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scientists to popularize periodized ing effect does not require pro- variety of performance standards
training using both western and longing muscle tension to the relating to power, strength, or en-
eastern training methodology in his point of fatigue, and (d) the maxi- durance when compared with lin-
work entitled “A New System of mum training effects are derived ear strength-training models.
Training.” The publication repre- by muscle tension of no less than
sented a 5-phase system of peri- 40–50% of one’s single repetition ■ Support, Goals, and Phases
odization for athletics (noncompet- maximum (RM) (24). Matveyev The appropriate manipulation
itive preparation period—5 summarized the modern concept and sequencing of volume (the
months, precompetitive period—1 of periodization on the basis of total amount of weight lifted per
month, initial competitive period— these earlier ideas as well as his exercise, training session, micro-
6 weeks) (24). Ozolin (1949) own preliminary work (19). cycle, mesocycle, macrocycle) and
stressed the importance of consid- Matveyev divided the training year intensity (level of muscular activi-
ering the competitive calendar and into distinct phases, each with dif- ty that can be quantified in terms
climatic factors in periodization in ferent characteristics and special of power) guide the final outcome
his important text “Training the application to training strength of a training program (12, 27, 28,
Athlete.” Critically, he emphasized and power athletes (17, 23, 24). 32). Higher volumes of work
the importance of active rest as an Despite some modifications made should produce greater gains in
essential component of the transi- by sports scientist on the basis of strength and power measures
tion phase to maintain and im- the physiological characteristics of (12). It is possible to observe
prove performance preparation. different sports, the length of the strength and power improvements
Letonov (1950) published “Reflec- sports season, and the individual without marked changes in body
tion on the Systematic Formulation characteristics of various athletes, mass or body composition in mod-
of Training In Sovietsky Sport,” the fundamental concepts pre- erately trained subjects (17, 30).
which discouraged the formulation sented by Matveyev remain valid Training at relatively higher inten-
of training protocols on the basis of and widely used today (6, 11, 27). sity levels is related to more com-
the competition calendar alone. He The alteration of high-, medi- plete neural activation, which is a
felt that the stages of training were um-, and low-intensity sessions potential argument for the neces-
a consequence of physiological and phases of training alone facil- sity for higher intensity levels (10).
processes. The only flaw to his itates recovery and adaptation to Different physiological stimuli (hy-
thinking may have been his failure intense training more effectively pertrophic versus neural factors)
to recognize that the training loads that the use of monotonic increase likely interacted in different ways
affected these processes in turn in loading from phase to phase. to produce the gains in maximum
(24). Hettinger and Mueller (1955) The high-intensity training ses- strength observed between linear
established that lowest trainability sions would strongly activate the versus periodized strength-train-
occurred during the winter months relevant muscles, whereas the ing studies (1, 13, 14, 17). Pro-
and highest trainability took place low-intensity training sessions will longed training periods (months)
in summer and autumn, with a enhance restoration (8, 9). Addi- with relative higher intensities and
dramatic decrease in trainability on tional research has demonstrated little variation (linear training) can
the onset of winter (24). the importance of periodizing vari- result in neural fatigue, which is
Regarding strength training, ation in training, particularly re- indicative of overtraining (10).
Hettinger (1961) devised 4 fea- garding lower intensity days. Sev- The highest power outputs
tures of training, which provoke eral studies have attempted to may be realized at 40–80% of 1RM
supercompensation (adaptation of analyze models of periodized (largest amount of weight that can
muscle tissue through various strength-training programs (1, 13, be lifted for 1 complete repetition of
biochemical, structural, and me- 14, 16–18, 20, 21, 23, 30, 31, 33). a particular exercise) or 60–100%
chanical adjustments that result These studies were performed at a of RM (largest amount of weight
in increased performance) (24, time period (7–24 weeks) consis- than be lifted for a specific number
32). The 4 features were (a) pro- tent with mesocycle length. Ten of complete repetitions) (34). Train-
duction of adequate muscle ten- (14, 16–18, 20, 21, 23, 30, 31, 33) ing specific movements with a
sion is central to all muscle train- of these studies found that peri- higher exercise intensity (i.e., high
ing, (b) 1 single maximal strength odized strength-training models power) can produce greater effects
effort per day is sufficient to main- provided a statistically significant on power- and speed-related per-
tain progress, (c) maximum train- improvement in one or more of a formance than can linear strength

