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Department of Psychology

Safety Manual
May , 2004
Department of Psychology Health and Safety Manual Contents

I. Introduction 3

A. Emergency Telephone and Internet Resources 3

II. Safety and Accident Program

A. Responsibility 4
B. Emergency Response Instructions
1. Fire and/or Smoke 4
2. Chemical Spills or Release 5
3. Building Evacuation 5
4.Employee/Student Injury 5
5.Explosive Device or Bomb Threat 6
6.Power/Utilities Failure 6
7.Crime in Progress 6
8.Weather Emergency 7
C. Classroom Safety Issues
1. Students with Disabilities 7
2. Overly Disruptive or Violent Student 8
D. Human Research Laboratory Safety Issues
1. General Issues 10
2. Special Research Populations
a. Infants and Children 11
b. Elderly and Persons with Disabilities 11
c. Clinical Populations 12
3. Field Research Sites 12
4. Researcher Safety 13
E. Animal Research Laboratory Safety Issues
1. General Issues 13
2. Allergic Reactions 13
3. Physical Injury from Bites and Scratches 14
4. Medical Monitoring 15
F. Quin Curtis Center (QCC) Safety Issues
1. Fire Alarm Procedures 15
2. Emergency Telephone Numbers 15
3. Client Emergency 16
4. Abusive Client Behavior 17
5. Emergency Call from QCC Client 18
6. Emergency Situation with an Individual – Not a QCC Client 20
7. QCC Guidelines for Voluntary and Involuntary Hospitalization 20

III. Chemical Hygiene Plan 25

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I. Introduction

This document is designed to satisfy West Virginia University requirements for safety
and accident prevention. The goal is to promote safety in the Department’s research,
teaching and service and to ensure compliance with institutional policies and
governmental regulations related to safety. The document is designed to summarize the
more important points of the program. Psychology Department employees should receive
and be familiar with a copy of this document. Please note that this Safety Manual
incorporates the Chemical Hygiene Plan of the Department of Psychology. The safety
and accident prevention program may be updated or otherwise modified periodically.
When this happens, copies of revised pages, or the entire document will be distributed to
all Psychology Department personnel.

A. Emergency Telephone Numbers and Web Resources

On Campus Emergency Number 9-911

Department Safety Officer (Kent Parker) 293-2001 x 31605 (Home: 292-1021)


Department Chair (Michael Perone) 293-2001 x 31604 (Home: 296-4373)
LSB Building Supervisor (Michael Perone) 293-2001 x 31604 (Home: 296-4373)
Department Associate Chair (Stan Cohen) 293-2001 x 31641 (Home: 292-0072)
Eberly College Safety Coordinator (Barbara Foster) (cell phone 692-9800)
Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222
WVU Biohazards Safety Committee (Andrew Cockburn) 293-7157
WVU Environmental Health & Safety 293-3792
WVU Health Service 293-2311
WVU Medical Center Safety 293-4952
WVU Office of Laboratory Animal Resources 293-2721
WVU Public Safety (Campus Police) 293-3136
WVU Radiation Safety 293-3431

Web sites

National Safety Council – www.nsc.org


Occupational Safety and Health Administration – www.osha.gov
Care Institute of Safety and Health – www.care-institute.com
American Safety and Health Institute – www.ashinstitute.com
National Safety Compliance – www.osha-safety-training.net

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II. Safety and Accident Prevention Program

A. Responsibility

Every member of the University community is responsible for acting at all times in a
manner that encourages the safety and well-being of all other community members. This
is a moral responsibility even in cases where it is not directly mandated by University
regulations. In addition, each faculty member, graduate student and staff member is
responsible for following University safety regulations.

The primary purpose of the Psychology Department’s safety program is to reduce the
chance of injury or illness through resolution of safety hazards. In pursuit of this purpose
the department chairperson and the safety committee will respond to all safety issues
raised by members of the community.

B. Emergency Response Instructions

1. Fire and/or Smoke


a. When the smoke/fire is first discovered, immediately sound the nearest
building fire alarm.
b. If the fire is too large to extinguish, or you think it may be, call 911 (9-911 for
campus phones).
? Name of caller
? The nature of the emergency
? The building and exact location of the fire
? The phone number at the scene
c. In case of a small fire, you may, if you’ve had the training, extinguish it with
the nearest fire extinguisher. If you have any doubts as to whether or not you
will be able to contain the fire, do not attempt to do so.
Please note that fire extinguishers are located strategically throughout the
LSB. Please take a short tour and note the location of fire extinguishers
near your office, laboratory and clinic. For your information the door
providing access to the fire extinguishers is locked to prevent vandalism,
but will open with a firm jerk.
d. Evacuate immediately following the Building Evacuation Plan.

2. Chemical Spill or Release

a. If the spill is less than 1 liter, initiate local procedures which are defined in
each laboratory Chemical Hygiene Plan. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
for all chemicals on the laboratory inventory should be readily accessible to
all laboratory workers. MSDS for the hazardous chemicals that are used in the
Department of Psychology are located in the Main Office in Room 1124 LSB.
In the case of a chemical accident the MSDS should be consulted.

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For spills larger than 1 liter or of extremely hazardous material follow steps 2-8

b. Quickly try to determine what was spilled; however, do not come into contact
with the substance or inhale fumes. If you experience eye irritation, burning
lungs, or other symptoms of chemical exposure, proceed directly to step 6.
c. Sound the building fire alarm to notify others to evacuate the building.
d. Phone 911 (9-911 from campus phones)
e. Follow the directions of the Building Evacuation Plan.
f. If someone has been splashed with a chemical, immediately flush the
contaminated area with water. In case of ingestion, immediately call 9-911 or
the Poison Control Center (1-800-642-3625). Do not induce vomiting except
under the advice of a physician. If needed, seek medical assistance.
g. Contact Chemical Hygiene Officer (CHO) if spill occurs in a laboratory
h. Call Environmental Health and Safety at 293-3792

3. Building Evacuation

a. Evacuate the building immediately. If others do not respond to the alarm or do


not evacuate, inform them of the need to evacuate immediately.
b. Upon evacuation, do not stop to take belongings, etc., from the building. Use
stairways and not elevators.
c. When out of the building, stay a safe distance from the building and out of the
way of emergency personnel.
d. If you suspect that anyone is still inside the building, notify the authorities at
the scene.
e. Stay upwind from smoke or chemical clouds.
f. Stay a safe distance from the building unless told to re-enter or other
directions are received from authorities on site.
g. Stay with classmates, fellow University employees, etc., so that a head count
may be taken.
h. Follow any further directions authorities on the scene might give.

4. Employee/Student Injury

a. In the case of an injured person call 911 (9-911 from a campus phone) and
calmly state:
? Name of caller
? Location and address of building
? Nature of Injury
? Phone number at the scene
? Listen for pre-arrival instructions from the 911 dispatcher
b. Do not move a seriously injured person unless their life will otherwise be in
danger.
c. If possible give first aid to seriously injured persons. If needed ask someone to
attempt to find an individual trained in first aid.

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d. Stay with the injured person until Emergency Medical Services arrive.
5. Explosive Device or Bomb Threat

a. Do not in any way touch any item or device that is suspected to be a bomb or
explosive.
b. Notify your supervisor or nearest University authority (Deans, Directors,
building supervisors, instructors, resident assistants, etc.).
c. Follow the instructions of your supervisor or other authority who will initiate
the Building Evacuation Plan.
d. Call 911 (9-911 from campus phones) and calmly state:
? Name of caller
? Nature of emergency
?The building and exact location of the bomb/explosive
?Description of the object
?The phone number at the scene

e. In the case of a bomb threat (a) try to keep the caller on the phone and (b)
obtain as much information as possible including:
? Location of the bomb
? When it will explode
? What it looks like
? What type of bomb it is
? Are you responsible for the bomb
? What is your name/address

6. Power/Utilities Failure

a. Notify the Department of Public Safety (293-3163) of the power failure and
your location. Critical areas (may be research experiments, refrigerated or air-
conditioned locations, or any area where a prolonged power failure could
adversely affect health or property) should be identified to DPS at this time if
known. During normal work days phone Physical Plant at (293-4357).
b. If your building has areas with emergency lighting, go to those areas.
c. Wait for instructions from University authorities (Deans, Directors, building
supervisors, instructors, etc.).
d. Be prepared to evacuate if circumstances necessitate (example: when an
investigation discloses an emergency of some sort).

7. Crime in Progress

a. Do not get involved with trying to prevent the crime unless it involves self
defense.
b. Gather as much information as possible about the criminal. If at all possible
take the time to note: height, weight, gender, age, clothing, vehicles involved,
and if the individual is armed.
c. Call 911 (9-911 from campus phones) and calmly state:

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? Name of caller
? Type of crime
? Exact location of crime
? Answers to other questions which you might be asked
d. If you are safe, stay where you are until authorities arrive.
e. Keep yourself safe by staying out of the way of the crime (away from
windows, etc.).

8. Weather Emergency

Conditions leading to weather emergencies are generally predictable. In the event


that heavy snows, high winds, extremely low temperatures, or a combination are
imminent the West Virginia University President will:

a. Suspend normal WVU operations and class schedules.


b. Delay starting time.
c. Send employees/students home early.
d. Implement Emergency Response Plan. Stay tuned to local radio and television
stations for public announcements.

