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Frequently Asked Questions

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Frequently Asked Questions

Sections:

Página 1 de 15 Frequently Asked Questions Sections:  The most common questions  Shareware and

The most common questions

Shareware and registering

Audio and instrument conversion issues

MIDI to waveform conversion issues

Editing issues

Miscellaneous issues

Auditioning issues

Continue to the next section

The most common questions

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the next section The most common questions Q A Q A Q A Q A How

How can I convert a .WAV (or any other digitized audio) file to a .MID?

You can't. Really! This is the one most persistent question that people keep asking. It is a matter

of two fundamentally different data types. It would take to long to explain this in depth here, but

suffice to say that it is a very difficult problem and an area where a computer (currently) can not

come even close to what a human can do. For more information read e.g. this web site.

I can't save in format XYZ even though you claim that Awave Studio supports it! Awave Studio handles several different data types and not all formats can store all types of data. What type of data you are trying to save is determined by what kind of 'item' that you have selected. See File format support and look at the small icons in the export formats list for info about what formats support what data types.

The program asks for some 'add-on' when I try to write some files!

A few file formats require external 3 rd party components to be installed before you can use

them. All of these 'add-ons' are available for free on our web site (either hosted on our own site,

or with a link to a 3 rd party site where you can download it). See the link to 'Audio codec add- ons' on the program download page.

Can I convert from RealAudio (.RA) files to other formats?

No. RealNetworks, who 'owns' the format has a policy of not allowing conversion of RA format

to any other format and they seem to be very strict on pouncing down on anyone who has tried

doing that. So we won't do it

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Why is it that stereo waveforms are converted to mono when I save my instruments?

Many (though not all) synthesizer formats

(which is the 'normal' way to store stereo recordings) - but generally they do support a form of stereo by using two mono waveforms, one panned full left and one panned full right. You need to explicitly convert the interleaved stereo waveforms into two mono waveforms and set them up in two layers so that they play back simultaneously. This whole process can be fully automated by using the Tools Interleaved Dual mono, or alternatively, the 'Instrument processing wizard's Split stereo waveforms feature. There is one more thing: some synthesizer formats supports an additional 'cue' to let the engine know that the samples should be played back in 'phase lock', this means that everything affecting pitch (pitch bend, lfo's et c) is applied equally to both of them. In this program, you set the region level 'phase group' parameter to the same group number for all waveforms that should be played back in phase lock.

And you check the 'phase master' box for the one that should be used to calculate all pitch effects for all of the waveforms in the same phase group. Alternatively, if you feel you are going to do this whole procedure often and don't want to be bothered about it, then go to Options

(e.g.

.SF2) simply do not support 'interleaved' stereo

Preferences

waveforms into dual mono when loading.

File load and check the option Automatically split stereo

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How do I read AKAI / Kurzweil / Roland CD-ROMs, or just plain Audio CD's for that matter? Use the appropriate commands on the I/O menu. Please note that if you use Windows 9X/ME then you must to have correct 'ASPI32' drivers installed before you can use this. Chances are that you already have without knowing, but if it doesn't work then try searching for something called 'ForceASPI' on the internet and try installing that. If you are running Windows Vista, you will probably also have to start the program using "Run as administrator" if this is going to work (since it requires talking directly to device drivers).

Continue to the next section

Shareware and registering

→ Continue to the next section Shareware and registering Q How do I buy Awave Studio

Q How do I buy Awave Studio, how much does it cost, and how can I pay for it?

A Please see our web site, where you can also buy it on-line.

The following selected Q&A's have been reproduced from the Shareware FAQ by kind permission of Mitchell Friedman, ASP Public Relations. The Shareware FAQ is copyright 1995-1997, Association of Shareware Professionals, All Rights Reserved.

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What is shareware? Shareware is a marketing method, not a type of software. Unlike software marketed through normal retail channels, where you are forced to pay for the product before you've even seen it, the shareware marketing method lets you try a program for a period of time before you buy it.

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Since you've tried a shareware program, you know whether it will meet your needs before you pay for it. Shareware programs are just like programs you find in major stores, catalogs, and other places where people purchase software -- except you get to use them, on your own computer, before paying for them.

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What happens if I like a shareware program?

