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COMPETENCY BASED LEARNING MATERIAL

TOURISM
Sector : (HOTEL AND RESTAURANT)
Qualification Title/ Level : EVENTS MANAGEMENT SERVICES NC III
PLAN AND DEVELOP EVENT PROPOSAL OR
Unit of Competency : BID
PLANNING AND DEVELOPING EVENT
Module Title : PROPOSAL OR BID
About this Competency based Learning Material

Inside this module are several Instruction sheets to achieve one


learning outcome.
In going through each sheet, you must follow the “Learning activity
sheet”. This learning activity sheet will guide you through the different
“instruction Sheets” that will assists you in performing different learning
activities towards the attainment of the learning outcome.

The instruction sheets may be in the form of:


 Information sheet – this will provide you with information,
(concepts, principles and other relevant information) needed in
performing certain activities.
 Operation Sheet – this will guide you in performing single task,
operation, or a process in job.
 Assignment sheet – is to guide you to enhance what you have
learned in the information sheet, operation or job sheet.
 Work sheet – are different forms that you need to fill up in
certain activities that you performed.

If you have questions, do not hesitate to ask your trainer/s for


assistance.

Recognition of Prior Learning

If you can demonstrate to your trainer that you are competent in a


particular skill, talk to him about having them formally recognized so you
would not have to undergo the same training again. If you have a
qualification or certificate of competency from previous trainings, show it to
your trainer. If the skills you have acquired are still relevant to this module,
they may become part of the evidence you can present for RPL. If you are
not sure about the level of your skills, discuss this with your trainer.

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
EVENTS MANAGEMENT SERVICES NC III
COMPETENCY-BASED LEARNING MATERIALS
List of Competencies

No Unit of competency Module title Code


Plan and Develop Event Planning and Developing
1. TRS342315
Proposal or Bid Event Proposal or Bid
2. Develop an Event Concept Developing an Event Concept TRS342316
3. Develop Event Program Developing Event Program TRS342317
Selecting Event Venue and
4. Select Event Venue and Site TRS342318
Site
Develop and Update Event Developing and Updating
5. TRS342319
Industry Knowledge Event Industry Knowledge
Provide On-site Event Providing On-site Event
6. TRS342320
Management Services Management Services
Manage Contractors for Indoor Managing Contractors for
7. TRS342321
Events Indoor Events
Develop and Update Developing and Updating
8. TRS342322
Knowledge on protocol Knowledge on protocol

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
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DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
MODULE CONTENT

PLAN AND DEVELOP EVENT


UNIT OF COMPETENCY :
PROPOSAL OR BID
PLANNING AND DEVELOPING
Module Title :
EVENT PROPOSAL OR BID

INTRODUCTION :

This unit covers the knowledge, skills, behavior and motivations


required to plan and develop proposals and bids for the staging of meetings
and events. Depending on the context, this role could be performed by a
wide range of individuals including event managers, local or regional
tourism managers, venue managers and marketing managers.

SUMMARY OF LEARNING OUTCOME:

1. Interpret event brief


2. Develop proposal and bid details
3. Develop bid materials
4. Submit or present the bid or proposal on time

SUMMARY OF ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

1. Contents of the event brief are accurately interpreted and the


company’s capacity to meet stated requirements is assessed.
2. Action required for the development of the proposal or bid is
identified and planned.
3. Liaison with customer is undertaken to clarify requirements when
appropriate.
4. Details for inclusion in the proposal/bid are developed after
consultation with suppliers and other relevant agencies.
5. Options to meet and, where possible, exceed the expectations of the
customer are developed, including integration of current and
emerging technology.
6. Possible competitors are evaluated and strategies to address
competitive issues are developed.
7. Bid materials are prepared within the designated time lines in
accordance with the requirements of the brief
8. Materials are presented in a format that maximizes the use of
presentation and promotional techniques.
9. The proposal/bid is delivered within the prescribed time line.
10. Proposal/bid presentation is conducted with maximum
visual/retention impact.

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
LEARNING OUTCOME 1 INTERPRET EVENT BRIEF

CONTENTS:
1. The proposal/bidding process for a specific meeting/event, including
effective assessment of the event brief, coordination of all details and
resources to meet the bid
2. Requirements and professional presentation of bid materials and
documents
3. Typical bid/proposal requirements and formats.
4. Industry practices relevant to event management
5. Organizational skills in terms of event planning
6. Communication skills to be able to present proposal or bid

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
1. Contents of the event brief are accurately interpreted and the company’s
capacity to meet stated requirements is assessed.
2. Action required for the development of the proposal or bid is identified
and planned.
3. Liaison with customer is undertaken to clarify requirements when
appropriate.

CONDITION: The trainees must be provided with the following:


Equipment
 LCD Projector (optional)
 Overhead Projector (optional)
 Computer
 Printer
TOOLS AND ACCESSORIES
 Software for presentation skills
SUPPLIES AND MATERIALS
 Sample proposal
 Sample brochures and other pertinent document relating to proposal
writing
Learning Materials
 Books relating to business proposal writing

ASSESSMENT METHODS:
 Oral questioning or interview
 Review of portfolios of evidence of on-the-job performance by
the candidate
 Third-party workplace reports of on-the-job performance by the
candidate

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
LEARNING EXPERIENCES

LO 1: PLAN AND DEVELOP EVENT PROPOSAL OR BID

LEARNING ACTIVITIES SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS


1. Read information sheet If you have some problems on Information
1.1-1 Sheet 1.1-1, don’t hesitate to approach your
Introduction to Events facilitator. If you feel you are knowledgeable
Management on the content of Information Sheet 1.1-1,
you can now answer Self-Check 1.1-1.
2. Answer Self Check 1.1-1 Compare your answer with the answer key
1.1-1. If you got 100% correct answer in this
self-check, you can now move to the next
information sheet. If not review the
information sheet and go over the self-check
again.
3. Read information sheet 1.1-2 If you have some problems on Information
Kinds of Events Sheet 1.1-2, don’t hesitate to approach your
facilitator. If you feel you are knowledgeable
on the content of Information Sheet 1.1-2,
you can now answer Self-Check 1.1-2.
4. Answer Self Check 1.1-2 Compare your answer with the answer key
1.1-2. If you got 100% correct answer in this
self-check, you can now move to the next
information sheet. If not review the
information sheet and go over the self-check
again.
5. Read information sheet 1.1-3 If you have some hesitate to approach your
General Categories of Events facilitator. If you feel you are knowledgeable
problems on Information Sheet 1.1-2, don’t
on the content of Information Sheet 1.1-2,
you can now answer Self-Check 1.1-3.
6. Answer Self Check 1.1-3 Compare your answer with the answer key
1.1-3. If you got 100% correct answer in this
self-check, you can now move to the next
information sheet. If not review the
information sheet and go over the self-check
again.
7. Read information sheet 1.1-4 If you have some problems on Information
Sheet 1.1-4, don’t hesitate to approach your
facilitator. If you feel you are knowledgeable
on the content of Information Sheet 1.1-1,
you can now answer Self-Check 1.1-4.
8. Answer Self Check 1.1-4 Compare your answer with the answer key