C. Classroom Safety Issues

1. Students with Disabilities

a. General Issues

Students with disabilities, be those temporarily (e.g., sprained ankle, broken


arm, etc.) or ongoing (e.g., serious visual impairment or inability to walk), are to
be accommodated in the classroom environment to the fullest reasonable extent
possible. Physical and medical disabilities may be obvious (e.g., requiring
wheelchair use or a guide dog) or less visible (e.g., epilepsy, asthma,
cardiovascular problems). Information and resources are available for both
students and instructors through Disability Services (a component of the Office
of Social Justice), which is located in the Mountainlair (293-6700). Available
services include facilitation of classroom access, transportation, and
instructional resources.

b. Environmental Safety

Under University policies, the only animals allowed in classroom areas are
companion animals, such as guide dogs for persons with visual impairments or
alert dogs for persons with epilepsy. Students with such animals should be
accommodated with necessary space. Classrooms are required by law to have
accommodations such as extra wide door frames, ramps, and seating space that
aid in accessibility of students with disabilities. When the instructor is aware of
the additional needs of a student registered in their class (either by notice of the

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student or Disability Services), it may be necessary to assist in the arrangements
of additional accommodations. All efforts should be made to ensure a safe and
accessible environment. Students should be informed of the availability of
Disability Services in the course syllabus.

c. Situational Safety

Some disabilities may occasionally result in an emergency medical problem. If


the instructor has been made aware ahead of time (by the student or Disability
Services) of any special actions to take, such as in the case of a severe asthma
attack or seizure, then those procedures should be followed. When such actions
are not known or are insufficient, the instructor is not able to comply, or other
medical problems arise, then Emergency Medical Services should be contacted
by calling 9-911 or (293-3136).

In other situations that may arise where the student may simply need additional
assistance accessing a resource or facility, common courtesy will guide the
instructor in assisting the student within the bounds of reason (e.g., holding a
door for a person using a wheelchair, or guiding a person with a visual
impairment to an exit or providing directions when they are not familiar with
the setting).

d. Reporting

Reporting of any concerns, extraordinary circumstances, unresolved incidents,


or barriers to full access should be made to the instructor’s supervisor, the
department Safety officer, and if necessary to the department Chairperson.

2. Overly Disruptive or Violent Student

a. General Issues

University rules and regulations specify a code of conduct for students. Students
are expected to comply with, observe, and obey the laws of the United States;
the State of West Virginia; local city, county, and municipal ordinances;
University policies, rules, and regulations; and the directions and orders of
University officers, faculty and staff who are charged with the administration of
institutional affairs on campus. Prohibited behavior includes: disorderly conduct
(e.g., fights, assaults, public disturbances, and public drunkenness), theft or
damage of property, disruption (e.g., interfering with an institutional activity,
such as a class; coercion, and restraining), hazing, and discrimination. Such
behaviors, when they occur in the context of the classroom or academic setting,
are to be addressed by those faculty, instructors, or staff who is present.

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b. Environmental Safety

The focus here is on knowledge and prevention. Students should be informed of


University policies regarding disruptive, violent, and discriminatory behavior in
the course syllabus, and that penalties— including expulsion— can be applied by
the University for such behavior in the classroom, academic building, or
elsewhere on campus. The instructor should endeavor to be aware of students
who display a pattern of escalating disruptive behavior over a series of class
meetings, and to be aware that certain course topics can be viewed as
inflammatory to some students.

c. Situational Safety

In situations where a student engages in disruptive behavior, a request to cease


or to leave the immediate area may be sufficient. However, when such behavior
is perceived as sufficiently threatening to the instructor or others, or is
excessively disruptive or even violent or damaging to property, the instructor
should call for assistance from faculty or staff and call the Department of Public
Safety at 9-911 or (293-3136).

The instructor should not place themselves in the position of intervening


directly with an excessively disruptive or violent student or group of students.
Instructors are generally not trained in the procedures for managing such
behavior; it is better dealt with by professional safety officers. The instructor
may direct other students to leave the immediate area of the excessively
disruptive or violent student for purposes of their own safety and to deescalate
the situation.

d. Reporting

When noticing escalating patterns of disruptive behavior, the instructor should


consult with a supervisor, after which a decision may be made to speak
privately with the student and perhaps suggest a means of addressing the
behavior (such as seeking counseling or withdrawing from the class).
Emergency incidents of excessively disruptive or violent behavior should be
reported immediately to the Department of Public Safety, who will file their
own reports in response to the incident. Instructors may take further action as
described in detail in the University policies and regulations on disciplinary
actions, which are published yearly in The Mountie and are available on the
University intranet.

Ongoing minor disturbances and significant events (such as those requiring


intervention by the Department of Public Safety) should be reported to the
instructor’s supervisor, the department Safety Officer, and the department
Chairperson.

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D. Human Research Laboratory Safety Issues

1. General Issues

a. Environmental Safety

i. These issues focus on preventative actions to ensure that the research


environment is as safe as possible prior to participant involvement.

? Identification and correction of potential safety and mobility


impediments in public areas including the parking lot, research room,
rest room, and other locations visited by the participant.

ii. Reporting of potential safety concerns

? These concerns should be reported to the supervising faculty member.


Concerns which need further attention should be directed to the Safety
Officer, and if needed, the department Chair.

b. Situation Safety – These issues focus on specific actions to deal with safety
concerns which could arise during the research process.

i. During a fire alarm, research testing must cease and procedures pertaining to
fire alarms must be followed (*See Section on Fire Arms)

? Identify exits closest to the testing area. Researchers are encouraged to


post this information in their laboratories

? Identify fire extinguisher locations. Researchers are encouraged to post


this information in their laboratories

ii. Basic First Aid (e.g., cuts)

? Identify location of phone, first aid kit/manual, Safety Officer and


others with specific training.

iii. Specific illnesses (e.g., epilepsy, diabetes, heart conditions)

? Identify the location of the phone, first aid kit/manual, Safety Officer
and others with specific training

? Identify the location of relevant aid (e.g., food for a diabetic


participant. Researchers should consider having relevant supplies
on hand.

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c. Reporting of incidents

i. All safety incidents should be reported to the supervising faculty member, who
may then contact the Safety Officer, and if needed, the department Chairperson.

2. Special Research Populations

a. Infants and Children

i. Environmental Safety issues

? Ensure that the testing environment does not contain exposed


radiators, uncovered electrical outlets, hanging blind cords, peeling or
chipping pain on walls, furniture that can be easily toppled, objects
accessible to children, sharp corners on furniture, accessible poisons.

? Ensure that age-appropriate toys are used with very young children.

? Ensure that the testing environment does contain posted emergency


phone numbers including faculty research lab administrator,
University police, city police and poison control.

? Researchers must have parental contact information readily accessible.

ii. Situational Safety

? Do not leave children unattended.

? Do not release children to persons other than parents and guardians


without prior consent.

? A researcher suspecting abuse of a child must immediately notify their


faculty supervisor who must notify Child Protective Services; *See the
QCC safety section for more detailed information.

b. Elderly and Persons with Disabilities

i. Environmental Safety Issues

? Ensure that the testing environment contains adequate hall and room
lighting, anchored rugs, stationary furniture (as opposed to chairs with
wheels).

? Maximize the testing room’s access to an elevator, as well as parking


lot proximity and safety.

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? Ensure that the testing environment does contain a posted list of
emergency phone numbers including faculty research lab
administrator, University police and City police.

? It is recommended that researchers have contact information for a


significant other on hand, and if applicable, researchers should have
guardian contact information readily accessible.

ii. Situational Safety

? Researchers should meet and escort older adult participants and those
with disabilities into the building and assist participant in navigating
difficult areas (e.g., stairs)

? A researcher suspecting abuse of an older adult or person with a


disability must immediately notify their faculty supervisor who in turn
must notify Adult Protective Services. *See the QCC safety section for
more detailed information.

c. Clinical Populations

i. Environmental Safety Issues

? Ensure that the testing environment contains a posted list of


emergency phone numbers including primary investigator, University
police, City police, etc. *See the QCC safety issues section for further
information.

ii. Situational Safety

? *See the QCC safety issues section for further information.

3. Field Research Sites

a. Environmental Safety Issues

i. Identify any site-specific concerns

ii. Identify any concerns the site has about WVU research procedure

iii. Ensure site conditions are safe and satisfy departmental guidelines

iv. Ensure access to an on-site telephone or carry a cell phone

v. Know the site’s exact location/address in case of an emergency

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vi. Post supervisor/principal investigator contact information

b. Situational Safety

i. Familiarize yourself with the on-site supervisors available to assist during an


emergency

ii. Consider carrying relevant supplies (e.g., first aid kit, cell phone, food)

4. Researcher Safety

a. Researchers should notify their faculty supervisor of all scheduled testing activities
including location, date and time

b. When conducting research in remote or off-site locations, at night or on the


weekends, be aware of other departmental persons in close vicinity

c. Researcher should discontinue research testing with participants who are abusive or
intoxicated

d. Researchers should not provide their home phone number/address to participants

e. Report all incidents to the faculty supervisor, and if needed, to the Safety Officer

E. Animal Research Lab Safety Issues

1. General Issues

The Department of Psychology maintains an AALAC accredited facility supporting


research with rats and pigeons. The facility is located in the Life Science Building. The
health and safety hazards associated with handling animals can be loosely placed into
three categories. First, by far the greatest occupational risk of working with rats and
pigeons is allergic reactions associated with breathing or contacting animal dander or
urine allergens. Second, physical injuries occur from bites and scratches (rats). Third,
the possibility of zoonotic diseases must always be considered, although humans are
not susceptible to infectious diseases suffered by animals and the potential for zoonotic
diseases has been greatly reduced due to the high quality of animals presently available
through suppliers.

2. Allergic Reactions

Those faculty or students who have other allergies are at particular risk. Animal or
animal products such as dander, hair, scales, fur, saliva and body wastes contains
powerful allergens that can cause both respiratory and skin disorders. Common

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symptoms of allergic reaction are nasal or eye symptoms, skin disorders and asthma.
How to protect yourself:

? Wash Your Hands. The single most effective preventive measure that can be
taken is thorough, regular hand washing. Wash hands and arms after handling
rats and pigeons. Never smoke, drink or eat in animal rooms or before
washing your hands.

? Wear Gloves. Particularly when working with rats, wear appropriate gloves
for the task.

? Wear Respiratory Protection. Dust masks should be worn at all times when
working with rats or pigeons.

? Wear Other Protective Clothing. Lab coats should be available and worn when
working with rats or pigeons.

3. Physical Injury from Bites and Scratches

If you work long enough with rats you will receive a bite. Laboratory rats are not
vicious but will bite if handled improperly and sometimes when they are food deprived.
Bite wounds, regardless of the species, must be cleaned thoroughly. The following is
recommended:

a. For superficial bites

? Wash the wound with soap and water under pressure from a faucet for at least
five minutes, but do not scrub, as this may bruise the tissue. Apply an
antiseptic lotion or cream.

