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QUARTER I Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 1 Week: 1

Lesson: Imaginative writing vs. technical/ academic/ and other forms of writing

Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of imagery, diction, figures of


speech, and variations on language.

Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce short paragraphs or


vignettes using imagery, diction, figures of speech, and specific experiences

Competency (Code):The learners differentiate imaginative writing from among other


forms of writing (HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ia-b-1)

Objectives: 1. Define creative writing.


2. Explain the nature of creative writing.
3. Appreciate creative works of literary authors through critical analysis of
its content.
4. Write their creative writing piece based from their personal experiences.

Initial Activities : ( PictoRama ) Other Suggested


Task Form a group of 5, then choose a picture to describe in a Activities
class. (5 mins.)
(Day MAYON

1-2) NN
Write a technical
and creative
manuscript form based
from the following
suggested topics:
1. Millennial Age
2. 21stCentury
Technology
3. Social
Responsibility
4. Communication
preferences of
the youth

CWC-PILI

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 1


Debriefing questions

1. Which group effectively presented or described


the pictures?
2. Give reasons why the descriptions were effective.
3. Did the group present it in a technical way or
imaginative way?

Concept Discovery

Watch video clip on the difference between


technical and imaginative writing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cLBtLXGj4mc

Creative writing and Its Difference to other forms of


writing

Technical Creative

Forms/ Research journals, Poetry, fiction,


samples proposals, reports, drama
guidelines
Objective Aims to instruct and Aims to entertain
inform the readers
Content Shows facts Reflects the
writer’s
imagination
Audience With specific target Broader audience
audience
Diction Formal Informal

Structure Systematic Artistic

1. Creative writing is the artistic expression


through written word. It is used to express the
writer’s ideas and emotions in an artistic
manner.It has a larger audience, informal, artistic,
subjective, and imaginative.

2. Technical writing commonly aims to give


information and instruction using specific facts.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 2


Take –a- Sample

Technical Works

The Bicol University (BU) gives professional and


technical training, and provides advanced specialized
instruction in literature, philosophy, the sciences and
arts, besides promoting scientific and technological
research.

-www.bicol-u.edu.ph

Creative Works

Uran

An enot na tagdo kang ambon


naghadok sa paha na daga
dangan nagpurak nin tuninong,
pinaara an ibang ambon.
Aruatsan sana, wagawa na an uran.
-Marissa Dela Cruz Reorizo-Redburn

Activity 1

Using a Venn Diagram, compare and contrast


imaginative writing from technical writing.

Technical Creative
Writing writing

Differences Similarities Differences

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Concept Elaboration

Write an essay about yourself. In the first box,


write it in a technical manner and in the second box,
translate it to a creative form.
Technical Description Creative Description

Rubric in Grading the Essay

Indicator Rating (1-5)


The first essay is written in a technical manner
The second essay is written in a creative manner
The content of the essay is clear
It is in proper form with correct grammar,
spelling, and proper punctuations.
Total

Peer Assessment

Exchange your essays with your seatmate and let your


seatmate evaluate the essays.

Indicator Rating (1-5)


The first essay is written in a technical
manner
The second essay is written in a creative
manner
The content of the essay is clear
It is in proper form with correct grammar,
spelling, and proper punctuations.
Total

Remarks
What are the strong points and what needs
to be improved?

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LESSON REFLECTION…

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 5


(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)
QUARTER 1 Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 1 Week: 1

Lesson: Sensory experience

Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of imagery, diction, figures of


speech, and variations on language.

Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce short paragraphs or


vignettes using imagery, diction, figures of speech, and specific experiences.

Competency (Code): The learners cull creative ideas from experiences.


(HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ia-b-2)

Objectives: 1. Identify the types of senses in literary text.


2. Explain the sensory details and its importance.
3. Use sensory details in writing meaningful texts.

Initial Activities : Group work Other Suggested Activities


Task
Station- to- station Game Boost yourself
(Day Form five groups and take turn in going to
3) the five stations where you will do an activity to 1. From the two
experience one of the five senses. pictures shown
below, which is
Station 1- Students will see a picture then describe more appealing to
it. (sight) you? Why?
Station 2- Smell brewed coffee then describe it.
(smell) A
Station 3- Feel the different kinds of leaves.
(touch)
Station 4- Listen to a recorded sound of nature
(hearing)
Station 5- Students will taste different candies
(taste)

Concept Elaboration
Imagery is the literary term used for
language and description that appeal to our five B
senses. When a writer attempts to describe
something so that it appeals to our sense of smell,
sight, taste, touch, or hearing; he/she has
used imagery. Often, imagery is built on other
literary devices, such as simile or metaphor, as the

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 6


author uses comparisons to appeal to our senses.
1. 2 From the sentence
Examples of Imagery: below, choose the one
which is more appealing
1. I could hear the popping and crackling as to you. Explain why.
mom dropped the bacon into the frying pan, and
soon the salty, greasy smell wafted toward me. 1. Her hair is pretty and
2. Glittering white, the blanket of snow covered long.
everything in sight. 2. Her shiny jet black hair
3. The golden yellow sunlight filtered down reaches her waist.
through the pale new leaves on the oak trees, 1. Her perfume smells like
coming to rest on Jessica's brown toes that were chocolate but sweeter.
splayed in the red Georgia mud. 2. Her perfume smells good.

Examples of Imagery in Literature Analyze the sample local poem


then, identify the types of
a. The poem "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" by imagery used.
William Wordsworth uses imagery throughout:
It’s More Funk in the Philippines
(Elmer G. Ramos)
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Soul Brotha Number One’s jagged wail
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. slices through the bruised flesh of midnight
with surgeon precision
Continuous as the stars that shine and madman’s frenzy abandon.
And twinkle on the milky way, pungent stench of rotting garbage,
They stretched in never-ending line clogged sewer,
and low-grade grass glides
Along the margin of a bay: in the febrile humid air
Ten thousand saw I at a glance, like intoxicated bats
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. from the deepest darkest cavern
of the nation’s damaged psyche.
A cop is mauling a street hustler:
b. “Charlotte's Web” is full of imagery, such as this her bloody toothless mouth
passage describing the fair: French kissing the gutter.
nausea-inducing Korean pop
blares from a nearby videoke dive
"In the hard-packed dirt of the midway, after while in some sleazy rat-infested cinema
the glaring lights are out and the people have gone somewhere in Recto
a priest is divinely intervening
to bed, you will find a veritable treasure of popcorn the asshole of a fourteen-year old vagrant
fragments, frozen custard dribblings, candied boy
apples abandoned by tired children, sugar fluff with heavenly gusto.
Drunks, punks, zealots, scums,
crystals, salted almonds, popsicles, partially hobos, hustlers, hipsters, cocksuckers,
gnawed ice cream cones and wooden sticks of copsuckers,
lollipops." meth-addicts, flesh-addicts, Jesus freaks,
pmps,
hundred-peso whores, smalltime pushers,
c.Romeo's description of Juliet in “Romeo and bigtime crooks…
Juliet” is full of imagery: cavort in the shadows
grooving like spastic maggots
to the sweaty frantic rhythm
Two of the fairest stars in all the of Third World decadence
heaven, Having some business, do entreat set to endless loop

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 7


her eyes To twinkle in their spheres till they (RIMPOS 2016)
return. What if her eyes were there, they in
her head? The brightness of her cheek Individual Task:
would shame those stars,
Bring sample picture or realia of
As daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in the following:
heaven Would through the airy region
stream so bright That birds would sing and 1. You favorite fruit
think it were not night.-- See how she leans 2. Your favorite place
her cheek upon her hand! 3. Your favorite perfume
4. Your favorite lotion
Concept Expansion 5. Your favorite sound music

Identify the type of senses used in the sentences. Fav-ulous - Scene

1. His almost –black hair captivates my attention. 1. Describe your favorite.


2. Ellaine has a high-pitched laugh. 2. Why do you like it?
3. Her hair feels wiry.
4. Freddie wears too much aftershave. Based from those pictures,
5. The pizza tastes extraordinary and mouth-watery. write a short monograph or
6. The rocks still wet from high tide. paragraph explaining why it is
7. The way the sea seems as blue as the sky, your favorite.
making it hard to tell where one ends and the other
begins.
8. The tiny pink shells in the white sand were
picked by the little girl.
9. The cry of the fox sounded like a child is a
terrible pain.
10. His ex-girlfriend gave him a cold handshake.