December 2002 Strength and Conditioning Journal 63


training. Periodization is strongly moderate/high intensity with mod- used to prepare the body for the
related to transfer of training effect erate/high volumes (strength increased demand of the next
and performance outcomes (28). To phase) to high intensity and low phase or period.
alter beneficially a variety of perfor- volume (power phase) (28, 32).
mance variables, particularly those The primary goal of the compe- ■ Periodization Application
concerned with power and speed, a tition period is to enable the athlete In the design and application
mesocycle should progress from an to reach peak strength and power of a periodized strength-training
emphasis on gaining strength to an through further increases in train- program, the conduction of a
emphasis on speed and power ing intensity accompanied by de- needs analysis (analysis of the per-
movements (28). creases in training volume (32). Ad- formance and fitness needs of both
The primary goals of periodiza- ditionally, skill technique and game the activity and the individual ath-
tion are the reduction of overtrain- strategy emphasis increases signif- lete involved in the sport) is essen-
ing potential and peaking at the icantly as time spent on physical tial (2, 7, 15, 27, 35). To conduct a
appropriate time or providing a conditioning decreases proportion- needs analysis, the following com-
maintenance program for sports ately. The competition period may ponents should be examined: (a)
with a specific season (28). Goals vary from a few weeks to several physiological and biomechanical
are met by appropriately manipu- months. Prolonged competition pe- requirements of sport, (b) injury
lating volume and intensity factors riods require some manipulation of profiles of sport, (c) each athlete’s
and by appropriately selecting ex- the intensity on a weekly or micro- strength and weaknesses, and (d)
ercises. Periodized programs are cycle basis. For sports with multi- available facilities, equipment, and
typically divided into 3 distinct ple major contents spread across budgeted resources. The phases
stages or phases (28, 32). The multiple weeks or months, the goal typically used during the prepara-
macrocycle is the largest division, is to preserve strength, power, and tory, competition, and peaking pe-
which typically constitutes an en- performance levels by following a riod are hypertrophy, strength,
tire training year but may also be maintenance program of moderate and power (2, 7, 15, 19, 22, 24, 27,
a period of many months up to 4 volumes and intensities (2–5). 32, 35).
years (Olympic athletes). Macrocy- The major goal of the peaking The hypertrophy phase is a
cles typically comprise two or more phase is to ensure that the athlete training period where the primary
mesocycles divided into several is at peak strength and power (32). goal is to increase muscle develop-
weeks to a few months. The num- The phase is characterized by very ment or a strength-endurance
ber of mesocycles is dependent on high-intensity and very low-vol- base in the case of strength-power
the goals of the athlete and, if ap- ume training activities. Typically, athletes. The goal is to develop an
plicable, the number of sport com- this period can only last for 3 endurance (muscle and metabolic)
petitions, contained within the pe- weeks because prolongation of base for more intense training
riod. Each mesocycle is divided this phase can potentially lead to using strength and conditioning
into 1 week to 4 weeklong micro- overtraining and decreased per- activities that may be specific or
cycles, which focuses on daily and formance (3–5, 22). nonspecific to the sport. Flexibility
weekly training variations (32). The transition or active rest training involves dynamic, static,
Each of these phases has dif- period serves to provide a break proprioceptive neuromuscular fa-
ferent goals and requires different between high-volume training and cilitated (PNF) stretching. Resis-
degrees of variation. The initial or high-intensity training between tance training includes sport-spe-
preparatory period occurs during the preparatory and competitive cific or nonsport-specific exercises
the time of the year when there are period (3–5). Furthermore, this pe- at high volume and low intensity.
no competitions and only a limited riod also focuses on nonsport-spe- Metabolic training includes a bal-
number of sport-specific skill prac- cific recreational activities per- ance of aerobic or anaerobic
tices of game strategy sessions. The formed at low intensities with low (strength-power athlete) interval
prime focus of this phase is to es- volumes (32). After a prolonged activities. Speed training focuses
tablish a base level of conditioning competitive phase, it is important on high-volume, low-intensity
to increase the athlete’s tolerance for an athlete’s long-term progress technique training.
for more intense training. Condi- to allow time to rehabilitate any The strength phase is a train-
tioning activities begin at relatively injuries and to rest, physically and ing phase where the major goal is
low intensity and high volumes (hy- mentally (3–5). Additionally, a 1- to increase maximal muscle force
pertrophy phase) and progress to week unloading period may be (2, 7, 15, 19, 22, 24, 27, 32, 35).