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You pay for it at the end of a trial period (typically 30 days) by sending the author a fee he or she has established for the program.

Why should I pay for and register a shareware program?

The same reason you should pay for any program: because it is the honest thing to do. Shareware is commercial software, fully protected by copyright laws. Like other business owners, shareware authors expect to earn money for making their programs available. Paying for and registering a program also entitles you to support from the author and other benefits, as specified by the author. Moreover, the more consumers who pay an author to use a program, the more likely the author will continue to improve it and to offer new programs.

How do shareware programs compare with other kinds of software?

Consumers who purchase shareware programs receive a level of product support that exceeds what traditional software manufacturers deliver. Shareware users who need support often speak directly to the actual developer of the program, who is intimately familiar with how it operates and therefore can provide excellent technical support. Shareware authors often fix bugs in programs and add features quickly, based on feedback from users. There is a wide price range for shareware, as there is with software distributed through other channels. In general, many shareware programs cost less than other kinds of software, while some programs cost about the same as retail counterparts.

What happens if I don't like a shareware program?

You simply stop using the program, and remove it from your system. Since you have had the

opportunity to try the program first before paying for it, you lose only the tiny amount of money you spent to download the program or to acquire it from a vendor or other source.

I ordered a shareware program from a catalog and paid for the disk. Why should I pay more now?

Shareware vendors distribute shareware versions of programs, charging a small fee for the costs of disk duplication and advertising, plus a small profit. Most shareware authors allow this type of distribution so you'll have a chance to try their programs. However, none of the money paid

to a shareware vendor goes to the author. If you try a shareware program, then continue to use it after the trial period, you must pay for and register the program. The same principal applies if you buy a shareware disk at a computer show or find a shareware program on a CD-ROM disc or at a store.

Continue to the next section

Audio and instrument conversion issues

to the next section Audio and instrument conversion issues Q Can I use the program to

Q Can I use the program to convert an audio file into a format that I can burn onto a CD and play on a standard CD-player?

Yes, but please note there is no built-in CD-burning function so you also need a CD-authoring program (you often receive one bundled with the CD-writer). Most of these today accept A standard WAV files as input for each track for creating an audio CD. However, they can sometimes be a bit picky about what sample rate et c that the WAV files are saved in. If you first resample the data to 44100Hz and then save as a 16-bit PCM stereo .WAV file then it should

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work fine.

Why do I need an 'external DLL' to write to MP3 format? The patent licensing costs for (legally) including an MP3 encoder (in some countries) would make the program prohibitively expensive. So instead you can use an external 3 rd party encoder

'Lame_Enc.dll' to compress MP3's. It is available as open source (both with full source code and in precompiled binary versions). How you then solve the patent licensing issues (if any) when using it is none of our business.

Why is it that stereo waveforms are converted to mono when I save my instruments?

Many (though not all) synthesizer formats

(which is the 'normal' way to store stereo recordings) - but generally they do support a form of stereo by using two mono waveforms, one panned full left and one panned full right. You need to explicitly convert the interleaved stereo waveforms into two mono waveforms and set them up in two layers so that they play back simultaneously. This whole process can be fully automated by using the Tools Interleaved Dual mono, or alternatively, the 'Instrument processing wizard's Split stereo waveforms feature. There is one more thing: some synthesizer formats supports an additional 'cue' to let the engine know that the samples should be played back in 'phase lock', this means that everything affecting pitch (pitch bend, lfo's et c) is applied equally to both of them. In this program, you set the region level 'phase group' parameter to the same group number for all waveforms that should be played back in phase lock.

And you check the 'phase master' box for the one that should be used to calculate all pitch effects for all of the waveforms in the same phase group. Alternatively, if you feel you are going to do this whole procedure often and don't want to be bothered about it, then go to Options

(e.g.

.SF2) simply do not support 'interleaved' stereo

Preferences

waveforms into dual mono when loading.

File load and check the option Automatically split stereo

Why can't I save stereo SF2 files?

You can - see the previous Q/A.

I want to convert my songs from Sibelius/CakeWalk/Finale/whatever to something that I can burn on an audio-CD - help!

Ok, here's how you do it:

Open your song in the sequencer (e.g. Sibelius) and then resave it as a 'Standard MIDI file' (i.e. a file with the extension .MID).