Rewrite the following sentence into a more


imagery-rich one.

The ancient floorboards creaked beneath


her, cold, bare feet as she paced the room
apprehensively.

Concept Extension

Read the following selections and discuss how


imagery was used.

(Teacher may provide other reading selections or

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 8


may opt to use the selection given in Other
Suggested Activities as a guide.)

Concept Finale

Write your own poem using imagery or different


sensory words.

Rubric in Grading the Poem

Indicator Rating (1-10


The message of the poem is
clear.
The poem captures the interest
of the readers.
The poem is based on the
objective.
It is in proper form with correct
grammar, spelling, and proper
punctuations.
Total

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 9


LESSON REFLECTION…

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 10


(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)
Quarter 1 Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 1 Week: 1

Lesson: Variations in Language

Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of imagery, diction, figures of


speech, and variations on language

Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce short paragraphs or


vignettes using imagery, diction, figures of speech, and specific experiences

Competency (Code): The learners utilize language to evoke emotional and intellectual
responses from readers (HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ia-b-3)

Objectives: 1. Define figures of speech;


2. Identify figures of speech used in a literary text;
3. Write a short creative piece which contains figures of speech.

Initial Activities (Figure-Lang) Other Suggested


Task Activities
Write a sample sentence that corresponds to the
(Day figurative languages enumerated below. Use the word Analyze the poem
4-5 ) stated below in your sentence. below. Underline the
figurative language used.
Figurative
Sentence
Language TAKORE
Simile By Jasper Ian U. Felezmiño

Metaphor Madya ta himation mo an init,


Personification Madya ta himation mo an
Hyperbole Sakuyang nababasang lawas,
Alliteration Asikasuhon mo an sakuyang
Allusion pagkurahaw,
Onomatopoeia
An kakiditan na sakuyang
pinapamati,
Key Concept
Dai ko mapupugulan an
Writers use figures of speech and figurative sakuyang sadiri,
language to creative images that would deepen the
reader’s comprehension of a text. Provides figurative Huli ta maluwas na an tubig
images which increase reading pleasure. Sa sakuyang mga nguso,
Mabuswak ini paluwas
Figurative kun ako papabayaan mo,
Language Definition
Indirect comparison of two things using Uni na maluwas na,
“like” or “as.” Dali-dalian mo huli ta uni na,
Simile Ex. Then she burst into view, a girl Luway-luway na akong
lovely as morning and just as fair...” niluluwasan

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(Waywaya, F. Sionil Jose) Huli ta nagkakalakaga na ako
digdi sa kalan.
Direct comparison between two objects
Metaphor
Ex. “Everything that exists, aromas,
light, metals, were little boats that sail toward
the isles of yours that wait for me...”

(If you forget me, Pablo Neruda)

Attribution of human qualities to a thing


Personification

Ex. “Because I could not stop for Death,


He kindly stopped for me; The carriage held but
just ourselves and immortality.”
(Because I could not stop for death by Emily Dickinson)
Exaggeration or overstatement

Ex. “Well now, one winter it was so cold


Hyperbole that all the geese flew backward and all the fish
moved south, and even the snow turned blue.
Late at night, it got so frigid that all spoken
words froze solid afore they could be heard.
People had to wait until sunup to find out what
folks were talking about the night before.”

(Babe, the Blue Ox, retold by S.E. Scholosser)

Repetition of the first consonant of neighboring


Alliteration words
Ex. “Leap up like that, like that, and
land so lightly.”

(Home Burial, Robert Frost)


Use of person, place, or thing of reference

Allusion Ex. “The morning wind forever blows;


the poem of creation is uninterrupted, but few
are the ears that hear it. Olympus is but the
outside of the earth everywhere.”

(Walden, Henry David Thoreau)

Use of words that mimic sounds


Onomatopoeia

Ex. “Boy, I rang that doorbell fast when I


got to old Spencer’s house.”

(The Catcher in The Rye, J.D. Salinger)

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Concept Explanation

Underline the example of figurative language in


each sentence. Then, identify if it is a simile (S), metaphor
(M), or an example of personification (P). If it is a
metaphor or a simile, write the two things being
compared.

1. A milkweed pod was bulging like a coin purse on


the ground of damp woods.
_______________________________________
2. The trees watched sympathetically over the lost
child.
________________________________________
3. Just like a troop of ants, everyone on the football
team enthusiastically helped set up the new goal posts.
________________________________________
4. The gumamela and the roses danced in the breeze.
________________________________________
5. John’s room was a garden choked with weeds.
________________________________________
(www.syracusecityschools.com)

Enrichment activity

Write a poem using at least five figures of


speech or figurative language.

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LESSON REFLECTION…

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 14


(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)
Quarter 1 Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 1 Week: 2

Lesson: Diction

Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of imagery, diction, figures of


speech, and variations on language

Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce short paragraphs or


vignettes using imagery, diction, figures of speech, and specific experiences

Competency (Code): The learners use imagery, diction, figures of speech, and specific
experiences (HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ia-b-4)

Objectives: 1. Familiarize oneself with the diction and its characteristics;


2. Demonstrate understanding about the characteristics of diction through
analyzing and relating one’s own experiences with the local poems; and
3. Apply the concepts of diction through writing meaningful texts.

Initial Activities (Read-Me-More) Other Suggested Activities


Task
Read the following letter then analyze its LET’S TRY IT. This awesome idea is
(Day style, the language or diction used and the from Carol Elsen from an AP Summer
5-9 ) level of formality. Institute.
1. The author's name
“Excuse Letter ng Mother ni Bekimon” 2. plus an adjective
(such as sophisticated,
Dear Teacheret, varied, inventive, sparkling,
effective, carefully crafted,
Kamustasa kalabasa? Keri ka flashy, folksy, colloquial). 
lang ba? Bet kong italak sayez na Use a different adjective for each sentence.
witit makakajosok sa skulembang si 3. plus the term "diction"
junakis ngayonchi. 4. plus a strong verb
Rarampage si atashi now at bet (such as: demonstrates,
kong kajoin force si bebemon.Ispluk ni creates, emphasizes, generates,
junakis na may periodical examinelya fulfills)
silachina. Sana ay givlakan mo itey ng 5. plus the function of the word
bonggang bonggang espesyalinda choices (what those choices do
examinelya. for the piece)
6. plus at least two examples
Trulibels,
Example:
Andrist's snazzy diction recreates
Mudrakels

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 15


http://zaptextpinoy.blogspot.com/2011/11/excuse-letter-ng-nanay-ni- the dynamic personality of General
bekimon-dear.html Custer with choices such as
"flamboyant" and "teetotaler." 

Key point Group Activity

Diction can be defined as style of


speaking or writing determined by the Ask students to write a short story
choice of words by a speaker or a that begins with the word “blue,” and in
writer. which the first word of every
paragraph is a color. Use the color
Diction or choice of words separates word only once in each paragraph, but
good writing from bad writing. It depends on suggests the color in as many ways as
a number of factors. Firstly, the word has to possible.
be right and accurate. Secondly, words
should be appropriate to the context in which
they are used. Lastly, the choice of words
should be such that the listener or readers
understand easily. Besides, proper diction or
proper choice of words is important to get the
message across. On the contrary, the wrong
choice of words can easily divert listeners or
readers which results in misinterpretation of
the message intended to be conveyed.

Types of Diction

Individuals vary their diction


depending on different contexts and settings.
Therefore, we come across various types of
diction. It may be “formal” where formal
words are used in formal situations e.g. press
conferences, presentations etc. Similarly, we
use “informal” diction in informal situations
like writing or talking to our friends.
Moreover, a “colloquial” diction uses words
common in everyday speech. “Slang” is the
use of words that are impolite or newly
coined.