64 Strength and Conditioning Journal December 2002


During this phase, running pro- ity training involves dynamic, stat- strength or power phases may be
grams progress to interval sprints ic, and PNF stretching. Resistance increased to more traditional 4-
of moderate distance, plyometric training includes low-volume, high- week time periods, whereas the
activities become more intense, intensity, sport-specific exercises. hypertrophy phase may be either
jumping activities may be intro- Metabolic training uses sport-spe- decreased in length or eliminated.
duced, and strength training be- cific intervals with full or near full Additionally, with sports that place
comes more specific to the sport. recovery between intervals. a tremendous emphasis on
Flexibility training involves dy- The peaking phase is based on strength and power, such as foot-
namic, static, and PNF stretching. the premise that a better-condi- ball, in which hypertrophy is not
Resistance training includes sport- tioned athlete will hold a peak necessarily a goal of the competi-
specific exercises of moderate vol- longer (2, 7, 15, 19, 22, 24, 27, 32, tive phase, the model that uses the
ume and intensity. Metabolic 35). Four general considerations strength and power phases exclu-
training focuses on anaerobic in- should be analyzed for this phase: sively during this period may serve
terval training. Speed training uses (a) number of competitions neces- the performance needs of the ath-
moderate volume technique train- sary to reach peak performance, lete better.
ing, including towing and downhill (b) strategy to maintain top athlet- An annual, sports condition-
running. ic form, (c) program design to en- ing, strength training periodized
The power phase is a training sure that the best performance will training cycle comprised 5
period where the major goal is to occur at the right time, and (d) preparatory mesocycles and a
increase the speed of force devel- teaching the athlete how to handle competition mesocycle, with the
opment of the muscles or increase the activity of resting and the psy- last 3 weeks being a peaking phase
muscle power (2, 7, 15, 19, 22, 24, chological stress of competition. (Tables 1–3). The first mesocycle is
27, 32, 35). Strength training pro- Flexibility training involves dy- a 15-week period that includes 2
gresses to increased intensity; namic, static, and PNF stretching. weeks of a transitional phase, 4
speed work intensifies to near con- Resistance training incorporates weeks each of hypertrophy,
test pace. Full recovery is recom- very high-intensity, very low-vol- strength, and power phases and
mended between bouts of exercis- ume, sport-specific exercises. Low- concludes with 1 week of active
es and speed-training drills, which volume, sport-specific intervals, rest (Table 1). The goal of this first
may include sled-towing sprints with full or near full recovery be- mesocycle is to establish the ath-
against resistance and the incor- tween intervals is used for meta- lete’s RM during 4-week periods of
poration of uphill and downhill bolic and speed training. hypertrophy, strength, and power.
sprints. Flexibility training involves The transition phase is a short Athletes should attempt 1 extra
dynamic, static, and PNF stretch- (1 week) phase of light training repetition on the last set of each
ing. Resistance training includes where the goal is to recover physi- exercise. Each time an athlete
sport-specific exercises of low vol- cally and mentally from previous completes 1 extra repetition on the
ume and high intensity. Metabolic training (2, 7, 15, 19, 22, 24, 27, last set, the athlete will increase
training uses short work intervals 32, 35). Activities are done at a low the training load in the next work-
of maximal and near maximal in- volume and low intensity. No psy- out by 5% or the smallest move-
tensity with full recovery intervals. chological stress from training or ment (whichever is larger). During
Speed training focuses on high-in- competition should be present. the course of a 4-week period for
tensity, low-volume activities. Recreation games and light, unsu- the hypertrophy, strength, and
The competition phase is a po- pervised training are emphasized power phases, the RM should be
sition of the training year that be- during this phase. established for each exercise in
gins with the first competition each phase.
phase and ends with the last com- ■ Practical Application The second mesocycle through
petition. The competition phase The practical application sec- the fifth mesocycle represent 26
may last anywhere from a few tion represents a model used by weeks of preparatory training that
weeks to a few months. The athlete the author in the development of includes 4, 6-week mesocycles,
should reach peak condition dur- an annual macrocycle. This model with 1 week of active rest after
ing this phase characterized by may be modified depending on a every 12 weeks (Table 2). The goal
very high intensity and very low needs analysis of the performance is to continue to re-establish the
volume in training activities (2, 7, requirements of either the sport or athlete’s RM for each exercise in
15, 19, 22, 24, 27, 32, 35). Flexibil- the athlete. As an example, the each phase. Upon completion of