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
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DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
1.1-4. If you got 100% correct answer in this
self-check, you can now move to the next
information sheet. If not review the
information sheet and go over the self-check
again.
9. Read information sheet 1.1-5 If you have some problems on Information
The Event Brief Sheet 1.1-5, don’t hesitate to approach your
facilitator. If you feel you are knowledgeable
on the content of Information Sheet 1.1-5,
you can now do Job Sheet 1.1-5.
10. Perform Job Sheet 1.1-5 Check your work with the performance
criteria checklist and let your trainer
evaluate your work.
11. Read information sheet 1.1-6 If you have some problems on Information
Sheet 1.1-6, don’t hesitate to approach your
facilitator. If you feel you are knowledgeable
on the content of Information Sheet 1.1-6,
you can now answer Self-Check 1.1-6.
12. Answer Self Check 1.1-6 Compare your answer with the answer key
1.1-6. If you got 100% correct answer in this
self-check, you can now move to the next
information sheet. If not review the
information sheet and go over the self-check
again.
13. Read information sheet 1.1-7 If you have some problems on Information
Sheet 1.1-7, don’t hesitate to approach your
facilitator. If you feel you are knowledgeable
on the content of Information Sheet 1.1-7,
you can now answer Job Sheet 1.1-7.
14. Perform Job Sheet 1.1-7 Check your work with the performance
criteria checklist and let your trainer
evaluate your work.

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
INFORMATION SHEET 1.1-1
INTRODUCTION TO EVENTS MANAGEMENT

Learning Objective: After reading this information sheet, you must be able
to:

1. Define an event
2. To describe the main characteristics of events.

Introduction

This module, in addition to introducing the rest of the CBLM, is intended to


set the scene for the trainee in terms of the crucial role of events in human
history through to the present day. It emphasizes events as artifacts of
human culture that have only recently developed into a fast- growing and
influential industry.

What is an event?

There are various answers to this question, depending on the


viewpoint of the person defining it. There are many definitions of
‘events’, available from various academic writers such as Getz (2007)
and Goldblatt (2008). As such definitions become more detailed; their
real world application becomes more problematic.

In general, events refer to the things that happen around us. These
include:

 ordinary events which occur naturally in our environment and


our daily lives and

 Special events – those that occur when people gather for a


purpose, where some people need to travel to participate while
some spend a lot of time and resource planning for the event.

This module however provides a general definition as follows:

Events are temporary and purposive gatherings of people.

It follows that ‘Events Management’, as a field of industrial practice,


should be defined as:

The organization and coordination of the activities required to


achieve the objectives of events.

Date Develop Document No.


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Main Characteristics of an Event

Events generally possess the following characteristics:


 They are temporary in nature.
 They are gatherings of people.
 They are often displays of ritual.
 They are, in some sense, unique occurrences.

Events are temporary


Events differ from other, more common, organizational activities
because they possess a finite beginning and end. Managers and
students probably agree that most events have a start time, a
programme and a finishing time.

Events are gatherings of people


So far, we have established that events are comprised of people,
though numbers of such attendees may vary considerably. A clear
definition of an event attendee is obviously easier to define in
certain situations than in others. Somebody attending a sports or
music event is unlikely to be allowed to enter without a ticket,
whether paid for or not.

Events can involve single people as the focus, as in the case of


concerts by solo music celebrities.

Events are often displays of ritual


Humans are the most socially evolved species on the planet. As
such, we develop social interactions beyond our family structures
which can trigger the need for events. Events are characterised by
rituals, symbols and artifacts which themselves denote meaning.

For example, one has only to consider the average wedding event,
which will likely be composed of various costumes, food and drink,
speeches and behaviours which denote the meanings of the culture
in question.

Events are unique occurrences


Events, because they are not permanent, are held at different
times, in different locations and for different reasons. Even the
same event held annually can differ considerably in its
characteristics. These features make every event, in a sense,
unique. This also makes planning for event legacy particularly
challenging, as the enduring things left over after the event are
often very difficult to predict.

Date Develop Document No.


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PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
SELF CHECK 1.1-1

True or False.. On the space provided before each number, write TRUE if the
statement is correct and FALSE if the statement is incorrect.

_______1. Generally speaking an event refers to the things that happen


around us.
_______2. Special events are those that occur naturally in our
environment and our daily lives.
_______3. Special events are those that occur when people gather for a
purpose.
_______4. A birthday celebration is an ordinary event.
_______5. Special events are temporary and purposive gatherings of
people
_______6. Events Management is the organization and coordination of
the activities required to achieve the objectives of events.
_______7. All events are temporary in nature.
_______8. Events are naturally the same.
_______9. Every event is unique.
_______10. Events can involve single people as the focus.

Date Develop Document No.


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DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
ANSWER SHEET 1.1-1

1. TRUE
2. FALSE
3. TRUE
4. FALSE
5. TRUE
6. TRUE
7. TRUE
8. FALSE
9. TRUE
10. TRUE

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
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INFORMATION SHEET 1.1-2
KINDS OF EVENTS
Learning Objective: After reading this information sheet, you must be able
to:
 Classify different kinds of events in different fields.
 Explain the importance of events.
 Understand similarities and differences between events.

The following are the various kinds of events in leisure and tourism and
other related fields:

1. Artistic performances 20. Boat trips


2. Carnivals 21. Historic tours
3. Festivals 22. Museum displays
4. Training Days 23. Careers exhibition
5. Trade exhibitions 24. Music festivals
6. Environmental days 25. Concerts
7. War Games 26. Marathons
8. Civic Galas 27. Educational seminars
9. Celebrity appearances 28. Sports competitions
10. Agricultural shows 29. Art displays
11. Open days 30. Fireworks displays
12. Garden days 31. Sponsored walks
13. Band contests 32. Dog shows
14. Caravan rallies 33. Round the world races
15. Pageant 34. Theatrical performances
16. Nature tours 35. Motoring rallies
17. Royal tournaments 36. Street dances
18. Town shows 37. Political rallies
19. Parades 38. Town shows

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
Importance of Events

If properly done, events can be the thrill of the lifetime. If poorly done, they
can bring about a very unpleasant experience.

All events and their customers are important. Thus, they need the best
attention and treatment they deserve.

Since each event is unique, the event organizer should identify its unique
features before organizing an event

Similarities and Differences between Events

Events have similarities and differences. They are similar because the basic
principles of event organization can be applied to all events. Events have
universal needs such as funding, facilities, transport, marketing, and
staffing. They face common problems and can apply common solutions.
Hence, sports organizers can learn from art organizers and vice-versa.

