 4-4
• Click on the folder Classroom Files on the left-hand side. (On the right-hand
side you should see the contents of Classroom Files, which should include
the document entitled “Opening Windows Explorer.rtf” – see Figure 4-5

My Documents
highlighted
Contents of My
Documents

Figure 4-4: Contents of My Documents

4-9
Classroom Contents of Classroom
Files Files
highlighted

Figure: 4-5 Contents of Classroom Files

Outcome: Students know how to open Windows Explorer, how to click on the
plus sign or white arrow beside a folder to find the subfolders, and how to click
on the name of folder to see the contents on the right-hand side.

Lesson 5: Creating Folders and Moving Files into Folders

Objective: To teach students how to create folders and to move files from one
folder to another

1. Explain how to create a folder, making sure to include the following points:

• The Menu Bar is similar to the Menu Bar in all Windows programs.
• Clicking on File in the Menu Bar will produce a drop-down menu with the word
“New” in it.
• Putting your mouse on the word “New” will bring you a side menu with the
word “Folder” in it.

Student Activity 3: Using Windows Explorer to Create Folders


With Windows Explorer open
• Click on Documents in the left-hand pane to see the contents in the right-
hand pane (side).
• Click on File in the Menu Bar.
• Move the mouse down to “New” in the drop-down menu and then click on
Folder in the menu that opens up to the side.
• You will see on the right-hand side a folder icon with the words “New Folder”
highlighted. DO NOT CLICK!

4-10
• Type: Moved Files
• Press the Enter key on the keyboard.

Instructor’s Note: Most students will want to know where they are typing and will want to
click somewhere. It is important to emphasize that because the words “New Folder” are
highlighted and flashing, typing the name of the folder will replace “New Folder”.
However, this will only work if they DO NOT click with the mouse. If they click, they will
be naming the folder “New Folder”.

2. Show students how to move a file from one folder to another by moving the file
“Opening Windows Explorer” from the folder Classroom Files to the folder
Moved Files.

Student Activity 4: Moving a File from one Folder to Another Using Windows Explorer

• Find the file “Opening Windows Explorer” by clicking on the plus sign or
white arrow beside “Documents” on the left-hand side and then clicking on
Classroom Files.
• Click on the file Opening Windows Explorer on the right-hand side.
• Click on Edit in the Menu Bar.
• Click on Cut (noting that when cutting files, unlike when cutting text, what you
cut does not immediately disappear; rather, the icon beside the file becomes
dim).
• Find the folder Moved Files on the left-hand side and click on it.

Note to Instructor: At this point it would be good to ask them why the right-hand side of
the screen is blank when they click on it, (and wait for them to answer that it’s because
they have just created the folder and there is nothing in it yet). If they can figure this out
themselves, it aids their understanding.

• Click on Edit in the Menu Bar and move down the drop-down menuand click
on Paste.
• Find the folder Classroom Files on the left-hand side and click. Note that the
file “Opening Windows Explorer” is no longer there.

Note to Instructor: Obviously your students cannot do this exercise at home, as they
will not have created the folder “Classroom Files”, nor the file “Opening Windows
Explorer”. Remind them that they cannot duplicate this at home, but that in their
“Classroom Handouts and Activities” handout, they have an Activity 4 which they can do
at home.

Student Activity 4 (at home): Moving a File from one Folder to Another Using Windows
Explorer

• Find the file “Class File” by clicking on My Documents on the left-hand side
• Click on the file Class File on the right-hand side

4-11
• Click on Edit in the Menu Bar.
• Click on Cut (noting that when cutting files, unlike when cutting text, what you cut
does not immediately disappear; rather, the icon beside the file becomes dim).
• Find the folder Moved Files on the left-hand side and click on it.
• Click on Edit in the Menu Bar and move down the drop-down menu and click on
Paste.
• Find the folder Documents on the left-hand side and click. Note that the file “Class
File” is no longer there.

3. End this section by summing up what we have just learned about Windows
Explorer making sure to include the following points:

• You can use Windows Explorer to:

o to look at folders and their contents


o to create new folders, and
o to move files from one folder to another folder.

Outcome: Students now know how to create a new folder in Windows Explorer
and how to move items from one folder to another.

Lesson 6: Copying, Opening and Deleting Files or Folders

Objective: To show students that they can use Windows Explorer to open files, to
copy files from one folder to another, and to delete files or folders.

1. Explain that you can use Windows Explorer to copy files in one folder to another
folder by using Copy and Paste, making sure to include the following points:

• In general, copying files is not a good thing to do because:


o the file takes double the amount of space, and
o if you make changes to the file, you will have to remember to change it
in 2 different places
• You can use copying files to preserve important files in a different place. For
example, if you have important pictures that you don’t want to lose, you may
want to copy them onto a flash drive or external hard drive in case your hard
drive fails or your computer is stolen.

2. Explain that you can use Windows Explorer to open programs by double-clicking
on the icon beside the name of the file. This is particularly useful if you can’t
identify the file by its name.

4-12
Student Activity 5: Opening Files Using Windows Explorer

• Find the folder Moved Files on the left-hand side and click on it.
• Look at the contents of Moved Files on the right-hand side and open the file
“Opening Windows Explorer” by double-clicking on the icon beside it.
• Close the file “Opening Windows Explorer” by clicking on the X in the top
right-hand corner.

Note to Instructor: Point out to students that they cannot duplicate this particular
activity at home, but that in their “Classroom Handouts and Activities” handout, they
have an Activity 5 which they can do at home for practice.

Activity 5 (at home): Opening Files Using Windows Explorer

• Find the folder Moved Files on the left-hand side and click on it.
• Look at the contents of Moved Files on the right-hand side and open the file “Class
File” by double-clicking on the icon beside it.
• Close the file “Class File” by clicking on the X in the top right-hand corner.

3. Explain that you can also use Windows Explorer to delete files by:

• Finding a file by clicking on its folder on the left-hand side


• Selecting the file by clicking on it on the right-hand hand side
• Pressing the Delete key on your keyboard

4. Explain that you can also delete folders by selecting them and pressing the
Delete key. Make sure to warn your students that although folders can appear
on either the left- or right-hand side, it is recommended that they only delete
them from the left-hand side.

Note to Instructor: Ask your students why you are recommending that you only delete
folders from the left-hand side. Ask them what happens when you click on a folder on
the left-hand side. The answer that you are trying to lead them to is that when you
delete a folder, you delete everything that’s in the folder, and that when you delete a
folder from the left-hand side, you have to select it by clicking on it first, and you
automatically will see the contents before you delete it.

Student Activity 6: Deleting Folders Using Windows Explorer

• Find the folder Classroom Files on the left-hand side and click on it, noting
the contents on the right-hand side.
• Press the Delete key.
• Note the Windows information box warning you that deleting the folder will not
only delete the folder but all its contents. Click on OK.

4-13
Note to Instructor: Point out to students that they cannot duplicate this particular activity
at home, but that in their “Classroom Handouts and Activities” handout, they have an
Activity 6 which they can do at home for practice.

Activity 6 (at home): Deleting Folders Using Windows Explorer

•Find the folder Moved Files on the left-hand side and click on it, noting the contents on
the right-hand side.
•Press the Delete key.
•Note the Windows information box warning you that deleting the folder will not only
delete the folder but all its contents. This includes the file “Class File”.Click on OK.

Also point out that they have an Information Sheet at the end of their “Classroom
Handouts and Activities” which goes over all the functions of Windows Explorer that
have been discussed in class.

Outcome: Students can open files inside of Windows Explorer and can delete
files and folders in Windows Explorer.

4-14
MODULE 4 : CLASSROOM HANDOUTS AND ACTIVITES
Activity 1: Saving a Document Using Save As

• Click on the Start button.


• Move your cursor down to All Programs and click.
• Click on Accessories. Move down the menu and click on WordPad.
• Type: My class file.
• Click on the File menu (or Menu button in Windows 7) and click on Save As.
• Ensure that the box beside “Save As” (in Windows XP) says “My
Documents” or that the box underneath “Save As” (in Windows 7) says
“Libraries > Documents”
• Click in the box beside “File Name” and type the words: Class File.
• Click in the box beside “Save as type” and choose the file format Rich Text
Document.
• Click on the Save button.

Activity 2: Opening and Using Windows Explorer to Display Folders and To View the
Contents of a Folder

• RIGHT-click on the Start button or globe and left-click on Open Windows


Explorer to open Windows Explorer.
• Click on the plus sign (Windows XP) or white arrow (Windows 7) beside
“My Documents”. (In the classroom you should see the subfolder “Classroom
Files”; at home you will probably see something different.)
• Click on the word Documents on the left-hand side. On the right-hand side
you should see the contents of Documents. (In the class you should see the
folder Classroom Files and the file “Class File”. At home you should see
different folders and the file “Class File”.)
• (In class only) Click on the folder Classroom Files on the left-hand side. (On
the right-hand side you should see the contents of Classroom Files, which
should include the document, entitled “Opening Windows Explorer.rtf”.
Illustrations Describing Folders Display in Windows Explorer

In Windows XP

Folders Contents
Displayed of
Verbatim

Has
Subfolders

In Windows 7

Contents of
Practice
Folder

Folders
Displayed

Has
Subfolders Activity
3: Using Windows Explorer to Create FoldersWith Windows Explorer open

• Click on Documents in the left-hand pane to see the contents in the right-
hand pane (side).
• Click on File in the Menu Bar.
• Move the mouse down to “New” in the drop-down menu and then click on
Folder in the menu that opens up to the side.
• You will see on the right-hand side a folder icon with the words “New Folder”
highlighted. DO NOT CLICK!
• Type: Moved Files.
• Press the Enter key on the keyboard.

Activity 4 (In class only): Moving a File from one Folder to Another Using Windows
Explorer

• Find the file “Opening Windows Explorer” by clicking on the plus sign or
white arrow beside “Documents” on the left-hand side and then clicking on
Classroom Files.
• Click on the file Opening Windows Explorer on the right-hand side.
• Click on Edit in the Menu Bar.
• Click on Cut (noting that when cutting files, unlike when cutting text, what you
cut does not immediately disappear; rather, - the icon beside the file becomes
dim).
• Find the folderMoved Files on the left-hand side and click on it.
• Click on Edit in the Menu Bar and move down the drop-down menu and click
on Paste.
• Find the folder Classroom Files on the left-hand - side and click. -Note that
the file “Opening Windows Explorer” is no longer there.

Activity 4 (at home): Moving a File from one Folder to Another Using Windows Explorer

• Find the file “Class File” by clicking on Documents on the left-hand side.
• Click on the file Class File on the right-hand side
• Click on Edit in the Menu Bar.
• Click on Cut (noting that when cutting files, unlike when cutting text, what you
cut does not immediately disappear; rather, the icon beside the file becomes
dim).
• Find the folder Moved Files on the left-hand side and click on it.
• Click on Edit in the Menu Bar and move down the drop-down menu and click
on Paste.
• Find the folder Documents on the left-hand side and click. Note that the file
“Class File” is no longer there.

Activity 5 (in class only): Opening Files Using Windows Explorer

• Find the folder Moved Files on the left-hand side and click on it.
• Look at the contents of Moved Files on the right-hand side and open the file
“Opening Windows Explorer” by double-clicking on the icon beside it.
• Close the file “Opening Windows Explorer” by clicking on the X in the top
right-hand corner.
Activity 5 (at home): Opening Files Using Windows Explorer

• Find the folder Moved Files on the left-hand side and click on it.
• Look at the Ccontents of Moved Files on the right-hand side and open the file
“Class File” by double-clicking on the icon beside it.
• Close the file “Class File” by clicking on the X in the top right-hand corner.

Activity 6 (in class only): Deleting Folders Using Windows Explorer

• Find the folder Classroom Files on the left-hand side and click on it, noting
the contents on the right-hand side.
• Press the Delete key.
• Note the Windows information box warning you that deleting the folder will not
only delete the folder but all its contents. Click on OK.

Activity 6 (at home): Deleting Folders Using Windows Explorer

• Find the folder Moved Files on the left-hand side and click on it. noting the
contents on the right-hand side.
• Press the Delete key.
• Note the Windows information box warning you that deleting the folder will not
only delete the folder but all its contents. This includes the file “Class File”.
Click on OK.
INFORMATION SHEET

Using Windows Explorer to Organize Your Files

Opening Windows Explorer

• Open Windows Explorer from the “Programs” menu (or right-click


on the “Start” button or the Computer icon on your desktop) and
left-click on “Explore” or “Open Windows Explorer”.
• The left-hand pane is a hierarchical organization of your computer
(includes folders only, no files):
o + or means subfolders are available in that folder
o – or means all folders have been displayed at that
level.
• The right-hand pane lists all folders or files of the highlighted
folder.

Saving Files

• Saving files for first time is “Save As”.


• “Save” will save the previously saved item in the same place as
before, wiping out the original.
• When saving a file, always remember to check that the “Save in”
box is correct, (eg. Libraries > Documents)
Failure to change to the correct folder can make it difficult to
find the file when needed.

Opening files

• Put the cursor on the word File in the File menu and click. Move
down the drop-down menu toOpen and click.
• If you do not get the dialog box with the “Look in” box in it, click on
the box labeled “Browse”.
• Make sure that you have the correct folder in the “Look in” box.
The file should appear in the big white box below the “Look in”
box.
• You can also open a file by finding it in Windows Explorer and
double-clicking on its icon.

Moving Files

• To move a file using Windows Explorer:


o Highlight the file you wish to move by clicking on it.
o Click on Edit in the Menu Bar.
o Click on Cut (Ctrl +C).
o Highlight the folder to which you wish to move the file.
o Click on Edit in the Menu Bar .
o Click on Paste (Ctrl +V).

Deleting files

• Deleting files must be done from a place where a file can be


highlighted (eg. Windows Explorer, or the big white box when you
are opening or saving files.)
• Highlight the file that you want to delete and press the Delete key.
• You can also, if your screen is not taking up the whole window,
left-click on the file and drag it to the Recycle Bin icon.
MODULE 4 : SUPPLEMENTARY RESOURCES AND
ACTIVITIES
Older Adults Training Curriculum

Module 4: Lessons 4-6 Opening Windows Explorer and Practicing Saving Files,
Creating Folders, Moving Files from one Folder to Another, and Deleting Folders.

1. Save an nternet page as an archived file inside a folder called “Windows


Explorer Practice”.

1. Open your browser.


2. Click on File.
3. Click on Save As.
4. Click on Documents in the left-hand margin so that “Libraries >
Documents” appears in the window underneath the words “Save
Webpage”.
5. Click on the words New Folder.
6. While “New folder” is blue and flashing, type: Windows Explorer Practice
Press Enter.
7. Double-click on the folder beside the words “Windows Explorer Practice”
so that “Windows Explorer Practice” now appears in the window above.
8. Click in the box labelled “File Name” and type: Internet Page. Click on the
down arrow beside the box labelled “Save as type” and choose Web
archive single file.
9. Click on the Save button.

2. Open Windows Explorer

1. Right-click on the Start button or globe.


2. Left-click click on Explore or Open Windows Explorer.

3. Create a new folder called Sample inside the folder labeled Windows
Explorer Practice

1. On left-hand side look for the folder called “Documents”.


2. Click on the plus sign beside it (or the white arrow in Windows 7).
3. Click on the folder Windows Explorer Practice to see its contents (which
should be blank) on the right-hand side.
4. Click on File in the Menu Bar.
5. Go to New and then Folder and click once.
6. While “New folder” is blue and flashing, type: Sample and press Enter.
7. You should now see a plus sign (or a white arrow pointing to the right in
Windows 7) in the left window beside “Windows Explorer Practice”.
8. Click on the plus sign (or white arrow) to see the folder “Sample” under
the folder “Windows Explorer Practice” on the left-hand side.
4. Move the file Internet Page from the folder called Windows Explorer
Practice to the folder called Sample

1. Look at contents of Windows Explorer Practice by finding it on left-hand


side and clicking on it.
2. Click once on the file Internet Page on the right-hand side.
3. Click on Edit in the Menu Bar and click on Cut.
4. Find the folder “Sample” on the left-hand side (you may have to click on
the plus sign (or arrow) beside “Windows Explorer Practice” to see it) and
click on the folder or the word Sample
5. Click on Edit in the Menu Bar and click on Paste.
6. (You will now find the file has disappeared from the folder “Windows
Explorer Practice” and is in the subfolder “Sample”.)

5. Open the file Internet Page from the folder Sample

1. Find the Sample folder on the left-hand side and click on it.
2. You should see the file “Internet Page”. Double-click on the icon beside
the words “Internet Page”.
3. Close the file by clicking on the X on the title bar labelled “Internet Page”.

6. Copy the file Internet Page into the folder called Windows Explorer Practice

1. Find the folder called Sample on the left-hand side and click on it.
2. You should see the file “Internet Page” on the right-hand side. Click once
on the words Internet Page so that the file is highlighted.
3. Click on the word Edit in the Menu Bar and click on Copy.
4. Find the contents of Windows Explorer Practice by clicking on it on the
left-hand h side. (You should see the folder “Sample” and nothing else on
the right-hand side.)
5. Click on Edit in the Menu Bbar and click on Paste. The contents of
“Windows Explorer Practice” on the right-hand side should now include
the folder “Sample” and the file “Internet Page”.