? Watch for signs of infection at the site, such as increased redness or pain,
swelling, drainage or if the person develops a fever. Call your physician or
healthcare provider right away if any of these symptoms occur.

b. For deeper bites or puncture wounds

? If the bite is bleeding apply pressure to it with a clean bandage or towel to


stop the bleeding.

? Wash the wound with soap and water under pressure from a faucet for at least
five minutes, but do not scrub, as this may bruise the tissue.

? Dry the wound, cover it with a sterile dressing, but do not use tape or butterfly
bandages to close the wound, as this may trap harmful bacteria in the wound.

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? Call your physician or healthcare professional for guidance and to determine
whether additional treatment, such as antibiotics or a tetanus booster is
needed. This is especially important for bites that cause deeper puncture
wounds.

? Call your physician or healthcare provider for any flu-like symptoms such as a
fever, headache, malaise, decreased appetite or swollen glands following the
bite.

4. Medical Monitoring

Faculty and graduate students having substantial animal contact will be included in
the West Virginia University Medical Monitoring Program. University Health
Associates and West Virginia University Hospitals will provide surveillance and
vaccinations for common zoonotic diseases that present risk to animal users.
Personnel will receive reminders and be offered free vaccination and testing
procedures.

F. Quinn Curtis Center (QCC) Safety Issues

1. Procedures for the fire alarm: If the fire alarm sounds while you are testing a
client or holding a therapy session, you must leave the clinic. Before you leave the
clinic, lock the file room and the outer door to the QCC. If you were meeting with
an adult client or a child client accompanied by an adult, then you should instruct
them to wait outside and return to the clinic when the building is reopened. Due to
issues of confidentiality, you should not stand with your client outside of the
building. However, if your client is in crisis or is a child who is not accompanied by
an adult, then you should remain with your client until the building is reopened.

2. Quick reference for Emergency Numbers

Valley Health Care 24-hour crisis line: (304) 296-1731 or 1-800-232-0020

Chestnut Ridge Hospital 24-hour help line: (304) 598-6400 or 1-800-636-3475

Child Protective Services (infant to 18, Monongalia County) (304) 285-3175

Adult Protective Services (10 or older, Monongalia County) (304) 285-3175

Child Abuse Hotline 1-800-352-6513

Morgantown Vet Center (Veterans only) (304) 291-4303

Rape & Domestic Violence Information Center (304) 292-5100

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Sheriff’s Department (304) 291-7260 or 911

Campus Security 9-911

*When you manage an emergency situation for a QCC client, make sure to
document all events in a progress note. The progress note should include the
following: date, time, who was consulted, and a chronological account of the events.
Note severity of threat judged to be present, range of options considered, action(s)
taken, and follow-up needed. Be sure to document reasoning in reaching decisions
regarding actions taken.

For a detailed description of the guidelines for voluntary and involuntary hospitalization,
reference The Clinical Policies and Procedures Manual located in the QCC Staff room.

3. Emergency Situation for a QCC Client in Clinic: When the individual is obviously
distressed, is reporting that he/she may imminently harm himself/herself or others, or is
reporting an instance of physical/sexual abuse or neglect. To aid in determining
imminence, assess the client’s intent, means of completing plan, and how soon the plan
might be acted upon.

a. Client Reporting Suicidal or Homicidal Intent: If a client reports suicidal or


homicidal intent, the therapist should follow the steps below immediately:

i. Assess the imminence of danger to the client or others (i.e., refer to the “definition of
emergency” situations above). To aid in determining imminence, assess the client’s
intent, means of completing plan, and how soon the plan might be acted upon.

ii . Client is in imminent danger (e.g., suicidal). Contact your Vertical Team Supervisor
and inform him/her of the situation. If your supervisor is unavailable, contact the
Clinic Director, or any other supervisor who is in the department. Telephone numbers
(work and home) are listed in the Emergency Procedures Manual on top of the front
desk.

iii. If instructed by your supervisor or the Clinic Director, call the Valley Health Care
24-hour crisis response line at (304) 296-1731 or 1-800-232-0020 or the Chestnut
Ridge Hospital 24-hour help line at (304) 598-6400 or 1-800-636-3475 or Ruby
Memorial Hospital at (304) 598-4171 and inform them of the situation and develop
a plan of action with the assistance of the contacted agency. If the situation occurs on
campus (e.g., in the QCC) or the client is a student or employee, also contact campus
security at 9-911.

iv. If a client leaves the therapy session against advice and you determine that he/she is
an imminent threat to him/herself, or to someone else, call the Sheriff’s Department
at (304) 291-7260 and report the situation and develop a plan of action with the

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assistance of the representative contacted at the Sheriff’s Department. In the event
that there is no answer at the Sheriff’s Department, dial “911”.

b. Another person is in imminent danger (e.g., client is threatening the safety of others)

i. Follow steps 1 thru 3 under “Client is in imminent danger” above. Also attempt
to gather as much information as possible from the caller about the person named
as being in danger. (e.g., full name, location, relation to client).

ii. If you have enough information, call the person named as being in danger and
inform him/her of the threat that has been made and who made the threat. Also,
call the Sheriff’s Department (911) and inform them of the emergency and the
danger regarding the threatened person. If you do not have enough information to
call the person named as being in danger, call the Sheriff’s department. Be
prepared to give the Sheriff.

c. Danger is judged not to be imminent.

i. Options therapists have to protect their clients and others include, but are not
limited to: (a) behavior contracting, (b) intensified or specialized outpatient
therapy, (c) increasing the frequency of therapeutic sessions, (d) reformulation of
the treatment plan, (e) referring for medication consultation, (f) voluntary
hospitalization, (g) and involuntary hospitalization. For a detailed description of
the guidelines for voluntary and involuntary hospitalization, reference Appendix
G (pages 49-51) in the Clinical Policies and Procedures Manual for the Quin
Curtis Center located on the front desk next to the telephone books. Be sure to
consult with a clinical supervisor and document all actions and the reasoning in
reaching decisions about actions taken and not taken.

4. Abusive Client Behavior

If a client is engaging in or is suspected of abusive behavior towards a child,


elderly person, or a person with disabilities, follow step 1 on page 2 of these
procedures, deciding on the imminence of continued abuse and actions to be taken
and then proceed to call the appropriate agency below to file a report or to get
information about the best way to proceed.

Child Protective Services (CPS: infant to 18 years old) (304) 285-3175


Adult Protective Services (APS: 18 years to adult) (304) 285-3175

*NOTE: Adult/Child Protective Services may also be contacted regarding cases involving
abuse of people with disabilities.

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Please be prepared to provide the following information:

1. Name, address, age, relation to client or perpetrator, and phone number of victim.

2. Client’s identifying information such as: age, birth date, social security number
and ethnicity.

3. Name, address, age, and phone number of alleged perpetrator (if different from
client’s information).

4. Identifying information regarding alleged perpetrator (if different from client’s


information).

5. Your name, QCC phone number (304-293-2001, ext 31671) and address (Life
Science Building, 53 Campus Drive, Department of Psychology, West
Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6040).

6. Reason for concern (i.e., alleged abuse, neglect or exploitation, suicide risk,
homicide risk).

*NOTE: Generally the therapist should have the client make the phone call with our
assistance. This is especially important if the perpetrator is not the client as they
have first-hand knowledge of the situation. Be sure to consult with a clinical
supervisor and document all actions and the reasoning in reaching decisions
about actions taken and not taken.

Once CPS or APS has been contacted, that agency will follow up on the
information provided by the therapist. Aside from documentation that the
situation occurred (see note above), therapists are not required to take any further
action to protect the victim. If information regarding the results of CPS or APS
investigation is desired by the therapist, a request for the information may be
placed with the agency. The agency contacted may also request further assistance
from the therapist if deemed necessary.

5. Emergency Telephone Call from a QCC Client

Definition of Emergency Calls: When the caller is obviously distressed, is reporting


that he/she may imminently harm him/herself or others, or is reporting an instance of
physical/sexual abuse or neglect. To aid in determining imminence, assess the client’s
intent, means of completing plan, and how soon the plan might be acted upon. In this
situation, please follow the steps listed below:

a. first determine whether or not the call is of an emergency nature by assessing, via
caller report, the imminence of danger (i.e., refer to the “Definition of Emergency
Calls” above to assess imminence of caller’s actions)

18
b. Not an Emergency: If it is not an emergency, (i.e., does not meet the criteria for
emergency calls defined in the “Definition of Emergency Calls” listed above) take
a message and if the caller is a current QCC client leave the message in an envelope
in the therapist’s department and on his/her voicemail. If the caller is not a current
QCC client take a message and leave it in the QCC mailbox of either the QCC
Director or one of the QCC’s graduate assistants.

c. Is an Emergency: If the call is of an emergency nature, first establish assurance


with the client that he/she is safe in the short term (e.g., verbal contract that he/she
will not harm themselves in the short term). Next, determine whether or not the
caller is a client of the QCC. In distress, a person may call the number of any
mental health facility looking for help, whether or not he/she is a client of the
facility.

i. If the caller is not a client of the QCC, refer to the “Emergency situation
with an individual not being seen in the QCC” section of The Emergency
Manual.

ii. If the caller is a client of the QCC:

? First: Consult with either the Clinic Director or Graduate Student


Coordinator0s) if they are in the QCC.

? Second: Try to find the caller’s therapist. Refer to practicum schedules


(completed by students at the beginning of each semester) for help in
contacting the therapist.

? Third: If the caller’s therapist cannot be contacted, try to contact the


therapist’s supervisor. A list of therapists and supervisors is available in
the QCC.

? Fourth: If the therapist’s supervisor cannot be contacted, try to contact


any QCC faculty or staff member to deal with the emergency caller. Leave
messages for everyone whom you tried to contact.

? Fifth: If no one is available, get an assurance from the caller that he/she
will call an emergency hotline and/or will wait to hear from a therapist.
Once given this assurance, refer the caller to the emergency numbers listed
on the title page in these Emergency Procedures and let the person know
you will continued to attempt to contact the therapist. If the caller cannot
wait or provide you with assurance, you should get his/her location, keep
them on the phone line, and call the Sheriff’s department (number on title
page of these procedures) on another line to ensure the safety of the caller
and others. Then follow instructions from the Sheriff’s department.