Events have unique characteristics that make one event different from
another. They could vary depending on the following:

1. Geographical Factor
2. Size of population
3. Age of population
4. Number of voluntary organizations
5. Affluence of the community
6. Ability of the organizers
7. Nature of the site/location
8. Facilities and equipment available

Steps to a Successful Event

The following are the important steps to follow to achieve a successful event:

1. Ask the initial event questions


2. Clarify and establish the aims and objectives of the event
3. Undertake a feasibility study and evaluate the result
4. Establish planning and implementation methodologies
5. Draw up a time schedule
6. Obtain finance and other required approvals
7. Launch the event into a public area
8. Establish operating structures and recruit key personnel

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9. Carry out all necessary preplanning and establish appropriate
control systems
10. Achieve pre-event preparation through a trained efficient
workforce and a good communication system
11. Publicize/ promote the event.
12. Complete a comprehensive double check on all arrangements.
13. Carry out the event according to the plan and contingency
strategy.
14. Review and evaluate the event after completion and finalize
accounts
15. Prepare a detailed report for appropriate personnel and future
use.

Date Develop Document No.


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SELF CHECK 1.1-2

A. ENUMERATE AT LEAST TEN (10) DIFFERENT KINDS OF EVENTS

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

B. Explain why event is important.


C. Explain the similarities and differences of events.

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
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PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
INFORMATION SHEET 1.1-3
THE GENERAL CATEGORIES OF EVENTS

Learning Objective: After reading this information sheet, you must be able
to:
1. Differentiate the 4 general categories of events.

INTRODUCTION

These days, event management services are in high demand, as more events
are being arranged in increasing numbers. Over the past ten to fifteen years,
the event management industry has witnessed huge growth. Each year,
across the world, nearly $500 billion is spent on planned events.

International Event management companies are hired to organise a wide


range of events. These companies can organise events for small groups of
people, or big events with thousands of attendees. Lots of businesses use
event management services, to ensure that their events run smoothly and
professionally. Event planning is a stressful, time consuming and expensive
activity. An event management company has the expertise and industry
contacts to offer a dependable service, at an affordable price. Let’s take a
closer look at how these companies approach organising different types of
events:

The Four General Categories Of Events

b. Leisure Events

Leisure event management is an interesting and diverse field. It


involves managing facilities like sports grounds, recreation

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
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PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
centres, parks and entertainment venues. Also, it can involve
managing a celebration or festival, sporting contest or concert.

c. Cultural Events

Often, cultural events are meant to enrich the cultural standing


of the city in which they are held. Cultural events teams create
unique festivals, memorable outdoor spectacles, accessible
entertainment and unexpected arts. Often, these teams work
alongside local government authorities. Every year, they will
plan innovative cultural programmes and events, and advertise
and oversee them from start to finish.

Managing a cultural event is a major undertaking. Festivals


seem glamorous and exciting but in reality, they are hard work
in every respect. Cultural event managers have to deliver an
artistic and cultural programme, which will appeal to the
public. However, they have to take local sensitivities into
account, adhere to strict planning and health and safety rules,
and still make a profit.

Cultural event managers need skills in fundraising and finance,


public relations and arts marketing. Typically, these events
management companies have tight budgets, and are dependent
on part time staff, enthusiastic volunteers and freelance
contractors. Obviously, styles of cultural events management
vary, based on the genre and size of events. Nonetheless, all
cultural events are linked to the well being of the community
and issues of identity. Also, they all tap into the visitor and
tourist economy.

d. Personal Events

Events organized by and for friends and family to celebrate life’s


important milestones.

Invariably, it takes a lot of time, effort and dedication to


organize a personal event. With catering arrangements, types of
menus, guest lists, booking the venue and designing the décor,
there are countless details that have to be scheduled and
coordinated. In the past, personal events management
companies only dealt with indoor events. However, nowadays,
these companies manage outdoor events as well.

The company will consult with the customer to discuss the


precise requirements, and then tailor the event in line with the
customer’s budget. Venue booking, marquee erecting, menu

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PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
planning and live entertainment provision is all included in the
service.

Not all customers for these types of events require complete


event management. Hence, personal event management services
can be enlisted to organize only part of an event — for example,
the hiring of entertainment or the catering. Initial consultations
will determine which parts of the event would be best left to a
professional organizer, and which parts the event hosts can
tackle themselves. Often, the division of labor is decided by
budget, and by the customer’s relative expertise.

e. Organizational Events

Organizational or Corporate events can include political,


charitable and commercial events, as well as sales events, such
as product launches, etc. A company that hosts an all day event
for several thousand people will require catering, entertainment
and accommodation arranging for all the guests. Event staff will
need to be recruited, a room to host the event will have to be
chosen, seating arrangements will need to be determined and
obviously, an event budget has to be established.

Obviously, event management is a multifaceted profession. The


scale of the task involved in managing the above types of events
is significant. It is hardly surprising that the industry is
thriving.

(Posted on January 30, 2014 by Uniqueworld DMC Promotions in Event


Planning - Learning Event Management)

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SELF CHECK 1.1-3

TEST 1.
IDENTIFICATION

.
_____________1. Events that involve managing facilities like sports
grounds, recreation centers, parks and entertainment
venues. Also, it can involve managing a celebration or
festival, sporting contest or concert.

_____________2. Events that include political, charitable and commercial


events, as well as sales events, such as product
launches, etc.

_____________3. Events that are meant to enrich the cultural standing of


the city in which they are held.

_____________4. Events organized by and for friends and family to


celebrate life’s important milestones.

Date Develop Document No.


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ANSWER KEY 1.1-3

Test I. Identification

1. Leisure Events
2. Organizational or Corporate Events
3. Cultural Events
4. Personal Events

Date Develop Document No.


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INFORMATION SHEET 1.1-4
THE ELEMENTS OF EVENT

Learning Objective: After reading this information sheet, you must be able
to:
 Explain the general elements of an event.

Introduction

Along with understanding the event objectives, it is also crucial to know the
answers to some other important questions. You will need to know how
much money you have to spend on the event; what is the event’s budget?
Also, how many people are expected to be attending? What is the desired
duration of the event and what time of day should it begin and end? Indeed
it may be an event that continues over several days, you will need to know
how many days it will take place over.

So at the outset you need answers to the following:

1. What event are we organizing?


2. Why are we organizing the event?
3. Who are expected to attend and to organize the event?
4. Where is it going to be held?
5. When is it going to be held?
6. How much is it going to cost?

These questions correspond to what we call in events management the 5Ws


and 1H of Events.

The Elements of Event

The 5Ws and 1H of events when answered actually correspond to the


necessary elements of any event. To illustrate:

QUESTIONS ELEMENT
What event are we organizing? Type and title of event
Why are we organizing the event Purpose for holding the event
Who are expected to attend and to Participants of the event and the
organize the event? role they play
Place or venue where the event is
Where is it going to be held?
going to take place
When is it going to be held? Date and Time of the event
How much is it going to cost? Resources
Date Develop Document No.
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These elements will be explained further below.

1. The type and title of event


Your title is the first thing that sells prospective attendees on your
event.

Standard Example: The 23rd Annual Black & White Ball


Creative Example: 23 Years in the Making… Tuxedos under Twilight

Useful Tips on Creating Event Titles

9. The event title should be less than 120 characters long,


including spaces.

10. Principal words should be capitalized. Do not capitalize


words like “a,”“and,” “in,” “of,” or “the” unless they are the first
word of the event title. Allcaps should not be used.
11. Single quotation marks should be used around the titles
of books, playsand movies.

12. Event titles should not include details like event sponsor.
These details should be included in the event description, which
appears on the event detail page.