Diction Examples in Literature

Depending on the topics at hand,


writers tend to vary their diction. Let us see
some examples of diction in literature:

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Example #1

Keats in his “Ode to the Grecian Urn”


uses formal diction to achieve a certain
effect. He goes: Analyze the following pictures of
the classroom situations. Describe each
“Heard melodies are sweet, but those in 2-3 sentences considering the diction.
unheard
Are sweeter: therefore, ye soft pipes, play
on”

Notice the use of formal “ye” instead


of informal “you”. The formality here is due
to the respect the urn inspires in Keats. In the
same poem he says:

“Ah, happy, happy boughs! that cannot shed


Your leaves, nor ever bid the spring adieu.”

It is more formal to use “adieu” than


to say “goodbye”.

Example #2

In sharp contrast to Keats, John


Donne uses colloquialism in his poem “The
Sun Rising”:

“Busy old fool, unruly Sun,


Why dost thou thus,
Through windows, and through curtains, call
on us?
Must to thy motions lovers’ seasons run?
Saucy pedantic wretch,”

Treating the sun as a real human


being, the poet speaks to the sun in an
informal way using colloquial expressions.
He rebukes the sun because the sun has
appeared to spoil the good time he is having
with his beloved. Further, he orders the
“saucy pedantic sun” to go away.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 17


Example #3

Writers’ skillfully choose words to


develop a certain tone and atmosphere in
their works. Read the following excerpt from
a short story “The School” by Donald
Barthelme:

“And the trees all died. They were


orange trees. I don’t know why they died,
they just died. Something wrong with the soil
possibly or maybe the stuff we got from the
nursery wasn’t the best. We complained
about it. So we’ve got thirty kids there, each
kid had his or her own little tree to plant and
we’ve got these thirty dead trees. All these
kids looking at these little brown sticks, it
was depressing.”

The use of the words “died”, “dead”,


“brown sticks” and “depressing” gives a
gloomy tone to the passage.

Example #4

Sometimes writers repeat their chosen


words or phrases to achieve an artistic effect.
Read the following example from “ A Tale of
Two Cities” by Charles Dickens:

“It was the best of times, it was the


worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it
was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch
of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it
was the season of Light, it was the season of
Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was
the winter of despair.”

By repeating the phrase “It was…”


throughout the passage, the writer ensures
that the readers will give more consideration
to characteristic of the “age” they are going
to read about in the novel.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 18


Function of Diction

In literature, writers choose words to


create and convey a typical mood, tone and
atmosphere to their readers. A writer’s choice
of words and his selection of graphic words
not only affects the reader’s attitude but also
conveys the writer’s feelings toward the
literary work. Moreover, poetry is known for
its unique diction that separates it from prose.
Usually, a poetic diction is marked by the use
of figures of speech, rhyming words etc.

Think of three words and write the words in


formal, informal, and slang diction. An
example is given as your guide.

Formal Informal Colloquial/Slang


Diction Diction Diction
Money Cash Bucks

Write an essay employing the


figurative language discussed earlier. Use
informal diction in your essay. Choose from
the following suggested subjects or topics:

1. Riding on a jeepney
2. Going to church
3. Attending a party
4. Swimming on a beach
5. Watching your favorite movie
6. Reading your favorite novel
7. Eating your favorite dish
8. Listening to your favorite song
9. Preparing your favorite dish
10. Visiting a new place

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 19


Rubric in grading the essay
Indicator Rating
(1-5)
The essay contains all the
figurative languages discussed.
The essay is written in the
informal language.
It is in proper form with correct
grammar, spelling, and proper
punctuations.
The essay captures the interest of
the reader.
TOTAL

Remarks

What is/are the strong point/s of the essay?


What needs to be improved?

Peer critiquing
Indicator Rating
(1-5)
The essay contains all the
figurative languages discussed.
The essay is written in the
informal language.
It is in proper form with correct
grammar, spelling, and proper
punctuations.
The essay captures the interest of
the reader.
TOTAL

Remarks/ suggestions

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 20


LESSON REFLECTION…

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 21


(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)
QUARTER 1 Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 1 Week: 3

Lesson: Sample works of well-known local writers

Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of imagery, diction, figures of


speech, and variations on language

Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce short paragraphs or


vignettes using imagery, diction, figures of speech, and specific experiences

Competency (Code): The learners read closely as writers with a consciousness of craft.
(HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ia-b-5)

Objectives: 1. Name famous Filipino writers and their works.


2. Analyze the literary text and its author.
Initial Activities (Match-Me-Now)
Task Read the following excerpt of a literary text. Then, Other Suggested
match column A to its writer in column B. Activities
(Day1
) A B Guided Reading
1. First, a poem must be 1. Jose Beach Ball:
magical, Garcia
Then musical as a sea-gull. Villa All you need are a few
It must be a brightness moving And beach balls (definitely
hold secret a bird’s flowering. get a backup or two in
any size from your local
2. I have watched her in stillness, 2. Francisco dollar store), a sharpie
how still and white and long. Arcellana marker, and a list of
I have followed her about questions. Paste the
with my eyes questions in the ball.
how silent and swift and strong. As the music
starts, the ball is passed
3.Magayunon na paghilingon 3. Jomar to the next student.
An patak ki uran. Baynado When the music stops,
Nag-uurunaan sa balisbisan the student will answer
Garu kristal sa sampayan. one question. The one
who get more correct
4.No worth, no use. 4. Menandro answers will be the
What to be done for one, S. Abanes winner.
in the corner insignificant
For more related reading texts and worksheets,
Two together, left or right, suit alright please visit:

They have story, they have meaning https://www.k5learning.com/reading-


comprehension-worksheets

5.Talaan ng aking mga dinaramdam, 5. Jose


Kasangguning lihim ng nais tandaan, Corazon

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 22


bawat dahon niya ay kinalalagyan De Jesus
ng isang gunitang pagkamahal-mahal.

Concept Elaboration

This list of Filipino writers is organized by the first


letter in the surname.
1. Francisco Arcellana
2. Francisco Balagtas
3. Lualhati Bautista
4. Carlos Bulosan
5. Cecilia Manguerra Brainard
6. Linda Ty Casper
7. Gilda Cordero-Fernando
8. Edmundo Farolán
9. Zoilo Galang
10. Guillermo Gómez Rivera
11. N. V. M. Gonzalez
12. Jessica Hagedorn
13. Nick Joaquin
14. F. Sionil José
15. Virginia R. Moreno
16. Peter Solis Nery
17. José Rizal
18. Alejandro R. Roces
19. Shirley Siaton
20. Michelle Cruz Skinner
21. Miguel Syjuco
22. Lysley Tenorio
23. Edilberto K. Tiempo
 Ric Canizares
 https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=21584443

Samples of Genre and its author

DahongPalay                   Short Story Arturo Rotar


Dahong Guinto Book of JC de Jesus
Poetry (Huseng Sisiw)
Daughter for Sale Drama Carlos Romulo
The Land of our Fathers Drama SeverinoMontano
The Shoes of Chadliwan Short Story Consorcio Borja
Betrayal in the Novel HernandoAbaya
Philippines
Walang Sugat Novel Severino Reyes
(Lola Basyang)

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 23


Slave of the Sea Short Story
Casiano Calalong
The Princess is Sorry Drama Jose Mijares
The Coward Short Story
Alfredo Litiatco
The Small Key Short Story
Paz Laterena
The Filipino Rebel Novel Maxima Kalaw
“1896” Poem Aurelio Alvero
To a Lost One Poem Angel Manalang
The Tree of Kamatayan Short Story
Alfredo Efren
Litiatco
In the Shadows Poem Mauro Mendez
Dead Stars Short Story Paz Marquez-
Benitez
Moonlight on the Manila Poem Fernando Maramag
Bay
Harvest Short Story Loreto Paras-Sulit
Limampung Kwentong Short Story Pedrito Reyes
Guinto
My Last Farewell Poem Dr. Jose Rizal
Song For Redemption Short Story Fidel de Castro
The Rice Planter Poem Leodolpo
Uichangco
My Home Poem Jose Hernandez
My Mother Poem Juan F. Salazar
Lihim ng Kumpisalan Novel Fausto Galauran
Plighted Word Short Story Narciso Reyes
Banang at Sikat Novel Lope K. Santos
Air Castles Poem Juan F. Salazar
Urbana at Felisa Novel Modesta de Castro
The Sampaguita Poem NatividadMarquez
Crusade in Asia Essay Carlos P. Romulo
Alitaptap Short Story CondradoPedroche
Farmer in the Sunset Short Story Narciso G. Reyes
Two Voices Book of Aberaldo &
Poetry Tarrosa Subido
Woman Sense (Column) Essays Pura Santillan-
Gastrnece
Thirteen Plays Book of Wilfredo Guerrero
Plays
Boiled Chicken Short Story Alvaro Martinez