December 2002 Strength and Conditioning Journal 65


Table 1
First Mesocycle—Off-season (15 Weeks)

1. RM—the goal of the first mesocycle is to determine the athlete’s maximum weight that can be used for a specified
number of repetitions performed.
2. Each athlete should attempt one extra repetition on the last set of each exercise.
3. If the athlete is capable of completing one extra repetition on the last set:
a. The athlete will increase the training resistances the next workout by 5% or the smallest increment (whichever
is larger).
4. If the athlete is not capable of completing one extra repetition on the last set:
a. The athlete will keep the training resistances the same the next workout.

Phase Length of microcycle Workouts per week


Transitional 2 weeks 3
Hypertrophy 4 weeks 3
Strength 4 weeks 3
Power 4 weeks 3
Active rest 1 week 3

Table 2
Second Mesocycle–Fifth Mesocycle (26 Weeks)

1. RM—the goal of the second–fifth mesocycle is to re-establish the athlete’s maximum weight that can be used for
a specified number of repetitions performed.
2. Each athlete should attempt one extra repetition on the last set of each exercise on the heavy training workout
(100% or higher).
3. If the athlete is capable of completing one extra repetition on the last set:
a. The athlete should mark a + next to the training resistances to signify that the extra repetition was completed.
4. If the athlete is not capable of completing one extra rep on the last set:
a. The athlete should mark a * next to the training resistances to signify that the extra repetition was not com-
pleted.
5. Upon completing the second–fifth mesocycle workouts in each phase, the athlete will now have his or her new RM
(heaviest weight that all repetitions could be completed without an extra repetition) established.

the second–fifth mesocycles the cycle between hypertrophy, ■ Summary


athlete will have re-established his strength, and power workouts. The Periodized strength-training
or her new RM for each exercise in last 3 weeks of the competition programs are nonlinear protocols
each phase. For sports that have a mesocycle should be reserved for with variables that include inten-
competition mesocycle greater peaking phase, where further re- sity, sets, repetitions, and exercise
than 11 weeks, the fifth mesocycle ductions in training volume may speed that can be manipulated
may be modified to be a part of the be made while increasing training such that specific training goals
competition mesocycle. intensity to ensure the highest are emphasized during different
The competition mesocycle level of performance for the most segments of a microcycle, mesocy-
represents a minimum of 11 weeks critical competitions. Competition cle, or macrocycle (7, 12, 24, 27).
of competition-phase training (C) in Table 3 represents the prac- In addition to adjustments
(Table 3). The goal of this phase is tical application of a periodized throughout mesocycles, there is
to use the athlete’s maximum strength-training model used for also variation between training
weight established in the sec- football during the competition sessions, which is important for
ond–fifth mesocycles. Athletes will mesocycle. elite strength-training participants

66 Strength and Conditioning Journal December 2002


Table 2 cont.
Second Mesocycle–Fifth Mesocycle (26 Weeks)