13. Please proofread titles for proper grammar and spelling.

Event Descriptions

1. The event description should typically give community members


a sense of who, what and how. Briefly explain who is speaking/
performing and what will they be talking about or doing. A
lecture title alone generally won’t get people to attend.

2. Provide more details and context to generate interest. If there


are multiple event sponsors, the description will also list the co-
sponsors. Please proofread descriptions for proper grammar and
spelling.

Examples

[Event title]
Government Careers Forum

[Event Description with two sponsors]

Explore public service through this popular networking and


recruiting program.
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The Government Careers Forum will feature a keynote
presentation by Massachusetts State Representative Tackey
Chan ’95, followed by round table networking sessions for
students, alumni, faculty and staff with agency representatives.
This event is sponsored by the Hiatt Career Center and the
Brandeis University Alumni Association.

[Event title]
Charter Cities: From Idea to Implementation

[Event description]
Paul Romer, a prominent American economist and specialist on
the theory of growth and innovation, will discuss charter cities
and their potential impact on economic prosperity. According to
Romer, a well-run city is an engine for growth and collaboration
among its citizens leads to a more efficient way of life.

[Event title]
Brandeis Theater Company: ‘Ordinary Mind, Ordinary Day’

[Event description]
Experience Virginia Woolf’s darkly elegant voice in an original
stage adaptation of four compelling short stories. Follow her
fascinating characters in a quest beyond fact and reason to the
rich inner life beneath the routines of our days. Discover theater
that brings to life not only the outside world but also the
internal experience of a moment — a moment that may recall a
catastrophic memory, a passionate longing, a forbidden
question or a hidden truth.

[Event title]
‘Winter’s Bone’ Film Screening and Discussion with Filmmaker
Debra Granik '85

[Event description]
Debra Granik '85 will screen and discuss her best-known work
to date – the Oscar-nominated film "Winter's Bone." The movie
tells the story of a teenage girl struggling to survive in the drug-
infested Ozark Mountains while searching for her missing
father. Granik will take questions from the audience after the
screening. This event is sponsored by the Film, Television and
Interactive Media Program and the Edie and Lew Wasserman
Fund

2. The Purpose for holding the event

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Every successful event has a primary purpose or mission,
accompanied by goals and objectives, which are the measurements of
success. Understanding the purpose/mission of the event leads to
good planning and appropriate allocation of resources (time and
money).

Even a press conference or policy speech or public ceremony has to


have a specific purpose or mission in order to succeed.

The mistake most often made in special events, especially fundraising


events, is that the organization does not understand the reason for
having the event beyond some simple concept of raising money or
having some sort of ceremony.

Do you have clear goals for staging a special event?

 Is the purpose to raise money?

Assuming one of your purposes is to raise funds, it is important


to determine when the funds are needed and what your
financial net goal is. The strategy to raise significant funds will
be considerably different than one to generate a few hundred
pesos. As a basic rule of thumb, match the event to your
financial needs and timeline.

 Is the purpose to generate new donor prospects or


volunteers?

In most successful fundraising events, one of the goals is to


attract new volunteers and money to support the organization.
Otherwise you may be redirecting money previously given to the
organization through other avenues and overtaxing current
volunteers.

 Is the purpose to increase public awareness of your


organization?

If you want to increase the visibility of the organization, the


event should be held where many people are exposed to the
name and mission of your organization and great efforts should
be aimed at good media coverage.

 Is the purpose to bring attention to your cause or mission?

Too often the population served by the organization is confused


with the audience for an event. Although the two should be
compatible with regards to the basic values of the organization,

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the audience of your event may be significantly different than
the clients you serve.

3. The Participants of the event and the role they play

 Wanting to stage an event will not guarantee success unless you


have connections to and the interest of appropriate attendees
and financial underwriters.

 Ask yourself: Who would be the natural choice of event


participants for the organization?

 It is also important to know if any other community activities


will be competing with your event for the audience, volunteers
and donors you will be targeting. There may be other activities
going on in a community at the same time, but the important
issue is whether your target group will have too many
competing activities on or around the same time of your event.
Many communities have groups that keep community
calendars. Check out other potential competing activities and
make certain that as soon as you know the date of the event you
get it on the calendar and get the word out so that others will
not plan competing events.

 Before committing to an event, be certain that both volunteer


and salaried staffing is adequate.

 Any event needs to be properly staffed so it’s imperative that


you have your staff on board for the occasion. Make a schedule
that everyone is comfortable with and accommodates your team
members’ personal lives (particularly if your event is on a
weekend). The worst way to start is to have an event staffed by
unhappy employees.

 Is there an effective leader, agreeable to chair the event? Often


an event will have two chairs with distinctly different jobs: a
celebrity chair and an organizing chair. The celebrity chair
agrees to be associated with the event, make some important
contacts, sign some letters endorsing the event or encouraging
people to attend and will also attend the event. The organizing
chair coordinates the considerable details associated with
producing an event.

 Is there an adequate pool of volunteers to plan and carry out the


event? As with all volunteer positions, each volunteer should be

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doing a job that brings mutual benefit to both the volunteer and
the event.

 Has the amount of staff time that will be needed for the event
been clearly established? Those planning for the event should
present a realistic proposal regarding the projected time that
staff will be supporting the event. Determine if this timing
conflicts with other known busy times for the organization. As
much as possible, event chairpersons should arrange for the
preparation details to be handled separately from the daily
running of the organizations.

 If the event involves selling tickets to get people to attend, do


you have people (board, volunteers, staff) who can be successful
at this? Don't just assume that somehow tickets distributed to
board and volunteers will automatically get sold.

4. The Place or venue where the event is going to take place

The venue or type of event and its location is vital to success. There
must be a connection between the cause that the organization
espouses, the venue selected and the community being served. This
includes everything from the type of event, the space and the layout
of the event, as well as the convenience and appropriateness of the
location in relation to the community served by the organization. A
special location can spark excitement weeks before the event takes
place.

When you’re ready to search for the perfect venue, consider the
following 10 important factors:

1. Cost
 As a cost-conscious organizer, you may want to keep the venue
cost down to allow more room in your budget for food and
beverages and entertainment.
 Being flexible on the date can be a great negotiating tool, as
certain days of the week tend to cost less.

2. Location
 A convenient location means different things for different events.
For an event with attendees within a limited geographic range, a
venue within a reasonable distance from most attendees’ homes
or places of work may make sense.
 If many attendees will be traveling from out of town, hosting the
event at a venue near the airport or their hotels will be
beneficial.

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 If attendees are being housed at a single location, hosting the
event at that hotel mitigates the need for valet parking and the
chance that attendees will be late due to getting lost.
 How to help attendees have all the necessary information about
venue is another important thing to consider.
 Nowadays offering attendees a mobile event app is a good way to
inform them with maps, a right direction to venue, an up-to-
date parking / shuttle arrangement information, and local
attractions.
 A top-notch event app like Whova usually supports interactive
indoor maps and also driving directions and parking
instructions. It allows attendees conveniently navigate and find
the exact building as well as indoor booths.