7. Delete the folder Sample and all of its contents.

1. Highlight the folder Sample on the left-hand side (not on the right).
2. You should see the content of “Sample”, which should be “Internet Page”
on the right-hand side. Press the Delete key on your keyboard.
3. You should see a Windows Information box which says “Are you sure you
want to delete the folder Sample and all of its contents”. Click on the Yes
button.
MODULE 5 : INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNET

5-1
MODULE 5 : LESSON PLAN

5-2
MODULE 5: INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNET

Students will be introduced to the internet. They will learn how to access it using
Internet Explorer and the Internet Explorer Toolbar.

Note to Instructor: This module covers using Internet Explorer and its Toolbars. If you
find, after working through this module, that your version of Internet Explorer is missing
some of the Toolbar functions, you can use Appendix A for Module 5 instead. That
alternative version will use Internet Explorer menus for opening new windows and tabs,
printing, and accessing the Find function, Text Size, Zoom , and View Source features.

Lesson 1: What is the Internet?

Objective: To introduce students to the internet, the range of its content, and
some common terminology.

1. Explain to your students what the internet is, making sure to include the following
points:

• The internet is simply a network of computer networks.


• It is called the World Wide Web because it is like a giant electronic web
connecting computers to each other and allowing information to be created,
stored, searched, accessed, and shared.
• The internet can be accessed through a computer.
• Websites are made up of web pages which contain information in the form of
text, images, and audio and video material.
• The internet is not organized, edited, or controlled by anyone – it consists of
billions of websites created by individuals, companies, and organizations.

2. Ask your students what terms or expressions they have heard to describe the
internet. Add any of the following that they do not mention:

• Sometimes the internet is simply called the web or the net.


• When someone is browsing the internet they might say that they are surfing the
net.
• When someone says: “go online” they usually mean “use the internet”.

3. Describe to your students the wide range of content available on the internet while
emphasizing the need to be a careful consumer. Make sure to include the following
points:

• There are websites on every kind of topic.

5-3
• Websites can provide information or entertainment, sell a product, or promote a
service.
• Internet content is determined by its participants, and as anyone can create a
website:
o not all information is accurate,
o in contrast with other materials found in a library, there is usually no
publisher or careful selection of content .

4. Ask your students what they think they will use the internet for. Here are some items
to add to their list.

• Doing research
• Reading ebooks or listening to audio books
• Reading newspapers or magazines
• Listening to the radio
• Playing games
• Learning a language
• Finding a person or organization
• Banking
• Job searching
• Online dating
• Accessing government information and forms
• Shopping
• Findingtravel information and making reservations
• Social networking (examples are services like Facebook and Twitter)
• Accessing maps and obtaining driving directions
• Staying in touch with family and friends

5. Explain to your students that all of these activities fall into two main categories:
accessing information (browsing) and communication (email and chat). Explain the
definitions of browsing, email and chat making sure to include the following points:

• Accessing information:
o Browsing is viewing websites and following links between their web pages.
To do this you need software called a web browser. There are many
browsers, created by different companies, to choose from (eg.: Internet
Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc.). We will focus on Internet Explorer.

• Communication:
o Email is electronic mail that can be sent to, or received from, family,
friends, and colleagues. You can use software to manage email on your
personal computer or a web-based email account to access email from
any computer. This will be explored further in Module 7.

5-4
o Chat is sending and receiving instant messages using a website or
software on your computer.

New Vocabulary
Browsing, Chat, Email, Web Browser, Web Pages, Websites, World Wide Web

Outcome:
Students now have a basic understanding of what the internet is, are aware of the
range of its content and the variety of its uses, and understand some common
terminology.

Lesson 2: Internet Explorer

Objective: To introduce students to the following concepts: browser, URL, and


hyperlink.

1. Explain to students what a browser and URL are, making sure to include the
following points:

• Internet Explorer is a web browser.


• A browser is software installed on your computer that lets you view websites on
the internet.
• Every website has an address - sometimes it is called a web address, a URL, or
a domain name.
• The best way to access a specific website is to tell Internet Explorer to go directly
to the website’s address.
• It is important to type the complete address in the Address Bar.
• A URL never contains any spaces.
• A web address is made up of three parts:
o Server: the beginning of the address – it is usually “www”, which stands
for “World Wide Web”
o Owner: this is the middle of the address and it tells you about the person,
company, or organization that owns the website.
o Type: the end of the address can tell you a bit about the source of the
website and its purpose.
• Examples of types of websites:
.ca – primarily Canadian websites
.com – used by commercial websites
.gov – American government websites
.edu – American university websites
.org – non-profit organization
.gov.on.ca – Ontario Provincial Government

5-5
.gc.ca – Canadian Federal Government

• Examples of web addresses:


www.biblioottawalibrary.ca
www.cbc.ca
www.octranspo.com
www.amazon.com
www.heritagecanada.org
www.gc.ca
www.weatheroffice.gc.ca

Student Activity 1: Opening a Website

• Click on the Start button.


• Click on All Programs.
• Click on Internet Explorer.
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.biblioottawalibrary.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key.

Type the complete “Go To” arrow


address Address Bar

Figure 5-1: Address Bar

2. Explain to students what a hyperlink is, making sure to include the following points:

• A hyperlink is usually just called a link.


• A link is an element (a button, image, or piece of text) on a web page.
• When you hover over a link, your cursor changes from an arrow to a hand with a
pointing finger.
• When you click on a link, you will be brought to a different page within that
website or to a different website.
5-6
Student Activity 2: Using Hyperlinks

On the Ottawa Public Library website (www.biblioottawalibrary.ca)


• Place your cursor on the words Continue in English so that the cursor changes
from an arrow to a pointing hand.
• Click ONCE to enter the Library’s website.
• Place your cursor on the word Browse in the web page’s Menu Bar and click.
• Click ONCE on the word Catalogue to go to the Library’s catalogue.
• Click on New Titles (near the top of the screen) to see new items that the Library
has recently purchased.
• Click on General Fiction – On Order to go to a page listing all of the new novels
that the Library has ordered recently.
• Click on Published Date and then 2013 to only see the novels that were
published in 2013.

New Vocabulary
Domain name, Hyperlink, Link, URL, Web address.

Outcome:
Students are now familiar with the concepts of a browser, URL, and hyperlink.
They know how to use a browser to access the internet and how to use
hyperlinks.

Lesson 3: Viewing Multiple Pages with Windows and Tabs

Objective: To teach students the difference between tabs and windows.

1. Explain the difference between windows and tabs, making sure to include the
following points:

• You can have more than one web page open at once.
• There are two ways to open an additional web page:
o open a new window by clicking on the Internet Explorer icon on the
Taskbar, or
o open a new tab by clicking on the New tab button beside the existing tabs.
• Having many windows open tends to clutter up the Taskbar and slow down your
computer.
• Tabs are preferable because they allow you to have several web pages open
within one Internet Explorer window.

5-7
Student activity 3: Using Windows and Tabs

• Open an extra window by using one of two methods:


o In the Taskbar (at the bottom), RIGHT-click on the Internet Explorer
icon and then LEFT-click on Internet Explorer, or
o In the Toolbar (near the top), click on Page and New Window.
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.cbc.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key.
• Open a new tab by clicking on the New Tab button beside the existing tabs.
Notice how the new tab appears inside the window.
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ctv.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key.
• Click on each tab and notice how both websites are open in the same window.
• Look at the Taskbar and place your mouse on the Internet Explorer icon. Click on
the original Internet Explorer window to see the page that appeared when you
first opened Internet Explorer.
• Click on the CBC/CTV window again.
• Click on the X on the CTV tab to close it.
• Click on the X in the top right corner of the Internet Explorer window (containing
the CBC website) to close the whole window.

Page

New Window

Figure 5-2: Opening a New Window

Tabs in use Close tab


New tab

5-8
Figure 5-3 (Tabs in Use) and 5-3a (All Open Webpages)

New window Taskbar

Windows in use
Figure 5-4: Windows XP

Lesson 4: Using the Internet Explorer Toolbar for Navigation

Objective: To teach your students how to use the Internet Explorer Toolbar for
navigation by introducing them to the Back and Forward buttons, as well as the
Recent Pages, Stop, Refresh and Home buttons.

5-9
Instructor’s Note
There are several browsers to choose from. Internet Explorer 8.1 was used during the
creation of this training manual. It is important to remember that websites may look
different in different browsers. It is also important to note that different browsers, and
even different versions of the same browser, have different Menu Bar and Toolbar
options. All of the following navigation tools should be present in different browsers, but
they may be accessed in different ways. If your version of Internet Explorer does not
have the same Toolbar, see Appendix A for alternate activities using the Menu Bar.

1. Show your students the Toolbar, making sure to include the following points:

• The Toolbar contains buttons to help you find, view, and print information
from web pages.
• What appears on the Toolbar will depend on the version of Internet Explorer
that you have.

2. Explain to your students how to use the Back and Forward buttons. Make sure
to include the following points:

• The Back button allows you to move back through the series of web pages
that you have visited.
• This is helpful when you want to return to a page you were just on or if a page
is not loading properly.
• The Forward button allows you to move forward through the series of web
pages that you have visited – but you must go back before you can go
forward.
• If you cannot find a page that you were on by using these buttons, try using
the Recent Pages function instead.

Student Activity 4: Using the Back and Forward Buttons

• Click on the Back button twice to move back two pages.


• Click on the Forward button twice to move forward again.

3. Explain to your students how to use the Recent Pages button, making sure to
include the following points:

• Recent Pages allows you to see a complete list of the web pages that you
have visited since opening Internet Explorer.
• You can use the Recent Pages list to revisit a web page without using the
Back button to scroll through many websites.
• Select a site from the drop-down list to go back to that page.

Student Activity 5: Using the Recent Pages Button

5-10
• Click on the Recent pages button.
• Select New Titles to return to the New Titles web page.

Back Forward Recent Pages button


Toolbar
List of recent pages

Figure 5-5: Previous Pages

4. Explain to your students how to use the Stop and Refresh buttons. Make sure to
include the following points:

• The Stop button will stop a web page from opening.


• The Refresh button will make the current page reopen.
• Refreshing the web page is useful when you want to see the most updated
version of the web page.
• You may also wish to stop and refresh a web page when it is taking too long
to open.

Instructor’s note:
Leave the following section (point 5) out if it is not possible to change the Home Page
on the computer that you are teaching with. If your students have their own computers
at home, tell them that they can do Activity 6 in their “Classroom Handouts and
Activities” on their own.

5. Explain to your students how to use the Home button. Make sure to include the
following points:

• The Home Page is the page that opens every time you open an Internet
Explorer window.
• The default Home Page is probably the company website of your internet
service provider , but you can change the Home Page to any web page that
you want.
5-11
• It is a good idea to choose a page that you like to visit often (eg. The Weather
Network, CBC, the Ottawa Public Library, Google, your web-based email,
etc.)
• You can only choose a Home Page for your personal computer – it is not
available on public library computers.

Student Activity 6: Selecting a Home Page

• Click on the Home button to return to the current Home Page.


• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.cbc.ca
• Click on the arrow beside the Home button to access the Home Page menu.
• Click on Add or Change Home Page...
• Select Use this webpage as your only home page.
• Click Yes.
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ottawa.ca
• Click on the Home button to return to the new Home Page that you chose.

Refresh Stop
Home Home Page menu

Change Home Page

Figure 5-6: Stop, Refresh, and Home

Use this webpage as


your Home Page

5-12
Figure 5-7: Home Page
New Vocabulary
Internet Service Provider, Refresh

Outcome: Students now understand how to use the Back and Forward arrows, as
well as the Recent Pages, Stop, Refresh and Home buttons.

Lesson 5: Printing with Internet Explorer


Objective: To show your students how to print web pages using Internet Explorer.

1. Tell your students that you will show them three ways to print information from
the internet, making sure to include the following points:

• The most direct way to print information from a web page is to simply click on
the Print icon on the Internet Explorer Toolbar; however, this is not
recommended because:
o Web pages are all made by different people, using different software,
so they will not all look the same when printed as they do on the
screen.
o Often only parts of the web page will print.
o Some pages contain advertising or lots of blank space that you do not
need.
• When you click on the Print drop-down menu, a Print box will appear with 4
printing options:
o “All” (all pages will be printed)
o “Selection” (prints only a section of text that you have highlighted)
o “Current Page” (the page that the cursor is on will be printed)
o “Pages” (you must enter the range of page numbers you wish to print)

2. Explain to your students what Print Preview is for, making sure to include the
following points:

• Print Preview lets you see how the website content will fit on a printed page.
• Seeing how a website will print can help you to avoid wasting paper on blank
pages and advertising.
• Look at the bottom of the Print Preview window to see how many printed
pages will be required to print the whole document.
• Use the “Next Page” and “Previous Page” buttons to see how all of the pages
will look. Take note of the ones that you would like to print.

Student Activity 7: Printing (Print Preview)

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
5-13
• Type: www.ottawa.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key.
• Click on Public Swimming Schedules.
• Underneath the hyperlink “Swim Type”, click on the down arrow to get a drop-
down list.
• Select 50+ Swim.
• Click on Search Schedules.
• Click on the menu arrow beside the Print button.
• Click on Print Preview to see how the page will look when it prints.

Print menu
Print button arrow
Print Preview

Figure 5-8: Deciding to Print

5-14
Next age
Print Previous Page

Figure 5-9: Print Preview

• If possible click on the Next Page arrow to see how all of the pages will look
when they are printed.
• Click on the X in the top right corner to close “Print Preview”.
• Click on the arrow beside the Print button.
• Click on Print...
• In this case, the page being printed appears well in Print Preview and all of
the information fits on one page, so under “Page Range” select All.
• Click on the arrows beside the “Number of copies” box to select the number
of copies that you would like to print.
• Click on the Print button (or the Cancel button if you do not wish to print).

5-15
Selected printer

Select number of copies

Select which
pages to print

Print
Figure 5-10: Print Box

Note to Instructor: Knowing how to copy and paste into WordPad or Word is a very
useful thing for your students to know if Print Preview or Selection is not working for
them. However, if you feel this would be too advanced for your students, you can omit
point 3 below.

3. Explain to your students that if the information on the web page does not appear
properly in Print Preview, it is preferable to copy it from the web page and paste it
into a word processing program like WordPad in order to print it.

Student Activity 8: Printing (Copy and Paste)

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ottawa.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Highlight the text that you wish to print.
• Copy the highlighted text by using the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+C.
• Open WordPad.
• In WordPad, place the cursor where you would like the text to be.
• Use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+V to paste the text.
• Click on File in the Menu Bar and then click on Print.

5-16
Print..
File

Figure 5-11: Printing in WordPad

Print

Figure 5-12: Print Box in Wordpad

New Vocabulary
Print Preview

Outcome: Students now know how to use Print Preview and Print to print web
pages.

5-17
Lesson 6: Using the Find on this Page Function.
Objective: To show students how to use the Internet Explorer Toolbar to find a
specific word on a web page.

1. Explain to your students how to use the Find on this Page function. Show them
how to find it and demonstrate a search. Make sure to include the following
points:

• Find on this Page lets you find a specific word on a web page – everywhere
that it appears.
o This is helpful when there is a lot of text on a page and you wish to see
only the section that is relevant to your search.

Find on this Page Search Options

Figure 5-13: Find on this Page

Student Activity 9: Find on this page

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.biblioottawalibrary.ca/en
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on Browse in the web page’s Menu Bar.
• Click on Online resources in the left-hand margin.
• Click on the Search Options arrow and select Find on Page. (If there is no
search options arrow, press the keys CTRL +F. A search box will appear on
the left side of the Toolbar or on top of the web page.)
• Click in the search box.
• Type: newspapers
• Notice how the word is highlighted on the web page.
• Toggle between the highlighted words by repeatedly clicking on Next or by
pressing the Enter key.

5-18
• The word that your cursor is on is highlighted in red, blue or black; the others
are highlighted in yellow.
Find on page search box

Figure 5-14: Results of Find on this Page

Outcome: Students now know where to find Find on this Page and how to use it.

5-19
Lesson 7: Using Text Size and Zoom
Objective: To show students how to use the Text Size and Zoom
features in Internet Explorer to make web pages more readable.

Note to Instructor: Text Size and Zoom should be found on all Internet Explorer
Toolbars but, depending on the version, they may not be in the exact same place as
shown. Once found however, the options should be the same.

1. Explain to students that the Text Size function is available to make the text on a
web page bigger or smaller. Be sure to include the following points:

• Text Size only changes the size of the text – images and borders will stay the
same.
• This may cause some distortion on the web page, as this is not the way that
the web page was intended to be viewed.
• Some text or images may be harder to view due to overlapping.

Student Activity 10: Text Size

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: ottawa.bibliocommons.com
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on the Page button on the Toolbar.
• Place the cursor on Text Size until the size options appear and click on
Largest.
• Select Medium to return to the original size.
Text Size Size options

5-15:
Figure 5 -15: Text Size
5-20
2. Explain to students that the Zoom function is available to make the whole web
page appear larger or smaller. Be sure to include the following points:

• Zoom is like a magnifier – it does not make any one element on the page
bigger or smaller but brings the whole page closer to you.
• When you zoom in, you may have to scroll left and right as well as up and
down to see the whole page.
• It is useful to zoom in on a specific part of a web page to see it more clearly.

Student Activity 11: Zoom

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.octranspo.com
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on English.
• Click on Routes and Maps.
• Click on the Page button on the Toolbar.
• Place the cursor on Zoom until the options appear.
• Click on 200%.
• Select 100% to return to the original size.
Zoom Zoom options

Figure 5-16: Text Zoom

5-21
Outcome: Students now know 2 ways of making the web page more readable if
they are having problems viewing smaller print.