Open this .MID file in Awave Studio.

Click on the small icon with two notes in the 'left pane' to select it (this icon represents the MIDI song - it also has one or more 'sub-icons' representing individual tracks). BTW, if you want to play the song before you save it to see that it's ok then tight click on the icon

and select Play MIDI song

Go to Options Preferences

MIDI to Wave → Select 44100 Hz as Sample

rate and check the Stereo output box. Click OK.

Click on the MIDI song in the collectionpane, then select File Save selected midi

song as

A Save MIDI song dialog box pops up.

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Enter a file name and select WAV - Microsoft Wave file under Save as type. Make sure PCM 16-bit is selected under Data format. Click OK.

You'll see a Converting progress dialog - wait until it is finished and closes.

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Start your CD-writing program, create an 'Audio-CD project' and use the WAV file as input for an audio track. Exactly how you do this depends on your CD-authoring software, but most of them will accept WAV files in this format (44100 Hz, stereo, 16-bit PCM). Why can it convert song data from .MOD files but not e.g. from .X3M modules into MIDI format?

This is a complicated process and MOD is both the simplest and the most widespread of the 'tracker' formats. That, plus its 'nostalgic' values, that made it our top priority to implement. If there is enough demand, we might be able to add additional 'tracker to MIDI' format translations.

I can't read files from my AKAI S1000 or AKAI S3000 CD-ROM! Try the I/O Read from AKAI CD command. Note that this requires that the program talk directly to the CD-ROM driver and to do this you must either use Windows NT/2000/XP (or later), or have valid "ASPI32" drivers installed. Very often you have such drivers already

installed without knowing it - but if it doesn't seem to work, then try searching the net for something called "ForceASPI" - it's not guaranteed to help and we can offer no support in this matter - but it often does help. If you are running Windows Vista, you will probably also have to start the program using "Run as administrator" if this is going to work (since it requires talking directly to device drivers).

I can't read files from my Kurzweil CD-ROM!

Try the I/O Read from Kurzweil CD command. Furthermore, see the notes for readin AKAI CD's above. Also that if you have a Windows version earlier than Windows XP then

inserting a Kurzweil CD might crash Windows. So if you use an older Windows version and want to avoid that happening, then turn off "Auto-Insert Notification" for the CD-ROM drive and do not try to access the CD except using the special command in Awave Studio.

I can't read files from my Audio CD!

Use I/O Read from Audio CD command. If that doesn't work properly, then sorry but not all

CD-ROM hardware can do this reliably

help if you start the program using "Run as administrator".

NB, if you are running Windows Vista, then it might

I can't read files from my SampleCell CD-ROM!

Can you see the files in the Windows Explorer or do you get an error message when you try to access the disc? If the latter, then the problem is most likely that the CD-ROM is formatted in a Macintosh proprietary format that Windows can't read. There are three solutions to this:

1. There are programs that can extend Windows so that it understands the Macintosh format (e.g. 'TransMac').

2. You can read the CD on a Mac, then transfer the files to a PC over a network connection.

3. You can read the CD on a Mac and write the files to a new CD using the standard 'ISO 9660' format.

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I can't read files from my Roland S5xx or S7xx series floppy disks!

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These floppy disks use a format that is not recognized by Windows and but they can be read directly by this program - use the I/O Read from Roland floppy command. Please note

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that this only works under Windows NT/2000/XP though. For Windows 9X/ME users we have to refer to a 3 rd party DOS utility called "S-Disk" that you can use to copy the contents of these disks to ".SDK" disk image files on the PC that Awave Studio can then read.

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I can't read files from my Ensoniq EPS or ASR-10 floppy disks! These floppy disks use a format that is not recognized by Windows and they can't be read directly by this program. However you can use 3 rd party utilities (for Windows NT/2000/XP

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look for one called "OmniFlop", for DOS/Windows 9X/ME, look for "EPSDisk" or alternatively "EDE") in order to 'copy' these floppy disks to "image files" on the PC that Awave Studio can then read!