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 24


The Oil Lamp Play Augusto Catanjal
Laarni- A Dream Short Story Loreto Paras
The Three Old Bachelors Short Story Laureano Yumol
Panday Pira Drama Jose M. Hernandez
Extra! Extra! Short Story Arturo Tolention
Celia Poem Claro Recto
“Inay” Short Story Alvaro Martinez
Vanishing Dawn Essay IV Mallari
Alang Dios Novel Fr. Anselmo
Fajardo
Indolence of the Filipinos Essay Dr. Jose Rizal
A Child of Sorrow Novel Zoilo Galang
Never Mind and Other Book of Procopio Solidum
Poems Poems
Mir-in-isa Short Story Jose Garcia Villa
Letter to Women of Essay Dr. Jose Rizal
Malolos
Azucena Book of M del Garcia
Verse Conception
His Dishonor, the Mayor Novel Leon Ma.Guerrero
Little Things Book of Godofredo Rivera
Essays
The Waves Drama Hilarion Vibal
Horizon from my Nipa Essays FB Icasiano (Mang
Hut Kiko)
Literature and Society Column of SP Lopez
Essays
Forces that Make a Great Essays Jose P. Laurel
Nation Great
Manila Column of Luis Dato
Verses
Noli Me Tangere Novel Dr. Jose Rizal
El Filibusterismo Novel Dr. Jose Rizal
For more related reading texts, please visit: https://theculturetrip.com/asia/philippines/articles/the-filipino-
authors-you-should-know/
https://www.ranker.com/list/famous-writers-from-philippines/reference
Read the selection below and answer the questions that
follow.
Healing
By Marissa Dela Cruz Reorizo-Redburn
translated by Helga Andrea R. Casillan
My machete uproots the weeds from the earth. I dig
out the kurokamote, the carabao grass, the wild ginger and

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 25


the many other weeds whose names I do not know. Even the
bashful mimosa does not escape my blade. They are left in
many mounds in my trail. I gather them all into one, the
mimosa’s thorns stabbing my hands and arms.
The sun beating down on my skin, the stinging of the
thorns, and the weight growing steadily heavier in my chest
come in searing waves and overpower me.
My machete speeds up in its task until I wound the cheeks of
the earth. My sweat rains down on the ground, bathing my
chest and drenching the weeds below. I stare down at my
blade for some time.
One by one, I pluck out the thorns piercing my skin.
Then, gingerly, I bury the grass and weeds and flatten the
ground above them.I rinse my machete in the stream. The
dirt that stained its blade is quietly carried away by the
current.
For more reading, kindly search for the book, “Dain Linaw an Hinaw” by Marissa Dela Cruz Reorizo-
Redburn
Answer each questions:
1. What was the story all about?
2. Who is the speaker in the poem?
3. What were the images used that
portrays the meaning of the text?
4. What are the figures of speech used
in the text?
5. How does the speaker conveyed the
message of the text?

Fill in the graphic organizer with the ideas from the text.
FIGURES OF
SPEAKER SPEECH DICTION

Healing IMAGERY
THEME

SITUATION DICTION
MOOD

LESSON REFLECTION…

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 26


(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)
Quarter 1 Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 2 Week: 4

Lesson: Reading and writing poetry (Elements of poetry)

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 27


Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of poetry as genre and how to
analyze its elements and techniques.

Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce a short, well-crafted


poem.

Competency (Code): The learners identify the various elements, techniques, and literary
devices in poetry. (HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ic-f-6)

Objectives:1. Identify various elements, techniques, and literary devices in poetry,


2. Appreciate the importance of theme and tone in writing poetry,
3. Use different elements, techniques and literary devices in making a poem.

Initial Activities: (Brainstorming) Other Suggested Activities


Task
List down all the thoughts you have right now.
(Day1- These thoughts may be about a person, your studies, Exchange your poem
2) food, books, music, idea, travel, feelings, etc. with your partner or
seatmate and let your
Write words or phrases in the box relating to your seatmate analyze and rate
thoughts. your poem and vice versa.

What is the theme of the


poem?

What is the tone used?

List down all the rhymes


in the poem.

What line and meters


were employed?

What is the genre of the


poem?

Key points
Rate the poem based on the
Various elements of poetry criteria

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 28


Poetry is a patterned from a verbal or written Indicators Rating
expression of ideas in concentrated, imaginative, and 1-5
rhythmical terms that often contain the elements of
sense, sound, and structure. It is considered as the The poem
oldest literary form. contains all the
elements
discussed
1.Denotation vs. Connotation
The poem is
Denotation is the dictionary meaning of the creatively written
word while Connotation is the suggested or implied
meaning/s associated with the word beyond its The message of
dictionary definition. the poem is clear

It is well-written
2. Imagery is the use of sensory details or with proper use
descriptions that appeal to one or more of the of punctuation,
senses: sight, touch, taste, and smell. These are correct spelling
otherwise known as “senses of the mind” since and correct
a poem without imagery is not poetry. grammar

3. Sound of a poem Total


Tone Color is achieved through repetition.
Remarks
a.Repetition of Single Sounds
● Alliteration is the repetition of similar and What is the strong points
accented sounds at the beginning of words. of the poem> what needs
● Assonance is the repetition of similar to be improved?
accented vowel sounds
1. Consonance is the repetition of similar
consonant sound typically within or at the end
of words.

b. Rhyme is the repetition of the same stressed


vowel sounds and any succeeding sounds in two or
more words.
Types of Rhyme
1. Internal Rhyme – rhyme within the line
2.Terminal Rhyme – rhyme found at the end of the
line.

Rhyme Scheme is the pattern of rhyme form that


ends a stanza or poem. The rhyme scheme is
designated by the assignment of a different letter of the
alphabet to each new rhyme.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 29


c. Repetition of Words

Example:
My dreams are dreams of thee, fair maid.
- -Rural Maid

d. Repetition of Sentences or Phrases

Example:
I dream that one day our voices will be heard.
I dream that one day our hope becomes worth.
- -Paraiso

4. Rhythm is the pattern of beats created by the


arrangement of stressed and unstressed
syllables, which gives musical quality and ads
emphasis to certain words and thus helps
convey the meaning of the poem. The effect is
derived from the sounds employed, the varying
pitches, stresses, volumes, and durations.

5. Meter is a regular recurrence of stressed and


unstressed syllables that give a line of poetry a
more or less predictable rhythm. Its unit of
measure is termed as “foot” which usually
contains an accented syllable and one or two
unaccented syllables.

Name of Pattern of Accent


Foot
Lambic Unaccented, Accented
Trochaic Accented, Unaccented
Anapestic Unaccented, Unaccented, Accented
Dactylic Accented, Unaccented, Unaccented
Spondaic Accented, Accented

6. Foot is the basic unit of meter consisting


of a group of two or three syllables.
Name of Feet/Line Measure

One foot Monometer

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 30


Two feet Dimeter
Three feet Trimeter
Four feet Tetrameter
Five feet Pentameter
Six feet Hexameter
Seven feet Heptameter
Eight feet Octameter

Nine feet Nonameter

Ten feet Decameter

Structure also talks about:

Poem Appreciation is achieved not only when


one has comprehended the plain sense or information
communicated by the poem; it is also achieved if the
attitude and feeling conveyed are captured, together
with the larger meaning of the work, which is only
possible when the tone and symbolic meanings are
discerned.

Boost yourself
1.Theme
The theme is the summarized statement
containing the main thought or meaning of the poem.

Rain

The first drop of dew kissed the parched soil before a


serene shower, luring its fellows to do the same, in a little
while, it poured.

Translated by Helga Andrea R. Casillan


(Dain Linaw an Hinaw-Marissa Reorizo-Redburn)

1. What is the message expressed by the poem?


2. State the theme of the poem.
2.Tone

Tone refers to the attitude and mood of the poem.