Lesson 8: Using View Source


Objective: To show your students why they need to use a web browser by
activating the View Source option.

1. Explain to students why web pages can only be read using a browser, making
sure to include the following points:

• We need software to view websites because they are written in a computer


language, or code, that a browser interprets for us. Internet Explorer is one
example of a browser.
• Without a browser, you would just see text and symbols that make up the
code.
• The code that you see in View Source is just one of the languages that
computer programmers use to create software and websites.

Student Activity 12: Using View Source

• Remain on the OC Transpo website.


• Click on the Page button.
• Click on View Source.
View Source

Figure 5-17: Find View Source


5-22
Figure 5-18: A Web page Without a Browser

Outcome:
Students now understand why they need a program called a web browser to
access the Internet.

Note to Instructor:
1. Please make copies of the form below, which is also found in the “Classroom
Handouts and Activities” handout for Module 5. Give this form to your students,
and if time allows, have them fill it out in class. If that does not work, tell them to
fill it out and bring it back when you teach Module 6. This will give you time to
create their Gmail accounts. Be sure to ask them for phone numbers and good
times to call, as you may have to have Google phone them with a verification
code to complete the Gmail account.
2. Although this is the end of Module 5, you will find a lesson on creating and using
favourites in Appendix B. If your students have asked you about creating
favourites, or if they have their own computers and you feel that they might be
interested in creating favourites, you may want to include this in this lesson or at
least give them the “Classroom Handouts and Activities” section and the
“Supplementary Resources and Activities” section of Appendix B.

5-23
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5-24
Web-based Email Questionnaire

In order to finish this Module, you must have a Gmail account. This is not the same as the
email account from your Internet Service Provider or another web-based email account like
Hotmail or Yahoo. To ensure that the workshop runs smoothly, we will be setting up an
account for you ahead of time. To set up the account we need you to answer the following 4
questions:

Please Answer all 4 Questions:

1. What is your first and last name?

_______________________ _________________________

first name last name

2. What do you want to use as your Gmail address? (This should ideally be some form of
your name. Please be specific. Using just a first name will not do, as there are hundreds
of millions of gmail accounts and each one must be unique.)

______________________________________________

3.What do you want to use as your password? (It should be at least 8 digits long. Upper
and lower case letters can be used but cannot be substituted for each other.)

__________________________________________

4. What is your date of birth?

_________________________________________

5-25
To Log into your Gmail account, go to www.gmail.com

In the box for Username or Email, type the username as it appears in Question 1. You do not
need the @gmail.com to sign in

In the box for Password, type your password.

Click on the button labelled “Sign in”.

5-26
MODULE 5 : CLASSROOM HANDOUTS AND ACTIVITIES
Activity 1: Opening a Website

• Click on the Start button (globe).


• Click on All Programs.
• Click on Internet Explorer.
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.biblioottawalibrary.ca.
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.

Internet Explorer Address Bar

Activity 2: Using Hyperlinks


On the Ottawa Public Library website (www.biblioottawalibrary.ca):
• Place your cursor on the words Continue in English so that the cursor changes
from an arrow to a pointing hand.
• Click ONCE to enter the Library’s website.
• Place your cursor on the word Browse in the web page’s Menu Bar and click.
• Click ONCE on the word Catalogue to go to the Library’s catalogue.
• Click on New Titles (near the top of the screen) to see new items that the Library
has recently purchased.
• Click on General Fiction – On Order to go to a page listing all the new novels
that the Library has ordered recently.
• Click on Published Date and then 2013 to only see the novels that were
published in 2013.
Activity 3: Using Windows and Tabs

• Open an extra window by using one of two methods:


o In the Taskbar (at the bottom) right-click on the Internet Explorer icon
and then left-click on Internet Explorer.
or
o In the Toolbar (near the top) click on Page and New Window
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.cbc.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key..
• Open a new tab by clicking on the New Tab button beside the existing tabs.
Notice how the new tab appears inside the window.
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ctv.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key.
• Click on each tab and notice how both websites are open in the same window.
• Look at the Taskbar and place your mouse on the Internet Explorer icon. Click on
the original Internet Explorer window to see the page that appeared when you
first opened Internet Explorer.
• Click on the CBC/CTV window again.
• Click on the X on the CTV tab to close it.
• Click on the X in the top right corner of the Internet Explorer window (containing
the CBC website) to close the whole window.

Windows and Tabs

Tabs in Use X to Close Click on New


Tab Tab box to open
new tab
Placing mouse here will bring up pictures of all tabs and
windows open in Windows 7

New Window Taskbar

Windows in use (Windows XP)

Activity 4: Using the Back and Forward Buttons

• Click on the Back button twice to move back two pages.


• Click on Forward button twice to move forward again.

Activity 5: Using the Recent Pages Button

• Click on the Recent pages button.


• Select New Titles to return to the New Titles web page.
Navigating with the Internet Explorer Toolbar

Back button Stop loading


Forward button
Refresh web page

Recent
Pages
button
(arrow)
List of recent pages

Activity 6: Selecting a Home Page


(This can only be done on your own computer, not on a City of Ottawa computer)

• Click on the Home button to return to the current Home Page.


• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.cbc.ca
• Click on the arrow beside the Home button to access the Home Page menu.
• Click on Add or Change Home Page...
• Select Use this web page as your only home page.
• Click Yes.
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ottawa.ca
• Click on the Home button to return to the new Home Page that you chose.

Activity 7: Printing (Print Preview)

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ottawa.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key.
• Click on Public Swimming Schedules.
• Underneath the hyperlink “Swim Type”, click on the down arrow to get a drop-
down list.
• Select 50+ Swim.
• Click on Search Schedules.
• Click on the menu arrow beside the Print button.
• Click on Print Preview to see how the page will look when it prints.
• If possible, click on Next Page to see how all of the pages will look when they
are printed.
• Click on the X in the top right corner to close Print Preview.
• Click on the arrow beside the Print button.
• Click on Print...
• In this case, the page being printed appears well in Print Preview and all of the
information fits on one page, so under “Page Range” select All.
• Click on the arrows beside the “Number of copies” box to select the number of
copies that you would like to print.
• Click on the Print button (or the Cancel button if you do not wish to print).

Print Box

Choose your
printer

Select number
of copies

Select
which
pages to
print

Print Button
Activity 8: Printing (Copy and Paste)

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ottawa.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key.
• Highlight the text that you wish to print.
• Copy the highlighted text by using the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+C.
• Open WordPad.
• In WordPad, place the cursor where you would like the text to be.
• Use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+V to paste the text.
• Click on File in the Menu Bar and then click on Print.

Activity 9: Find on this page

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.biblioottawalibrary.ca/en
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on Browse in the web page’s Menu Bar.
• Click on Online resources in the left-hand margin.
• Click on the Search Options arrow and select Find on Page. (If there is no
search options arrow, press the keys CTRL +F. A search box will appear on
the left side of the Toolbar or on top of the web page.)
• Click in the search box.
• Type: newspapers
• Notice how the word is highlighted on the web page.
• Toggle between the highlighted words by repeatedly clicking on Next or by
pressing the Enter key.
• The word that your cursor is on is highlighted in red, blue or black; the others
are highlighted in yellow.

Activity 10: Text Size

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: ottawa.bibliocommons.com
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on the Page button on the Toolbar.
• Place the cursor on Text Size until the size options appear and click on
Largest.
• Select Medium to return to the original size.
Activity 11: Zoom

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.octranspo.com
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on English.
• Click on Routes and Maps.
• Click on the Page button on the Toolbar.
• Place the cursor on Zoom until the options appear.
• Click on 200%.
• Select 100% to return to the original size.

Activity 12: Using View Source

• Remain on the OC Transpo website.


• Click on the Page button.
• Click on View Source.
• The code that you see in “View Source” is just one of the languages that
computer programmers use to create software and websites.
This form is to be filled out and returned to your instructor before you begin Module 6.

Web-based Email Form

In order to start Module 7, you must have a Gmail account. This is not the same as the
email account from your Internet Service Provider or another web-based email account
such as Hotmail or Yahoo. To ensure that the workshop runs smoothly, we will be
setting up an account for you ahead of time. To set up the account we need you to
answer the following 4 questions:

Please Answer all 4 Questions:

1. What is your first and last name?

_______________________ _________________________
first name last name

2. What do you want to use as your Gmail address? (This should ideally be some
form of your name. Please be specific. Using just a first name will not do, as
there are hundreds of millions of Gmail accounts and each one must be unique.)

______________________________________________

3.What do you want to use as your password? (It should be at least 8 digits long.
Upper and lower case letters can be used but cannot be substituted for each other..)

__________________________________________

4. What is your date of birth?

_________________________________________
To Log into your Gmail account, go to www.gmail.com

In the box for Username or Email, type the username as it appears in Question 1. You
do not need the @gmail.com to sign in

In the box for Password, type your password.

Click on the button labelled “Sign in”.


MODULE 6 : EXPLORING THE INTERNET

6-1
MODULE 6 : LESSON PLAN

6-2
MODULE 6: EXPLORING THE INTERNET

Instructor’s Note: Make sure that you collect the Web-based email form that you gave
out at the end of the previous module. If any are missing, make sure they are filled out
before the end of this class, as you will need to have already created the accounts
before the beginning of the next module.

Students will be introduced to basic internet searching. They will be taught how
to conduct a keyword search, phrase search, and advanced search. They will
also learn how to evaluate their results.

Lesson 1: Searching the internet

Objective: To teach students about search engines, specifically Google, and to


introduce them to basic internet searching.

1. Explain to students what a search engine is, making sure to include the following
points:

• A search engine is a website where you can:


o Use keywords to search for web pages that contain information that
interests you.
o Search for a specific website when you do not know its address.
• Search engines are created and managed by different companies, so they
provide different results and present the results in different ways.
• No search engine can search the entire internet.
• They cannot search library catalogues, databases, or websites that require a
login.
• Since the internet is constantly changing, your results may vary from day to
day.
• There are many types of search engines.

2. Explain to students that there are many search engines to choose from but we will
focus on one. Explain what Google is, making sure to include the following points:

• Google is a search engine that lets you search for information on the internet.
• Google is the biggest, and most popular, search engine.
• Do not mix up the Google Search Box and the Internet Explorer Address Bar.
o The Google Search Box is where you type the words you would like to
search for – it is part of Google’s web page.
o The Address Bar is for typing a specific address – it is part of the
Internet Explorer browser.

6-3
Address Bar Search Box

Search button

Figure 6-1: Google’s Website

3. Explain to the students what a keyword search is, making sure to include the
following points:

• A keyword search is used in a search engine to search for websites.


• It is the most basic, but often most effective, internet search.
• Keywords do not describe what you are looking for but are words that appear
on the websites that you wish to find.
• Exclude words like “a” and “the”.
• Google will suggest words or phrases as you type your keywords – you can
choose one of these suggestions or just ignore them.
• If you do not get the results that you want, try to add keywords to be more
specific or try different words to describe the topic.

Student Activity 1: Searching with Keywords

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.google.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click in the Google Search Box.
• Type: book club suggestions.
• Notice Google’s suggested keywords that appear under the search box as you
type.
• Click on the Google Search button.

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Address Bar

Search Box

Google’s
suggestions

Search button

Figure 6-2: Conducting a Search

4. Explain to students that they can search for a complete phrase by putting quotation
marks around it. Make sure to include the following points:

• This can be useful to find a specific document, song lyrics, title of a book or
movie, etc.
• Quotation marks tell the search engine to search for the exact words you typed
in the order that they appear, so it is important to pay attention to word order
and be accurate.

Student Activity 2: Searching with Phrases

• Click in the Search Box.


• Type: “I have run I have crawled” (Include the quotation marks.)
• Click on Google Search or press the Enter key.

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Search for a phrase

Figure 6-3: Search for a phrase

Figure 6-4: Results of the search for a phrase

5. Explain to students the purpose of conducting an Advanced Search, making sure


to include the following points:

• Advanced Search allows you to narrow your search by adding limitations to it.
• This can give you more accurate, specific results. The more limitations you add
to your search, the more web pages will be kept out of your search results.
• Select a language to limit your results to web pages written in that language.
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• Enter a date to limit your results by the date that the web pages were last
modified.
• Use the “Site or domain” box to limit your results to a specific type of website
(.com, .ca, .org, .gc.ca, etc.).
• If you are looking for a particular type of file, you can limit your results by file
type (eg. pdf document, Microsoft Word document, Microsoft Excel document,
etc.).
• You may need to conduct a preliminary search in order to access the Advanced
Search screen. From the results page, you would then:,
o
o click on the Advanced Search link found at the bottom of the -page.
or
o click on the Menu Options button in the top right-hand corner.

Figure 6-5: Advanced Search Link

Menu Options button


Advanced Search

Figure 6-6: Advanced Search in Menu Options

Student Activity 3: Conducting an Advanced Search

• Return to the search results page.


• Click on Advanced Search.
• Erase “I have run I have crawled” if it is in the phrase search box.
• Type: Canada food guide in the “All these words” search box.
• Click on the “Site or Domain” box.
• Type: .gc.ca
• Click on the “File Type” box.
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file type
• Click on Adobe Acrobat PDF (.pdf).
• Click on Advanced Search button near the bottom of the page.

keywords domain name

Figure 6-7: Advanced Search options

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Figure 6-8: Advanced Search results

New Vocabulary
Advanced search, Keyword search, Search Engine,

Outcomes:
Students now understand what a search engine is and have become familiar with
Google. They are able to conduct a basic keyword search, a search for a phrase,
and an advanced search.

Lesson 2: Understanding the Results Screen


Objective: To make students familiar with the different parts of the results screen.

1. Show your students the search results page and describe what it contains. Make
sure to include the following points:

• The results page contains a list of web pages found by the search engine.
• Each entry includes:
o a link to a web page
o the complete address of the web page
o some text from the web page to show you where the keywords appear
• The Search Box is now at the top of the search results page and contains the
keywords that you just searched for.
• The URL has changed to reflect the page being displayed. This is the
address of this particular search results page.

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• There are many pages of results, but it is not necessary to look beyond page
3, as the most relevant websites will be listed on the first few pages.
• Scroll down to the bottom of the page to proceed to the next page of results.
• At the top and side of the screen, you may see a box called “Ads related to”
or “Ads” – this is advertising.
• Advertisers pay the companies that create search engines to display their ads
near the top of the search results when certain keywords are used as search
terms.

Student Activity 4: Looking at the Search Results Page

• Click in the Google Search Box.


• Erase whatever is there.
• Type: book club suggestions (As you start typing you will notice that “book
club suggestions” is one of Google’s suggestions, so you can also click on the
item in Google’s drop-down list of suggestions.)
• Note the ads that appear on the top and bottom of the results page that are
not part of your search.

Address Bar Search Box

Advertising
Result list

Link to the web page

Web address (URL)


of the web page

Figure 6-9: Top of the Search Results Page

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Next page of
results

Pages of results

Figure 6-10: Bottom of the Search Results Page

2. Show your students how to open a website from the results screen, and show
them the different parts of the page. Make sure to include the following points:

• You must click on one of the blue links to open a website.


• Look at the complete web address below the links to help you choose the
website that you wish to open.
• Every website is different, but most will have the following elements:
o A main page – this is usually called the home page
o Navigation buttons – can be located at the top or side of each page
and help you move to different parts of the website (including one to
return to the homepage)
o The content of the web page – usually in the center
• You will also see more visual ads on most websites at the top, sides, and
bottom of the screen. Like broadcasters of television programs, website
owners display advertising to make money (to pay to maintain the website
and for profit).

Student Activity 5: Opening a Website from the Results Page

• Click on the link to open the GoodReads website (www.goodreads.com).


• Notice that the Address bar now contains the URL for the current page.
• Find the website’s internal navigation buttons or Menu Bar.
• Find the main content of the web page.

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• Note as you move your mouse over the page how the cursor changes from
an arrow to a hand.
• Click on one of the links for a book. Note that the page has changed, , To get
back to the original page, you have to click on the Back arrow.
• Now click on the ad on the right-hand side of the page. Note how it goes to a
different page and opens up a new window.
• Close the new window.
• Click on the Back button to return to the Google results page.

Back button Address Bar Website’s internal navigation


buttons

Link to a book

Ad
Homepage

Figure 6-11: A website from the results page

3. Explain to students that if Google is unsure of the keywords that you typed in the
Search Box, it will search using an alternate spelling. Make sure to include the
following points:

• The alternative keywords that Google has used will be under the Search Box
and beside the words “Showing results for:”
• Sometimes this is helpful when you are not sure how to spell a particular
name or term.
• If Google makes an incorrect assumption, you can search for the original
keywords by clicking on the link beside “Search instead for:”

Student Activity 6: Using Spelling Suggestions

• Click in the Search box.


• Type: Opra Wfry

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• Press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Notice the alternate spelling that Google has chosen (Oprah Winfrey).
• Click on the original keywords beside “Search instead for” to see what the
search results would be without Google’s correction.

Corrected spelling original keywords

Figure 6-12: Alternate spelling

New Vocabulary
Home page, Results screen

Outcome: Students are now familiar with the different parts of the results page
and the basic elements of a website. They know how to open a page and how to
use spelling suggestions.

Lesson 3: Evaluating Your Results

Objective: To help students understand the importance of choosing websites


carefully and to teach them how to assess the usefulness of a website by asking:
who? what? why? where?, and when?