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I can't read files from my AKAI S-series floppy disks! These floppy disks use a format that is not recognized by Windows and they can't be read directly by this program. However you can either use a 3 rd party utility called "OmniFlop" (available for Windows NT/2000/XP) to create "image files" that Awave Studio can

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then read - if you carefully rename the files to a .AKAI file extension (otherwise the format wont be detected properly). Alternatively, you can use a 3 rd party utility called "AkaiDisk" (works under DOS/Windows 9X/ME) to read the disks and extract ".P" program files and ".S" sample files that Awave Studio can then read!

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It can't read/write SoundDesigner II files properly!

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The most likely cause of your problem is that the Mac has it's own file system which is not compatible with anything else. A single file can in fact be multiple files called 'forks'. You probably have transferred your file from a Mac to a PC (or vice versa) and only got the 'data fork' of the original Mac SD2 file. This is only raw data with no header (all info about the bits/sample, no of channels, sample rate et c that were stored in the 'resource fork' has been lost). So when you open such a file, Awave Studio simply uses default values - 44100 Hz, 16-bit, mono. That is the bad news. The good news is that you can override these format values if you

go to <waveform> Properties Source.

When going back to the Mac, the problem is that without the 'resource fork' present the Mac apps wont recognize the file. The 'flattened' SD2 format that Awave Studio can both read and write is a special way to 'merge' the 'data fork' and the 'resource fork' into a single 'flattened' file, thus preserving all data when transferring it to another platform. This format is used by the 'FetchIt' program (a popular Mac ftp client). You have to set the correct options in that program to tell it to use the flattened format though.

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How do I read/write 'raw' data files without any header information?

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As these can't be auto-detected (due to the lack of header) and there is no standard for the file extension, we have had to make up some file extensions for them. If you rename your files to have the proper extensions then they should read just fine! BTW, all formats assume little- endian (Intel style) byte ordering. You also have an option of saving 16-bit words in big endian (Motorola style) format but when reading these you will have to manually enter the waveform 'source' property sheet and check the 'byteswap' box (finish by hitting Apply). The various 'raw' formats are named as follows:

.ub

Unsigned 8-bit bytes

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.sb

Signed 8-bit bytes

.uw

Unsigned 16-bit words

.sw

Signed 16-bit words

.udw

Unsigned 32-bit dwords

.sdw

Signed 32-bit dwords

.f32

IEEE 32-bit floating point

.f64

IEEE 64-bit floating point

I'm having some trouble reading and writing GigaSampler/GigaStudio files - help!

Have you the notes about the GIG format?

I converted a file to .AU format for use in a Java applet, but it doesn't work!

The standard Java code is really stupid in that it is very particular as to what 'flavor' of .AU files

it will accept

processing wizard' to resample the waveform to 8000Hz. Then save it as an .AU file and specify mu-law in the data format list of the save file dialog.

It must be an 8kHz, 'mu-law data format' .AU file. First use the 'Audio

Why are there three levels ('region', 'layer', and 'instrument') of articulation data? What happens with this when I save a file?

Articulation consists of 'modifiers' that change the sound over time, e.g. lfos and envelopes. Awave Studio supports articulation parameters stored at 'three levels', instrument global, layer override, and region override articulation. Each level can be enabled or disabled. The relation between the three levels should be interpreted as follows: When a waveform is played, the 'per region override' articulation parameters are used if enabled. If not then the 'per layer override' articulation parameters are used if enabled. If not, then the 'instrument global' articulation parameters are used if enabled. If not, then reasonable, neutral default values are used. Now, various synthesizers generally only support articulation parameters stored at one of these three levels. When reading files this is naturally not a problem. When writing to a format that supports per region articulation then the process for determining the articulation for a waveform outlined above is used to find the per region parameters to write. But what happens when the output formats only support per layer or instrument global articulation? The approach used is to average the articulation for all the waveforms used in the layer or the instrument, i.e. the process described earlier is used to 'propagate down' articulation to every waveform. All the 'waveform articulations' are then 'averaged upwards' to the articulation level that we want. Sounds complicated? This is the best process we have been able to devise for converting between the formats of different synthesizers. As an example consider if only per layer articulation is enabled in a single layered, two-region instrument and we want to save this instrument to a file format that supports only per layer articulation. This process will save the instruments per layer data in the files per layer data as is natural (although it has first been propagated down to each of the two regions and then averaged back to form the original per layer articulation again). Let's say you then enable the articulation for one of the two regions. When next you save the instrument again, the average of the 'per layer' data (propagated down to the waveform with no per region articulation) and the new per region data (for the articulated regions waveform) is saved as the files per layer data

Hint: While very useful for making good conversions, this three level articulation structure may only be confusing when editing instruments targeted for a specific synthesizer. In this case you can use the 'Instrument processing wizard' to 'move the articulation level' of all data to the single level supported by your target synthesizer. E.g. if you will be using the Turtle Beach Maui synth then you can use this to get all the articulation at the 'per layer' level.