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6. Emergency situation with an individual who is not a QCC client

Definition of Emergency Situations: When the individual is obviously distressed, is


reporting that imminent harm may occur to him/herself or others, or is reporting an
instance of physical/sexual abuse or neglect. To aid in determining imminence, assess
the client’s intent, means of completing plan, and how soon the plan might be acted
upon.

a. Emergency Situation: (as defined by the “Definition of Emergency


Situations”). If the individual is not a client of the QCC, explain that we do not
provide emergency crisis services. Get an assurance from the caller that he/she
will call an emergency hotline. Once given this assurance refer the caller to the
emergency numbers listed on the title page in these Emergency Procedures for
Valley Health Care, Chestnut Ridge Hospital, Child and Adult Protective
Services, or the Child Abuse Hotline. If the caller cannot provide you with an
assurance get his/her location, keep them on the phone line, and call the
Sheriff’s department (number on title page of these procedures) on another line
to ensure the safety of the caller and others. Then follow instructions from the
Sheriff’s department.

b. Not an Emergency Situation: If the individual is not a current QCC client take
a message and leave it in the mailbox of the QCC Director or one of the QCC
graduate assistants.

7. QCC Guidelines for Voluntary and Involuntary Hospitalization*


(Current as of 07/19/00

*When you manage a hospitalization procedure for a QCC client, make sure to document
all the events in a progress note. The progress note should include the following: date,
time, who was consulted, and a chronological account of the events. Note severity of
threat judged to be present, range of options considered, action(s) taken, and follow-up
needed. Be sure to document reasoning in reaching decisions regarding actions taken.

When a client presents a high risk of suicide or harm to others, then additional
treatment is needed. A discussion of how to determine the extent of dangerousness is
addressed in Chapter 7 of Fremouw, de Perczel, and Ellis (1990). Options therapists
have to protect their clients include, but are not limited to: (a) intensified or specialized
outpatient therapy, (b) increasing the frequency of therapeutic sessions, (c)
reformulation of the treatment plan, (d) referring for medication consultation, (e)
voluntary hospitalization, (f) and involuntary hospitalization. Decisions regarding the
course of action will be based on the therapist’s judgment of the imminence of risk to
the client or others. If at any time in the selection of options or hospitalization process
there is an immediate situation of danger to the client or others, therapists or another
QCC staff member should contact “911”. An example of this situation would be if the
client leaves the QCC “against the therapist’s advice” and the action implies that the
client is not willing to work with the therapist while seeking intensified treatment.

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Typically, before making any decisions about the best options for clients, therapists
should discuss the client’s situation with their faculty supervisor. However, in case of
an emergency, therapists may take independent action. If the therapist’s faculty
supervisor is not available, then he/she will need to seek out counsel with one of the
following individuals. First, if the Clinic Director or Graduate Student Coordinator(s)
are in the QCC, they should be notified. Second, if the above individuals are not
available, therapists should try to find a QCC faculty supervisor, another vertical team
member, or a QCC therapist. Third, if none of these individuals are available, then
therapists should contact Valley Health Care’s 24-hour crisis response line at 1-800-
232-0020 or Chestnut Ridge Hospital’s 24-hour help line through Ruby Memorial
Hospital at 1-800-636-3475.

Intensified or Specialized Outpatient Therapy: If the probability of the suicidal or


homicidal behavior is judged to be low enough that outpatient treatment can continue
on an intensified basis, then this may be an appropriate option. This option could entail
increasing the number of therapy sessions per week, or the time spent during sessions
with clients. Further, therapists may need increased supervision time, or faculty
participation in therapy sessions. In addition, therapists may attempt to involve family
member, partners, or friends in therapy sessions and management of risk behaviors
(e.g., suicide contract). If therapists are working with children or adolescents, then
involvement in services from parents or legal guardians is crucial. Another
management strategy therapists may consider is contacting their client over the phone
on a daily basis to assess risk factors and follow through with interventions procedures.

Voluntary and Involuntary Units in Monongalia County: Before discussing the


procedures for voluntary and involuntary hospitalization, a list of units in the area that
may be considered follows:

? Chestnut Ridge Hospital (304-293-4000 or 1-800-458-4898) in Morgantown,


WV. Has voluntary and involuntary units for children, adolescents, and adults.
Offers inpatient care for adolescents and adults with substance abuse problems and
mental illness.

? Fairmont General Hospital (304-367-7229 or 1-800-564-2499) in Fairmont, WV.


Has predominately voluntary units for psychiatric and substance abuse issues, but
also will admit patients who are civilly committed.

? Sharpe Hospital (304-269-1210) in Weston, WV. Almost all patients admitted are
civilly committed; the hospital rarely admits patients on a voluntary basis (their
voluntary procedure rarely can be used). Offers services to adults with mental
illness and dual diagnoses, but does not take patients whose concerns are strictly
related to substance use.

? Shawnee Hills (304-789-2405) in Charleston, WV. Has voluntary and involuntary


units for adults with substance abuse or dependence issues.

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? Fox Run Hospital (1-800-245-2131 or 614-695-2131) in St. Clairesville, Ohio. Has
locked facilities for children and adolescents with psychiatric, behavior, and
substance use concerns.

? Olympic Center (304-329-2400) in Kingwood, WV. Offers services to adolescents


with substance abuse and dependence.

Voluntary Hospitalization: Voluntary hospitalization may be appropriate after


considering the following. First, call appropriate options from the above-mentioned
list, and find out whether they have room for admission of a client with suicidal or
homicidal risk. Second, find out if the particular hospitals that seem appropriate and
could admit your client have adequate forms of supervision that will minimize your
client’s dangerousness, as well as protect him/her. For example, closed doors and
24-hour suicide precautions need to be available. Third, explore whether your client
has the financial ability to seek voluntary admissions and to cooperate with
inpatient treatment.

Once a hospital is selected (after consultation with facility and faculty supervisor),
the therapist should make a referral by calling the site. Make sure that a family
member, friend, or case manager is present (or phoned to come to the QCC) to
assist with transporting the client to the facility selected. Therapists should not
transport clients.

Involuntary Hospitalization: If intensified outpatient services and voluntary


hospitalization are not appropriate, then civil commitment of the client should be
pursued. The civil commitment also is referred to as the probable cause process. In
order for a client to be civilly committed, he/she will have to meet three criteria.
First, there should be evidence that the client has a mental illness, mental
retardation or is addicted to a substance. Second, the client should be at risk for
being a danger to him/herself, or a danger to others as indicated by recent overt acts
(including verbal threats). Finally, no less restrictive alternative is available.

The civil commitment process can be quite complicated. Fortunately, Valley Health
Care facilitates the application for all civil commitments in Monongalia County.
Therefore, in pursuing this option, therapists should first contact a crisis worker at
Valley. Again, the 24-hour numbers for Valley are 1-800-232-0020 or (304) 296-
1731. Therapists should ask to speak with a crisis worker. Currently, (i.e., July of
2000) three staff members from the Morgantown office facilitate the application.
Leonard Wolf, Bill Townsend and Nancy Blake.

Therapists should inform the crisis worker that an application for involuntary
hospitalization is warranted for a particular client. Afterwards, therapist should ask
the crisis worker to come to the QCC in order to complete the application. Thus, the
therapist will be the applicant unless a family member or friend is present at the
QCC and would be a more appropriate applicant. If involuntary hospitalization is
warranted in a situation outside of the clinic, such as from the person’s home,

22
school, or work place, therapists should inform family members or support persons
that anyone can be an applicant for commitment. In this situation, the potential
applicant should call Valley directly. The therapist is responsible for contacting a
person who is willing to be the applicant. If family members refuse, attempts should
be made to contact other support persons. In the case that no applicant can be
contacted, the therapist should contact the Sheriff’s department (304-291-7260) in
order to ensure the safety of the client and designate an applicant.

See Emergency Procedures Manual in the staff room of the QCC for information
regarding the course of action taken in involuntary hospitalization procedures once
under the supervision of Valley Health Care workers.

Criteria for finding probable cause. The legal process allows findings for
probable cause to be based on any one of three criteria.
1. Mental illness 2. Chemical dependence 3. Threat of harm to self or others

In practice, one very rarely sees court ordered placements based on criteria #1 or #2
alone. It is criterion #3 that carries the most weight in the decision to commit, and it
is frequently the addition of mental illness or chemical dependence that allows the
incarceration to be psychiatric rather then criminal.

There is likely to be a variety of historical reasons for the weight carried by


criterion #3. The most immediate and obvious reason for preferring to base findings
on these criteria is our legal system’s commitment to the rights of the individual. A
mentally ill or chemically dependent citizen has the same protection under the Bill
of Rights as every other US citizen. There is nothing in the nature of these
“impairments” to justify, prima facie (a legal presumption that means “on the face
of it” or “at first sight” or “at first face”), a revocation of the “impaired
individual’s” right to freedom. It is not until a citizen shows the potential to do
harm to another or harm to self that the legal system’s current reading of traditional
parents patriae (defining the role of the state as a sovereign or quasi-sovereign
guardian of persons under some form of legal disability) provides for interference
with an individual’s rights. Here the admixture of legal precedents against harm
combined with our philosophical intolerance for crossing personal boundaries
combines to produce a finding.

While it is not up to the clinician/facilitator to make a case for finding probable


cause, it is important for staff to understand how the weight of these grounds might
be distributed in order to decide the fruitfulness of initiating the probable cause
process. Suggesting to the applicant that some alternative intervention provides a
more viable solution.

23
References

Fremouw, W.J., Perczel, M.D., & Ellis, T.E. (1990). Suicide Risk: Assessment and
response guidelines.

24
Department of Psychology
Chemical Hygiene Plan

West Virginia University’s Chemical Hygiene Plan is designed to ensure the institution’s
compliance with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Laboratory
Standard, which is published in the Code of Federal Regulations under 29 CFR 1910. 1450,
“Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemical in Laboratories”. The Standard covers most
employers engaged in the laboratory use of hazardous chemicals.