1. Explain to students where internet content comes from, making sure to include the
following points:
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• Like the information from books, magazines, films, and TV programs, not all of
the information on websites is accurate, reliable, or appropriate for everyone’s
needs.
• Unlike books, magazines, films, and TV programs, websites do not go through
the process of being “published”.
• Some websites contain reliable information that is created, edited, and updated
by experts and professional institutions.
• Many websites contain unreliable information, opinions that most people would
not agree with, and material that may be offensive, dangerous, and, in some
cases, illegal.
• It is important to be careful about which websites you choose to visit and trust.

2. Explain to your students the importance of evaluating their results, making sure to
include the following points:

• Once you have a list of web pages, you must evaluate the list to determine which
web sites will be the most useful and appropriate for your needs.
• It is important to know how you wish to use the information on the website and
ask yourself how authoritative, comprehensive, and current do you need this
information to be?
• Once you know your needs, you can assess the websites to determine whether
or not they meet your needs.
• When evaluating a website ask yourself these five questions: Who? What? Why?
Where? When?

3. Explain to the students the importance of knowing the WHO (that is, the author or
the entity responsible) for the website. Be sure to include the following points:

• The first clue about the author of the website can be found by looking at the
domain name, which is the first part of the web address or URL.
o The first or second part of the domain name will usually be the entity
responsible for the website, for example: www.biblioottawalibrary.ca is the
Ottawa Public Library’s website address and biblioottawalibrary tells you
that.
o The end of the domain name can tell you about the type of website:
.com – used by commercial websites
.gov – American government websites
.edu – American university websites
.org – non-profit organization
.gc.ca – Canadian Federal Government
• For more information about the source of the website, look for a link to a page
called “About Us” or “Contact Us” – usually at the top or bottom of the page.

4. Explain to the students the importance of knowing the WHAT (that is, the content of
the website). Be sure to include the following points:

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• An authoritative website should include bibliographic information stating where
they got their information.
• The website should look professional and not have any spelling or grammatical
errors.
• The website should not contain opinions presented as facts or statements that
are known to be untrue.

5. Explain to your students the importance of knowing the WHY (that is, the purpose ot
the website). Be sure to include the following points:

• Websites are created for many different reasons. Think about why the author or
organization created the website.
• Consider the information you are looking for and consider if the website’s
purpose conflicts with your own.
• It is important to be aware of the intent of the person or company who created
the website and to choose a site whose purpose matches your needs.

Instructor’s note:
It is important to find examples of how a website’s purpose might be good for some
information needs but not for others. A couple of examples might be:

1. If you are looking for information about getting a new cat or dog or for information
on pet behaviour , you can consult a website like www.purina.com. Purina
spends a lot of money on developing contents for its website. However, if you
are trying to determine what type of food to feed your pet or whether you should
buy commercial pet food or make your own, that site, created to sell pet food,
may not be your best choice.

2. If you want to find out the rules concerning Unemployment Insurance, a site with
.gc.ca in its address would be a good choice, as it indicates that that is a federal
government site. However, if you want to find out whether Unemployment
Insurance is effective in reducing the unemployment rate, the federal government
site may not be your best information source.

6. Explain to your students the importance of knowing the WHERE (that is, the
intended geographic location of the audience). Be sure to include the following
points:

• Think about where the information originated and for which location it was
intended.
• Websites created by people or organizations in other cities or countries may
contain information that does not apply to your city or country. For example:
o Driving regulations vary from country to country and province to province.
o Parking regulations vary from city to city.

6-15
7. Explain to your students the importance of knowing the WHEN (that is, the currency
of the information). Be sure to include the following points:

• Some information is very time-sensitive


• You will want the most up-to-date information possible.

Student Activity 7: Find out about the author (WHO) by finding the “About” and “Contact
US” links:

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.carleton.ca
• Find the “About” link at the top of the main web page.
• Find the “Contact information link at the bottom of the main web page.

Find more information about


the author / organization

Figure 6-13: Finding the “About” Link

Find the contact


information of the
author /
organization

Figure 6-14: Finding the “Contact” Link


6-16
Activity 8: Use the WHAT in a website to evaluate its reliability.

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address
• Type: whitehouse.net/privacy.html.
• Does this website look like a legitimate website?
• Can you see anything that might indicate that it isn’t?

Activity 9: Take notice of WHERE when searching for something that may have
geographical differences.

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.google.ca
• Type disability permit parking in the Google Search Box.
• Note that although the first item shows you how to get a disability permit in
Ontario (okay), the next items talk about different jurisdictions.
• Add Ottawa to the end of your search in the Google Search Box and see the
difference.

Activity 10: Go to the following website hosting the Columbia Encyclopedia and see if
you can find any clues about the date of modification..

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.infoplease.com/encyclopedia
• Can you find any clues about when this page was last updated? What about the
Columbia Encyclopedia itself?

Outcome: Students now understand the importance of choosing websites


carefully and how to assess the usefulness of a website by asking who? what?
why? where? and when?

6-17
MODULE 6 : CLASSROOM HANDOUTS AND ACTIVITIES
Activity 1: Searching for Keywords

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.google.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click in the Google Search Box.
• Type: book club suggestions.
• Notice Google’s suggested keywords that appear under the search box as you
type.
• Click on the Google Search button.

Performing a Google Search


Google Search Box (to help
Internet Explorer Address Bar (type in
you find a web page when you
the web address when you know it)
do not know the web address

Activity 2: Searching for Phrases

• Click in the Search Box.


• Type: “I have run I have crawled” (Include the quotation marks.)
• Click on Google Search or press the Enter key.

Activity 3: Conducting an Advanced Search

• Return to the search results page.


• Click on Advanced Search.
• Erase “I have run I have crawled” if it is in the phrase search box
• Type: Canada food guide in the “All these words” search box
• Click on the “Site or Domain” box.
• Type: .gc.ca
• Click on the “File Type” box.
• Click on Adobe Acrobat PDF (.pdf).
• Click on the Advanced Search button near the bottom of the page.

Google’s Advanced Search Options

Keywords
Domain name file type

Activity 4: Looking at the Search Results Page

• Click in the Google Search Box.


• Erase whatever is there.
• Type: book club suggestions (As you start typing you will notice that “book
club suggestions” is one of Google’s suggestions, so you can also click on the
item in Google’s drop-down list of suggestions.)
• Note the ads that appear on the top and bottom of the results page that are not
part of your search.

Activity 5: Opening a Website from the Results Page

• Click on the link to open the GoodReads website (www.goodreads.com)


• Notice that the Address Bar now contains the URL for the current page.
• Find the website’s internal navigation buttons or menu bar.
• Find the main content of the web page.
• Note as you move your mouse over the page how the cursor changes from an
arrow to a hand.
• Click on one of the links for a book. Note that the page has changed. To get
back to the original page, you have to click on the Back arrow.
• Now click on the ad on the right-hand side of the page. Note that it goes to a
different page and opens up a new window.
• Close the new window.
• Click on the Back button to return to the Google results page.

Activity 6: Using Spelling Suggestions

• Click in the Search Box.


• Type: Opra Wfry.
• Press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Notice the alternate spelling that Google has chosen (Oprah Winfrey).
• Click on the original keywords beside “Search instead for” to see what the
search results would be without Google’s correction.

Activity 7: Find out about the author (WHO) by finding the “About” and “Contact us”
links:

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.carleton.ca
• Find the “About” link at the top of the main web page.
• Find the “Contact information” link at the bottom of the main web page.

Activity 8: Use the WHAT in a website to evaluate its reliability.

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: whitehouse.net/privacy.html
• Does this website look like a legitimate website?
• Can you see anything that might indicate that it isn’t?
Activity 9: Take notice of the WHERE if searching for something that may have
geographic implications.

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.google.ca
• Type disability permit parking in the Google Search Box.
• Note that although the first item shows you how to get a disability permit in
Ontario (okay), the next items talk about different jurisdictions.
• Add Ottawa to the end of your search in the Google Search Box and see the
difference.

Activity 10: Use the WHEN in a website to test the website’s currency. Go to the
following website hosting the Columbia Encyclopedia and see if you can find any clues
about the date of modification.

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.infoplease.com/encyclopedia
• Can you find any clues about when this page was last updated? What about the
Columbia Encyclopedia itself?
MODULE 6 : SUPPLEMENTARY RESOURCES AND ACTIVITES
Older Adults Training Curriculum

Module 6: Lessons 1, 3: Internet Searching and Evaluating Your Results

1. Find a website which tells you how to add items to WordPad’s Quick
Access Toolbar:

a) Type: www.google.ca in the Internet Explorer Address Bar and press the
Enter key on your keyboard.
b) In the Google Search Box, type: “how do I” “quick access toolbar”
WordPad
c) Press the Enter key on your keyboard. The first three “hits” will answer your
question.

2. Find a listing of seniors centres run by the City of Ottawa:

a) Type: www.google.ca in the Address Bar and press the Enter Kkey on your
keyboard.
b) In the Google Search Box type seniors centres Ottawa.
c) Press the Enter key on your keyboard.

3. Use Google to find a Windows tutorial, misspelling “tutorial”:

a) Type: www.google.ca in the Address Bar and press the Enter key on your
keyboard.
b) In the Google Search Box type: Windows tootorial.
c) Note that as you are typing, the Google Search Box is giving you a
suggestion for “Windows tutorial”.
d) Press the Enter key on your keyboard. Note that Google is telling you that it
is showing the results for “Windows tutorial” but is also giving you a link to
click on if you really want it to search for “Windows tootorial”.

4. Find out which books were discussed on CBC’s Canada Reads for 2013:

a) Type: www.google.ca in the Address Bar and press the Enter key on your
keyboard.
b) In the Google Search Box start typing: Canada reads 2013, and when you
get Google’s drop-down list of suggestions, click on Canada reads 2013
book list.
c) Move your cursor down to one of the items listed on the results page. Click on
the down arrow located to the right of the web address for that site.
d) Click on the word cached. (If you do not see that word, try the next item on
the list.)
e) If you scroll down the page, you will see that your search keywords have
been highlighted.
5. Find the title and lyrics of the Frank Sinatra song which mentions “move a
rubber tree plant”:

a) Type: www.google.ca in the Address Bar and press the Enter key on your
keyboard.
b) In the Google Search Box type the phrase “move a rubber tree plant”
(including the quotation marks), and then add the word Sinatra after it.
c) Press the Enter key.

6. Use Advanced Search to find the City of Ottawa’s Recreation guide for 50+
programs:

a) Type: www.google.ca in the Address Bar and press the Enter key on your
keyboard.
b) Type: 50+ programs in the Search Box and press Enter.
c) Click on Advanced Search at the bottom of the page.
d) Erase “50 programs” from the search box located beside the words “all these
words”.
e) Click in the box beside the words “this exact word or phrase”.
f) Type: 50+ programs.
g) Scroll down the page until you get to the “Then narrow your results” section
and click in the box beside the words “site or domain”.
h) Type: ottawa.ca (This will restrict your search to the City of Ottawa website.)
i) Scroll down further until you find the box beside the words “file type:” and click
on the down arrow beside the words “any format”.
Click on down arrow

j) Click on Adobe Acrobat PDF (.pdf) (An Adobe Acrobat document is a


format that is used when you want to make sure that the formatting remains
the same no matter what computer equipment is being used. It is often used
to “publish” a document such as a brochure or magazine article.

7. Look at the following 2 web pages on Martin Luther King and evaluate the
accuracy of the information:

http://www.martinlutherking.org

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Luther_King,_Jr.

(If you have problems getting to the second web page, , go to


www.wikipedia.com and type martin luther king in the Search Box. Then
press the Enter key on your keyboard.)

a) Some of the questions you should be considering are:


• Who is responsible for the site or the articles?
• Are there opinions claiming to be facts?
• Does the information appear to be balanced or biased?
• Are there complete references that you can check for the information
provided?
MODULE 7 : USING WEB-BASED EMAIL

7-1
MODULE 7 : LESSON PLAN

7-2
MODULE 7: USING WEB-BASED EMAIL
This module will introduce the student to web-based email.

Instructor’s Notes:
1. This module assumes that everyone now has a web-based email account. If you
have followed the instructions in the previous modules, you should have forms to
give back to all of the students who needed a Gmail account.
2. Before starting this module, it would be a good idea to create slips of paper with
the email addresses of all of the students in your class. This will help to simplify
the activities in Lesson 4 of this module.

Lesson 1: Introduction to Web-based email


Objective: To explain what email, and in particular web-based email, is, why we
use it, and what you need to set up a web-based email account.

1. Explain what email is, making sure to include the following points:

• Email is electronic mail.


• It can be sent anywhere in world.
• It is convenient because you can send email whenever you want, and the
person receiving it can read it whenever they want.
• It eliminates telephone tag.
• The difference between an email address and a web address is the inclusion
of the @ sign. For example, the Ottawa Public Library’s website is
www.BiblioOttawaLibrary.ca, but its email address is
InfoService@BiblioOttawaLibrary.ca.

2. Explain what web-based email is, making sure to include the following points:

• As the program resides on a web page, you must first go to that web page in
order to send and receive email..
• It is a free service provided by a variety of different websites.
As it is available from any computer that is linked to the internet, you can access
your email no matter where you are geographically. (In contrast, with a client-based
program, any email that is downloaded is stored only on your computer.) It will stay
with you if you switch to a new Internet Service Provider (ISP). In contrast, your
client- based email will disappear if you switch to a new ISP, even if the company
(eg. Rogers) uses web-based email as part of its service.)

3. Explain what you need to set up an email account, making sure to include the
following points:

7-3
Note to Instructor: You can explain the following points while giving your students
back the forms that they filled out at the end of Module 5.

o The Terms of Service or Policy agreement, which you should read


before creating an account, includes important conditions, such as:
The email user won’t do anything illegal.
o The email provider will provide service to the best of its ability, but will
not be responsible for any losses incurred should something happen
to the email account.
• The user’s personal information will only be used by the provider to
administer its services. Personal information will only be disclosed to a third
party if required by law. Most forms have compulsory and optional questions.
If you don’t answer the compulsory questions, you won’t be able to set up an
email account. You can, however, choose whether or not you want to
answer the optional questions.
• When choosing an email address (sometimes referred to as a username ):
o Try to choose something that will be recognizable to people with whom
you want to communicate.
o Ideally, it should be some form of your name.
o Avoid cutesy names like “sex starved”. Such a name may be okay if
communicating with friends, but not with someone more official, such
as your Member of Parliament or clergy.
o As it needs to be unique, you may need to add numbers to it. For
privacy reasons, avoid adding your date of birth.
• Choosing a password:
o Choose one that you will remember.
o Ideally, it should be a combination of letters and numbers with a
capital letter or punctuation symbol included.
o Sometimes a minimum number of characters will be required. (eg.
Gmail’s minimum is 8.)
o It must not be a form of your name or email address.

New vocabulary:
Client-based email, Web-based email,

Outcome: Students understand the difference between client-based and web-


based email. They will also have a web-based email account.

Lesson 2: Accessing Your Email


Objective: To introduce students to their Gmail accounts.

1. Show them how to log into their Gmail account, making sure to include the
following points:

7-4
Note to Instructor: If you previously gave your students the web-based email form to fill
out, point out that the instructions for opening their account are on the back of it. If you
didn’t use a form, or if they already have a Gmail account, give them the form now so
that they will have the step-by-step instructions.

• To log into your Gmail, you only need your username, which is your email
address without the @gmail.com.
• You will often get a message asking you for a cell phone number or a
secondary email address. You can choose to add that information or to just
click on the button “Save and continue”. The advantages of adding such
contact information are:
o If you are ever unable to log into your account, Gmail can send you a
link to create a new password.
o Gmail will have a way of contacting you if they note suspicious activity
in your account and want to warn you about it.
• You may get a message asking you to update your browser if you are using
an outdated version, such as IE8 (Internet Explorer 8). If it’s possible for you
to update your browser or to download Firefox or Chrome, you should do so.
If you can’t (eg. when using Ottawa Public Library or City of Ottawa
computers), you should click on the “Not now” button.
• If you get a message reminding you that Gmail does not have a password or
phone number recovery option, click on the “Dismiss” or “Add info” now links.

Student Activity 1: Logging into Your Gmail Account

• Click in the Address Bar of your browser and type www.gmail.com.


• Press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Type your username in the box labelled “Username”. (Remember that your
username is the part of your web address that comes before the @ sign.)
• Press the Tab key. This will move the the flashing bar into the box labelled
“Password”.
• Type your password, remembering that it matters whether you are using
capital or small letters.
• Click on the box labelled Sign in.
• If you are on a public computer, make sure that there is no checkmark beside
“Stay signed in”.
• If you are asked to enter a cell phone number or to upgrade your browser,
click on the link which is the equivalent of “Not now” or “Remind me later”.

2. Introduce them to the Inbox, making sure to include the following points,:

• When you sign in, you are looking at your inbox, which is a list of the emails
that people have sent to you.
• Gmail has divided its inbox into 3 tabs: Primary, Social, and Promotions.
o Primary will include most of your messages.

7-5
o Social will include updates from social media sites like Facebook and
Twitter.
o Promotions will include advertisements, primarily from companies with
which you have a relationship. If you would prefer not to have these
tabs, you can turn them off.
o If you would like a message that appears in the Promotions or Social
tab to appear in your Primary tab, you can move it. The next time that
a similar message appears, it will go to your Primary tab.