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It doesn't seem to convert envelope/lfo/layer data for my instrument file format!

There can be several reasons:

1. Your file format do not support that particular kind of data.

2. Awave Studio do not support that particular feature of that particular file format.

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3. Perhaps it is there but has been 'averaged' out so much that you don't hear it. This can e.g.

happen if you have an instrument with 10 waveforms, each with their own per region articulation, and save it to a format that only supports e.g. instrument global articulation. If one of the regions has articulation differing from the others then it still only affects 1/10 th of the instrument global articulation data that is saved which may be too little to hear. Read the previous Q/A for a more in depth discussion about how articulation is treated. To avoid confusion, you can use the Options Preferences Parameter set feature to disable articulation for all levels not supported the output file format. See the table below for what level articulation various file formats supports. The converted instrument looks all right, but when I upload it to my synth, I can't hear anything when I try to play it!

There can be several causes:

1. Make sure that you have in fact uploaded it to your synthesizer correctly. As this is done differently for almost every synth, we can't help you there; you must know what you are doing.

2. Make sure that you have assigned it to the correct program number and MIDI channel as you are trying to play it 'on' and check that all MIDI routing et c are OK so that MIDI data actually gets where you want it to.

3. Look at each 'region' in the instrument; the region(s) is used to trigger a waveform. Look at the key range parameter. The waveform is only triggered if the MIDI key lies within the key range (e.g. drum sounds is often only triggered by one single key).

4. Look at each 'region' in the instrument. Look at the velocity range parameter. The waveform is only triggered if the MIDI key down velocity lies within the velocity range.

5. Look at both all the regions and all the waveforms. Check the 'damping' parameter. This adjusts the 'volume' at which the waveform(s) is played. Perhaps it is set so low that you can't hear anything?

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Why do loops sometimes 'click and pop' when converted to my synths format?

A possible explanation may be that there are reverse or bi-directional loops and your synth

doesn't support those. In these cases those loops are saved flagged as normal forward loops but

they are not actually converted to forward loops. However you use the 'Audio processing

wizard' to convert them to 'forward' loops. Then save it in your synths file format. It is also possible to have this done automatically for you - see Options Preferences File load. Of course it may also be that the loops simple are badly made so that the pops and clicks where there to begin with

It displays the root-key-names one octave too high / too low in my files!

Not necessarily - it depends on your preferences so to speak. It may be that we simply use a different numbering for the octaves than the program you created the original file in. There are

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more that one way to 'number' the MIDI keys. One is by starting with C-1 for MIDI key number 0 which gives C4 as the 'middle C'. Another starts at C0 for MIDI key 0, which gives C5 as 'middle C'. Awave Studio defaults to use C4 for 'middle C'. But you can change this if you want!

Simply go to Options Preferences Miscellaneous and set your preference for the Display notes & keys as option. Note that the difference is only semantic; there is of course no difference in the sound if you call something C4 or C5, or even by the MIDI key number '60' (which BTW, you can also tell the program to display it as).

When saving stereo data to a format that only support mono waveforms (like .PAT) or when doing an SDS transfer, how do I specify which channel of the stereo data should be used? In these situations the channels are automatically merged using an 'arithmetic average' algorithm. However, you can use the waveform 'Audio processing wizard' to specifically convert the data to mono before you save it; there - you can choose between 'average of channels', 'left channel only' or 'right channel only' algorithms.

How do I read a file as 'raw audio' data, i.e. how do I override the automatic type detection?