The University’s Chemical Hygiene Plan applies to all departments engaged in the
laboratory use of hazardous chemicals. According to OSHA’S “Hazard Communication
Standard,” 29 CFR 1910.1200, a chemical is hazardous if it meets any of several criteria: (a) it
is carcinogenic, toxic, corrosive, an irritant, a strong sensitizer, flammable, or chemically
reactive; (b) it is listed under the Occupational Safety and Health Act, 29 CFR 1910, Subpart
Z; (c) it has an assigned Threshold Limit Value by the American Conference of Governmental
Industrial Hygienists (Mercier, 1996, pp. 5-6).

Each department is responsible for developing site-specific Chemical Hygiene Plans. The
goal is to protect workers through the development and implementation of practices and
control measures expressly tailored to the individual laboratory. The plan contained herein
represents the Department of Psychology’s overall Chemical Hygiene Plan. It is based on
WVU’s Chemical Hygiene Plan and the template provided in WVU’s Generic Hygiene Plan,
and on the Department of Chemistry’s Chemical Hygiene Plan. The Department of
Psychology’s Plan should be supplemented by additional Plans developed to meet the special
needs of particular laboratories within the Department (“laboratory-specific” Plans).

A list of hazardous chemicals and permissible exposure limits can be found in Mercier
(1996, pp. 157-169). Few substances currently used in the Department of Psychology appear
on the list. But other substances used in our laboratories pose risks, including drugs and the
syringes used to inject them (the latter generate significant amounts of hazardous waste). In the
interest of safety, any laboratory using hazardous chemicals, drugs and other controlled
substances, or materials that generate hazardous waste should comply with the relevant
provisions of this Departmental Chemical Hygiene Plan.

Note that the Federal standard for Chemical Hygiene Plans does not address the use of
biological or radiological hazards; however, any hazardous chemicals used in conjunction with
a biological or radiological substance is covered under the Chemical Hygiene Plan. For
guidance, contact WVU’s Radiation Safety Office (293-3413) or the Biohazards Safety
Committee (293-4559).

I. GENERAL PRINCIPLES

All faculty, staff, and students in the Department of Psychology should observe the
following general guidelines regarding chemical laboratories:

25
A. Minimize exposure to all laboratory chemicals. Know and follow all necessary
precautions when handling laboratory chemicals. Avoid skin and eye contact.
Before using a potentially hazardous substance, read the Material Safety Data
Sheet.

B. Assume that all chemical of unknown toxicity are toxic.

C. To prevent exposure to airborne substances, perform work in fume hoods as much as


possible and prudent. Use the fume hood when there is a possibility of release of
toxic chemical vapors, dusts, or gases.

D. Follow safe and prudent laboratory practices on a daily basis. Chemical hygiene is
not a short-term activity, but a continual, sincere effort.

E. Observe the permissible exposure limits of OSHA and the Threshold Limit Values
of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists as listed in the
Material Safety Data Sheet for each chemical.

F. Obtain prior approval for laboratory operations requiring special precautions (over
and above normal laboratory precautions) from the Chemical Hygiene Officer, the
Department Safety Committee, and the WVU Office of Environmental Health and
Safety (293-3792).

G. Maintain access to the emergency telephone numbers listed below:

On-Campus Emergency Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-911


Department Safety Officer (Kent Parker) . . . . 293-2001 x 31605 (Home: 292-1021)
Department Chair (Michael Perone) . . . . . . . . 293-2001 x 31604 (Home: 296-4373)
LSB Supervisor (Michael Perone) . . . . . . . . . 293-2001 x 31604 (Home: 296-4373)
Department Associate Chair (Stan Cohen). . . .293-2001 x 31641 (Home:
Eberly College Safety Coordinator (Barbara Foster) . . . . . . . 692-9800 (cell phone)
Poison Control Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-800-642-3625
WVU Biohazards Safety Committee (Andrew Cockburn) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293-7157
WVU Environmental Health & Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293-3792
WVU Health Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293-2311
WVU Medical Center Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293-4952
WVU Office of Laboratory Animal Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293-2721
WVU Public Safety (Campus Police) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293-3136
WVU Radiation Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293-3431

II. DEPARTMENTAL RESPONSIBILITIES

A. Department Chair

1. The Department Chair is responsible for chemical hygiene and safety within the
Department of Psychology.

26
2. The Chair recommends to the dean a faculty member to serve as the Department’s
Chemical Hygiene Officer.

3. The Chair appoints the Department’s Safety Officer, who also serves as the Chemical
Hygiene Officer and Chair of the Department Safety Committee.

4. In consultation with the Chemical Hygiene Officer, the Chair appoints the members of
the Department Safety Committee.

5. The Chair serves as an ex officio member of the Department Safety Committee.

B. Chemical Hygiene Officer

1. The Chemical Hygiene Officer is appointed by the dean to serve in this capacity, and by
the Department Chair to serve as the Department of Psychology’s Safety Office and chair
of the Department Safety Committee.

2. The Officer provides technical guidance in the development and implementation of


Departmental and laboratory-specific Chemical Hygiene Plans.

3. The Officer is responsible for the design and implementation of the Departmental
Chemical Hygiene Plan.

4. The Officer monitors the procurement, use, and disposal of chemical and controlled
substances such as drugs.

5. The Officer monitors the procurement, use, and disposal of materials that may generate
hazardous waste (e.g., syringes).

6. The Officer maintains records for audits and inventories of the Department’s facilities,
including maintaining records of personnel trained in the usage of the Departmental
Chemical Hygiene Plan. The Officer maintains records of personnel training and facilities
inspections related to safety.

7. The Officer assists Laboratory Directors in developing and maintaining adequate


laboratory facilities and conducts periodic reviews of the facilities.

8. The Officer keeps current of legal requirements concerning regulated substances.

9. The Officer seeks ways to improve chemical hygiene and certify to WVU’s Office of
Environmental Health and Safety that an annual review of the Department’s Chemical
Hygiene Plan has been performed.

10. The Officer ensures that laboratory workers receive appropriate training and information
to ensure that they are aware of the hazards of chemicals or other substances present in
their work area. Training and information shall be provided at the time of a worker’s

27
initial assignment to a chemical laboratory and prior to assignments involving new kinds
of chemical exposure. The frequency of refresher information and training shall be
determined by the Chemical Hygiene Officer and the Office of Environmental Health and
Safety. Information and training may include, but is not limited to:

a. Contents of the OSHA Laboratory Standard and appendices;

b. Location of the Departmental and laboratory-specific Chemical Hygiene Plans;

c. Permissible exposure limits of OSHA-regulated substances or recommended exposure


limits for other hazardous chemicals where there is no applicable OSHA standard;

d. Signs and symptoms associated with exposure to hazardous chemicals;

e. Location and availability of reference material on the hazards, safe handling, storage,
and disposal of hazardous chemicals found in the laboratory, including (but not limited
to) Material Safety Data Sheets;

f. Methods and observations that may be used to detect the presence or release of
hazardous chemicals;

g. Physical and health hazards of chemicals in the workplace;

h. Measures workers can take to protect themselves from these hazards, including
specific procedures which have been implemented to protect employees from exposure
to hazardous chemicals;

i. Applicable details of the University and Departmental Chemical Hygiene Plans;

j. Proper use of personal protective equipment, gas cylinders and hoods.

11. The Officer notifies workers of the availability of medical attention under the following
circumstances:

a. Whenever a worker develops signs or symptoms associated with a hazardous


chemical to which the worker may have been exposed in the laboratory;

b. Where exposure monitoring reveals an exposure level routinely above the action level
for an OSHA-regulated substance for which there are exposure monitoring and
medical surveillance requirements;

c. Whenever a spill, leak, explosion, or other occurrence results in likelihood of


hazardous exposure.

28
12. The Officer provides to the appropriate medical authority the following information, if
medical attention becomes necessary:

a. Identity of the hazardous chemical(s) to which the worker may have been exposed;

b. Description of the conditions under which the exposure occurred;

c. Signs and symptoms the worker may be experiencing.

13. The Officer notifies affected workers in writing of any monitoring results, either
individually or by posting results in an appropriate location accessible to workers. This
information shall be distributed within 5 working days upon receipt of the results from
the Office of Environmental Health and Safety.

14. The Officer attends annual Chemical Hygiene Officer training sessions that are
conducted by the Office of Environmental Health and Safety and their associates.

15. The Officer attends meetings that are conducted by the Eberly College Safety
Coordinator.

C. Department Safety Committee

1. The Department of Psychology’s Safety Committee consists of the Chemical Hygiene


Officer and two additional faculty members, one graduate student, and one staff member
appointed by the Department Chair in consultation with the Chemical Hygiene Officer,
and the Department Chair who serves ex officio.

2. The Committee develops policies and procedures relevant to the promotion and
maintenance of safety in the Department’s laboratories, classrooms, clinics, and offices,
as well as in the Department’s off-campus programs of research, teaching, and service.

3. The Committee takes appropriate steps to ensure compliance with safety-related policies
and procedures of the University, Eberly College, and the Department, including (but not
limited to) compliance with the provisions of the University and Departmental Chemical
Hygiene Plans.

4. The Committee monitors the safety-related training of faculty, staff, and students and
maintains records of such training.

5. The Committee reviews safety-related practices in the Department and recommends


corrections and improvements.

6. The Committee prepares safety-related reports that may be required of the Department by
the University or College.

29
7. The Committee assists the Chemical Hygiene Officer in fulfilling the responsibilities
described in Section II.B.

D. Laboratory Directors

1. The Laboratory Director is the faculty member in charge of a research facility or research
project, or a laboratory associated with an academic course. Unless a change is approved
by the Chemical Hygiene Officer, the Laboratory Director is the faculty member to
whom laboratory space or other research-related resources are assigned, or the faculty
member who is teaching the course.