Phase Week # First workout Second workout Third workout


Second mesocycle—off-season (6 weeks)
Hypertrophy 1 Day 1—Lt, 80% RM Day 2—Hvy, 100% RM Day 1—Med, 90% RM
Hypertrophy 2 Day 2—Med, 90% RM Day 1—Hvy, 100% RM Day 2—Lt, 80% RM
Strength 3 Day 1—Lt, 80% RM Day 2—Hvy, 100% RM Day 1—Med, 90% RM
Strength 4 Day 2—Med, 90% RM Day 1—Hvy, 100% RM Day 2—Lt, 80% RM
Power 5 Day 1—Lt, 80% RM Day 2—Hvy, 100% RM Day 1—Med, 90% RM
Power 6 Day 2—Med, 90% RM Day 1—Hvy, 100% RM Day 2—Lt, 80% RM
Third mesocycle (A)—off-season (7 weeks)
Hypertrophy 1 Day 1—Lt, 82.5% RM Day 2—Hvy, 102.5% RM Day 1—Med, 92.5% RM
Hypertrophy 2 Day 2—Med, 92.5% RM Day 1—Hvy, 102.5% RM Day 2—Lt, 82.5% RM
Strength 3 Day 1—Lt, 82.5% RM Day 2—Hvy, 102.5% RM Day 1—Med, 92.5% RM
Strength 4 Day 2—Med, 92.5% RM Day 1—Hvy, 102.5% RM Day 2—Lt, 82.5% RM
Power 5 Day 1—Lt, 82.5% RM Day 2—Hvy, 102.5% RM Day 1—Med, 92.5% RM
Power 6 Day 2—Med, 92.5% RM Day 1—Hvy, 102.5% RM Day 2—Lt, 82.5% RM
Active rest 7 Testing Testing Rest
Third mesocycle (B)—off-season (7 weeks)
Hypertrophy 1 Day 1—Lt, 85% RM Day 2—Hvy, 105% RM Day 1—Med, 95% RM
Hypertrophy 2 Day 2—Med, 95% RM Day 1—Hvy, 105% RM Day 2—Lt, 85% RM
Strength 3 Day 1—Lt, 85% RM Day 2—Hvy, 105% RM Day 1—Med, 95% RM
Strength 4 Day 2—Med, 95% RM Day 1—Hvy, 105% RM Day 2—Lt, 85% RM
Power 5 Day 1—Lt, 85% RM Day 2—Hvy, 105% RM Day 1—Med, 95% RM
Power 6 Day 2—Med, 95% RM Day 1—Hvy, 105% RM Day 2—Lt, 85% RM
Active rest 7 Testing Testing Rest
Fourth mesocycle (A)—preseason (6 weeks)
Hypertrophy 1 Day 1—Lt, 85% RM Day 2—Hvy, 105% RM Day 1—Med, 95% RM
Hypertrophy 2 Day 2—Med, 95% RM Day 1—Hvy, 105% RM Day 2—Lt, 85% RM
Strength 3 Day 1—Lt, 85% RM Day 2—Hvy, 105% RM Day 1—Med, 95% RM
Strength 4 Day 2—Med, 95% RM Day 1—Hvy, 105% RM Day 2—Lt, 85% RM