Number of Unread Google Tabs


Click here to Messages
get back to
Inbox

Click here Name of Date of


to select Subject of
sender message
message message

Figure 7-1: The Gmail Inbox

3. Finish this lesson by showing students how to read messages, reinforcing the
idea that when they are looking at their inbox, they are only seeing a list of the
messages, not the messages themselves.

Student Activity 2: Reading Messages

• Click on the subject of a message to see the whole message.


• Click on Inbox on the left-hand side to get back to your inbox (list of
messages).

7-6
New Vocabulary:
Inbox, Username

Outcome: Students can now access their Gmail account and read messages.

Lesson 3: Organizing Your Inbox


Objective: To teach students how to use the labelling and archiving features to
organize their inbox as well as how to retrieve information that they have already
archived.

1. Explain the goal of keeping their inbox for incoming unread mail only, and assure
them that they do not have to delete items in order to remove them from their
inbox. Reinforce the idea broached in Lesson 2 that when they want to do
something to an email, they have to choose it first by clicking in the Select box to
the left of the message. Make sure that they understand that the cursor must be
an arrow and not a clenched hand when they do this.

2. Show your students how to move an item from one tab to another by clicking and
dragging the item with the clenched hand.

3. Point out the icons labelled in the diagram below. Make sure that students
understand that they will see these icons only after clicking in the Select box next
to a message.

Report spam Delete Move to Assign label


Archive

Select Box

Figure 7-2: A Selected Message Brings Up the Icons Needed to Organize


Your Inbox

7-7
Student Activity 3: Selecting a Message

• Select a message by clicking in the Select box beside the message. You will
now see the icons that you can use to organize your inbox.
• Click again on the Select box to de-select the item. Note that the icons have
disappeared.

4. Explain the importance of labels, making sure to include the following points:

• If you forget to assign a label, you can usually find your item by using
Google’s powerful search capability.
• Examples of labels they you may want to use include names of children or
grandchildren, hobbies, etc.

Student Activity 4: Assigning Labels

• Click in the Select box to choose a message.


• Click on the Label icon

• Click on Create New.


• Type in the label name you have chosen and click on Create.
• You should now be back at your inbox, and you should see your new label at
the beginning of the subject of your selected email message, as well as in the
left-hand margin.

5. Explain the process of archiving messages, making sure to include the following
points:

• Your inbox should only contain unread messages or messages that you are
keeping temporarily because you want to respond to or forward them.
• Once you have labelled an item, you should archive it by clicking on the
archive button to remove it from your inbox.
• To find an archived item:
o click on a label in the left-hand margin to find all of the items which you
have tagged with that label; or
o use the Gmail search box above to search for keywords contained in
the email that you are looking for.

Student Activity 5: Archiving an Email

• While the email message in your inbox is still selected, archive it by clicking
on the Archive icon .
• Click on the label in the left-hand margin. You will see the message that you
just archived.

7-8
6. Show your students how to delete an item by selecting it in the inbox and clicking
on Delete. Explain that this sends the message to the Trash folder, where it will
remain for approximately one month unless they empty the Trash folder
themselves.

Student Activity 6: Deleting an Email

• Select a message by clicking on the Select box.


• Click on the Delete icon . Notice that the item has disappeared from the
inbox. (Do not worry about actually deleting it, as it will go into a the Trash
folder and stay there for about a month.)
• Find the “Trash” heading in the left-hand margin (If you do not see it, click on
the word “More”.)
• Click on Trash. You will see the message that you just deleted.
• Click in the Select box beside the message and then click on the Move to
icon
• Click on Inbox.
• Click on Inbox in the left-hand margin. You will now see the message that
was previously in the Trash.

New Vocabulary:
Label, Select Box, Trash

Outcome: Students are now comfortable assigning labels, and archiving and
deleting messages. They also understand the goal of keeping their inbox for
incoming mail and not storage.

Lesson 4: Sending messages


Objective: To teach your students how to send, print and reply to an email
message.

1. Show your students how to create an email message in Gmail by clicking on the
red Compose button in the left-hand margin.

7-9
Create a new message

Figure 7-3: Compose Button in Gmail

Note to Instructor: It is a good idea to inform students at this point that different email
providers use different terminology. Gmail uses the word “compose” but others may
use “new message” or simply “new”.

2. Explain the important elements of creating a new message, making sure to


include the following points:

• The “To” box is where you enter the email address of the person to whom you
are writing. You need to enter the full email address with the @ sign.
• The “CC” box stands for “Carbon Copy” and is where you put the email
addresses of other persons to whom you want to send the email. All
addresses in the To and CC boxes are visible to each person who receives
the e-mail. The “BCC” box stands for “Blind Carbon Copy” and is where you
put the email addresses of recipients whose names you prefer to hide from
the other recipients. (I If you are sending an email to a lot of people, it is best
to put everyone in the BCC box in order to protect people’s privacy).
• The Subject box is where you should always put a word or phrase that will
give the recipients an idea of what the email is about. (You do not write your
entire message here).
• The Message box is where you write the content of your message.
• The “Send” button is what you click on once you are finished with the
message.
• The “Check Spelling” link is used if you would like to make sure that you did
not make any spelling mistakes.

7-10
To Box (address
of person you are CC (Carbon Copy)
emailing BCC (Blind
Carbon Copy) Subject

Message box
Check spelling link

Send button

Figure 7-4: Parts of an Email Message

Instructor’s Note:
Before proceeding with this student activity, you should give each student a slip of
paper with another student’s email address.

Student Activity 7: Sending a Message

• Get an email address from someone else in the class or from your instructor.
• Click on the Compose button.
• Click in the “To” box and type in the person’s full email address, including the
@ sign (which is usually Shift +2).
• Click in the Subject box to get your flashing cursor and type: Hello.
• Click in the large Message box below and type a brief message, making sure
to start with “Helloo” (a misspelled version of “Hello”), so that you can learn to
use the Check Spelling link.
• Click on the Check Spelling link above the Message box on the right.

7-11
• The word “Helloo” should be highlighted in yellow. Click on the word.
• Gmail will give you a few alternate spellings, including “Hello”.
• Click on Hello.
• You can then deal with any other misspellings or just click on the word Done,
which has replaced the Check Spelling link.
• Click on the red Send button.

3. Show your students how to print an email that they have composed, making sure
to include the following points:

• You cannot print from the Compose box.


• You can print from the Inbox or the Sent Messages box.
• You should always use the print icon from the email program, which only
becomes visible when you open up a specific email.

Print icon

Figure 7-5: Use Gmail’s Print Icon to Print a Message

• Once you click on the Print icon, you will get the Print Dialog box where you
can click on the “Print” button.

7-12
Print Button

Figure 7-6 : Print Dialog Box

Student Activity 8: Printing an Email

• Click on Sent Messages in the left-hand margin.


• Find the message that you sent and click on the subject (Hello).
• Find the Print icon and click on it to get the Print Dialog box.
• Click on Print to print the message or Cancel to not print the message.

4. Show your students how to reply to an email by clicking on the Reply arrow,
making sure to include the following points:

• Clicking on the curved arrow will automatically create a reply addressed to the
sender of the email.
• Clicking on the down arrow beside the Reply arrow will give you other
options, such as :
o “Reply to all”, which will send your message to the originator of the
email as well as anyone else listed in the “CC” box.
o “Forward”, which will allow you to forward the email to someone new.
When you use reply, the text from the original message will automatically be
included in the body of the message. You can modify or delete this original
text as needed

7-13
Click on Down
Reply Arrow Arrow to get Other
Options

Quoted text

Other
Options
Menu

Figure 7-7 Click on the Reply Arrow to Reply to an Email Someone Sent You

Student Activity 9: Replying to a Message

• Click on Inbox in the left-hand margin to see the list of messages sent to you.
• Click on the subject (Hello) of the message that you just received in order to
read it.
• Click on the Reply arrow.
• Click in the Message box and type: Thank you for your message.
• Click on the Send button.

New Vocabulary:
CC, BCC

Outcome: Students can now send a message, print it and reply to it.

7-14
Lesson 5: Internet safety
Objective: To teach students how to protect themselves from potential threats to
their personal safety and to keep their personal information and their computer
secure.

Note to Instructor: Before beginning this section, reassure your students that they don’t
have to remember everything you are saying since they have an Information Sheet in
their “Classroom Handouts and Activities” which describes how to keep themselves safe
on the Internet.

1. Explain to students how the use of the internet can pose a threat to their personal
safety, making sure to include the following points:

• The internet allows people to connect, meet, and share information like never
before This has many benefits but also many risks.
• Just like in the real world, the virtual world of the internet is populated by a
wide range of people with different views and intentions – including criminals.
• The internet can provide a feeling of anonymity:
o This gives some people a false sense of security.
o Some people use this to their advantage by misrepresenting
themselves to defraud or do harm to others.
• Protect your identity and reputation:
o Be careful what information, comments, and photos you share on
social media websites like Facebook and Twitter.
o Once something is posted online, it can never be truly deleted.
• Be careful when using dating websites and chatrooms:
o People are not always what they appear to be and many profiles are
fake.
o Never provide your last name, address, or other personal or financial
information to someone you do not know and trust.
o Beware of any potential partner or friend who asks you directly for
cash, or who asks you to cash a money order or cheque.
o If you wish to meet in person, choose a busy public place, and let a
friend or family member know when and where you are going.

2. Explain to your students the importance of being cautious when filling out forms
and shopping online, making sure to include the following points:

• Keep private information private unless it’s necessary to get a service, and
make sure that you are dealing with a reputable site.
• Be careful about answering medical quizzes.
• Keep others’ information private as well. For example, if you are interested in
genealogy, be careful what you post about living people.

7-15
• Purchase items from reputable companies only and make sure that their sites
are secure (There should be an https:// in the address bar and a lock symbol
beside the address bar.)
• Never give out information like social insurance numbers, bank account
numbers or credit card numbers unless making a purchase on a secure site.

https:// Lock symbol

Figure 7-8: Secure Website

3. Explain to your students what a computer virus is, how it can spread, and what
they can do to prevent the spread. Be sure to include the following points:

• A computer virus is a computer program that can interfere with the running of
your computer and can damage or delete files.
• All computer viruses are man-made, and they can replicate themselves and
spread from computer to computer through: :
o removeable media such as USB flash drives, CDs or DVDs, etc.;
o electronic documents;
o email attachments; and
o pop-ups. (Clicking on these can cause malicious software to be
downloaded from the internet.)

7-16
• Do not click on pop-ups unless you are familiar with the product and the
company. (If you are not sure, close the pop-up and go to the company’s
website to find the product.)
• Do not provide information about yourself or your computer to someone who
calls you on the phone. (Microsoft will not call you up to check on your
operating system.)
• Do not allow access to your computer to anybody whom you have not
contacted for help.
• Do not respond to a pop-up or website which tells you that you have a virus.
(That is what your virus software is for.)

4. Explain to your students the importance of using software to protect your


computer, making sure to include the following points:

• Anti-virus software scans your computer to detect and eliminate viruses.


o The software can also scan files and email before you download them
from the internet to prevent you from downloading a virus.
o It is important to have anti-virus software installed on your computer
and to keep it up to date.
o Some examples are: Norton Antivirus and McAffee (for a fee); and
AVG, Avast and Microsoft Essentials (free).
• A firewall checks traffic going in and out of your computer, looking for
suspicious patterns.
o You should already have a Windows firewall installed, but could use
others.
o Whichever firewall software you have , make sure that it is activated.
o It prevents sites from key logging (keeping track of your keystrokes),
which helps to protect sensitive information like passwords and credit
card numbers.

• Anti-spyware software prevents programs from changing the configuration of


your computer without your consent.
o It can work in real time or perform scans on demand. (Note that most
free anti-spyware programs will not perform real-time scanning..)
• You should regularly update the software on your computer, including internet
browsers, so that security patches are loaded in a timely manner.
o Windows, Adobe, Java, and anti-virus software should be set up to
update automatically.
o You can use software like Secunia to check for other programs that
require security updates.

New Vocabulary
Anti-virus software, Computer virus, Firewall, Spyware

7-17
Outcome: Students are now aware of and can protect themselves from potential
threats to their personal safety, personal information and their computer.

7-18
Lesson 6: Email Safety
Objective: To ensure that the student(s) can use their email safely without
exposing themselves and others to harm.

Note to Instructor: Before beginning this section, reassure your students that they don’t
have to remember everything that you are saying since they have an Information Sheet
in their “Classroom Handouts and Activities” which describes how to use email safely.

1. Explain that attachments can contain harmful viruses and/or spyware, making sure
to cover the following points:

• Don’t open attachments from people you don’t know.


• Don’t open attachments that you aren’t expecting from people you do know
unless there is a personal message explaining why they are sending the
attachment. (An example might be a photo or drawing from a grandchild with a
personal explanation from their parent.)
o Sometimes a person’s email can be hijacked by someone who, in an
attempt to spread a virus, perpetrate a fraud or obtain private information,
manages to send an email to everyone in that person’s contact list.
o If you are in doubt, phone the person who sent you the message.

2. Explain that links can also be harmful. They may look like they are coming from a
reputable institution but may be something else entirely. Make sure to cover the
following points:

• Examples of links you should not click on, are links sent supposedly from your
bank or email provider which ask you to verify your account by clicking on the link
and signing in to your account. This is called phishing.
o Banks, in particular, will never send you that type of email. An exception
would be if you initiated the exchange with something like an “I forgot my
password” link.
• Another example of links that you should not click on are ones sent from people
you know which don’t include a personal message explaining why they are
sending you the link.
• If you aren’t sure if a link is safe:
o Google the institution that has sent you the message in order to access its
website (rather than clicking on the link in the e-mail). Contact the
institution by phoning them or filling out an email form on their website in
order to ask about the validity of the message that you had received.
o Email or phone the person you know and ask them if they meant to send
you that link.

7-19
3. Tell your students that if it is necessary to send an email to many people on behalf of
an organization to which they belong, they should bcc everyone in order to avoid
giving someone’s email to someone who doesn’t need it.

4. Tell your students to never put credit card information in an email. Email is NOT
secure. Using a secure website is MUCH safer.

5. Tell your students not to respond to emails from foreign governments or nationals
who ask for help in recovering money. (This is a very old and lucrative scam.) If it
sounds too good to be true, it is.

6. Tell your students not to respond to emails from anyone, including family and
friends, requesting that money be sent to a post office box or through Western Union
because the sender is stuck in jail or is stuck in a foreign country. Be sure to include
the following points:

• If you are worried that the sender may really be in trouble, try phoning the person
to verify the information, or look for something in the email that relates to you
personally.
• Also try to take some language from the email and search for it in a search
engine like Google to see if other people have received the same email.

7. Tell your students not to forward an email to everyone they know just because the
email tells you to do so. It is most likely a hoax. If they’re not sure:

• Google some lines from the email to see if people have been discussing the
scam or hoax.
• Check some good websites for identifying scams and hoaxes such as:
www.snopes.com and urbanlegends.about.com

8. Tell your students not to respond in any way to spam, making sure to include the
following points:.

• If the message has a link that you can click on to opt out of the spam, don’t click
on it.. This just lets the spammer know that your address is active.
• An exception would be email from a legitimate company with which you have a
relationship and to which you may have given your email address. You may
unsubscribe from those.

9. Start a discussion by asking your students if there are any hoaxes or scams that
they have heard of. If they come up with some, talk about what might have been the
right thing to do in that case.. If they don’t come up with any examples, ask them
what they should do if:
• Your bank contacts you to ask that you verify the login to your account.
• Your email provider tells you that they will cancel your account unless you verify
your password.

7-20
• A friend, acquaintance or family member emails you that are vacationing in a
foreign country and have lost their wallet. The hotel they are staying at will not
give them back their passport unless they pay them the amount owing. They ask
you to send them money through Western Union so they can come home.

New Vocabulary:
Attachment, Contact List, Phishing, Spam

Outcome: Students now understand some of the perils that they may face when
using email and feel more confident avoiding them.

7-21
MODULE 7 : CLASSROOM HANDOUTS AND ACTIVITIES
Activity 1: Logging Into Your Gmail Account

• Click in the address bar of your browser and type www.gmail.com


• Press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Type your username in the box labelled “Username”. (Remember that your
username is the part of your web address that comes before the @ sign.)
• Press the Tab key. This will move the flashing bar into the box labelled
“Password”.
• Type your password, remembering that it matters whether you are using
capital or small letters.
• Click on the box labelled Sign in.
• If you are on a public site make, sure there is no checkmark beside “Stay
signed in”.
• If you are asked to enter a cell phone number or to upgrade your browser,
click on the link which is the equivalent of “Not now” or “Remind me later”.

Activity 2: Reading Messages

• Click on the subject of a message to see the whole message.


• Click on Inbox on the left-hand side to get back to your inbox (list of
messages).

The Gmail Inbox

Number of Unread
Messages
Click here to Google Tabs
get back to
Name of
Inbox
sender

Click here Subject of


to select message Date of
message message
Activity 3: Selecting a Message

• Select a message by clicking in the Select box beside the message. You will
now see the icons that you can use to organize your inbox.
• Click again on the Select box to de-select the item. Note that the icons have
disappeared.

Selecting a Message Brings Up the Icons Needed to Organize Your Inbox

Archive Report spam Delete Move to Assign label


Select Box

Activity 4: Assigning Labels

• Click in the Select box to choose a message.