If the file in question is 'auto-detected' with '100% certainty' (in the lower right portion of the file open dialog) as a supported file format, then you can't. You can however often (but not always) go to <waveform> Properties Source and change the data type there. If the file

type can't be detected at all (0% certainty) then it will be read as 'raw data' and you will automatically get to this tab when you load the file. If however it is detected with say around '33% certainty' and you get an error message when you try to open the file then you may try to remove the file extension (e.g. turn 'foo.bar' into 'foo') and open it again.

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My synth complains about something with name collision or that it need unique names in some way - help! We attempt to ensure that all items have unique names (since this is required by several synthesizers). This is accomplished by adding a number to the end of the name whenever a collision would otherwise have occurred. However, it may well be that the file format for your synth only allows much shorter names than what we do, so the when they are truncated to fit, the names no longer are unique. If this is the case, you will simply have to keep an eye open for the situation and manually adjust the names wherever necessary before you save it.

Continue to the next section

MIDI to waveform conversion issues

to the next section MIDI to waveform conversion issues Q What synthesizer is used for rendering

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What synthesizer is used for rendering the MIDI data into samples?

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The built in Awave Software Synthesizer is used.

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Aren't there any options?

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Yes, several, see Options Preferences MIDI to Wave.

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Why does it take such a long time to render?

It is optimized for sound quality rather than CPU cost. After all you normally do the conversion only once and the quality of the result is then constant every time you listen to it. The rendering

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can operate in two modes 'normal' and 'Super quality' mode - you select which in Options →

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Preferences → MIDI to Wave. The super quality mode is much slower - but also gives an even higher audio quality. Use it if e.g. you are targeting 24-bit audio or for production use.

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My other synth sounds better when playing MIDI files!

The most likely cause for this is that your synth may be using a better instrument collection than

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the one used by default by Awave Studio. This is easily fixed by selecting a better bank using

Options Preferences

MIDI to Wave Default GM bank.

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Where can I find a better GM/GS instrument collection?

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If you have a SoundBlaster audio card then chances are good that you already have Emu's 4MB bank (a file named 'CT4MGM.sf2') somewhere on your hard-disk. You might also also have their 7.5MB bank (a file named 'CT8MGM.sf2') - you might prefer one of those.

There are also many freeware collections available on the net that you might want to try. Here are a few examples:

Unison GS (29MB).

GeneralUser GS v1.4 (30MB).

Fluid R3 (68MB).

SGM-180 v2.01 (235MB).

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What MIDI controllers are supported?

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Please refer to the MIDI implementation chart.

Continue to the next section

Editing issues

chart . → Continue to the next section Editing issues Q A Where are all the

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Where are all the 'Audio processing wizard' functions listed in the help file for the? I only see a few of them! Some of them are only applicable to some sorts of data (e.g. "convert mono to stereo" is only meaningful for mono data), while other is only implemented for some data types (like remove silence currently only works on mono data) and finally, many of the functions requires you to select a range in the waveform first (e.g. to fade in or out). To do that, in the waveform properties editor tab, press down a mouse button over the waveform, drag with the mouse and release the button (to deselect all, just click on the waveform again).

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How can I 'hear' the loop in the loop point editor?

There are two ways:

1. Press the Play |> loop button to start/stop playing the loop. While it is playing, you can directly hear changes while you edit the loop points. There is a delay of second or two, due to the buffering in the software synthesizer

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2. Using auditioning. First enable auditioning in the program options. Back in the loop point editor, press Apply to update the loop point. Then play it on your keyboard! If you don't have an external MIDI keyboard and are using Awave Studio's 'virtual keyboard', then you'll have to use some other 'virtual keyboard' program since it won't work in the property dialogs (where you need your computer keyboard to type in numbers and things).

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How do I create an appropriate amplitude envelope for 'one-shot' waveforms?

The envelope format provided by Awave Studio can't really handle this very common case. But

the 'tweak solution' is to set the attack duration to 0 and sustain and release values to maximum. This will be saved as an envelope appropriate for such 'one-shot' waveforms

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How can I use a stereo waveform in an instrument for my synthesizer?