Power 5 Day 1—Lt, 85% RM Day 2—Hvy, 105% RM Day 1—Med, 95% RM
Power 6 Day 2—Med, 95% RM Day 1—Hvy, 105% RM Day 2—Lt, 85% RM
Fourth mesocycle (B)—preseason (6 weeks)
Hypertrophy 1 Day 1—Lt, 90% RM Day 2—Hvy, 110% RM Day 1—Med, 100% RM
Hypertrophy 2 Day 2—Med, 100% RM Day 1—Hvy, 110% RM Day 2—Lt, 90% RM
Strength 3 Day 1—Lt, 90% RM Day 2—Hvy, 110% RM Day 1—Med, 100% RM
Strength 4 Day 2—Med, 100% RM Day 1—Hvy, 110% RM Day 2—Lt, 90% RM
Power 5 Day 1—Lt, 90% RM Day 2—Hvy, 110% RM Day 1—Med, 100% RM
Power 6 Day 2—Med, 100% RM Day 1—Hvy, 110% RM Day 2—Lt, 90% RM
Fifth mesocycle (A)—preseason/in-season (7 weeks)
Hypertrophy 1 Day 1—Lt, 87.5% RM Day 2—Hvy, 107.5% RM Day 1—Med, 97.5% RM
Hypertrophy 2 Day 2—Med, 97.5% RM Day 1—Hvy, 107.5% RM Day 2—Lt, 87.5% RM
Strength 3 Day 1—Lt, 87.5% RM Day 2—Hvy, 107.5% RM Day 1—Med, 97.5% RM
Strength 4 Day 2—Med, 97.5% RM Day 1—Hvy, 107.5% RM Day 2—Lt, 87.5% RM
Power 5 Day 1—Lt, 87.5% RM Day 2—Hvy, 107.5% RM Day 1—Med, 97.5% RM
Power 6 Day 2—Med, 97.5% RM Day 1—Hvy, 107.5% RM Day 2—Lt, 87.5% RM
Active rest 7 Testing Testing Rest
Fifth mesocycle (B)—preseason/in-season (7 weeks)
Hypertrophy 1 Day 1—Lt, 95% RM Day 2—Hvy, 115% RM Day 1—Med, 105% RM
Hypertrophy 2 Day 2—Med, 105% RM Day 1—Hvy, 115% RM Day 2—Lt, 95% RM
Strength 3 Day 1—Lt, 95% RM Day 2—Hvy, 115% RM Day 1—Med, 105% RM
Strength 4 Day 2—Med, 105% RM Day 1—Hvy, 115% RM Day 2—Lt, 95% RM
Power 5 Day 1—Lt, 95% RM Day 2—Hvy, 115% RM Day 1—Med, 105% RM
Power 6 Day 2—Med, 105% RM Day 1—Hvy, 115% RM Day 2—Lt, 95% RM
Active rest 7 Testing Testing Rest
Note: Lt = light training resistance workout; Med = medium training resistance workout; Hvy = heavy training resistance work-
out; Testing = Tests measuring sport specific parameters (power, speed, agility).