• Click on the Label icon .
• Click on Create New.
• Type in the label that you have chosen and click on Create.
• You should now be back at your inbox, and you should see your new label at
the beginning of the subject of your selected email message, as well as in the
left-hand margin.

Activity 5: Archiving an email.

• While the email message in your inbox is still selected, archive it by clicking
on the Archive icon .
• Click on the label in the left-hand margin. You will see the message that you
just archived.
Activity 6: Deleting an Email

• Select a message by clicking on the Select box.


• Click on the Delete icon . Notice that the item has disappeared from the
inbox. (Do not worry about actually deleting it, as it will go into the Trash
folder and stay there for about a month.)
• Find the “Trash” heading in the left-hand margin. (If you do not see it, click
on the word More.)
• Click on Trash. You will see the message that you just deleted.
• Click in the Select box beside the message and then click on the Move to
icon .
• Click on Inbox.
• Click on Inbox in the left-hand margin. You will see the message that was
previously in the Trash.

Activity 7: Sending a Message

• Get an email address from someone else in the class or from your instructor.
• Click on the Compose button.
• Click in the “To” box and type in the full email address, including the @ sign
(which is usually Shift +2).
• Click in the Subject box to get your flashing cursor and type: Hello
• Click in the large Message box below and type a brief message, making sure
to start with “Helloo” (a misspelled version of “Hello”), so that you can learn to
use the “Check Spelling” link.
• Click on the Check Spelling link above the Message box on the right.
• The word “Helloo” should be highlighted in yellow. Click on the word.
• Gmail will give you a few alternate spellings including “Hello”.
• Click on Hello.
• You can then deal with any other misspellings or just click on the word Done,
which has replaced the “Check Spelling” link.
• Click on the red Send button.
Parts of an Email Message

Activity 8: Printing an Email

• Click on Sent Messages in the left-hand margin.


• Find the message that you sent and click on the subject (Hello).
• Find the Print icon and click on it to get the “Print” Dialog box.
• Click on Print to print the message or Cancel to not print the message.
Activity 9: Replying to a Message

• Click on Inbox in the left-hand margin to see the list of messages sent to you.
• Click on the subject (Hello) of the message that you just received in order to
read it.
• Click on the Reply arrow.
• Click in the Message box and type: Thank you for your message.
• Click on the Send button.

Replying To an Email Message


INFORMATION SHEET

Internet safety

1. The internet can pose a threat to your personal safety.

• The internet allows people to connect, meet, and share information like never
before. This has many benefits but also many risks.
• Just like in the real world, the virtual world of the internet is populated by a
wide range of people with different views and intentions – including criminals.
• The internet can provide a feeling of anonymity:
o This gives some people a false sense of security.
o Some people use this to their advantage by misrepresenting
themselves to defraud or do harm to others.
• Protect your identity and reputation:
o Be careful what information, comments, and photos you share on
social media websites like Facebook and Twitter.
o )Once something is posted online, it can never be truly deleted.
• Be careful when using dating websites and chatrooms:
o People are not always what they appear to be and many profiles are
fake.
o Never provide your last name, address, or other personal or financial
information to someone you do not know and trust.
o Beware of any potential partner or friend who asks you directly for
cash, or who asks you to cash a money order or cheque.
o If you wish to meet in person, choose a busy public place, and let a
friend or family member know when and where you are going.

2. It is important to be cautious when filling out forms and shopping online.

• Keep private information private unless it’s necessary to get a service, and
make sure that you are dealing with a reputable site.
• Be careful about answering medical quizzes.
• Keep others’ information private as well. For example, if you are interested in
genealogy, be careful what you post about living people.
• Purchase items from reputable companies only and make sure that their sites
are secure. (There should be an https:// in the address bar and a lock symbol
beside the address bar.)
• Never give out information like social insurance numbers, bank account
numbers or credit card numbers unless making a purchase on a secure site.
Secure Website

https://
Lock

3. Computer viruses: how they can spread, and what you can do to prevent them.

• A computer virus is a computer program that can interfere with the running of
your computer and can damage or delete files.
• All computer viruses are man-made, and they can replicate themselves and
spread from computer to computer through:
o removable media such as USB flash drives, CDs or DVDs, etc.;
o electronic documents;
o email attachments; and
o pop-ups. (Clicking on these can cause malicious software to be
downloaded from the internet.)
• Do not click on pop-ups unless you are familiar with the product and the
company. (If you are not sure, close the pop-up and go to the company’s website
to find the product.)
• Do not provide information about yourself or your computer to someone who
calls you on the phone. (Microsoft will not call you up to check on your operating
system.)
• Do not allow access to your computer to anybody whom you have not contacted
for help.
• Do not respond to a pop-up or website which tells you that you have a virus.
(That is what your virus software is for.)

4. It is important to use software to protect your computer.

• Anti-virus software scans your computer to detect and eliminate viruses.


o The software can also scan files and email before you download them
from the internet to prevent you from downloading a virus.
o It is important to have anti-virus software installed on your computer
and to keep it up to date.
o Some examples are: Norton Antivirus and McAffee (for a fee); and
AVG, Avast and Microsoft Essentials (free).
• A firewall is a piece of hardware or a computer program which checks traffic
going in and out of your computer, looking for suspicious patterns.
o You should already have a Windows firewall installed, but you could
use others.
o Whichever firewall software you have, make sure that it is activated.
o Prevents sites from key logging (keeping track of your keystrokes) to
protect sensitive information like passwords and credit card numbers.
• Anti-spyware prevents programs from changing the configuration of your
computer without your consent.
o It can work in real time or perform scans on demand. (Note that most
free anti-spyware programs will not perform real-time scanning.)
• You should regularly update the software on your computer, including internet
browsers, so that security patches are loaded in a timely manner.
o Windows, Adobe, Java and virus software should be set up to update
automatically.
o You can use software like Secunia to check for other programs that
require security updates.
INFORMATION SHEET

Email Safety

1. Attachments can contain harmful viruses and/or spyware:

• Don’t open attachments from people you don’t know.


• Don’t open attachments that you aren’t expecting from people you do know
unless there is a personal message explaining why they are sending the
attachment. (An example might be a photo or drawing from a grandchild with
a personal explanation from their parent)
o Sometimes a person’s email can be hijacked by someone who, in an
attempt to spread a virus, perpetrate a fraud or obtain private
information, manages to send an email to everyone in that person’s
contact list.
o If you are in doubt, phone the person who sent you the message.

2. Links can also be harmful. They may look like they are coming from a reputable
institution but may be something else entirely.

• Examples of links that you should not click on are links sent supposedly from
your bank or email provider which ask you to verify your account by clicking
on the link and signing in to your account. This is called phishing.
o Banks, in particular, will never send you that type of email. An exception
would be if you initiated the exchange with something like an “I forgot my
password” link.
• Another example of links that you should not click on are ones sent from
people you know which don’t include a personal message explaining why
they are sending you the link.
• If you aren’t sure if a link is safe:
o Google the institution that has sent you the message in order to access
its website (rather than clicking on the e-mail link).
o Contact the institution by phoning them or by filling out an email form
on their website in order to ask about the validity of the message that
you had received.
o Email or phone the person you know and ask them if they meant to
send you that link.

3. If it is necessary to send an email to many people on behalf of an organization to


which you belong, you should bcc everyone in order to avoid giving someone’s
email to someone who doesn’t need it.

4. Never put credit card information in an email. Email is NOT secure. Using a
secure website is MUCH safer.
5. Do not respond to emails from foreign governments or nationals who ask for help
in recovering money. (This is a very old and lucrative scam.) If it sounds too good
to be true, it is.

6. Do not respond to emails from anyone, including family and friends, requesting
that money be sent to a post office box or through Western Union because the
sender is stuck in jail or is stuck in a foreign country.

• If you are worried that the sender may really be in trouble , try phoning the
person to verify the information or look for something in the email that relates
to you personally.
• Also try to take some language from the email and search for it in a search
engine to see if other people have received the same email.

7. Do not forward an email to everyone you know because the email tells you to do
so. It is most likely a hoax. If you are not sure:

• Google some lines from the email to see if people have been discussing the
scam or hoax.
• Check some good websites for identifying scams and hoaxes such as:
www.snopes.com and urbanlegends.about.com.

8. Do not respond in any way to spam (unsolicited email).

• If the message has a link that you can click on to opt out of the spam, don’t
click on it. This just lets the spammer know that your address is active.
• An exception would be email from a legitimate company with which you have
a relationship and to which you may have given your email address. You
may unsubscribe from those.
Appendix A : Alternate version of Module 5 using the
Menu Bar for Lesson 3 (Windows and Tabs) and
Lessons 5-8 (Printing, Find on this Page, Text Size
and Zoom Text and View Source)

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APPENDIX A : LESSON PLAN

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MODULE 5: INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNET

Students will be introduced to the internet. They will learn how to access it using
Internet Explorer and the Internet Explorer Toolbar.

Instructor’s note:

This Module can be used instead of Module 5. It covers the same material but includes
alternative instructions and activities for Lesson 3, and Lessons 5-8. These instructions
involve using Menu Bar items instead of Toolbar items and can be used if the Toolbar
items mentioned in the regular curriculum cannot be found in your version of Internet
Explorer.

Lesson 1: What is the Internet?

Objective: To introduce students to the internet, the range of its content, and
some common terminology.

1. Explain to your students what the internet is, making sure to include the following
points:

• The internet is simply a network of computer networks.


• It is called the World Wide Web because it is like a giant electronic web
connecting computers to each other and allowing information to be created,
stored, searched, accessed, and shared.
• The internet can be accessed through a computer.
• Websites are made up of web pages which contain information in the form of
text, images, and audio and video material.
• The internet is not organized, edited, or controlled by anyone – it consists of
billions of websites created by individuals, companies, and organizations.

2. Ask your students what terms or expressions they have heard to describe the
internet. Add any of the following that they do not mention:

• Sometimes the internet is simply called the web or the net


• When someone is browsing the internet they might say that they are surfing the
net
• When someone says: “go online” they usually mean “use the internet”.

3. Describe to your students the wide range of content available on the internet while
emphasizing the need to be a careful consumer. Make sure to include the following
points:

• There are websites on every kind of topic

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• Websites can provide information or entertainment, sell a product, or promote a
service.
• Internet content is determined by its participants, and as anyone can create a
website:
o not all information is accurate.
o in contrast with other materials found in a library, there is usually no
publisher or careful selection of material.

4. Ask your students what they think they will use the internet for. Here are some items
to add to their list.

• Doing research
• Reading ebooks or listening to audio books
• Reading newspapers or magazines
• Listening to the radio
• Playing games
• Learning a language
• Finding a person or organization
• Banking
• Job searching
• Online dating
• Accessing government information and forms
• Shopping
• Finding travel information and making reservations
• Social networking (examples are services like Facebook and Twitter)
• Accessing maps and obtaining driving directions
• Staying in touch with family and friends

5. Explain to your students that all of these activities fall into two main categories:
accessing information (browsing) and communication (email and chat). Explain the
definitions of browsing, email and chat making sure to include the following points:

• Accessing information:
o Browsing is viewing websites and following links between their web pages.
To do this you need software called a web browser. There are many
browsers, created by different companies, to choose from (eg.: Internet
Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc.). We will focus on Internet Explorer.

• Communication:
o Email is electronic mail that can be sent to, or received from, family,
friends, and colleagues. You can use software to manage email on your
personal computer or a web-based email account to access email from
any computer. This will be explored further in Module 5.
o Chat is sending and receiving instant messages using a website or
software on your computer.

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New Vocabulary
Browsing, Chat, Email, Web Browser, Web Pages, Websites, World Wide Web

Outcome:
Students now have a basic understanding of what the internet is, are aware of the
range of its content and the variety of its uses, and understand some common
terminology.

Lesson 2: Internet Explorer

Objective: To introduce students to the following concepts: browser, URL, and


hyperlink.

1. Explain to students what a browser and URL are making sure to include the
following points:

• Internet Explorer is a web browser


• A browser is software installed on your computer that lets you view websites on
the internet.
• Every website has an address - sometimes it is called a web address, a URL, or
a domain name
• The best way to access a specific website is to tell Internet Explorer to go directly
to the website’s address.
• It is important to type the complete address in the Address Bar.
• A URL never contains any spaces.
• A web address made up of three parts:
o Server: This is the beginning of the address. It is usually “www.”, which
stands for “World Wide Web”.
o Owner: This is the middle of the address, and it tells you about the person,
company, or organization that owns the website.
o Type: The end of the address can tell you a bit about the source of the
website and its purpose.
• Examples of types of websites:
.ca – primarily Canadian websites
.com – used by commercial websites
.gov – American government websites
.edu – American university websites
.org – non-profit organization
.gov.on.ca – Ontario Provincial Government
.gc.ca – Canadian Federal Government
• Examples of web addresses:
www.biblioottawalibrary.ca

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www.cbc.ca
www.octranspo.com
www.amazon.com
www.heritagecanada.org
www.gc.ca
www.weatheroffice.gc.ca

Student Activity 1: Opening a Website

• Click on the Start button.


• Click on All Programs.
• Click on Internet Explorer.
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.biblioottawalibrary.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key.

Type the complete “Go To” arrow


address Address Bar

Figure 5-1: Address Bar

2. Explain to students what a hyperlink is making sure to include the following points:

• A hyperlink is usually just called a link.


• A link is an element (a button, image, or piece of text) on a web page.
• When you hover over a link your cursor changes from an arrow to a hand with a
pointing finger.
• When you click on a link, you will be brought to a different page within that
website or to a different website.

Student Activity 2: Using Hyperlinks

On the Ottawa Public Library website (www.biblioottawalibrary.ca)

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• Place your cursor on the words Continue in English so that the cursor changes
from an arrow to a pointing hand.
• Click ONCE to enter the Library’s website.
• Place your cursor on the word Browse in the web page’s Menu Bar and click.
Click ONCE on the word Catalogue to go to the library’s catalogue.
• Click on New Titles (near the top of the screen) to see new items that the Library
has recently purchased.
• Click on General Fiction – On Order to go to a page listing all of the new novels
that the Library has ordered recently.
• Click on Published Date and then 2013 to only see the novels that were
published in 2013.

New Vocabulary
Domain name, Hyperlink, Link, URL, Web address.

Outcome:
Students are now familiar with the concepts of a browser, URL, and hyperlink.
They know how to use a browser to access the internet and how to use
hyperlinks.

Lesson 3: Viewing Multiple Pages with Windows and Tabs

Objective: To teach students the difference between tabs and windows.

1. Explain the difference between windows and tabs, making sure to include following
points:

• You can have more than one web page open at once.
• There are two ways to open an additional web page:
o open a new window by clicking on the Internet Explorer icon on the
Taskbar, or
o open a new tab by clicking on the File menu in the top-left corner of your
screen.
• Having many windows open tends to clutter up the Taskbar and slow down your
computer.
• Tabs are preferable because they allow you to have several web pages open
within one Internet Explorer window.

Student activity 3: Using Windows and Tabs

• Open an extra window by using one of two methods:


o In the Taskbar (at the bottom), right-click on the Internet Explorer icon
and then left-click on Internet Explorer, or,

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o In the Menu Bar (near the top), click on File and New Window. Notice
how the new window appears in the Taskbar.
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.cbc.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key.
• Open a new tab by clicking on the New Tab button beside the existing tabs.
Notice how the new tab appears inside the window.
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ctv.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key.
• Click on each tab and notice how both websites are open in the same window.
• Look at the Taskbar and place your mouse on the Internet Explorer icon. Click on
the original Internet Explorer window to see the page that appeared when you
first opened Internet Explorer.
• Click on the CBC/CTV window again.
• Click on the X on the CTV tab to close it.
• Click on the X in the top right corner of the Internet Explorer window (containing
the CBC website) to close the whole window.

File menu

New Tab

New Window

5-2: Opening a New Window or a new tab

New tab
Tabs in use Close tab

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Lesson 4: Using the Internet Explorer Toolbar for Navigation

Objective: To teach your students how to use the Internet Explorer Toolbar for
navigation by introducing them to the Back and Forward buttons, as well as the
Recent Pages, Stop, Refresh and Home buttons.

Instructor’s Note
There are several browsers to choose from. Internet Explorer 8.1 was used during the
creation of this training manual. It is important to remember that websites may look
different in different browsers. It is also important to note that different browsers, even
different versions of the same browser, have different Menu Bar and Toolbar options. All

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of the following navigation tools should be present in different browsers, but they may
be accessed in different ways.

1. Show your students the Toolbar, making sure to include the following points:

• The Toolbar contains buttons to help you find, view, and print information
from web pages.
• What appears on the Toolbar will depend on the version of Internet Explorer
that you have.

2. Explain to your students how to use the Back and Forward buttons. Make sure
to include the following points:

• The Back button allows you to move back through the series of web pages
that you have visited.
• This is helpful when you want to return to a page you were just on or if a page
is not loading properly.
• The Forward button allows you to move forward through the series of web
pages that you have visited – but you must go back before you can go
forward.
• If you cannot find a page you were on by using these buttons, try using the
Recent Pages function instead.

Student Activity 4: Using the Back and Forward Buttons

• Click on the Back button twice to move back two pages.


• Click on the Forward button twice to move forward again.

3. Explain to your students how to use the Recent Pages button, making sure to
include the following points:

• Recent Pages allows you to see a complete list of the web pages that you
have visited since opening Internet Explorer.
• You can use the Recent Pages list to revisit a web page without using the
Back button to scroll through many websites.
• Select a site from the drop-down list to go back to that page.