3. Ambiance
 Pay special attention to the existing decor inside the venue.
 What style is the architecture and what does the building’s
interior convey?
 If you’re holding a gala, you’ll likely need different venue
accommodations than you would for an expo.
 The less the ambiance matches the desired feeling of your event
(upscale, high tech, etc.) the more decorating you’ll need to do to
make up for it.

4. Services and Amenities


In addition to the appearance of the site, it is also important to
take into consideration the services and amenities that the venue
offers. Consider the following:

 Does the venue have a kitchen and can it provide catering to


your event? If so, often a venue will waive the facility fee and
only charge a down payment along with the cost of food for each
attendee. Other venues may not have kitchens. Those venues
without kitchen facilities may have a partnership with a food
provider that you’re required to use, or you may be free to bring
in your own vendors. Many venues have an exclusive
relationship with certain vendors, typically food vendors. This
can be great if the venue has partnered with a fantastic vendor.
If not, it can create a huge headache, and negatively impact the
experience of your attendees. If you can’t book a venue that
serves food your attendees will enjoy, it would be better to select
a venue that allows you to bring in outside food vendors.

 Does it have tables, chairs and linens you can use? If a venue
has these items, you can save a great deal of money and effort
by using what they have, assuming it matches your theme and
ambiance.
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 Does it have a setup/clean up crew? If you’ve found a venue
which provides a setup and clean up crew, rejoice! This isn’t
always the case. If these services aren’t available you’ll need to
build your event team.

 Does it have AV capabilities? Some venues have a built in


audio-visual equipment for you to use, and others will require
you to bring that in yourself.

5. Capacity and Minimums

 What’s the capacity? If you’ve followed our advice, you already


know how many attendees to expect. You’ll need to know the
room capacity of the venues for a few reasons. First, for general
and practical reasons, 500 people can’t comfortably fit into a
room with a 250-person capacity. And second, there are fire and
safety codes that the venue has to abide by.

 What are the F&B Minimums? If your venue offers food and/or
beverages, find out what the food and beverage minimums, also
known as F&B minimums, are and get this information in
writing. If you have past attendance records for this event,
ensure that those records are in line with the minimums. You
may have plans to attract an even larger audience this year, but
you also want to make sure that your bases are covered in case
attendance expectations are not met.

 How to make adjustment based on attendee feedback? It is


important to be able to make an informed adjustment for rooms
and F&B quickly right before or during your event. Many
organizers find that a live polling provided an event app helped
headcount to estimate attendance on the last day of an event or
a reception dinner, which helps make a quick and informed
decision that saves time and money. Here lists 5 use cases of a
live polling.

6. Parking

 Does the venue have a parking lot or valet parking? A venue


with a parking lot is what dreams are made of. If that’s not the
case, are there parking lots nearby which attendees can access
and use? If there is no parking available, you’re not completely
out of luck as you have a few alternatives:

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 You can rent out or reserve nearby parking lots for your
attendees and either include the cost in the ticket prices, or
have attendees pay when they park.

 Uber and Lyft often provide a credit to new users. You can work
with them to set this up and let your attendees know the new
user discount code and encourage them to carpool.

 If there’s only street parking available, you can encourage them


to use Zirx, an on-demand car service that will drive them from
their parked car to the venue.

 You could offer valet parking for the event, even if the venue
doesn’t. Providing a valet may be essential if the event is an
upscale event such as a gala.

 You can encourage attendees to share a ride. An event app like


Whova can help them coordinate with one another through a
group chat or an event bulletin board.

7. Layout

Even though you’ll be finding your venue early in the event


planning process, you’ll still want to have a rough idea of what
types of activities you’ll be including, the amenities you’ll require,
and the needs of your team and the attendees.

While narrowing down your selection, get an illustrated floor plan


of each venue, and walk through your favorites at least once,
making note of important things such as where the outlets are and
where AV equipment is or can be located.

The layout and floor plan will greatly affect a few different aspects
of your event:

 Flow of traffic. Think about the flow of traffic through your


event. The kind of flow you’ll want will be different for each
event. What areas will be high traffic at the event? Registration?
The auditorium doors? Keep this in mind when choosing your
venue, realizing that how you setup the tables and decor will
greatly affect this as well.

 Event activities. If you want to have keynote speakers at your


event, you’ll either need a stage, or a spot to place a rented
stage. Will you need a demo area? Will there be a bar?

8. Accessibility
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 Accessibility refers to the possibility that everyone, especially
those with special needs, can access the building and its
amenities. Before you can answer this question, you’ll need to
understand who your attendees are and what their needs are.
Meg Hall, C.E.O. of PartySpark.com elaborates on the
importance:

 Often when novice event planners are touring a venue they


forget to consider guests of all ages. Meaning – if your event is
going to have a lot of children or babies, check the restrooms for
diaper changing stations. If you will have elderly guests,
consider finding a venue that is ADA compliant or has minimal
stairs. I am also considerate of guests special needs as I create a
seating chart.

 You’ll probably know whether there will be children at your


venue, but you may not know if there will be individuals with
other special needs. In this situation, reviewing recent events
hosted by your organization may give you a sense of this.

9. Insurance

 According to BizBash, some venues won’t even do business with


you if you don’t have insurance. Amy Hallquist-Hamric,
president of Hallquist Insurance Agency agrees with BizBash.
“There are several venues that require a certain amount of
liability as well as them named as additional insured for the
event,” states Hallquist. “Typically you can ask your general
liability insurance agent for this endorsement for your event.
 It is also a great idea to START EARLY in planning to have this
added; as well as to have all of the wording required, address,
etc. prior to contacting your agent.”

10. Acoustics

 Have you ever attended an event at a venue that was so loud, it


was hard to hear others, causing you to strain your hearing and
lose your voice, all in one night? That’s caused by poor
acoustics.

 Acoustics is just a fancy word for how sound travels through the
venue. A low ceiling will make the venue seem cozy, but it will
make it louder if it’s packed. Alternatively, a large warehouse-
style venue will result in echoes, or what architects refer to as
“reverberation”.
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 Although, acoustics aren’t the be-all and end-all of your event,
there are things you can do to improve them such as making
good use of patios outside the venue, or as Armstrong Ceilings
states in their article written for the American Institute for
Architects’ website, you can use acoustical clouds or canopies.

 As you can see, there’s a lot to consider when choosing your


event’s venue. However, if you take the above into consideration
when doing your research, you’ll find the perfect venue for your
event.

Once you decide a right venue, now it is a step for you to consider how
to keep your attendees informed with up-to-date information and how
to engage them and get their feedback to make the event run more
smoothly.

5. The Date and Time of the event

Things to Keep in Mind When Choosing an Event Date

If you’re in the beginning stages of planning a meeting of like minds,


then you will want to make sure you choose the perfect date. You
want to choose a date that will allow the most people possible to
attend, not conflict with holidays and vacation time, and will work for
you and your event organizers.

1. Watch Out for Vacations

When choosing an event date, you want to steer clear of times


when people typically vacation or their children have school
breaks. People are less likely to attend your conference during
these times as they likely make plans each year with their
families.