It is the overall atmosphere of the poem which
influence the emotional response of the reader.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 31


Tone is the writer’s attitude toward his subject,
mood, and moral view. It is the feeling that the poem
has created in the reader. It is communicated by the
writer’s or speaker’s attitude toward his subject, his
imagined audience, or himself. It is the emotional
coloring of the work which is indicated by the
inflection of the speaker’s voice.

Agony
Mel Johannes Hortal

To hold you dear is never easy,


When your love seems to have dried up easily.
As much as I want you to stay with me,
You appear to be moving away from me.

Confused and haunted by our memories,


Every step I take is riddled with misery.
Torn between holding on and letting you go,
Every decision I make brings me back to thee.

That I still love you is a reality,


But our unity’s now an ambiguity.
And while I hope that you still love me the same,
Your silence prolongs my agony.

(Buruhian –Mga pili na kurit ag Rawitdawit Project Susog;Creative Block Buhi


2017 Gold Print Publishing House. Naga)

1.What is the tone of Mel Johannes Hortal’s poem


“Agony”?
2.Can you feel the poet’s emotion in the poem? In
what way?

Concept Follow-Up

Write a two-stanza poem applying the various


elements, techniques and literary devices

Techniques and literary devices used in poetry

Day 3-4 A narrative technique (also known more


narrowly for literary fictional narratives as

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 32


a literary technique, literary device, or fictional
device) is any of several specific methods the
creator of a narrative uses to convey what they
want—in other words, a strategy used in the
making of a narrative to relay information.

A literary device is a technique that shapes


narrative to produce an effect on the reader.

List of narrative techniques - Wikipedia


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_narrative_technique
s

Poetic Devices

Poetry is the kind of thing poets write.


— Robert Frost

Man, if you gotta ask, you’ll never know.


— Louis Armstrong

1.The SOUNDS of words

Words or portions of words can be


clustered or juxtaposed to achieve specific kinds
of effects when we hear them. The sounds that
result can strike us as clever and pleasing, even
soothing.
a. alliteration: the repetition of consonant
sounds, particularly at the beginning of words.
b. allusion: a reference to a person,
event, or work outside the poem or literary piece.
c.assonance: the repetition of similar
vowel sounds.

2.The MEANINGs of words

Most words convey several meanings or


shades of meaning at the same time. It is the
poet’s job to find words which, when used in
relation to other words in the poem, will carry the
precise intention of thought. Often, some of the
more significant words may carry several layers
or “depths” of meaning at once.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 33


a. Allegory: A representation of an
abstract or spiritual meaning.

b. Ambiguity: A word or phrase that can


mean more than one thing, even in its context.
Example: Robert Frost’s ‘The Subverted
Flower’

c. Analogy: A comparison, usually


something unfamiliar with something familiar.
Example: The plumbing took a maze of
turns where even water got lost.

3.Arranging the words

Words follow each other in a sequence


determined by the poet. In order to discuss the
arrangements that result, certain terms have
been applied to various aspects of that
arrangement process.

Point of View: The author’s point of view


concentrates on the vantage point of the speaker,
or “teller” of the story or poem. This may be
considered the poem’s “voice” — the pervasive
presence behind the overall work. This is also
sometimes referred to as the persona.

• 1st Person: the speaker is a character in


the story or poem and tells it from his/her
perspective (uses “I”).
• 3rd Person limited: the speaker is not
part of the story, but tells about the other
characters through the limited perceptions of one
other person.
• 3rd Person omniscient: the speaker is
not part of the story, but is able to “know” and
describe what all characters are thinking.

4.The IMAGES of words

A poet uses words more consciously than

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 34


any other writer. Although poetry often deals with
deep human emotions or philosophical thought,
people generally don’t respond very strongly to
abstract words, even the words describing such
emotions and thoughts.

1. Imagery: The use of vivid language to


generate ideas and/or evoke mental
images, not only of the visual sense, but of
sensation and emotion as well. While most
commonly used in reference to figurative
language, imagery can apply to any
component of a poem that evoke sensory
experience and emotional response, and
also applies to the concrete things so
brought to mind.

Examples:
• Sight: Smoke mysteriously puffed
out from the clown’s ears.
• Sound: Tom placed his ear
tightly against the wall; he could hear a
faint but distinct thump thump thump.
•Touch: The burlap wall covering
scraped against the little boy’s cheek.
•Taste: A salty tear ran across onto
her lips.
• Smell: Cinnamon! That’s what
wafted into his nostrils.

Poetic Devices | Academy of American Poets


https://www.poets.org/poetic-devices

Genre Generation

Choose a genre and write a poem based on a


chosen genre. Use the words or phrases you listed in
activity 1 in your poem. Make sure that the elements
discussed such as theme, tone, rhyme, line and meter
are present in your poem.
.

LESSON REFLECTION…

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 35


(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)
QUARTER 1 Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 2 Week: 4

Lesson: Reading and writing poetry (Conventional forms)

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 36


Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of poetry as genre and how to
analyze its elements and techniques.

Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce a short, well-crafted


poem.

Competency (Code):The learners determine specific forms and conventions of poetry.


(HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ic-f-7)

Objectives:1. Determine specific forms and conventions of poetry

Initial Activities (FORM-ATIC)


Task Other Suggested
Read and analyze the sample poems Activities
(Day1
-8) TREES
By Joyce Kilmer After discussion of
the different forms
I think that I shall never see of poetry, students
A poem lovely as a tree. may write or
compose their own
A tree whose hungry mouth is prest poem based from
Against the earth's sweet flowing breast;  the types of poems
discussed.
A tree that looks at God all day,
And lifts her leafy arms to pray; 

A tree that may in summer wear


A nest of robins in her hair; 

Upon whose bosom snow has lain; 


Who intimately lives with rain.

Poems are made by fools like me,


But only God can make a tree.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 37


How would you differentiate the sample poems?
How do they differ?

Types of Poetry

a.Narrative Poem is a poem that tells a story.


b.Lyric Poem is descriptive or expository in nature where
the poet is concerned mainly with presenting a scene in words,
conveying sensory richness of his subject, or the revelation of
ideas or emotions.
c.Dramatic Poem is a poem where a story is told through
the verse dialogue of the characters and a narrator.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 38


SPECIFIC FORMS AND CONVENTIONS OF POETRY

1. Ballad: a narrative poem written as a series of quatrains in


which lines of iambic tetrameter alternate with iambic trimeter
with an xaxa, xbxb rhyme scheme with frequent use of repetition
and often including a refrain. The “story” of a ballad can be a
wide range of subjects but frequently deals with folklore or
popular legends. They are written in a straight-forward manner,
seldom with detail, but always with graphic simplicity and force.
Most ballads are suitable for singing: “Barbara Allen” is an
example. Many of the oldest ballads were first written and
performed by minstrels as court entertainment.
Folk ballads are of unknown origin and are usually
lacking in artistic finish. Because they are handed down by oral
tradition, folk ballads are subject to variations and continual
change.
Other types of ballads include literary ballads, combining
the natures of epic and lyric poetry, which are written by known
authors, often in the style and form of the folk ballad, such as
Keats’ ‘La Belle Dame sans Merci.”

2. Ballade: a French form, it consists of three seven or eight-


line stanzas using no more than three recurrent rhymes, with an
identical refrain after each stanza and a closing envoi repeating
the rhymes of the last four lines of the stanza

3.Concrete Poetry: also known as pattern poetry or shaped


verse, these are poems that are printed on the page so that they
form a recognizable outline related to the subject, thus conveying
or extending the meaning of the words. Pattern poetry retains its
meaning when read aloud, whereas the essence of concrete poetry
lies in its appearance on the page rather than in the words; it is
intended to be perceived as a visual whole and often cannot be
effective when read aloud. This form has had brief popularity at
several periods in history.

4 • Epigram: a pithy, sometimes satiric, couplet or quatrain


comprising a single thought or event and often aphoristic with a
witty or humorous turn of thought.

5 • Epitaph: a brief poem or statement in memory of


someone who is deceased, used as, or suitable for, a tombstone
inscription; now, often witty or humorous and written without
intent of actual funerary use.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 39


6• Haiku: a Japanese form of poetry consisting of three
unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables. The elusive
flavor of the form, however, lies more in its touch and tone than
in its syllabic structure. Deeply imbedded in Japanese culture and
strongly influenced by Zen Buddhism, haiku are very brief
descriptions of nature that convey some implicit insight or
essence of a moment. Traditionally, they contain either a direct or
oblique reference to a season.