If the synth supports multi-layering, you can split the stereo waveform into two mono waveforms (e.g. using the 'Audio processing wizard'), pan them full left res. full right and put them in separate layers in the instrument. This whole process can be fully automated by using the 'Instrument processing wizard's Split stereo waveforms feature! There is one more thing, some synthesizer formats supports an additional 'cue' to let the engine

know that the samples should be played back in 'phase lock', this means that everything affecting pitch (pitch bend, lfos et c) is calculated the same for both of them. In the DLS world, which we use, you set the region level 'phase group' parameter to the same group number for all waveforms that should be played back in phase lock. And you check the 'phase master' box for the one that should be used to calculate all pitch effects for all of the waveforms in the same phase group.

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What about drum kits? Are they supported?

Drum kits are treated as just another multi-waveform instrument, but has a 'Drum kit flag' set in the instrument property sheet. They are also indicated with a different icon in the tree-view. Note that different synthesizers select and number drum kits a bit differently; some select them by program number alone, some by bank number, and some by both. Awave Studio uses both the bank and the program number as one 'linear' number so that drum kits no 0 to 127 are all in bank

0. Kit 128

by each particular synthesizer and file format. For maximum portability, it is recommended that you always set the bank number to 0 for drum kits.

255

are in bank 1 et c. This is then translated to or from the numbering scheme used

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In the waveform source properties page, why is the data type controls always 'grayed out' for some file formats (like .WAV)?

These controls are only available for file formats that internally are handled by a 'generic' waveform data reader. Some file formats has more specialized readers that won't let you change these things. In these cases there's really no reason why you should change these things in those cases; the data type controls is intended for use when reading raw data formats which lack any 'header information' and you may have to manually adjust the data type. Another reason they may be 'grayed' is if you have done any editing or processing on the waveform data. In that case they are grayed to prevent the 'editing' from being lost (by re-reading the data from disk, which is what happens if you change the data type).

Continue to the next section

Miscellaneous issues

→ Continue to the next section Miscellaneous issues file:///C:/Users/RLopes/AppData/Local/Temp/~hh3F78.htm

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How do I pronounce Awave?

Like two words "A wave".

Where can I find audio samples and instruments?

We have listed a few good internet sources here.

Can I just use any 'sound data' that I happen to find for whatever purposes that I like?

Not really, you must first make sure that it is in the public domain and that it is not copyrighted material. If it is copyrighted, then you will need to get permission from the copyright owner.

Much material that you find on the Internet are public domain it really is the case.

but it is up to you to verify that

I try to load, convert, audition or play this really huge file, but it takes a very, very long time and

the program just exits with an out-of-memory message

Awave Studio is limited to working only with files it can fit into memory. To play huge files you may need a huge amount of physical RAM. And when loading and saving stuff it sometimes may need up to 8 bytes per wavesample; e.g. a 10 minutes long stereo file sampled 48000Hz may require up to 10 * 60 * 2 * 48000 * 8 => about 440MB memory.

(Or perhaps it even crashes?)

I try to convert this MPEG file, which is only, lets say 10MB, I have lots of more memory than that but it still behaves like in the previous Q? Why is this?

Well, a 10MB compressed MPEG file may become about 512MB when uncompressed! And if that needs to be converted further before saving, then the memory requirement could become

double that - a whopping 1GB. What you need is a program that decodes the MPEG file 'in small pieces at a time' (known as streaming) - we'd recommend our Awave Audio software for that purpose.

The program just exits after I have used it for less than a minute! Is this normal?

No. The most probable explanation for this is if 'Awave Studio.exe' has been tampered with. Perhaps the file was corrupted during a file transfer or a disk problem. Or if you are unfortunate,

your system may be infected by a computer virus! Try running an anti-virus program to see if your computer is 'clean' and if it is, then try (re-) downloading it directly from our official web site.

Why don't you make a Max/DOS/OS2/Linux/Unix/Amiga/Atari version?

Because we don't have the time and don't think the market would motivate in purely economical terms.

Why don't you do a French/Dutch/Japanese/whatever language version?

Partly because of lack of the necessary language skills. But mostly because developing and maintaining several different language versions would mean a huge amount of additional work

and we believe that 99.9% of the users knows enough of the English language to use the present version. If anyone would like to translate the help file, then we'd be happy to supply the necessary English source texts files.

I have a problem with the computer dead crashing or becoming unstable when I try to use, or have used, a DirectX plug-in!