Some dates to avoid:

 Any major holiday


 when kids are on summer break
 During back-to-school
 During another major convention in the industry
 Choose Days that Make Sense

2. Choose The Best Day

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Another thing you’ll want to think about as you choose an event
date is what actual days of the week you’ll host your event. Most
conferences start on Wednesday or Thursday and run through
Sunday.

Wednesday events are typically welcoming type events. This


makes more sense for those who have to request time off work.
It is much easier to request three days off and take the weekend
than to request five days off during the week. Also, if you plan
welcoming events on Wednesday and closing events Sunday
morning, those who can only afford to take a day or two away
from their offices can still attend on Friday and Saturday and
get something out of the event.

3. Some Months Are Better

In a report gathered by the International Association for Political


Science Students about best practices for conferences, the
authors suggest that the best dates for conferences tend to be
September, April and May.

This is smart because the weather is mild during these months,


keeping travel issues at a minimum. You’ll also avoid heavy
vacation times and most holidays by planning events during one
of these three months.

4. Find Out When the Venue You Want Is Available

Perhaps you know that about 800 people will attend your event
and the only hotel in the area you’ve chosen that will hold that
many is only available on two dates. That may limit your
options on which date you choose.

You have two choices. You can plan your event around the
dates the hotel has available, or you can change where you plan
to hold your event.

By learning ahead when the location might be available, you can


better plan for a date that will work best for you and for your
attendees.

5. Consider the Schedule of Planners and the Keynote


Speaker

Talk to those who will be the biggest help in planning your event
and find out when they are available to attend and help you out.
It will be next to impossible to hold a successful event if only

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half of your volunteers are available to help you set up and keep
things running smoothly.

You’ll also want to chat with your potential keynote speaker and
find out what dates work best for him. Finding a keynote who
will draw registrations can be a tough task, so the last thing you
want to do is lose your big name expert because that date isn’t
as good for him as it is for you.

Once you’ve considered all of these factors, get out a calendar


and circle several dates that will work for all of these elements.
Once you have a handful of dates, you can begin to narrow it
down further by looking at holidays, other events, weather
patterns and even what date is best for you and your team.

6. The Resources
The Event Budget/Costs

Predicting the financial outcome of an event

The event budget is a projection (forecast) of the income and


expenditure that the event will incur based on plans made and
information gathered.

The preparation of a budget is an essential part of event


management. It is fundamentally important that Event
Directors are able to predict with reasonable accuracy whether
the event will result in a profit, a loss or will break-even. This is
achieved by identifying and costing all probable expenditures
and by totaling all expected revenues (income). By comparing
expenditures and revenues, it then becomes possible to forecast
the financial outcome of the event.

The prediction of financial outcomes of the event need to take


place very early in the planning stages. There is no use on
setting dates, booking venues, preparing plans until there has
been some attempt to determine whether the event is financially
viable.

Importance of financial control of an event

Once the Event Budget has been constructed, the Event


Director has a means to exercise control of the event finances.
Many organisations have run into severe financial difficulty and
even bankruptcy as a result of staging events. The budget
therefore enables the Event Director to make sound financial
decisions about the choice of venue, and expenditure on a whole
range of things including promotion, equipment and stafffing.
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The process of budgeting also enables the Event Director to
calculate how much revenue is needed to stage the event in
accordance with the planned level of expenditure.

Continual adjustment of the event budget

The preparation of an event budget is one of the earliest tasks to


be undertaken in the event management process. However, it
should be expected that there will be numerous adjustments
and refinements to the budget throughout the whole project life-
cycle. It is not possible to know every cost from the start, nor is
it possible to know whether efforts to secure sponsorship and
government funding will be successful. Event budgets by the
event management team as better information comes to hand.

Basic event budgeting rules

Although the budget takes time to develop, there are some basic
rules that should be followed from the outset:

 Budget to avoid making a loss


If an event looks likely to make a loss, it calls into question
whether the event should go ahead according to the
existing plan. If it is not to late, plans should be changed
so that the event will at least break-even.

 Be realistic about event incomes


Far too often, event plans are far too optimistic about the
amount of sponsorship to ge gained, or the number of
people who will attend as spectators or participants. Over
optimistic predictions are often a cause for financial loss
as a result of staging an event.

 Have a contingency plan


In thinking through what could possibly go wrong with an
event, it is a good idea to determine what must be done if
something does go wrong. For example, what happens if
the sponsorship pull out, or there is very bad weather?

Typical event expenditure


Events costs will depend on the scale and type of event. Not all the
categories stated in the table below will apply to every event.

The example below is a sports event expenditure.

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Costs associated with officials needed to run the event may
have to be borne by the event organisers. Event participants
Travel and
are generally responsible for their own travel and
Accommodation
accommodation costs. In minor or local events travel and
accommodation costs are unlikely.
The cost of medals, trophies and other awards requires
detailed knowledge about the number of competitors, the
Trophies, Awards
categories of divisions of the competition and the format of
the competition.
Salaries Applies only events are organised by professional staff.
Postage and Events usually require considerable communications with
telephone participants and the event management team.
Special event stationery may be printed but otherwise there
Stationery and
is always a lot of photocopying and usage of organisation
Photocopying
letterheads to write correspondence.
Events require persons with at least First Aid training to be
Medical Fees in attendance. Larger events may also warrant the
employment of a doctor and physiotherapists.
A critically important aspect of the budget. Information about
the probable cost of the venue needs to be obtained as early
Venue Hire as possible. Beware that there some hidden costs such as
security and supervision costs, and heating and lighting
costs.
Additional insurance can be taken out to cover risks of injury
Insurance
and/or financial losses associated with events.
Event programmes, posters, fliers and other promotional
Printing documents may need to be printed - especially where quality
and colour is required.
Expenditure on promotion may be considerable where a
significant proportion of the event revenue is likely to be
Promotion earned through spectators. Promotion covers items such as
advertising, give-aways, costs associated with promotional
events and sponsors' signage.
Includes equipment directly used by participants in the event
and also any equipment used by the event management staff
Equipment Hire
including sound systems, computers, mobile phones, two
way radios, etc.
Transport Includes costs of transporting equipment and hire of buses.

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SELF-CHECK 1.1-4

Test 1.

To what Event Element does the following question correspond to?

QUESTIONS ELEMENT

1. What event are we organizing?


2. Why are we organizing the event
Who are expected to attend and to organize
3. the event?
4. Where is it going to be held?
5. When is it going to be held?
6. How much is it going to cost?

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ANSWER KEY 1.1-4

1. Type and title of event


2. Purpose for holding the event
3. Participants of the event and the role they play
4. Place or venue where the event is going to take place
5. Date and Time of the event
6. Resources

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INFORMATION SHEET 1.1-5
THE EVENT BRIEF

Learning Objective: After reading this information sheet, you must be able
to:
 Define an event brief
 Interpret an event brief
 Write your own event brief/ concept paper

What is an event brief?

An event brief is a complete overview of the event you are planning to run. It
is written before any practical plans are made and long before the date of
the event. It includes any details relevant to the event and how you expect it
to run such as key dates, limitations etc. It is a document that should be
referred to throughout the planning of the event so that you can track your
progress and stay focused.
That being said things do change rapidly when planning events but any
adjustments made should be a development of the original idea set out in
your brief.