7 • Limerick: a light or humorous form of five chiefly


anapestic verses of which lines one, two and five are of three feet
and lines three and four are of two feet, with a rhyme scheme of
aabba. Named for a town in Ireland of that name, the limerick
was popularized by Edward Lear in his Book of Nonsense
published in 1846, and is generally considered the only fixed
form of English origin.
While the final line of Lear’s limericks usually was a
repetition of the first line, modern limericks generally use the
final line for clever witticisms and word play. Their content also
frequently tends toward the ribald and off-color.

8•Lyric: derived from the Greek word for lyre, lyric


poetry was originally designed to be sung. One of the three main
groups of poetry (the others being narrative and dramatic), lyric
verse is the most frequently used modern form, including all
poems in which the speaker’s ardent expression of a (usually
single) emotional element predominates. Ranging from complex
thoughts to the simplicity of playful wit, the melodic imagery of
skillfully written lyric poetry evokes in the reader’s mind the
recall of similar emotional experiences.

9 • Ode: any of several stanzaic forms more complex than


the lyric, with intricate rhyme schemes and irregular number of
lines, generally of considerable length, always written in a style
marked by a rich, intense expression of an elevated thought
praising a person or object. “Ode to a Nightingale” is an example.

10• Sonnet: a fourteen line poem in iambic pentameter


with a prescribed rhyme scheme; its subject was traditionally
love. Three variations are found frequently in English, although
others are occasionally seen.

Activity. The class will be divided into groups. Each group


will research a poem sample of the forms assigned to them.
This will be creatively presented to the class.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 40


Rubrics for grading class presentation:

Indicator Rating (1-5)


The group presented the right poem
based on the form assigned to them.

The group creatively presented the


poem to the class.

The presentation is engaging and


captures the interest of the audience

Total

Activity
Write your poem based on the form assigned to your group.
Rate the poem based on the criteria.

Indicators Rating 1-5

The poem written is based on the form


assigned.

The contents of the poem is clear.

The poem captures the interest of the


reader.

It is in proper form with proper use of


punctuation, correct spelling and correct
grammar

Total

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 41


LESSON REFLECTION…

(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 42


QUARTER 1 Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 2 Week: 4

Lesson: Reading and writing poetry (Prose forms and performance poetry)

Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of poetry as genre and how to
analyze its elements and techniques.

Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce a short, well-crafted


poem.

Competency (Code):The learners use selected elements of poetry in short exercises.


(HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ic-f-8)

Objectives:1. Identify the various images in the poem


2. Use elements of poetry in analyzing a poem
Initial
Task Activities (Let’s do the TWIST.) Other Suggested
Activities
(Day1- Read the poem
7) Explain a particular stanza Brainstorm on
Identify the various images in the poem how the poem can be
interpreted literally
and figuratively
RICHARD CORY using the TWIST
format.
Whenever Richard Cory went down town,
We people on the pavement looked at him:
He was a gentleman from sole to crown,
Clean favored, and imperially slim.

And he was always quietly arrayed,


And he was always human when he talked;
But still he fluttered pulses when he said,
"Good-morning," and he glittered when he walked.

And he was rich – yes, richer than a king –


And admirably schooled in every grace:
In fine, we thought that he was everything
To make us wish that we were in his place.

So on we worked, and waited for the light,


And went without the meat, and cursed the bread;
And Richard Cory, one calm summer night,
Went home and put a bullet through his head.[3]

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 43


T.W.I.S.T. A Poetry Analysis Strategy
The Acronym T.W.I.S.T. Stands for:
T = Title
W = What’s it all about
I = Imagery
S = Style/Structure
T = Theme
T.W.I.S.T. Answers the following…
2. How do great writers create a tone that a reader can feel
through their work?
3. What are the elements of a poem, and how can we learn
to analyze its meaning?
4. How do literary elements affect a reader's understanding
of a work of literature?
T = Title
1. Read the title and stop.
2. Predict what the poem will be about.
3. Consider specific word choices (diction) and their
connotations, associations or emotional impact.
W – What’s it all about?
1. Paraphrase each stanza of the poem.
2. Don’t interpret it, just tell it in your own words.
I = Imagery
1. Look for any imagery (description that makes it so real
you can imagine it with any of your five senses)
2. look for symbolism, metaphors, similes, personification,
irony, understatement, allusions, alliteration,
onomatopoeia, assonance
A poem will probably not have all of these elements, but do check for them all. They
will help you understand the poem.
S = Style/Structure
1. The author’s use of poetic devices such as rhythm (write
out the meter pattern) , rhyme scheme, repetition
2. Look for punctuation used, stanza division, changes in
stanza or line length, layout of poem, or capitalized
words.
3. Look for the tone and the tone shift, poet’s attitude
towards the subject, etc.
4. Discuss how these elements relate to the meaning of the
poem.
T = Theme
1. Look at the title again from an interpretive level. Do you
see anything new?
2. What is the subject of the poem? Then determine what the
poet is saying about each of the subjects.
3. What is the author’s insight about life?

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 44


Read the poem below then identify the various elements used in
describing its local setting.
HOMETOWN
(from the book Moon Over Magarao)
Luis Cabalquinto
After a supper of mountain rice
And wood-roasted river crab
I sit on a long bench outside
The old house, looking at a river.

Alone, myself, again away


From that other self in the city
On this piece of ancestor land,
My pulses slowed, I am at peace.

I have no wish but this place –


To remain here in a stopped time
With stars moving on that water
And in the sky of a brightness

Answering: I want nothing else


But this stillness feeling me
From a pure darkness over the land
That smells ever freshly of trees.

The night and I are quiet now


But for small laughter from a neighbor,
The quick sweep of a winged creature
And a warm dog, snuggled by my feet.

Follow Up: Use elements of poetry in analyzing a poem.

Poem Analysis
T -Title. What does it mean to you? Make some predictions
W (What’s it all about? Paraphrase/summarize the entire poem)
I (Imagery - identify as many examples of sensory details and
figurative language you can find)
S (Structure/Style - find the rhyme scheme/rhyme, discuss
stanza/line length, tone, tone shift)
T (Theme - What is the subject of the poem? NOW, tell me
what the poet is saying about the subject? Is there a life lesson
for all of us?

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 45


MAYON
KRISTIAN SENDON CORDERO
CAMARINES SUR

Ayon sa alamat, lason ng pana ni Pagtuga,


Ang lumikha sa bulkan-libingan ito
Ng dalagang namatay sa isang Digmaan.

Ngayon, ano ang tutubo sa paanan ng Mayon


Gayong nagiging malawak na itong sementeryo
Ng abo, ng tao. Manganganak na kaya ito?

Tinitigan ko ang nakangangang bulkan-binalot


Ng ulap at ng sariling usok ang Tuktok, gatas sa labi.
Baka sakali, magpakita, nang may silbi ang kamera.

Sa ilang retrato na ibinebenta ng mga bata sa Cagsawa


Lusaw na tae ang nagliliyab na lava, Dumadaloy pababa.
Matandang nag nganganga ayon Naman sa isang makata

Sa isang lumang postcard na nakita Ko sa Antigo Merkado---- Online sources:


Kapag sa malayo, isa siyang Magandang sikyung nakatanod,
Handa sa pagkapkap, naghihintay sa Iyong pagpasok. • Partner Poems for
Building Fluency:
Analyze the following poem then write your answer in the blank Grades 4-6: 40
sheet below. Engaging Poems for
Poem Analysis sheet Two-Voices With
Title of Poem: ________________________________________ Motivating Activities
Written by: ___________________________________________ –
Date written: _________________________________________ http://www.amazon.c
Additional information found on Poet: _____________________ a/Partner-Poems-
Words/line that “caught” your eye: ________________________ Building-Fluency
Theme of poem: _______________________________________ Comprehension/dp/0
Poetic Devices found in poem: 545108764/ref=sr_1_
Metaphor ___________________________________________ 2?
Simile ____________________________________________ ie=UTF8&qid=1431
Imagery _____________________________________________ 109811&sr=82&key
Other (please identify) __________________________________ words=partner+poem
How it connects to you/your life: s
____________________________________________________ • Poetry Picnic -
____________________________________________________ http://readingyear.blo
____________________________________________________ gspot.ca/2011/04/poe
____________________________________________________ try-picnic.html
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 46


LESSON REFLECTION…

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 47


(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)
QUARTER 1 Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 2 Week: 4

Lesson: Reading and writing poetry (Innovative techniques in writing poetry)

Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of poetry as genre and how to
analyze its elements and techniques.

Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce a short, well-crafted


poem.

Competency (Code): The learners explore innovative techniques in writing poetry.


(HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ic-f-9)

Objectives: 1. Familiarize oneself with the different forms of poetry through reading
literary texts;
3. Apply one’s knowledge through writing poem based on specific form.

Initial Activities : Picture Cues Other Suggested


Task Activities

(Day
1-7 ) Create a simple
poem about
poverty.

Read and create


new poem out of
the idea of the
reading material.

Analyzing Literary
Text
Step 1:
Students will be
learning strategies
to help them
appreciate poetry
and read poetry
more effectively.
Step 2:
What can you say about the pictures? What are the words that you Discuss the
can associate out of the pictures? following

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 48


strategies and their
Direction: Read the poem below. importance with
“Children who travail this life so hard” your students.
By Eureka C. Bianzon 1.Preview the
I find myself searching for peace from heaven poem and read it
Praying for those starved and abandoned children
I cried hard convincing myself
aloud a few times.
to understand 2.Visualize the
Why the world seems so unfair images, clarify
on innocent hands words and phrases.
Why they need to experience things 3.Evaluate the
With pain
Striving their life with so much
poem's theme, and
Hardiness to gain allow your
They’ve lost everything even their parents understanding to
Who left them in the middle of predicament grow.
Now I am bemoaning about the feeling that I’ve ever felt
Something that broke my heart
As I recollect
Step 3:
From the story of children who Read the poem.
travail this life so hard Step 4:
Struggling for hope, for peace of their dreadful hearts Apply the
May this bewildered world be kind to them strategies when
May they find the fair life that they
reading and
Keep on searching
May they experience the happiness discussing the
They deserved poem. For
And be secluded from all the dire things that they absorbed…. example, discuss
the number of
For more related readings, please visit:
lines and stanzas,
http://www.mypenandsoul.wordpress.com
listen for rhyme
Guide Questions: and rhythm, etc.
1. Who is the speaker? Is the person Step 5:
male or female? Discuss unfamiliar
2. Does the poet place significant words in poem,
information or emotion in these places? such as "dreary"
3. Does the poet intend to leave a and "bog." Look
lasting impression by closing with a particular thought? them up in the
4. Does the voice speak in first dictionaries if
person (I, me, my, mine)? necessary.
5. Are there concrete images or Step 6:
pictures that the poet wants readers to see? Students will be
6. Is the voice meant to be given with
universal — for example, applicable to either sex at any Inference Graphic
time or place? Organizer
7. Is the poet deliberately printable. They
concealing information from the readers? will choose three
8. Why does the poet leave out descriptive
significant facts? Are readers supposed to fill in the statements from
blanks? the poem and write

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 49


9. Does the poem stress cultural an inference for
details, such as the behavior, dress, or speech habits of each statement.
a particular group or a historical period or event? Step 7:
10. Are any sections written in Encourage
dialect, slang, or foreign words? students to draw
Read the literary text then familiarize with the type of poetry used. illustrations to
accompany their
inferences.
Step 8:
Discuss students'
inferences as a
class.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 50


Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 51
Creating Picture

Out of the pictures shown above, use those in writing a


poem based from your experience.

_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
_____________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________
______________________________________________

Rubrics in grading the poem

Indicator Rating (1-5)

The poem written is based on the form


assigned.

The content of the poem is clear.

It is in proper form with correct grammar,


spelling, and proper punctuations.

The essay captures the interest of the


reader.

Total

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 52


LESSON REFLECTION…

(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)


QUARTER 1 Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 1 Week: 4

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 53


Lesson: Reading and writing poetry (Poetry writing)
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of poetry as genre and how to
analyze its elements and techniques.
Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce a short, well-crafted
poem.
Competency (Code): The learners write a short poem applying the various elements,
techniques and literary devices. (HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ic-f-10)
Objectives:1.Write a short poem applying the various elements, techniques and literary
devices.
Initial Activities : Perform the activity. Other Suggested
Task Activities

(Day1 Found poems


-4 ) give language to
students who may
struggle to find the
right words.  
Found poetry is
easily accessible,
hands on, and fun.
Easy to set up, all
you need to do to
implement found
poetry in your
classroom is gather
together stacks of
old magazines,
scissors, glue, and
colorful paper.  
 
First, instruct
students to find
powerful words in
the pages of
magazines, cut
them out, and make
piles on their desk.
You could also
assign cutting out
powerful words
from old magazines
for homework and
save yourself the
time and mess in
your classroom.  
 

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 54


Think about the latest music that you love related to the Next, students
first task but consider its formality. Make a parody of the song. arrange and
_____________________________________ rearrange the words
_____________________________________ on their desk into
_____________________________________ meaningful poetry.
_____________________________________ This is a great
_____________________________________ opportunity to
_______________________________________ reinforce the power
_____________________________________ of form, shape, and
_____________________________________ line breaks in
poetry and
encourage students
to be thoughtful in
their choices.  Talk
to your students
Reinforcement Activity about choosing the
best words,
eliminating
unnecessary words,
and playing around
with word choice. 
 
Finally, instruct
students to glue
their poem into
place on a colorful
piece of paper and
decorate your room
with the beauty and
power of poetry.

 
 
The class will be divided into 5 groups. Each will research For more fun
a poem sample of the form/s. activities, please
visit:
Task I: Make a poem considering the elements of poem. https://www.readitwri
Task II: Create poem concerning the diction. teitlearnit.com/single-
post/2017/03/28/High
Task III: Craft a poem using the techniques.
-Interest-Poetry-
Task IV: Create a poem using imagery. Activities
Task V: Construct a poem focusing on the figures of speech.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 55


LESSON REFLECTION…

(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 56


QUARTER 2 Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 3 Week: 7

Lesson: Reading and Writing Fiction (Elements of Short Story)

Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of fiction as genre and are able
to analyze its elements and techniques.

Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce at least one striking scene
for a short story.

Competency (Code): The learners identify the various elements, techniques and literary
devices in short story. (HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ig-i-11)

Objectives: 1. Relate one’s own experiences in the reading material.


2. Name the elements of fiction and its function.
3. Apply the elements of fiction in writing a creative literary text.

Initial Other Suggested


Task Watch the video clip of the safeguard, #Pabaon sa Buhay” Activities
www.safeguard.ph/en-ph/pabaon-sa-buhay
(Day1
-4 ) A ‘PABAON’ IS A FORM OF PROTECTION THAT
MOM GIVES
TO PREPARE HER CHILD FOR THE OUTSIDE
WORLD
Every mom faces the parenting dilemma of wanting to
keep her children close & protected or letting
them go out and explore the world, to learn and grow by
themselves.
This is the real-life story of how a mother’s ‘pabaon’ of
life lessons & values protected her
son’s indigenous identity in the outside world. The lessons of
Warlita King enabled her son Norman to be
the first ever Aeta to graduate from the Philippines’ premier
state university.

Guide Questions:
1. What have you learned
from the video?
b. Whose life was featured in the story?
c. What was the most striking point in the story in which you
can relate?