Student Activity 5: Using the Recent Pages Button

• Click on the Recent Pages button.


• Select New Titles to return to the New Titles web page.

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Back Forward Recent Pages Button
Toolbar

List of recent pages

Figure 5-5: Previous Pages

4. Explain to your students how to use the Stop and Refresh buttons. Make sure to
include the following points:

• The Stop button will stop a web page from opening.


• The Refresh button will make the current page reopen.
• Refreshing the web page is useful when you want to see the most updated
version of the web page.
• You may also wish to stop and refresh a web page when it is taking too long
to open.

Note to Instructor:

Leave the following section (point 5) out if it is not possible to change the Home Page
on the computer that you are teaching with. If your students have their own computers
at home, tell them that they can do Activity 6 in their Classroom Handouts and Activities
on their own.

5. Explain to your students how to use the Home button. Make sure to include the
following points:

• The Home Page is the page that opens every time you open an Internet
Explorer window.

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• The default Home Page is probably the company website of your internet
service provider. but you can change the Home Page to any web page that
you want.
• It is a good idea to choose a page that you like to visit often (eg. The Weather
Network, CBC, the Ottawa Public Library, Google, your web-based email,
etc.)
• You can only choose a Home Page for your personal computer – it is not
available on public library computers.

Student Activity 6: Selecting a Home Page

• Click on the Home button to return to the current Home Page.


• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.cbc.ca
• Click on the arrow beside the Home button to access the Home Page menu.
• Click on Add or Change Home Page...
• Select Use this webpage as your only home page.
• Click Yes.
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ottawa.ca
• Click on the Home button to return to the new Home Page that you chose.

Refresh Stop Home


Home Page menu

Change Home Page

Figure 5-6: Stop, Refresh, and Home

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Use this webpage as
your Home Page

Figure 5-7: Home Page

New Vocabulary
Internet Service Provider, Refresh

Outcome: Students now understand how to use the Back and Forward arrows, as
well as the Recent Pages, Stop, Refresh and Home buttons.

Lesson 5: Printing with Internet Explorer

Objective: To show your students how to print web pages using Internet Explorer.

1. Tell your students that you will show them three ways to print information from the
internet, making sure to include the following points:

• The most direct way to print information from a web page is to simply click on the
Print icon on the Internet Explorer Toolbar; however this is not recommended
because:
o Web pages are all made by different people, using different software, so
they will not all look the same when printed as they do on the screen.
o Often only parts of the web page will print.
o Some pages contain advertising or lots of blank space that you do not
need.
• When you click on Print, a Print box will appear with 4 printing options:
o “All” (all pages will be printed)
o “Selection” (prints only a section of text that you have highlighted)

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o “Current Page” (the page that the cursor is on will be printed)
o “Pages” (you must enter the range of page numbers you wish to print)

2. Explain to your students what Print Preview is for, making sure to include the
following points:

• Print Preview lets you see how the website content will fit on a printed page.
• Seeing how a website will print can help you to avoid wasting paper on black
pages and advertising.
• Look at the bottom of the Print Preview window to see how many printed
pages will be required to print the whole document.
• Use the “Next Page” and “Previous Page” buttons to see how all of the pages
will look.
• Take note of the ones that you would like to print.

Student Activity 7: Printing (Print Preview)

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ottawa.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key.
• Click on Public Swimming Schedules.
• Next to the hyperlink “Swim Type”, click on the down arrow to get a drop-
down list.
• Select 50+ Swim.
• Click on Search Schedules.
• Click on File in the Menu Bar.
• Click on Print Preview to see how the page will look when it prints.
File menu
Print Preview

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Next Page
Figure 5-8: Deciding to Print
Print

Figure 5-9: Print Preview

• If possible click on the Next Page arrow to see how all the pages will look
when they are printed.
• Click on the X in the top right corner to close Print Preview.
• Click on the arrow beside the Print button.
• Click on Print...
• In this case, the page being printed appears well in Print Preview and all of
the information fits on one page, so under “Page Range” select All.
• Click on the arrows beside the “Number of copies” box to select the number
of copies that you would like to print.
• Click on the Print button (or the Cancel button if you do not wish to print).

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Selected printer

Select number of copies

Select which
pages to print

Print
Figure 5-10: Print Box

Note to Instructor: Knowing how to copy and paste into WordPad or Word is a very
useful thing for your students to know if Print Preview or Selection is not working for
them. However if you feel this would be too advanced for your students you can omit
point 3 below.

3. Explain to your students that if the information on the web page does not appear
properly in Print Preview it is preferable to copy it from the web page and paste it
into a word processing program like WordPad in order to print it.

Student Activity 8: Printing (Copy and Paste)

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ottawa.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Highlight the text that you wish to print.
• Copy the highlighted text by using the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+C.
• Open WordPad.
• In WordPad, place the cursor where you would like the text to be.
• Use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+V to paste the text.
• Click on File in the Menu Bar and then click on Print...
File menu Print..

Figure 5-11: Printing in WordPad


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Print

Figure 5-12: Print Box in Wordpad

New Vocabulary
Print Preview

Outcome: Students now know how to use Print Preview and Print to print web
pages..

Lesson 6: Using the Find on this Page Function.


Objective: To show students how to use the Internet Explorer Toolbar to find a
specific word on a web page.

1. Explain to your students how to use the Find on this Page function. Show them how
to find it and demonstrate a search. Make sure to include the following points:

• Find on this Page lets you find a specific word on a web page – everywhere that
it appears.
o This is helpful when there is a lot of text on a page and you wish to see
only the section that is relevant to your search.

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Edit menu Find on this Page

Figure 5-13: Find on this Page

Student Activity 9: Find on this page

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.biblioottawalibrary.ca/en.
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on Browse in the web page’s menu bar.
• Click on Online resources in the left-hand margin.
• Click on the word Edit in the Menu Bar and select Find on this Page from
the drop-down menu. A search box will appear in the top left-hand corner of
the page.
• Click in the search box.
• Type: newspapers
• Notice how the word is highlighted on the web page.
• Toggle between the highlighted words by repeatedly clicking on Next or by
pressing the Enter key.
• The word that your cursor is on is highlighted in red, blue or black; the others
are highlighted in yellow.

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Find on page search box

Figure 5-14: Results of Find on this Page

Outcome: Students now know where to find Find on this Page and how to use it.

Lesson 7: Using Text Size and Zoom


Objective: To show students how to use the Text Size and Zoom features in
Internet Explorer to make web pages more readable.

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1. Explain to students that the Text Size function is available to make the text on a web
page bigger or smaller. Be sure to include the following points:

• Text Size only changes the size of the text – images and borders will stay the
same .
• This may cause some distortion on the web page, as this is not the way that the
web page was intended to be viewed.
• Some text or images may be harder to view due to overlapping.

Student Activity 10: Text Size

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: ottawa.bibliocommons.com
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on View in the Menu Bar.
• Move down the drop-down menu until your cursor rests on Text Size. You will
see a side menu on the right-hand side.
• Click on Largest.
• Select Medium to return to the original size.

Text Size Size options

Figure 5-15: Text Size

2. Explain to students that the Zoom function is available to make the whole web page
appear larger or smaller. Be sure to include the following points:

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• Zoom is like a magnifier – it does not make any one element on the page bigger
or smaller but brings the whole page closer to you.
• When you zoom in, you may have to scroll left and right as well as up and down
to see the whole page.
• It is useful to zoom in on a specific part of a web page to see it more clearly.

Student Activity 11: Zoom

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.octranspo.com
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard
• Click on English.
• Click on Routes and Maps.
• Click on View in the Menu Bar.
• Move your cursor down the drop-down menu until it rests on Zoom. You will then
see a side menu to the right.
• Click on 200%.
• Select 100% to return to the original size.

View Menu Zoom


Zoom options

Figure 5-16: Text Zoom

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Outcome: Students now know 2 ways of making the web page more readable if
they are having problems viewing smaller print.

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Lesson 8: Using View Source
Objective: To show your students why they need to use a web browser by
activating the View Source option.

1. Explain to students why web pages can only be read using a browser, making
sure to include the following points:

• We need software to view websites because they are written in a computer


language, or code that a browser interprets for us, Internet Explorer is one
example of a browser.
• Without a browser you would just see text and symbols that make up the
code.
• The code that you see in View Source is just one of the languages that
computer programmers use to create software and websites.

Student Activity 12: Using View Source

• Remain on the OC Transpo website.


• Click on View in the Menu Bar.
• Move down the drop-down menu and click on Source.

View menu Source

Figure 5-17: Find View Source

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Figure 5-18: A Web page Without a Browser

Outcome: Students now understand why they need a program called a web
browser to access the Internet.

Note to Instructor:
1. Please make copies of the form below, which is also found in the “Classroom
Handouts and Activities” handout for Appendix A. Give this form to your
students, and if time allows, have them fill it out in class. If that does not work,
tell them to fill it out and bring it back when you teach Module 6. This will give
you time to create their Gmail accounts. Be sure to ask them for phone numbers
and good times to call as you may have to have Google phone them with a
verification code to complete the Gmail account.
2. Although this is the end of Module 5/Appendix A, you will find a lesson on
creating and using favourites in Appendix B. If your students have asked you
about creating favourites or if they have their own computers and you feel that
they might be interested in creating favourites, you may want to include this in
this lesson or at least give them the “Classroom Handouts and Activities” section
and the “Supplementary Resources and Activities” section of Appendix B.

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Web-based Email Questionnaire

In order to finish this Module, you must have a Gmail account. This is not the same as the
email account from your Internet Service Provider or another web-based email account like
Hotmail or Yahoo. To ensure that the workshop runs smoothly, we will be setting up an
account for you ahead of time. To set up the account we need you to answer the following 4
questions:

Please Answer all 4 Questions:

1. What is your first and last name?

_______________________ _________________________

first name last name

2. What do you want to use as your Gmail address? (This should ideally be some form of
your name. Please be specific. Using just a first name will not do, as there are hundreds
of millions of Gmail accounts and each one must be unique.)

______________________________________________

3.What do you want to use as your password? (It should be at least 8 digits long. Upper
and lower case letters can be used but cannot be substituted for each other.)

__________________________________________

4. What is your date of birth?

_________________________________________

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To Log into your Gmail account, go to www.gmail.com

In the box for Username or Email, type the username as it appears in Question 1. You do not
need the @gmail.com to sign in.

In the box for Password, type your password.

Click on the button labelled “Sign in”.

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APPENDIX A : CLASSROOM HANDOUTS AND ACTIVITIES
Activity 1: Opening a Website

• Click on the Start button (globe).


• Click on All Programs.
• Click on Internet Explorer.
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.biblioottawalibrary.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.

Internet Explorer Address Bar

Activity 2: Using Hyperlinks

On the Ottawa Public Library website (www.biblioottawalibrary.ca):


• Place your cursor on the words Continue in English so that the cursor changes
from an arrow to a pointing hand.
• Click ONCE to enter the Library’s website.
• Place your cursor on the word Browse in the web page’s Menu Bar and click.
• Click ONCE on the word Catalogue to go to the Library’s catalogue
• Click on New Titles (near the top of the screen) to see new items that the Library
has recently purchased.
• Click on General Fiction – On Order to go to a page listing all the new novels
that the Library has ordered recently.
• Click on Published Date and then 2013 to only see the novels that were
published in 2013.
Activity 3: Using Windows and Tabs

• Open an extra window by using one of two methods:


o In the Taskbar (at the bottom) right-click on the Internet Explorer icon
and then left-click on Internet Explorer.
or
o In the Menu Bar (near the top), click on File and New Window. -
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.cbc.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key.
• Open a new tab by clicking on the New Tab button beside the existing tabs.
Notice how the new tab appears inside the window.
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ctv.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key.
• Click on each tab and notice how both websites are open in the same window.
• Look at the Taskbar and click on the original Internet Explorer window to see the
page that appeared when you first opened Internet Explorer.
• Click on the CBC/CTV window again.
• Click on the X on the CTV tab to close it.
• Click on the X in the top right corner of the Internet Explorer window (containing
the CBC website) to close the whole window.

Windows and Tabs

File menu Tabs in use


New tab
Close tab
Placing mouse here will bring up pictures of all tabs and
windows open in Windows 7

New Window Taskbar

Windows in use (Windows XP)


Activity 4: Using the Back and Forward Buttons

• Click on the Back button twice to move back two pages.


• Click on the Forward button twice to move forward again.

Activity 5: Using the Recent Pages Button

• Click on the Recent Pages button


• Select New Titles to return to the New Titles web page.

Navigating with the Internet Explorer Toolbar

Back button Stop loading


Forward button Refresh web page

Recent
Pages
button
List of recent pages
(arrow)

Activity 6: Selecting a Home Page (can only be done on your own computer, not a City
of Ottawa computer)

• Click on the Home button to return to the current Home Page.


• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.cbc.ca
• Click on the arrow beside the Home button to access the Home Page menu.
• Click on Add or Change Home Page...
• Select Use this webpage as your only home page.
• Click Yes.
• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.
• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ottawa.ca
• Click on the Home button to return to the new Home Page that you chose.

Activity 7: Printing (Print Preview)

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ottawa.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key.
• Click on Public Swimming Schedules.
• Next to the hyperlink “Swim Type”, click on the down arrow to get a drop-
down list.
• Select 50+ Swim.
• Click on Search Schedules.
• Click on File in the Menu Bar.
• Click on Print Preview to see how the page will look when it prints.
• If possible click on the Next Page arrow to see how all the pages will look
when they are printed.
• Click on the X in the top right corner to close Print Preview.
• Click on the arrow beside the Print button.
• Click on Print...
• In this case, the page being printed appears well in Print Preview and all of
the information fits on one page, so under “Page Range” select All.
• Click on the arrows beside the “Number of copies” box to select the number
of copies that you would like to print.
• Click on the Print button (or the Cancel button if you do not wish to print).
Print Box

Activity 8: Printing (Copy and Paste)

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.ottawa.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Highlight the text that you wish to print.
• Copy the highlighted text by using the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+C.
• Open WordPad.
• In WordPad, place the cursor where you would like the text to be.
• Use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+V to paste the text.
• Click on File in the Menu Bar and then click on Print...

Activity 9: Find on this page

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.biblioottawalibrary.ca/en
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on Browse in the web page’s menu bar.
• Click on Online resources in the left-hand margin.
• Click on the word Edit in the Menu Bar and select Find on this Page from the
drop-down menu. A search box will appear in the top left-hand corner of the
page.
• Click in the search box.
• Type: newspapers
• Notice how the word is highlighted on the web page.
• Toggle between the highlighted words by repeatedly clicking on Next or by
pressing the Enter key.
• The word that your cursor is on is highlighted in red, blue or black; the others are
highlighted in yellow.

Activity 10: Text Size

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: ottawa.bibliocommons.com
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on View in the Menu Bar.
• Move down the drop-down menu until your cursor rests on Text Size. You will
see a side menu on the right-hand side.
• Click on Largest.
• Select Medium to return to the original size.

Activity 11: Zoom

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.octranspo.com
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard
• Click on English.
• Click on Routes and Maps.
• Click on View in the Menu Bar.
• Move your cursor down the drop-down menu until it rests on Zoom. You will then
see a side menu to the right.
• Click on 200%
• Select 100% to return to the original size.
Activity 12: Using View Source

• Remain on the OC Transpo website.


• Click on View in the Menu Bar.
• Move down the drop-down menu and click on Source.
• The code that you see in “View Source” is just one of the languages that
computer programmers use to create software and websites.
This form is to be filled out and returned to your instructor before you begin
Module 6.

Web-based Email Form

In order to start Module 7, you must have a Gmail account. This is not the
same as the email account from your Internet Service Provider or another
web-based email account like Hotmail or Yahoo. To ensure that the
workshop runs smoothly, we will be setting up an account for you ahead of
time. To set up the account we need you to answer the following 4 questions:

Please answer all 4 Questions:

1. What is your first and last name?

_______________________ _________________________
First name Last name

2. What do you want to use as your Gmail address? (This should ideally be
some form of your name. Please be specific. Using just a first name will not
do, as there are hundreds of millions of Gmail accounts and each one must
be unique.)

______________________________________________

3. What do you want to use as your password? (It should be at least 8 digits
long. Upper and lower case letters can be used but cannot be substituted for each
other.

__________________________________________

4. What is your date of birth?

_________________________________________
To Log into your Gmail account, go to www.gmail.com

In the box for Username or Email, type the username as it appears in


Question 1. You do not need the @gmail.com to sign in

In the box for Password, type your password.

Click on the button labelled “Sign in”.


APPENDIX B
FAVORITES

B-1
APPENDIX B: LESSON PLAN

B-2
1. Explain what favorites are, making sure to include the following points:

• Favorites is a list of favorite websites that you visit often.


• Adding a website to your Favorites list makes it faster and easier for you to visit
it.
• It is the address of the website that is saved, so if the website changes
addresses, you will have to update your Favorites list.
• You can see the list by clicking on the Favorites button.
• The websites in your Favorites list can be organized by using folders. Give the
folders names to describe the types of websites that you want to keep in them.

Favorites Add to Favorites...

Figure B-1: The Favorites List

Student Activity: Adding a Favorite and Creating a New Folder

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.weather.gc.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on Ottawa.
• Click on the Favorites button.
• Click on Add to Favorites.