Tips for writing an Event Brief:

• To begin the brief process, you must give a clear overview of the event.
This may include: details of the events structure, the purpose of the
event and a clear description of what you want to happen during the
course of the event. The aim of the project should be included here.
(including targets and/or any ethos)

• The date of the event must be specified, including dates of any


interviews, meetings and other times in which you must attend) In
this point, the commitments people need to make, in terms of times,
should be made clear.

• The venue/location must be specified

• Your target audience should be decided on before planning to put in


the brief.

• If there are any partners from outside groups that you are working
with, they should be included in your brief, stating what they do, and
how they are involved in the event.

• State a clear budget at the start of the event to plan around. This
budget should be outlined in the brief.

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• Income and expenditure targets should be included. For example,
stating ticket prices if applicable, and expected profit from event.

• All management/main roles in the event must be specified, with a


brief description for each so people know what they are putting
themselves forward for.

• Lastly, any necessary contact details should be put in the brief so that
any questions about the brief can be answered.

• An event brief can be used as part of a recruitment process for


leadership roles on the event you are planning. Application forms can
be attached. In the professional world an event brief often
accompanies job adverts for freelance project co-ordinators.

Below is a sample of an event brief TEMPLATE

EVENT BRIEF
University Programs &
Events

CONTACT COORDINATOR: Name, Phone Number, Email

EVENT: Name of event

DAY/DATE/TIME: Timing of event

LOCATION: Location of event

HOST: Sponsor of the event

GUESTS: Include an estimate of attendees

PURPOSE: Description of the objective or purpose of the


event

PARKING/ACCESS: Include if you are using a specific voucher and


list for VIP guests

INVITATIONS: Description of type of invitation and how it will be


distributed (email, Postal Mail) RSVP Date, Online
Registration

DIRECTIONAL SIGNAGE: Include location of exterior signs and specific text


to be included on the signs ( request is only for
exterior signage)

AUDIO VISUAL: Include specific requests for equipment and


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setup. Use MediaVision Form

SET-UP: Basic set-up instructions

GROUNDS: Include requests for debris, snow removal and/or


any exterior trash removal
Work order No:

CUSTODIAL: Indicate requests for garbage bins and interior


trash removal

SECURITY: Include requests for officers, time and location of


event
Confirmation No:

MOVERS: Include requests for location of times and delivery


time

OUTSIDE SERVICES: Include specific names of vendors, time of arrival


and preferred access
Confirmation No:

PROMOTION: Determine the best method of timing to advertise


and promote your event

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EVENT BRIEF TEMPLATE 2
Event Details

Name of the event:

Start date: End date:

Commences at : Ends at:

Proposed Venue:

Event Budget: No of expected guests:

Event Purpose

Strategic objectives / expected outcomes:

Details of the event:

*Categories of expected guests: Names of expected external VIPs, if any:

Master of Ceremony (Host):

Executives required for this event: Proposed role of Executives:

Date and time executive will be required:

Proposed speech points will be provided for the Executive:

Other speakers:

Are media invited / expected?

Is any AV required (please specify):

Will there be catering (please specify):

Coordination:

Name of Event manager: Department:

Telephone: Mobile: Email:

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
JOB SHEET 1.1-5

Title: Prepare an EVENT BRIEF


Performance Following the 5W and 1H you must be able to
Objective: create an Event Brief for your client.
 Ballpen
Supplies :  Yellow Paper/ Bond Papers
 Eraser
Computer Set/ Laptop
Equipment :
Printer
Steps/Procedure:

1. Use the example of template #2; create your own event brief for a
prospective client who will be celebrating her debut.
2. Present the Brief to your Trainer for checking.

Assessment Method:

Performance Criteria Checklist

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
Performance Criteria Checklist for
Job Sheet 1.1-5

Trainee’s Name__________________________ Date ________________

Task: Create an Event Brief

Criteria YES NO

Are the following details included in the event brief?

1. Name or Title of the Event?

2. Purpose of the event?

3. Start and end date of the event?

4. Venue of the event?

5. Number of event participants?

6. Proposed budget of the event?

Feedback

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
INFORMATION SHEET 1.1-6

BIDDING FOR EVENTS

Learning Objective: After reading this information sheet, you must be able
to:
 Understand the importance of bid process and bidding for an event.
 Explain the main PURPOSE of the bid process.
 Explain the tasks involved in a Bid process.

Bidding for events

Why is it necessary to bid for an event?

It is often the case that more than one Event Company will desire to stage
an event. Such a situation is healthy and generally leads to a striving by
each bidding organisation to show that they can put on the best event. The
decision as to which club will host what event is usually taken at meetings
of the organisation that governs the event. For example, the decision as to
which club will host a regional or local event will be taken by the regional or
local association.

The Bid Process

It is a normal practice for any representative body, at any level, that has the
responsibility to select which organisation will stage an event, to ask each
and every rival organisation to supply a proposal detailing how they will
organise and stage the event. This process of supplying a proposal is often
referred to as the "bid process". The main purpose of the bid process is to:

 Demonstrate that the bidding organisation has the capability and


resources to stage the event
 Provide additional reasons why the bidding organisation should be
selected over other rival bidders. For example, these additional
reasons may include:
Date Develop Document No.
EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
o Participants will have better facilities than other rival bidders
o The event has greater financial backing than rival bids
o Public support is more assured
o Spectators will have better facilities
o It's their turn

When organisations are required to enter into a formal bid process in order
to win the right to stage an event, there are two tasks.

1. DEVELOPING a BID PROPOSAL and to submit the document to the


selecting authority by the required date.
2. MAKING A FORMAL PRESENTATION that draws out the main points
or highlights of their proposal and to answer any questions that may
arise.

Take Note of the following facts about the bid.

1. The bid is the most critical marketing tool in obtaining business in


the event industry.
2. The bid should answer all the needs and requirements specified by
the client in a clear and concise manner.
3. A bid may be presented to an individual, a small committee, a
board of directors, or a general assembly of of hundreds or even a
thousand people.

Bid Preparation

1. Request a “bidform” or information about the specific needs and


requirements of the client (individuals, organization, corporation,
agency, etc.)
a. A bidform can be as short as one page or longer.
b. It is a document that explains in detail what the organization
needs in order to host a particular event.
2. Research the histories of the organization for at least the past four
years; analyze any discrepancies and clarify them with the
organization’s meeting planner.
3. How is the bid to be made? Will the client allow an oral presentation
or does it only accept written bids or both?
4. Find out all the logistical details of the bid presentation such as
location date and time.
a. Time limitation of the presentation
b. Required number of copies of bid
c. Number of people to whom the presentation will be made
d. Names, titles, addresses of people to whom the presentation will
be made
Date Develop Document No.
EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
e. Who else will be making the presentation
f. Whether there are any restrictions or rules pertaining to the
presentation.