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Check if you have a DirectX plug-in from Antares (e.g. 'AutoTune' or 'MicModeler') or any A other that might use 'PACE copy protection'. If you have, then the only solution is to uninstall them as it seems like the PACE protection does 'bad things' that is not compatible with this program. Not our fault

Continue to the next section

Auditioning issues

fault → Continue to the next section Auditioning issues General auditioning issues: Q A Why doesn't

General auditioning issues:

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Why doesn't the virtual keyboard work in the property sheets?

Because there you need your keyboard to type in numbers and stuff.

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The virtual keyboards key layout is not well suited for my non-QWERTY keyboards (e.g. German keyboards may have X and Y swapped). What can I do?

You can edit the key assignment for the virtual keyboard with the registry editor ('regedit.exe') that comes with Windows. Open this_computer HKEY_CURRENT_USER

Software FMJ-Software Awave Studio and edit the mtVKeys string. It's just a

string of (normally 29, but maximum 36) characters holding the ASCII key to assign to a note, beginning with C3 for the first character, then in increasing order.

The Awave Software Synthesizer:

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I get pops and crackles in the sound when using this synth for auditioning.

Go to Options Preferences Auditioning and successively increase the Latency

setting until the problem goes away. If that doesn't help then try halving the Sample rate setting.

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How can I disable or enable the reverb-effect? When using the Awave Software Synth for auditioning it will mix in a reverb effect

independently on each playing waveform to the exact amount specified by the Default reverb mix parameter in the articulation properties. When the synth for rendering 'MIDI to Waveform' you can disable reverb processing

entirely in Options Preferences

MIDI to Wave (e.g. in case you wish to add

your own reverb as post processing using a 3 rd party DirectX reverb plug-in using the 'Audio processing wizard'). NB, if you do not disable it, then it will behave in the same way as when auditioning except that it will also react to MIDI CC91 messages by adjusting the mix as specified by the 'CC91 to reverb mix' parameter (reverb-mix = default-reverb-mix + (CC91-value/127) * CC91-to-reverb-mix).

What MIDI controllers do this synth support?

Please refer to the MIDI implementation chart.

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DirectMusic synths: (e.g. the Microsoft software synth)

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I can't hear all regions and/or layers when using this for auditioning!

You probably have DirectX 7 - which provides a version of the Microsoft software synth which is 'DLS level 1' only. This means that melodic instruments can have only a single layer with a maximum of 16 regions. With DirectX v8 it was updated to DLS level 2 support - which removes these limitations among many other things.

I can't hear any sound at all if I turn on the filter! If you are using Windows 98/ME, then get DirectX v8.1 (or later). This seems to be a bug in DirectX 8 for 9X/ME (but not in the W2K version!).

SoundFont Management System synths: (SoundBlaster X-Fi! / Live! / Audigy

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I have one of these cards, but it doesn't appear in Awave's list of auditioning devices, what should I do? Install the latest version of the Emu SoundFont Management System. It's available from

FMJ-Software's www site. NB, current versions of Creative's drivers probably installs this by default so you don't need to worry about it.

I get the error message "You need a newer version of the SoundFont manager". What's wrong?

You need to install v1.01 or later of the Emu SoundFont Management System.

The SoundFont Management system installs a 'SoundFont MIDI router' MIDI device in my system. I don't want it. Can I remove it safely?

Awave Studio do not need the MIDI router device but here may be other applications that

do. It's up to you

Windows multimedia settings if you don't want MIDI files to be played through it.

But you can always keep and turn off 'map through this device' in the

AWEMAN managed synths: (SoundBlaster AWE32 / AWE64 /

SB32)

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It complains about not being able to load AWEMAN32.DLL when I try to use auditioning. You must have this .DLL installed in your WINDOWS or WINDOWS\SYSTEM directory. You must also have the very latest driver that supports the new .SF2 file format.

After having used auditioning, I sometimes cannot play back MIDI files properly! Instruments are silent or messed up!

You need to restore your original MIDI instrument setup. Quit Awave Studio then launch the Awe Control Panel. Use it to clear all user banks and to reload your GM or GS bank.

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Q When auditioning waveform items, I can only hear anything within a certain key-range.

A It seems like the EMU8000 synthesizer use by the AWE32 can only interpolate within a certain range so if the note is too far off from the root-key, then there'll be no sound.

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