2. The Laboratory Director develops and maintains the laboratory-specific Chemical


Hygiene Plan. The Plan should:

a. Identify the persons and facilities covered by the Plan;

b. Be accessible to all laboratory personnel at any time;

c. Be reviewed and updated as necessary, at least once per year;

d. List the locations for storage, dispensing, and disposal of chemicals, drugs or other
controlled substances, and materials that may generate hazardous waste;

e. Specify procedures for disposal of hazardous waste (guidelines and requirements are
available from the Office of Environmental Health and Safety, 293-3792);

f. Include Material Safety Data Sheets for chemical and controlled substances used or
stored in the laboratory;

g. Include emergency procedures specific to the laboratory’s operations (including


procedures for responding to spills), incorporating building evacuation routes;

h. List all systems intended to contain hazardous materials (e.g., fume hoods, glove
boxes, explosion-proof refrigerators, flammable storage cabinets; drug safes),
including information on restrictions, special precautions, preventative maintenance
schedules, and any other information relevant to safe operation;

i. List the personal protective equipment available for use in the laboratory and, if
appropriate, discuss specific uses of the equipment;

j. Specify standard operating procedures for chemicals that are used routinely and pose
a potential health hazard, written in a form that makes the information useful to the
laboratory workers;

k. Be developed with the guidance of the Office of Environmental Health and Safety or
Chemical Hygiene Officer, as appropriate;

30
l. Be subject to review by the Office of Environmental Health and Safety and the Eberly
College Safety Coordinator.

3. The Laboratory Director communicates appropriate portions of the University,


Departmental, and laboratory-specific Chemical Hygiene Plans to faculty, student, or
staff who fall under their supervision.

4. The Laboratory Director ensures that his or her research projects are conducted safely in
accordance with the University, Departmental, and laboratory-specific Chemical Hygiene
Plans and other applicable institutional policies.

5. The Laboratory Director keeps informed of current regulations and changes regarding the
OSHA Laboratory Standard.

6. The Laboratory Director ensures that appropriate personal protective equipment is


available and used properly.

7. The Laboratory Director ensures that facilities are maintained.

8. The Laboratory Director is responsible for maintaining a complete up-to-date inventory


of all chemicals (with amounts) in storage or use, and for providing this information to
the Chemical Hygiene Officer upon request.

E. Workers

1. Workers are individuals who conduct research in chemical laboratories, including


Laboratory Directors. They may be members of the faculty or staff, students or visiting
researchers.

2. Workers plan and conduct each operation in accordance with applicable portions of
relevant Chemical Hygiene Plans.

3. Workers develop good habits of chemical hygiene.

4. Workers should immediately report any job-related illness or injury to the Laboratory
Director.

31
III. FACILITIES

A. Fire Alarm Policy

1. When a fire alarm sounds in the facility, everyone is required to evacuate the building via
the nearest exits.

2. If appropriate, flames should be extinguished and equipment turned off before exiting.

3. Faculty and teaching assistants are responsible for ensuring that the egress of students
from their classrooms and laboratories is expeditious and orderly.

4. Personnel who violate this Fire Alarm Policy will be subject to citations or arrest by the
responding authorities of the University and the City of Morgantown and to internal
review and discipline by appropriate institutional officials. The Morgantown Fire
Department has the ultimate authority at the scene.

5. This policy should be posted in a conspicuous place in each laboratory. Appendix A


includes the information in a suitable form.

B. Design of Chemical Laboratories

1. The laboratory should have an appropriate general ventilation system to avoid intake of
contaminated air. General ventilation in the laboratory should be consistent with ANSI
Standard Z9.5-1992, “Laboratory Ventilation”.

2. Chemical stocking areas should be well-ventilated.

3. Hazardous chemicals and potentially dangerous supplies such as syringes should be


stored in a manner that limits access to everyone except workers who need these
materials for their work and have been trained in their proper use.

4. Each laboratory that uses hazardous chemicals should have available working hoods and
sinks, as appropriate for the type and use of the chemicals.

5. Fire extinguishers, safety showers and eyewash stations should be provided in close
proximity to each laboratory that uses hazardous chemicals, as appropriate for the type
and use of the chemicals.

6. Hazardous waste should be disposed in accordance with the University’s Hazardous


Waste Program. The Laboratory Director should obtain the Program’s guidelines and
requirements from the Office of Environmental Health and Safety (293-3792) and ensure
that all workers in the laboratory comply with them.

32
C. Maintenance of Chemical Laboratories

1. Laboratory hoods shall be inspected on a regular basis. The Office of Environmental


Health and Safety should provide assistance.

2. Safety showers and eyewash stations shall be inspected 4 times per year by members of
the Department Safety Committee.

3. Modifications to the laboratory should be undertaken only after consultation with the
Chemical Hygiene Officer and the Office of Environmental Health and Safety
(293-3792).

D. Ventilation of Chemical Laboratories

1. Laboratory procedures that may involve gas or vapor emissions from hazardous
chemicals should not be started if there is any reason to suspect that the ventilation
system is inadequate.

2. There should be 2.5 linear feet of hood space for every 2 workers who spend the
majority of their time working with hazardous chemicals.

3. Hood face velocity should be 60 to 100 linear feet per minute.

4. General ventilation should have a performance level of 4 to 12 room air changes per
hour if local exhaust hoods are used as the primary method of control. General
ventilation only provides a source of breathing air and a source of make-up air for local
ventilation devices.

IV. GENERAL PROTOCOLS

A. Procurement

1. Requisitions for chemicals, controlled substances (e.g., drugs), and materials that may
pose a danger to personnel or generate hazardous waste (e.g., syringes) should be
approved by the Chemical Hygiene Officer before they are submitted to the Department
Chair for final approval.

2. Orders are received in 1124 Life Sciences Building.

B. Stockrooms and Storerooms

1. Rooms specifically designated for storage or handling of chemicals, controlled


substances and potentially dangerous materials, and utilization areas such as
preparation rooms, storerooms, waste collection rooms, storage bunkers and chemical
laboratories are controlled-access areas.

33
2. Controlled-access areas should not be entered by the general public.

3. Tours should be restricted and under the control of the Laboratory Director.

4. Keys to these areas should be carefully monitored and issued to as few people as
possible by the Building Supervisor.

5. Toxic chemicals should be segregated in a well-identified area with adequate local


exhaust.

6. Chemicals that are highly toxic should be placed in unbreakable secondary containers.

C. Transportation of Chemicals

1. When chemicals are hand-carried, they should be placed in a safety container or a


rubber bucket as appropriate. Transportation of chemicals in crowded hallways should
be avoided.

2. Chemicals may be transported on carts with appropriate side rails.

a. For liquid chemicals, the carts should be made of nonreactive plastic. These carts
should have trays of single-piece construction at least 2 inches deep to contain
spills. Bottles should be kept separated or insulated by plastic foam or cardboard.
Liquids should never be transported in basket-type carts or other types of carts
whose shelves would allow leakage of spills. Carts should not be overfilled.

b. Solids may be transported in any type cart except the basket type.

c. Gas cylinders require special carts for transport. Prior to transport, regulators should
be removed and replaced with a safety cap.

d. When carting chemicals to or from an outdoor storage facility, there should be


appropriate ramps installed to provide proper access. Carts should never be carried
over obstructions.

D. Storage

1. Storage of chemicals on bench tops or inside hoods is not permitted.

2. Safety storage cabinets should be used for long-term storage of limited amounts of
chemicals and solvents. Open-shelf storage is permitted for non-volatile chemicals that
are not highly toxic.

3. All chemicals should be dated upon receipt, before being stored.

34
4. Peroxide-forming chemicals should be dated upon receipt and when opened. These
chemicals should be disposed of according to the shelf-life information on the Material
Safety Data Sheet.

5. Hallways and stairways should not be used as storage areas.

E. Housekeeping, Maintenance, and Inspections of Chemical Laboratories

1. Formal housekeeping and chemical hygiene inspections should be held four (4) times
per year, as arranged by the Department Safety Committee.

2. The Eberly College Safety Coordinator will conduct an annual inspection of


laboratories.

3. Eyewash stations should be “bump tested” and inspected four (4) times per year by
members of the Department Safety Committee.

4. Safety showers should be tested four (4) times per year by members of the Department
Safety Committee.

5. Access to exits, emergency equipment, and utilities should never be blocked.

F. Environmental Monitoring

1. Regular employee-exposure monitoring shall be provided if the Office of


Environmental Health and Safety has a reason to believe that exposure levels for
specific chemical routinely exceed OSHA;s action level.

2. Personnel from the Office of Environmental Health and Safety may conduct regular
monitoring for airborne substances when a new ventilation system is tested or hoods are
redesigned.

3. Personnel from the Office of Environmental Health and Safety may conduct regular
monitoring if a hazardous substance is stored in the laboratory or if a substance is used
routinely (3 or more times per week).

G. Medical Monitoring

WVU has an established Employee Medical Monitoring Program for employees


exposed to hazardous substances at designated threshold levels on a routine basis or as
a result of an incident. Department personnel should understand that monitoring can be
arranged, if appropriate, with the assistance of the Chemical Hygiene Officer.

35
H. Personal Protective Equipment

1. Protective equipment should be compatible with the degree of potential chemical


hazard. Workers should read the label and Material Safety Data Sheet of the particular
chemical to decide what protective equipment is required.

2. Fire extinguishers should be made accessible where required.

3. Access to fire alarms and telephones should be provided for emergency use near
chemical laboratories.

4. Use of respirators should be in compliance with WVU’s Respiratory Protection


Program (CFR 1910.134).

I. Records

1. Accident reports should be submitted to the Chemical Hygiene Officer who, in turn,
should forward them to the Office of Environmental Health and Safety and the
Department Chair.

2. Inventory and usage records of high-risk substances should be maintained by the


Chemical Hygiene Officer. Copies should be kept in the offices of the Chemical
Hygiene Officer and the Department Chair.

3. Medical records should be retained by WVU at the Department of Human Resources,


Health Sciences Center.

4. A complete up-to-date inventory of all chemicals (with amounts) should be maintained


in each laboratory by the Laboratory Director. A comprehensive inventory of all
chemicals in the Department should be maintained in the office of the Chemical
Hygiene Officer. All chemical inventories should be updated once per year, or more
frequently as directed by the Chemical Hygiene Officer.

5. The Chemical Hygiene Officer maintains records of all personnel training and facilities
inspections related to safety.