Bid Presentation

1. Be sure that bid document is complete, neat and readable without


misspellings and grammatical errors.
2. Personalize the bid document. Some clients even engrave the names of
decision makers on the cover of the bid document to give it a more
personalized touch.
3. If there is a “bidform” from the client, be sure it is completely filled out
with the needed supplemental information. Be sure to include color
photographs and the brochures that will sell your bid.
4. If an oral presentation is made, prepare the scripts of each person
who will participate in the presentation.

Preparing the Event Proposal

The amount of detail required in the event proposal will depend on the scale
and importance of the event. However event proposals generally share many
common components.

The information that event proposals should convey includes but is not
limited to the following:

 The Event Team


 Venue and Facilities
 The Program
 The Budget

The Purpose of an Event Proposal

The document may be viewed by many different potential stakeholders in


the event. The table below provides examples of how an event proposal may
be used by such stakeholders.

Stakeholder Need for the proposal

A National Sports A NSO may receive requests from more than one
Organisation (NSO) organisation wishing to organise a National
Championship. The NSO must therefore decide
Example: which organisation has the right to organise the
event. Each state may be asked to submit a
University Athletic proposal to the NSO outlining how they will

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
Association of the organise the event and how much it will cost. Based
Philippines (UAAP) upon submitted proposals the NSO will make a
choice of which organisation will host the event.

Sponsors will view the proposal to gain an


understanding of the scale and importance of the
A Sponsor
event, the potential exposure to their target markets
to be gained and the relative strengths and
Example:
weaknesses of forming a partnership with the event
organisers. Sponsors will use this information to
San Miguel Beer
make decisions about whether to sponsor the event
Corporation
or not, and if so to put a value on the event as a
form of promotion.

The event proposal may be used as the basis of an


application for funding to government agencies.
They are often interested in supplying public funds
Government to assist organisations to bid and stage major
events. Governments are keen to attract events as
Example: A city they are viewed as a mechanism for attracting
council "sport tourists" who will provide increased revenues
to local businesses, prestige to a city or region and
have an impact on the development of a sport or
recreation in their area of jurisdiction.

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
SELF-CHECK 1.1-4

1. Why is it necessary to bid for an event?


2. When organizations are required to enter into a formal bid process in
order to win the right to stage an event, what are the two tasks of the
event organizer?
3. Discuss the main purpose of an event proposal.

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
INFORMATION SHEET 1.1-7

WRITING AN EVENT PROPOSAL

Learning Objective: After reading this information sheet, you must be able
to:
 Understand WHAT INFORMATION is contained in an event proposal.
 Explain the nature of each information contained in the proposal.
 Create a simple event proposal.

When writing an event proposal the amount of detail required will depend on
the scale and importance of the event. However event proposals generally
share many common components. The information that event proposals
should convey includes but is not limited to the following:

 Company profile of the bidder


o Company Name
o Company Representative
o Company Mission
o Company Vision
o Services offered
o Company Location and contact number / website
o Organizational Chart
Date Develop Document No.
EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
o Client testimony if available
 Description of the Event
 Experience of the Event Bidder
 Venue and facilities offered
 The event program
 The proposed event budget

Description of the Event

 It is important to provide the reader of the event proposal with an


overview of what the event is about.

 Some events need very little explaining because they are


commonplace.

 However, it is unwise to rely on the title of the event alone to explain


its purpose.

 In providing an overview for the reader, it may be important to


describe the main participant target group(s), the main goals to be
achieved in running the event and, if the event is somewhat unusual,
one or two sentences that provide the reader with mental picture of
what the event will be.

Experience of the Event Bidder

 The organisation or entity bidding for the event should extol its
experience and capability.

 It is crucial that whoever assesses the bids firmly believes the bidding
organisation will be able to put on a good show.

 The proposal should contain succinct information about the event


management experience of the proposed event team.

 If experience in staging events is limited then it is useful to mention


any managerial, project management or co-ordination experience in
any other field.

 Qualifications of persons in the event management team may also


prove useful to mention.

 The proposal should also describe any training that will be given to
event volunteers.

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
Venue and Facilities offered

 The reader of the proposal will


want to know whether the venue is
suitable for the event.

 The proposal should outline all


facilities available at the venue,
everything from toilets to car-parking.

 For indoor events, the type of surface, lighting, air-conditioning,


seating, electronic equipment should be well described.

 For outdoor events, the level of maintenance on turf, seating and


shading for spectators, fencing, drainage and floodlighting is worthy of
mention.

 It is often worthwhile to include a map or floor diagram.

 Photographs of key features of the venue may assist.

 There needs to be a detailed description of what would be attractive to


event goers and how the venue will fully cater for the needs of the
event, including performers, officials and spectators.

 Don't forget to include information about public transport to the


venue, and car parking for those who arrive by car.

 If the venue has staged similar events in the past, you should make
mention of this.

The Event Program

 It is often the case that the host club or organisation


has little or no say in setting the program when the date or
dates have been set by the governing body.

 However, at the initial stage of bidding, the event


proposal may suggest a program in terms of the number of
days, and the start and finish times.

 It is important for decision makers to know how many


hours a day the venue is available.

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
 It is worthwhile to consider that the program should also include
ceremonial events with visiting dignitaries who may make speeches or
present awards

 Furthermore the event bidding team can proposed entertainment


'extras' that may start or finish the program or fill any gaps.

The Proposed Event Budget

 The organisation bidding for the event should draft a budget of


probable income and expenditure.

 It is important that such a budget is realistic and therefore some care


and consideration needs to be given to suggesting sponsors that have
not yet formalized any sponsorship agreement.

 The event budget should not show a loss when all projected income
and expenditure has been taken into account.

 If the budget predicts a loss there will be major concerns in the minds
of those who assess the event bid proposal.

 The organisation that wins the bid may be entitled to an amount of


funding from the governing body to alleviate certain costs that will
likely be incurred.

 However, there is also an expectancy that the host club or


organisation will have an opportunity to make money through the
canteen, bar, fundraising raffles and merchandising.

 These forms of income should be reflected in the budget in the event


proposal.

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
JOB SHEET 1.1-7

Title: Write an Event Proposal


Performance Write an Event proposal for a client who is
Objective: celebrating her debut.
 Ballpen
Supplies :  Yellow Paper/ Bond Papers
 Eraser
Computer Set/ Laptop
Equipment :
Printer
Steps/Procedure:

4. Create your company profile


5. Include the description of the event
6. Include “experiences” as an event bidder
7. Include testimonies of satisfied clients
8. Include at least 3 possible venues for the event detailing pros
and cons for each
9. Include the proposed budget

Assessment Method:

Performance Criteria Checklist

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali
Performance Criteria Checklist for
Job Sheet 1.1-7

Trainee’s Name__________________________ Date ________________

Task: Create an Event Brief

Criteria YES NO

Are the following details included in the event


proposal?

1. Profile of the company

2. Event description

3. “Experiences” as an event bidder

4. Testimonies of satisfied clients


3 possible venues for the event
5.
detailing pros and cons for each
6. Proposed budget

Feedback

Date Develop Document No.


EVM NC III May 2016 Issued by:
PLAN AND Developed by:
DEVELOP EVENT Revision #
PROPOSAL OR BID Orlando G. Umali