B-3
• Click in the box beside “Name”.
• Type: Environment Canada.
• Click on New Folder.
• Click in the box beside “Folder Name”.
• Type: Weather.
• Click on Create.
• Click on Add.

Type a name

Put it in a new folder

Type a folder name

Figure B-2: Create a Folder


Create the folder

Add to the Weather


Figure B-3: Add a Favorite to the Folder folder in Favorites

B-4
Figure B-4: Favorite Inside the Weather Folder

Student Activity: Adding another Favorite to the Same Folder

• Click ONCE in the Address bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.theweathernetwork.com
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on Ottawa.
• Click on the Favorites button.
• Click on Add to Favorites.
• Click on the arrow beside the “Create in” textbox to see the list of folders.
• Click on Weather.
• Click on Add.
Add to Favorites...

Figure B-5: Add another Favorite

B-5
Weather Folder

List of Folders

Figure B-6: Select the Weather Folder

Add

Figure B-7: Add the New Favorite to the Weather Folder

Figure B-8: Two Favorites inside the Weather Folder

B-6
2. Describe the Favorites Bar, making sure to include the following points:

• The Favorites Bar is underneath the Address Bar – It contains buttons that are
links to websites.
• You can add buttons for the websites that you visit most often (eg. Google).
• As with the Favorites list, the Favorites bar saves the web address of the
website, not the content, so if the website’s address changes, you will have to
find the new website and add it to your Favorites bar again

Student Activity: Adding a Website to the Favorites Bar

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type:www.cbc.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on Add to Favorites Bar.
• Click on the Back button to return to the previous page.
• Click on the CBC button that you just added to go to the CBC website.

Add to the Favorites Bar


Favorites Bar

Figure B-9: Add a Favorite to the Favorites Bar

B-7
Figure B-10: A Favorite has Been Added to the Favorites Bar

B-8
APPENDIX B: CLASSROOM HANDOUTS AND ACTIVITIES
Activity 1: Adding a Favorite and Creating a New Folder

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.weather.gc.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on Ottawa.
• Click on the Favorites button.
• Click on Add to Favorites.
• Click in the box beside “Name”.
• Type: Environment Canada
• Click on New Folder.
• Click in the box beside “Folder Name”.
• Type: Weather.
• Click on Create.
• Click on Add.

Activity 2: Adding another Favorite to the Same Folder

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.theweathernetwork.com
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on Ottawa.
• Click on the Favorites button.
• Click on Add to Favorites.
• Click on the arrow beside the “Create in” textbox to see the list of folders.
• Click on Weather.
• Clickon Add.

Activity 3: Adding a Website to the Favorites Bar

• Click ONCE in the Address Bar to highlight the current address.


• Press the Backspace button to erase the current address.
• Type: www.cbc.ca
• Click on the Go to arrow or press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on Add to Favorites Bar.
• Click on the Back button to return to the previous page.
• Click on the CBC button that you just added to go to the CBC website.
APPENDIX B : SUPPLEMENTARY RESOURCES AND
ACTIVITIES
Older Adults Training Curriculum

Module 5: Lesson 8 Adding Web Pages and Folders in Favorites

1. Create a folder named “Search Web sites”:


• Click on the Address Bar so that address is in blue and pulsing.
• Type www.google.ca
• Press the Enter key on your keyboard. (You will then be on the Google
page.)
• Click on the Favorites icon in the Toolbar.
• Click on Add to Favorites.
• Click on the button labeled New Folder.
• Beside “Folder Name” type: Search Web sites.
• Click on Create.

2. Put www.google.ca into the newly created folder:


• Folder “Search Web sites” will be in the box labeled “Create in”.
• Click on Add.

3. Go to Yahoo Canada and place it in the same folder:


• Click on the Address Bar so that address is in blue and pulsing.
• Type ca.yahoo.com and press the Enter key on your keyboard.
• Click on the Favorites icon in the Toolbar.
• Click on Add to Favorites.
• Click on the down arrow beside the words “Create In”, to get a list of folders.
Find and click on the folder Search Web sites.. (The words will turn blue and
the folder icon will open.)
• Click on Add.

4. Find the websites that you saved:


• Click on the Favorites icon in the Toolbar.
• Find and click on the folder Search Web sites.
• You will see the websites that you added.
GLOSSARY
Address Bar

A rectangular opening near the top of a web browser which displays the website
address or URL of the web page being displayed. You should be able to click in the
opening and type in a new web page address.

Advanced Search

A useful feature in many search engines which allows you to narrow your search by
specifying additional restrictions like language, document type and domain name.

Attachment:

A computer file or photo that has been sent with an email.

Anti-virus Software:

A type of computer software which is used to protect your computer by detecting and
deleting malicious software trying to access your computer.

BCC:

Abbreviation of “Blind Carbon Copy”. In email systems it means that a copy of the
message will be sent to whoever is in the BCC, but the message recipient(s) (in the “To”
and “CC” ) will be unaware that a copy has been sent to someone else.

Box:
See CPU

Browser:

Shortened form of “Web Browser”, which is a piece of software used to view web sites
found on the World Wide Web.

Browsing:

Using a Web Browser to explore the internet.

Bullets:

Atypographical symbol, often a black circle, which is used in front of items in a list to
emphasize them.
Cached Page:

A copy of a web page stored in a search engine’s server which is used to create your
search results and can often be viewed even if the website in question is not working.

CC:

Abbreviation of “Carbon Copy”. When used in email systems, it means that a copy of a
message will be sent to the email in the CC box, and the person to whom the email is
addressedwill be aware that a copy was sent to someone else.

Chat:

Real-time communication involving the sending and receiving of messages between 2


or more people typing text into their computers.

Check box:
See Select Box

Client-Based Email:

Email provided by a company or Internet Service Provider (ISP) where the email is
downloaded from a server onto a person’s computer. Once the email recipient leaves
the company or ISP, the email address disappears.

Clipart:

A collection of ready-made artwork that can be inserted into a document by someone


doing word processing.

Computer Screen:
See Monitor

Computer Virus:

A small program which is loaded onto your computer without your knowledge and which
can reproduce itself. It can interfere with the running of your computer and its software,
erase information on your hard drive, and infect other computers and networks if
allowed to attach itself to a computer program. To protect your computer from computer
viruses you, must have an up-to-date antivirus program.
Contact List:

A list of screen names or email addresses created by an online entity. In email terms,
it’s a collection of email addresses which you have previously used or physically added
to your contact list, or from which messages have been sent to you. . You can use your
contact list to keep track of people to whom you would like to send email messages.

CPU:

Abbreviation of “Central Processing Unit”, the piece of electronic circuitry which is


essentially the brains of the computer. Also called a processor or microprocessor, it is
also the term often used to describe the box or the tower which houses the CPU as well
as the computer’s other components.

Cursor:

The position on the screen of your mouse or pointing device. It is often also used to
describe the position of the flashing bar which is where text will appear when typing in a
document.

Database:

A collection of information organized in a way to make it searchable by a computer


program.

Default:

The original setting for a computer or program. It is the setting that will automatically be
used, unless it is changed by the user. For example, in some computers the default
Font setting for WordPad is the font called Times New Roman.

Desktop:

The Windows interface displayed on your computer monitor when you turn on your
computer. It is called a desktop because in computer terms, it has all the objects you
might find on a physical desktop to help you complete your tasks.
Domain Name:

A unique name that represents a specific website or server. Often used interchangeably
with the terms web address and URL. The main difference is that the domain name is
the first part of a web address. It ends with something called a top level domain
(examples of top level domains are .com, .ca, .org) and precedes the first slash in a
web address or URL.

Drop-Down Menu

A vertical list of options that appear below an item when you click on it. Drop-down
menus appear when you click on an item in a menu bar, or when you click on a down
arrow beside a text box.

Ebook:

Shortened form of “electronic book” which is a digital book published to be read on an


electronic device like an ebook reader, tablet or computer.

Email:

Shortened form of “electronic mail” , which is a method of exchanging digital messages


across the internet or other computer networks.

FAQ:

An abbreviation pronounced as the separate letters “f a q”, or an acronym pronounced


as “fack”. It’s a series of questions and answers to supposedly common questions.
Although it started off as a way to avoid having to answer the same questions over and
over again to new users of an older system called Usenet, it quickly expanded as a
convention to provide help to users of a web page or computer program. It has migrated
offline as well and can refer to any series of questions and answers on a particular
topic.

File:

A collection of computer data, usually in the form of a document, picture or computer


program, that is saved to the hard drive on your computer or your USB flash drive so
you can retrieve it later.
Firewall:

A piece of hardware or software which limits the types of data that can enter or leave a
computer system and therefore helps protect it from being accessed by unauthorized
users.

Flash Drive:
See USB Flash Drive

Folder:

A place on your hard drive or flash drive where files can be saved. It can be described
as a placeholder or container where you can store files. The space it takes up on your
hard drive or flash drive is equal to the space taken up by the files inside it.

Font:

A style of lettering that determines what a word processing document will look like.

Gmail:

The name given to Google’s free web-based email service.

Google:

1. An internet company noted for a variety of internet products, including searching,


email and online software.
2. To search for information using an internet search engine.

Hardware:

The physical parts or components of a computer.

Home Page:

1. The starting page or front page of a website.


2. The web page that appears when a browser is first opened or when the Home
icon is clicked.

Hyperlink:

An element in an electronic document or web page which, when clicked on, will bring
the user to a different page in a document or a different page on the Web. Hyperlinks in
web pages are often in coloured and underlined text, but not always. You can tell that
you are indeed on a hyperlink if your cursor changes from a pointer to a hand.

Icons

Small pictures or graphics which symbolize a place, file, program or action. They can
be found on the Windows desktop and in toolbars. When clicked on (or double-clicked
on the Windows desktop), they will start an action, open a program or bring the user to
a specific place on their computer.

Inbox

An electronic folder where incoming emails arrive, or a listing of incoming messages.

Internet:

A worldwide system of computer networks which is mainly used to disseminate


information through the World Wide Web and to provide a structure for email.

Internet Explorer

The name of the web browser created by the company Microsoft and which is installed
as part of the Windows Operating System. There are many other kinds of web
browsers. The most popular ones are Firefox and Google Chrome for computers
running Windows, and Safari for MacIntosh (Apple) computers or devices.

Internet Service Provider:

Also called ISP, this is a company that provides consumers and businesses with a
connection to the internet for a fee.

ISP
See Internet Service Provider

Jump Drive
See USB Flash Drive

Keyboard Shortcut:

A key or combination of keys which, when pressed, performs an action in a computer


program.

Keyword:
Words or phrases which are used as index terms in computer-based searching.

Label

In Gmail this is a keyword created by the user to describe the content of a message. It
is used to group similar messages and to help find archived messages.

Laptop Computer:

Often also called a notebook, netbook or Ultrabook,this is a smaller and more portable
computer which is suitable for travelling or for spaces which are too small for desktop
computers.

Link:

Shortened form of Hyperlink.

Malware:

A general term describing software that is designed to harm your computer, such as
computer viruses.

Maximize Windows button:

One of the buttons located in the top right-hand corner of a normal Windows program
which, when clicked on, allows the screen to take over the full desktop.

Memory stick:
See USB Flash Drive

Menu:

A list of commands or options from which you are expected to make a choice.

Menu Bar:

A horizontal list of items which, when clicked on, produce drop-downmenus. It appears
at the top of a Windows screen just below the Title Bar, as well as near the top of some
web pages.
Minimize Window button:

One of the buttons located in the top- right-hand corner of a normal Windows program
which, when clicked on, keeps the Windows program open but removes it from your
Desktop and keeps it open on your Taskbar.

Monitor:

Also known as your computer screen, the monitor displays the text and graphics
generated by the computer.

Mouse:

Pointing device that moves the pointer or cursor around on the screen and allows you to
select or move objects and highlight text.

Mouse over:

A picture or command which is produced when the user places their mouse over a
certain area of the computer screen or web page.

Netbook:
See Laptop Computer

Notebook Computer:
See Laptop Computer

Operating System:

A program used to control a computer. It provides the link between the user and the
computer as well as the link between the programs on the computer and the computer.
Examples of operating systems are Windows and Mac.

Peripheral:

A piece of hardware that works with your computer but is not an essential part of it.
Examples of peripherals are printers, scanners and USB flash drives.

Phishing:

An attempt to get personal or financial information by mimicking an established website,


such as that of a bank, Yahoo, or PenPal, and directing users to a link that looks
legitimate. The user is then asked to verify their identity by signing in with a username
and password.
Point and Click:

Putting the tip of the pointer’s arrow in the middle of an item and clicking once with the
left mouse button.

Pop-Up Ad

An ad which may suddenly appear when you are trying to access a web page. It may
appear either on top of the web page or underneath it (a pop-under).

Print Preview:

A feature of Internet Explorer and other programs which shows what a page will look
like once it is printed (which often differs from what is visible on the computer screen).

Ranking:

The mathematical relationship between a set of items. When applied to Search Engine
results, it determines the order in which websites appear in a list of results. Although
search engines tend to keep their ranking criteria secret, a couple of the factors are the
number of times your keywords appear and the popularity of the websites.

Reboot:

To restart a computer by closing down and restarting the operating system.

Refresh:

To update a web page by reloading it into your Browser.

Results Page:
See Search Results Page

Ribbon:

An extended toolbar that presents a series of icons, often arranged in groupings. It is


the interface used by Microsoft office programs since 2007 and Microsoft WordPad
since Windows 7.
Scanner:

A piece of hardware that optically scans physical pieces of paper which could be
images, photos, printed text or handwriting, and converts it to a digital image that can be
loaded onto a computer.

Screen:
See Monitor

Scrolling:

To cause text and graphics to move up and down or side to side on a computer monitor
in order to allow the user to see the full page.

Search Engine:

A program or web page which allows someone to use keywords to search for
documents on the Web and which returns a list of the documents or Web pages where
the keywords were found.

Search Result Page:

A list of web pages displayed by a search engine in response to a search enquiry.

Select Box:

Used in online resources and sometimes called a check box, it is a small square which,
when clicked on, produces a check mark. It is used to select an item in a list so that the
user can then perform some sort of action on the item selected.

Shortcuts:

Also called file shortcuts or link files, allows a single file to appear to be in more than
one location by linking it to a file, folder or icon in another location Often used to place
links to files on your desktop.

Software:

Also calleda computer program is a set of instructions written in computer language


that gives a user the ability to perform a variety of tasks on the computer.

Spam

Anonymous unsolicited bulk emails.

Spyware:
A type of software that installs itself on a computer without the owner’s knowledge,
gathers information about the computer user and transmits that information back to the
organization that created it.

Start button:

Also called a Start Globe in Windows 7, this is a button normally located in the bottom
left-hand corner of the screen which is used to launch something called a Start Menu.

Start Menu:

A menu that appears when you click on the Start button. It provides access to all of the
programs (software) that reside on your computer, as well as the shutdown buttons
required to shut Windows down properly.

Taskbar:

A bar, usually at the bottom of the screen, that contains the Start button and shows
which programs are open and running.

Task Manager:

A utility program in an operating system that reports on the running of all programs and
processes on a computer. In Windows it will show you which programs are running
and which have stopped responding, and it will allow you to close any program or
application that has stopped responding.

Thumbnail:

Miniature version of a picture, which ismeant to give the user an idea of what the image
contains.

Toolbar:

A series of icons or small graphics, located beneath the Menu Bar, which provide
shortcuts to actions that can perform be performed with the Menu Bar.

Tower:
See CPU
Trash

In Gmail, this is the folder or place which contains the items that the user has identified
for deletion.

Ultrabook:
See Laptop Computer

URL:

Abbreviation of “Uniform Resource Locator” , which is the address of a specific web


page.

USB Flash Drive:

A memory device which can be plugged into the USB port of a computer. It can be used
to save and transport electronic files. It is also known as a flash drive, memory stick,
USB key, jump drive, etc.

Username:

A unique sequence of characters identifying a user of a computer or online system. It is


often based on a form of the person’s name and is usually used with a password to log
into a computer or other online system.

Virus:
See Computer Virus

Web Address:
See URL

Web-Based Email

Email provided for free by a website. The email recipient must go to that website in
order to receive or send email, and the email is stored on the internet, not on the email
recipient’s computer.

Web Browser:

A software program that translates a special computer language called HTML and
allows you to browse the World Wide Web. Popular examples include Windows Internet
Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, and Google Chrome.
Web Page:

A document written in a computer language normally referred to as HTML (Hypertext


Markup Language). A collection of web pages is usually referred to as a website.

Website:

A collection of related web pages emanating from a single organization or domain


name, which is hosted on at least one web server with access to the Internet.

Windows Explorer:

A computer program included with all versions of Windows that helps you to manage
your files and folders.

Windows Mouse

A computer mouse with 2 mouse buttons: a right mouse button used to bring up
shortcut menus, and a left mouse button. It may include additional optional buttons or
wheels for added functionality.

Word Processor:

A computer program which allows you to create, edit, save and print documents.
Examples of word processing programs are: Word, WordPerfect and WordPad (a
simple word processing program which comes free with the Windows operating
system).

World Wide Web:

A collection of specially formatted documents written in a computer language called


HTML (Hypertext Markup Language). These documents may contain graphics, audio
and video files and are connected through hyperlinks. To view these documents, the
user must use a program called a web browser. The World Wide Web may also be
referred to as “WWW” or “the Web”. Although it is sometimes also referred to as “the
internet”, in reality it is not synonymous with the internet but is accessed via the internet.