J. Signs and Labels

1. Emergency signs should be posted outside of each chemical laboratory with the
following information:

a. In case of emergency call 9-911;

b. The name, office telephone number, home telephone number, and email address of
the Laboratory Director;

36
c. WVU Office of Environmental Health and Safety (293-3792).

2. Inside each laboratory, the following information should be displayed in a conspicuous


place:

a. The contact information listed in Section I.G of this Plan (Appendix A provides the
information in a form suitable for posting);

b. The name, office telephone number, home telephone number, and email address of
the Laboratory Director;

c. The names, office telephone numbers, home telephone numbers, and email addresses
of the laboratory’s workers;

d. Emergency instructions on responding to fire alarms and chemical spills (Appendix


A).

3. All primary containers (supplied by the manufacturer) should be labeled with the name
of the chemical and include all of the manufacturer’s warnings and data. Secondary
containers should be labeled with the name of the chemical as well as pertinent hazard
warnings. Repair or replace damaged labels immediately.

4. Label, as appropriate, safety equipment and the location of safety equipment. Repair or
replace damaged labels immediately.

5. Post warning signs for special or unusual hazards. These include, but are not limited to,
acid storage, compressed gases, carcinogens, and highly toxic or volatile materials. Any
area in which work is conducted with carcinogens should be designated as a controlled
access area. Mark controlled areas with “WARNING –RESTRICTED ACCESS” signs.

K. Spill Policy

1. All chemical spills that present a health hazard should be reported immediately to the
Chemical Hygiene Officer. Written notification should be submitted by the Laboratory
Director to the Chemical Hygiene Officer and the Department Chair within 24 hours of
the incident.

2. The spill and evacuation policy in Appendix A should be followed. This policy should
be included in each laboratory-specific Chemical Hygiene Plan and posted inside each
laboratory in a conspicuous place. The laboratory-specific plan should supplement the
policy with:

a. specific evacuation routes based on the location of the laboratory;

b. instructions on responding to spills based on information in the Material Safety Data


Sheet for the chemicals in the laboratory inventory.

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3. The fire alarm system should be used to alert personnel in remote or isolated areas of the
facility in the event of a chemical spill that is life-threatening or poses a significant risk
to health.

4. Spills should be cleaned up using appropriate protective equipment and clothing. Waste
should be disposed of properly.

L. Information and Training

All workers should be informed and trained in the policies and procedures relevant to their
particular duties involving chemicals. Information may be transmitted through meetings,
memos, inspections, and written documentation, as well as training sessions conducted by
the Office of Environmental Health and Safety or others.

M. Chemical Waste Disposal

12. Chemical waste and other hazardous waste should be collected in appropriate
containers, properly labeled. Disposal is arranged by completing a “Hazardous
Materials Disposal Form” and submitting it to the Chemical Hygiene Officer for
approval. The form is available on line from the Office of Environmental Health and
Safety. http://intranet.wvu.edu/facilities_services/ehs.htm.

13. Do not pour any chemicals down the drain.

V. GENERAL PROCEDURES FOR ALL LABORATORY WORK WITH CHEMICALS

More specific information should be included in the laboratory-specific Chemical Hygiene


Plans:

A. Accidents

1. Read the Material Safety Data Sheet for each chemical involved in an accident.

2. In case of eye contact: Flush eyes with cold water for 15 minutes and immediately seek
medical attention.

3. In case of ingestion: Immediately dial 9-911 or the Poison Control Center (1-800-642-
3625). Do not induce vomiting except under the advice of a physician.

4. In case of skin contact: Flush affected area with water and remove contaminated
clothing. Seek medical attention if needed.

B. Avoidance of “Routine” Exposure

1. Read the material Safety Data Sheet before using a chemical for the first time.

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2. Do not smell or taste chemicals or drugs.

3. Vent any apparatus that may discharge chemicals (vacuum pumps, distillation columns,
etc.). Connect such apparatus to exhaust hoods as approved by the Chemical Hygiene
Officer.

4. Inspect gloves and glove boxes before use.

5. Prevent release of toxic substances into rooms.

6. Wash gloves and then hands after chemical usage. Never wear used gloves out of the
laboratory.

C. Choice of Chemicals

Choice of chemicals should be appropriate to the facilities and not exceed the capacity of
the exhaust system.

D. Eating and Smoking

1. Do not eat, smoke, drink, chew gum, use smokeless tobacco, or apply cosmetics in
areas where laboratory chemicals are present. Wash hands before leaving the laboratory
to engage in any of these activities. (University policy prohibits smoking in academic
buildings)

2. Food, beverages, and cosmetics should not be stored, handled, used or consumed in
areas where laboratory chemicals are present.

3. Do not use laboratory glassware or utensils for any other purpose (e.g., do not drink
from beakers).

E. Equipment and Glassware

1. Handle and store laboratory glassware with care. Discard broken or damaged glassware.

2. Take extra precautions when using Dewar flasks; shield or wrap them to contain
implosions.

3. Use laboratory equipment only for its intended purpose.

F. Exiting the Laboratory

1. Wash exposed areas of skin thoroughly before leaving the laboratory.

2. Do not wear lab gloves and coats outside the laboratory.

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G. Horseplay

Avoid practical jokes or other behaviors that might injure, confuse, or distract another
laboratory worker.

H. Mouth Suction

Do not use mouth suction for pipetting or starting a siphon.

I. Personal Apparel

1. Confine long hair and loose clothing when working in a chemical laboratory.

2. Wear shores at all times in the laboratory. Do not wear perforated shoes or sandals.

3. Wear clothes that cover the legs. Shorts are prohibited.

J. Personal Housekeeping

1. Keep work areas clean and uncluttered. Properly label chemicals and equipment for use
and storage. Repair or replace damaged labels immediately.

2. Clean up work areas at the end of the operation or day.

K. Personal Protection

1. Protective equipment shall be compatible with the degree of hazard a particular chemical
exhibits. Personnel should read the label and Material Safety Data Sheet to determine
what personal protective equipment is required when using a particular chemical.

2. Appropriate eye protection should be worn by all persons (including visitors) where
chemicals are used or stored.

3. Pregnant workers should be referred to the Chemical Hygiene Officer by the Laboratory
Director before conducting laboratory experiments.

4. Wear appropriate gloves when handling toxic materials. Inspect gloves for defects before
using.

5. Use other appropriate protection (e.g., shields) as required.

6. Contact lenses should not be worn unless they are absolutely necessary. If contact lenses
are used, workers should notify the Laboratory Director so that special precautions may
be taken.

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L. Planning for Laboratory Operations

1. Plan appropriate protective procedures and plan for positioning of equipment before
beginning any operation.

2. Seek information and advice about the hazards of the chemicals to be used. Refer to
labels and Material Safety Data Sheets as necessary.

M. Unattended Operations

1. Plans for an unattended operation involving chemicals should be reviewed and


approved by the Chemical Hygiene Officer. The Officer should consider the potential
consequences of an accident, equipment failure, or utility failure before allowing an
unattended operation.

2. Leave lights on and post a sign on the laboratory door announcing the nature of the
unattended operation.

3. Provide for containment of any toxic substance that may be released through equipment
of utility failure.

4. Provide for potential water leaks or loss of electrical power, etc.

N. Use of Hoods

1. Use a hood when there is a possibility of the release of toxic chemical vapors, dusts, or
gases.

2. Use a hood when working with any volatile substance.

3. Do not store chemicals in hoods. Do not block vents for air flow.

4. Leave the hood on if you are uncertain whether general ventilation is adequate. Label
the switch so it is not inadvertently turned on.

O. Vigilance

Be alert for unsafe conditions and report them to the Laboratory Director or, if that person
is unavailable, the Chemical Hygiene Officer or a member of the Department Safety
Committee.

P. Working Alone

Every effort should be made to avoid working alone in a chemical laboratory. If such
action is unavoidable, then you should notify one or more co-workers or workers in nearby

41
laboratories. In work involving highly toxic materials, at least two (2) persons should be
present in the laboratory.

VI. GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR HANDLING HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS

A. Working with Allergens and Embryo toxins

1. Allergens

a. Read and follow instructions on the Material Data Safety Data Sheet.

b. Wear suitable gloves and other appropriate personal protective equipment to


prevent exposure to allergens or substances of unknown allergenic activity.

2. Embryo toxins

a. The Code of Federal Regulations, 29 CFR 1910.1450, defines reproductive toxins


as “chemical which affect the reproductive capabilities including chromosomal
damage (mutations) and effects on fetuses (teratogenesis).”

b. All embryo toxins should be handled with great care. Workers should make
informed decisions regarding the use of such materials. Read and follow
instructions on the Material Safety Data Sheet.

3. Recommendations for women of childbearing age

a. Handle embryo toxins only in a proper fume hood.

b. Use appropriate protective apparel, especially gloves, to prevent skin contact.

c. Review each laboratory operation with your supervisor periodically, or when a


procedure is changed.

d. Store allergens or embryo toxins in a well-ventilated area in an unbreakable


secondary container.

4. Pregnancy

Pregnant workers should be referred to the Chemical Hygiene Officer before


conducting any laboratory experiments involving chemical or drugs.

42
B. Chemicals of Moderate Chronic or High Acute Toxicity

Supplement the rules above with the following practices:

1. Minimize exposure to these toxic substances by using any and all reasonable
precautions.

2. Store these chemicals in areas with controlled access.

3. Always use a laboratory hood when working with such chemicals.

4. Use appropriate personal protection (e.g., gloves) and always wash hands and arms
after working with these chemicals.

5. Ensure that at least two (2) persons are present during use of highly toxic
substances.

6. Thoroughly decontaminate area, including clothing and shoes, should a spill occur.

7. Store waste materials in a closed, well-labeled container until disposal.

C. Chemicals of High Chronic and Acute Toxicity Including Select Carcinogens

1. Conduct all work in a controlled area and designate it as such. Mark controlled areas
with “WARNING-RESTRICTED ACCESS” signs. Label all containers with
warning and identify labels. Repair or replace damaged labels immediately.

2. Follow specific contamination-decontamination procedures.

3. Protect vacuum pumps from contamination with the use of scrubbers or High
Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters and vent into the hood.