December 2002 Strength and Conditioning Journal 67


Table 3
Competition (11 Weeks)

1. The goal of the competition phase is to use the athlete’s maximum weight established in the second–fifth
mesocycle.
2. Athletes will cycle between hypertrophy, strength, and power workouts weekly.
3. Competition A and B: weeks #1–#6 will focus on using 80% RM—light workouts, 90% RM—medium work-
outs, and 100% RM—heavy workouts.
4. Competition A: weeks #7–#11 will focus on using 82.5% RM—light workouts, 92.5% RM—medium work-
outs, and 102.5% RM—heavy workouts.
Competition B: weeks #7–#11 will focus on using 85% RM—light workouts, 95% RM—medium workouts,
and 105% RM—heavy workouts.
5. Competition C: weeks #1–#4 will focus on using 80% RM—light workouts, 90% RM—medium workouts, and
100% RM—heavy workouts.
6. Competition C: weeks #5–#8 will focus on using 85% RM—light workouts, 95% RM—medium workouts, and
105% RM—heavy workouts.
7. Competition C: weeks #9–#12 will focus on using 90% RM—light workouts, 100% RM—medium workouts,
and 110% RM—heavy workouts.

Phase Week # First workout Second workout Third workout


Competition (A)—in-season (11 weeks)
Hypertrophy 1 Day 1—Lt, 80% RM Day 2—Hvy, 100% RM Day 1—Med, 90% RM
Strength 2 Day 1—Lt, 80% RM Day 2—Hvy, 100% RM Day 1—Med, 90% RM
Power 3 Day 1—Lt, 80% RM Day 2—Hvy, 100% RM Day 1—Med, 90% RM
Hypertrophy 4 Day 2—Med, 90% RM Day 1—Hvy, 100% RM Day 2—Lt, 80% RM
Strength 5 Day 2—Med, 90% RM Day 1—Hvy, 100% RM Day 2—Lt, 80% RM
Power 6 Day 2—Med, 90% RM Day 1—Hvy, 100% RM Day 2—Lt, 80% RM
Hypertrophy 7 Day 1—Lt, 82.5% RM Day 2—Hvy, 102.5% RM Day 1—Med, 92.5% RM
Strength 8 Day 1—Lt, 82.5% RM Day 2—Hvy, 102.5% RM Day 1—Med, 92.5% RM
Power 9 Day 1—Lt, 82.5% RM Day 2—Hvy, 102.5% RM Day 1—Med, 92.5% RM
Strength 10 Day 2—Med, 92.5% RM Day 1—Hvy, 102.5% RM Day 2—Lt, 82.5% RM
Power 11 Day 2—Med, 92.5% RM Day 1—Hvy, 102.5% RM Day 2—Lt, 82.5% RM
Competition (B)—in-season (11 weeks)
Hypertrophy 1 Day 1—Lt, 80% RM Day 2—Hvy, 100% RM Day 1—Med, 90% RM
Strength 2 Day 1—Lt, 80% RM Day 2—Hvy, 100% RM Day 1—Med, 90% RM
Power 3 Day 1—Lt, 80% RM Day 2—Hvy, 100% RM Day 1—Med, 90% RM
Hypertrophy 4 Day 2—Med, 90% RM Day 1—Hvy, 100% RM Day 2—Lt, 80% RM
Strength 5 Day 2—Med, 90% RM Day 1—Hvy, 100% RM Day 2—Lt, 80% RM
Power 6 Day 2—Med, 90% RM Day 1—Hvy, 100% RM Day 2—Lt, 80% RM
Hypertrophy 7 Day 1—Lt, 85% RM Day 2—Hvy, 105% RM Day 1—Med, 95% RM
Strength 8 Day 1—Lt, 85% RM Day 2—Hvy, 105% RM Day 1—Med, 95% RM
Power 9 Day 1—Lt, 85% RM Day 2—Hvy, 105% RM Day 1—Med, 95% RM
Strength 10 Day 2—Med, 95% RM Day 1—Hvy, 105% RM Day 2—Lt, 85% RM
Power 11 Day 2—Med, 95% RM Day 1—Hvy, 105% RM Day 2—Lt, 85% RM
Competition (C)—in-season (12 weeks)
Strength 1 Day 1—Lt, 80% RM Day 2—Hvy, 100% RM Day 1—Med, 90% RM
Power 2 Day 1—Lt, 80% RM Day 2—Hvy, 100% RM Day 1—Med, 90% RM
Strength 3 Day 2—Med, 90% RM Day 1—Hvy, 100% RM Day 2—Lt, 80% RM
Power 4 Day 2—Med, 90% RM Day 1—Hvy, 100% RM Day 2—Lt, 80% RM
Strength 5 Day 1—Lt, 85% RM Day 2—Hvy, 105% RM Day 1—Med, 95% RM
Power 6 Day 1—Lt, 85% RM Day 2—Hvy, 105% RM Day 1—Med, 95% RM
Strength 7 Day 2—Med, 95% RM Day 1—Hvy, 105% RM Day 2—Lt, 85% RM
Power 8 Day 2—Med, 95% RM Day 1—Hvy, 105% RM Day 2—Lt, 85% RM
Strength 9 Day 1—Lt, 90% RM Day 2—Hvy, 110% RM Day 1—Med, 100% RM
Power 10 Day 1—Lt, 90% RM Day 2—Hvy, 110% RM Day 1—Med, 100% RM
Strength 11 Day 2—Med, 100% RM Day 1—Hvy, 110% RM Day 2—Lt, 90% RM
Power 12 Day 2—Med, 100% RM Day 1—Hvy, 110% RM Day 2—Lt, 90% RM
Note: Lt = light training resistance workout; Med = medium training resistance workout; Hvy = heavy training resistance work-
out; Testing = Tests measuring sport specific parameters (power, speed, agility).

68 Strength and Conditioning Journal December 2002


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