4. Decontaminate vacuum pumps and glassware in a hood before removing from a


controlled area.

5. Devise procedures to maximize the containment of aerosols.

6. Decontaminate the controlled area before normal work in resumed.

7. When exiting a controlled area, remove any protective clothing, place in an


appropriately labeled container for disposal and wash hands, forearms, face and
neck.

8. Use a wet mop for housekeeping or a vacuum cleaner equipped with a HEPA filter
for sweeping toxic dusts. These items should be disposed of as hazardous waste or
thoroughly decontaminated prior to leaving the area.

43
9. Consult the Chemical Hygiene Officer to arrange for medical surveillance if using a
cancer-causing substance in amounts that may result in exposure to personnel.

10. Keep records on all amounts of these substances stored and used. List names of their
users with the dates used.

11. Store containers in a well-ventilated limited-access area. Store the chemical in a


secondary, unbreakable, properly labeled container.

12. Write contingency plans for equipment and materials needed in the event of an
accident or spill.

13. Negative-pressure glove boxes should have a ventilation rate of at least 2 volume
changes per hour.

a. Positive-pressure glove boxes should be thoroughly checked for leaks. All leaks
should be eliminated.

b. Trap the exit gases from glove boxes or filter all of the exit gases from glove
boxes and release gases into the hood.

14. Use chemical decontamination of contaminated waste (including waste washings


from contaminated flasks) as appropriate.

15. Make sure that containers of contaminated wastes are transferred from the
controlled area in appropriate secondary containers.

D. Animal Work with Chemicals of High Chronic Toxicity

Housing and care of animals is provided by the WVU Office of Laboratory Animal
Resources (293-2721). Therefore, the special precautions involved in animal work with
chemicals of high chronic toxicity should be planned in conjunction with the Office. As
with all animal use, approval by the Animal Care and Use Committee (293-7073) is
required before animals may be purchased or work conducted.

1. For large-scale studies with animals, special facilities with restricted access are
preferable.

2. When possible, administer chemicals by injection or gavages instead of feeding the


chemical in the diet.

3. Use a caging system with a HEPA filter system that is under negative pressure.
Make sure the air flow in the cage area is directed away from the laboratory
worker’s breathing zone.

44
4. Cleaning cages

a. Devise procedures to minimize the formation of air contaminants from urine,


feces, and the animal’s feeding system.

b. Use a HEPA filtered vacuum system for cleaning contaminated bedding. Use
wet methods to minimize dusts. Properly dispose of bedding.

5. Mix the animals’ food in a closed container under a hood.

6. Dispose of contaminated animal waste and tissues by incineration. If incineration is


not available, double-bag the waste and package for burial in an EPA-approved site.
Contact the Office of Environmental Health and Safety for guidance.

E. Compressed Gas

1. Cylinders containing gases under pressures of more than 100 pounds per square
inch or gas cylinders more than 36 inches in heights.

a. should be handled or transported only on suitable trucks;

b. should be transported with the safety cap covering the valve (i.e., regulators
should be removed and replaced with a safety cap prior to transport);

c. should be secured, when stored or used in a laboratory, by a cylinder strap or


chain positioned approximately one-third of the way down the cylinder.

2. Cylinders containing poisonous, corrosive, or flammable gases;

a. should not be opened by any worker without authorization of the Laboratory


Director and training from an authority recognized by the Chemical Hygiene
Officer;

b. should be opened only when properly connected, with adequate traps, to


apparatus contained in a hood under draft.

3. Reactions or operations involving high or low pressure – especially those using


hazardous or explosive gases – should be properly contained or vented.

4. Extensive use of inert gases could lead to the generation of potentially lethal oxygen
deficiency in spaces with inadequate ventilation. The Laboratory Director is
responsible for planning and implementing appropriate precautions.

45
5. Because carbon monoxide (CO) is highly toxic and yet completely odorless, it
should be used with extreme caution. All work involving CO or compounds that
produce CO should be performed in a hood equipped with an alarm and approved
for such use by the Office of Environmental Health and Safety. The apparatus
should be free of leaks and any CO evolved or purged should be vented up the hood
without the possibility of backflow into the laboratory. When a laboratory uses CO,
the Laboratory Director should install a reliable CO detector equipped with a digital
readout and an audible alarm, and arrange monthly ventilation inspections involving
the Chemical Hygiene Officer.

F. Clothing

1. Wear appropriate gloves and a laboratory apron or a fully-buttoned lab coat.

2. If complete containment of aerosols and dusts cannot be achieved, wear appropriate


personal protective equipment. If a respirator is required, prior approval should be
obtained from the Chemical Hygiene Officer and the Office of Environmental
Health and Safety.

G. Safety Recommendations

Laboratory personnel should review the laboratory Safety Pocket Handbook


(Mercier, 1996), which is available from the Chemical Hygiene Officer. The
Handbook contains valuable advice about safe laboratory practices. The table of
contents follows:

1. Introduction

2. Chemical Hazard Communication


a. Definition of a Chemical Hazard
b. Health Hazards
c. Exposure Limits
d. Toxicity Information
e. OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard
f. Material Satety Data Sheets (MSDSs)
g. Signs and Labels
h. Hazard Rating Systems
i. Signs and Symptoms of Overexposure

3. Protection
a. Engineering Controls
b. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

4. OSHA’s Laboratory Standard


a. The Purpose of OSHA’s Laboratory Standard
b. Where the OSHA Laboratory Standard Applies

46
c. Other Regulations that may apply to your Lab
d. Chemical Hygiene Plan
e. Chemical Hygiene Officer
f. Employee Information and Training
g. Medical Consultations
h. Monitoring – Exposure Level Determination

5. Standard Methods of Prevention


a. Common Laboratory Safety Practices
b. Chemical Handling
c. Glassware Safety
d. Housekeeping
e. When prior approval is required
f. Chemical Storage
g. Particularly Hazardous Chemicals

6. Other Aspects of Safety


a. Hazards of Compressed Gases
b. Biological Hazards
c. Radiation
d. Nonionizing Radiation
e. Laboratory Waste
f. Electrical Safety
g. Ergonomics

7. Emergencies
a. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)
b. Determining if Emergency is Minor or Major
c. First Aid Kit
d. Minor Emergencies
e. Major Emergencies
f. Calling Emergency Responders

8. What Does Safety Mean to You?

9. Appendices
a. Permissible Exposure Limits
b. OSHA Specifically Regulated Hazardous Materials – Known or Suspected
Carcinogens
c. ANSI Z87.1 – Selection Criteria for Protection Devices
d. How to Read and Understand an MSDS
e. List of Selected Incompatible Chemicals
f. Common Signs and Symbols You Should Know
g. EPA Maximum Allowed Concentration of Specific Toxic Contaminants
from CFR 261.24

47
10. Glossary

H. Material Safety Data Sheets

Material Safety Data Sheets for all chemicals on the laboratory inventory should be
readily accessible to all laboratory workers.

VII: Reference

Mercier, P. (Ed.) (1966) Laboratory safety pocket handbook. Schenectady, NY: Genium.

VIII: History of This Document

A. April 22, 2001: The initial version of the Department of


Psychology’s Chemical Hygiene Plan was completed by the
2000-01 Department Safety Committee (Irving J. Goodman,
Chair, Karri Bonner, Lindsey Cohen, B. Kent Parker and
Michael Perone). Barbara Foster, Eberly College Safety
Coordinator, provided information, comments and criticism
that substantially improved the document.

48
Appendix A

Information to be Posted in Laboratories

49
In Case of a

Fire Alarm
1. Extinguish flames and turn off equipment as
appropriate before leaving the building.

2. Leave the building via the nearest exit.

3. Instructors: Ensure that your students leave


the building in an expeditious and orderly
fashion.

4. Researchers and Clinicians: Ensure that


participants and clients (and people who
accompany them) leave the building
expeditiously.

5. The Morgantown Fire Department has the


ultimate authority at the scene.

Personnel who violate this Fire Alarm Policy are subject to


citations or arrest by authorities of the University and the City
of Morgantown, and to internal review and discipline by
appropriate institutional officials.

50
Department of Psychology

Emergency
Telephone Numbers
On-Campus Emergency Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-911
Department Safety Officer (Kent Parker) . . . 293-2001 x31605 (Home: 292-1021)
Department Chair (Michael Perone) . . . . . . . 293-2001 x31604 (Home: 296-4373)
LSB Building Supervisor (Michael Perone) . 293-2001 x31604 (Home: 296-4373)
Department Associate Chair (Katherine Karraker). .293-2001 x31641
(Home: 296-1933)
Eberly College Safety Coordinator (Barbara Foster) . . . . . . . (cell phone 692-9800)
Poison Control Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-800-642-3625
WVU Biohazards Safety Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293 7157
WVU Environmental Health & Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293-3792
WVU Health Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293-2311
WVU Medical Center Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293-4952
WVU Office of Laboratory Animal Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293-2721
WVU Public Safety (Campus Police) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293-3136
WVU Radiation Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293-3413

51
In Case of a

Chemical Spill or Release


For spills of extremely hazardous material, follow Steps 2 through 8

1. If the spill is less that 1 liter, initiate local procedures as defined in the
laboratory-specific Chemical Hygiene Plan.

2. Quickly try to determine what was spilled; however, do not come into contact
with the substance or inhale fumes. If you experience eye irritation, burning
lungs, or other symptoms of chemical exposure, proceed directly to Step 6.

3. Sound the building fire alarm to notify others to evacuate the building.

4. Phone 9-911.

5. Follow the directions of the Building Evacuation Plan.

6. If someone has been splashed with the chemical, immediately flush the
contained area with water. If needed, seek medical assistance.

7. Contact the Chemical Hygiene Officer, Department Chair, or Associate Chair.

Chemical 293-2001 x31605


Hygiene Officer Kent Parker 2110 LSB Home: 292-1021
Department 293-2001 x31604
Chair Michael Perone 1130 LSB Home: 296-4373
Associate 293-2001 x31641
Chair Katherine 1206 LSB Home: 296-1933
Karraker

8. Call Environmental Health and Safety at 293-3792.

52