Learning Discovery

Analyze the elements of the story in the video clip

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 57


and give its definition.
What are the stages of
Five Elements of Fiction a plot?
Plot, Setting, Character, Point of View, Theme

I. Plot — How the author arranges events to develop the


basic idea; it is the sequence of events in a story or play. The What is plot?
plot is a planned, logical series of events having a beginning, 1. What happens?
middle, and end. The short story usually has one plot so it 2. How it happens?
can be read in one sitting.
Plot is where the action that takes place in the story. What are the parts of a
It is a series of connected happenings and their result. In plot?
order to have a result, we must have an initial event, or
conflict.
What is conflict?
There are five essential parts of plot:

1.Exposition (introduction) — Beginning of the Special Plot techniques


story; characters, background, and setting revealed. It is
where the characters are introduced.
2.Rising Action — Events in the story become
complicated; the conflict is revealed. These are events
between the introduction and climax. This is the situation
where the initial conflict or the generating circumstances,
which create a conflict to arise. Rising action usually
heightened anticipation for the reader.
3.Conflict — Essential to plot, opposition ties
incidents together and moves the plot. Not merely limited to
arguments, conflict can be any form of struggle the main
character faces. Within a short story, there may be only one
central struggle, or there may be many minor obstacles In every end of the
discussion on the
within a dominant struggle.
elements of the fiction,
Conflict is the struggle between opposing forces while students may ask to
in the central Conflict, the main character must fight against write their own story or
some force or make an important decision. relate their own
personal experiences
through writing.
There are two types of conflict:
1. Internal— Struggle within one's self. 1.Plot.
Create a 200 words
Character vs. Self
fiction using a
Internal conflict - take place inside a person's mind. chronological plot.
Example - a character is torn between risking his life to save
someone else. Struggles with own soul, physical limitations,
choices, etc.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 58


2. External— Struggle with a force outside one's self.
Character vs. Character 2. Setting

Struggles against other people. Create s short story


Character vs. Nature with the following
setting
Struggles against animals, weather, environment, etc. 1. One Christmas
Character vs. Society Eve
Struggles against ideas, practices, or customs of others. 2. On
Summertime
3. Rainy night
External conflict - takes place when a person or party
group struggles against another person or group or against a 4. Along the street
non-human force such as a storm or a car that won't start. 5. On the bus
station

4.Climax — Turning point of the story. Readers 3.Characters


wonders what will happen next; will the conflict be resolved
or not? Climax is the highest point of anticipation - "make Write a short story
using or own character
or break" for the main character.
Consider the climax as a three-fold phenomenon Ex. Your own anime
Your own pet
1. Main character receives new information.
1. Main character accepts this information (realizes it
but does not necessarily agree with it).
2. Main character acts on this information (makes a
choice that will determine whether or not objective is
met).

5. Falling action is where the resolution begins; events and


complications start to fall into place. These are the events
between climax and denouement. It is the falling action and
conclusion which is also known as a denouement.
Resolution or conclusion is the final outcome of
events in the story.

11. Setting — Time and location that a story takes place.


For some stories, the setting is very important; while
for others, it is not. It is t he background against
which the incidents of the story take place. Not
merely a place, it includes the place where, the time
when, and social conditions under which the story
moves along.
This can include atmosphere, the tone and feeling of a

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 59


story, i.e. gloomy, cheery, etc.
In one form or another, setting is essential to the
story. Often, the relevance of the story is lost in
another setting.
When examining how setting contributes to a story, there
are multiple aspects to consider:
1. Place - Geographical location; where is the action of
the story taking place? 2) Time - Historical period,
time of day, year, etc.; when is the story taking
place?
1. Weather conditions - Is it rainy, sunny,
stormy, etc.?
2. Social conditions - What is the daily life of
the character's like? Does the story contain
local colour (writing that focuses on the
speech, dress, mannerisms, customs, etc. of a
particular place)?
3. Mood or atmosphere - What feeling is created
at the beginning of the story? Cheerful or
eerie?

Ill. Character — There are two meanings for "


person in a fictional story; or 2) qualities of a person.

CHARACTERS
There must be living beings in the story that think or
act in order to keep the story going. They must seem like
living and feeling individuals in order for us to feel strongly
about them
The worst thing that could happen for as writer is that
you feel indifferent toward the characters. If we don't care
for the characters, we are not inclined to keep reading.

FOUR METHODS OF PRESENTING A CHARACTER:

• Actions or thoughts of the character.


• Conversations the character engages in.
• Conversations of other characters about a third character.
• Author's own opinion. This might be overt or may be
implied

1) People in a work of fiction can be a(n):


1. Protagonist — Clear center of story;

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 60


all major events are important to this
character.
2. Antagonist — Opposition or "enemy"
of main character.
1. Characteristics of a character can be revealed
through:
1. his/her physical appearance
2. what he/she says, thinks, feels, dreams and what he/she
does or does not do
3. what others say about him/her and how others react to
him/her
2. Characters can be...
1. Round — Fully-developed
personalities that are affected by the
story's events; they can learn, grow,
or deteriorate by the end of the story.
Characters are most convincing
when they resemble real people by
being consistent, motivated, and life-
like.
2. Flat - One-dimensional character
3. Dynamic — Character who does go
through change and "grows" during a
story
4. Static — Character does not go
through a change.

1. Point Of View — The angle from which the story is


told. .

Points of View: Presentation of a Story

• Author Omniscient (all knowing, alt seeing).


This is a third person point of view. The omniscient
author, writing in third person, sees whatever he
wants to see, inside or outside his character, in
privacy or public, and interprets as he chooses.

• Author participant (first person). The author may


be the main character or could be a secondary
character.

• Author as an observer (3rd, person). Involves


objective treatment, as though the story teller had
no inner sight into the characters thinking or

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 61


behavior.

• Multiple story tellers'(3rd person)

There are several variations of POV:

1. First Person — Story told by the protagonist


or a character who interacts closely with the
protagonist or other characters; speaker uses
the pronouns "I", "me", "we". Reader’s
experiences the story through this person's
eyes and only knows what he/she knows and
feels.
2. Second Person — Story told by a narrator
who addresses the reader or some other
assumed "you"; speaker uses pronouns
"you", "your", and "yours". Ex: You wake up
to discover that you have been robbed of all
of your worldly possessions.
3. Third Person — Story told by a narrator who
sees all of the action; speaker uses the
pronouns "he she", "it", ''they", "his", "hers,
its", and "theirs". This person may be a
character in the story.

There are several types of third person POV:

1. Limited — Probably, the easiest POV for a


beginning writer to use, "limited" POV funnels all
action through the eyes of a single character; readers
only see what the narrator sees.
2. Omniscient- God-like, the narrator knows and sees
everything, and can move from one character's mind
to another. Authors can be omniscient narrators by
moving from character to character, event to event,
and introducing information at their discretion.

There are two main types of omniscient POV:

1. Innocent Eye/Naive Narrator Story told through


child's eyes; narrator's judgment is different from
that of an adult.
2. Stream of Consciousness — Story told so readers
solely experience a character's thoughts and

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 62


reactions.

2. Theme — Central message, "moral of the story,"


and underlying meaning of a fictional piece; may be
the author's thoughts on the topic or view of human
nature.

1. Story's title usually emphasizes what the


author is saying.
2. Various figures of speech (symbolism,
allusion, simile, metaphor, hyperbole, or
irony) may be utilized to highlight the theme.
3. Examples of common themes occurring in
literature; on television, and in film are:
1. Things are not always as they appear to be.
2. Love is blind.
3. Believe in yourself.
4. People are afraid of change.
5. Don't judge a book by its cover.

Theme

The total meaning of the story. IT DOES NOT


HAVE TO BE TIED UP IN A SIMPLE MORAL.
In many cases, stories are packages that allow
readers to see the outcomes of certain behaviors.
Without a theme, the story lacks meaning or
purpose.
Sometimes the theme is stated, sometimes it is only
implied. In other stories, the theme may be a direct
refutation of a traditional theme.

Concept assessment

Identify the correct word/s that clearly describes the


statements. Choose your answers in the box

Exposition setting Inciting incident Surprise ending


Foreshadowing Theme Rising action conflict
Suspense Denouement Climax Flashback

1. This introduces the reader to the setting and


characters.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 63


2. This event creates the central conflict or
struggle.
3. The development part of the story where the
struggle takes place.
4. This is the high point of interest and suspense in
the story.
5. The resolution point at which the conflict is
ended or resolved.
6. It is a feeling of excitement or tension the reader
experiences as the plot unfolds. Writers create
suspense by raising questions in the reader's
mind.
7. A hint or clue about an event that will occur later
in the story.
8. A section of the story that is interrupted to tell
about an earlier event.
9. An ending that catches the reader off guard with
something unexpected.
10. The central message, "moral of the story," and
underlying meaning of a fictional piece

Short stories usually have properties like the following:

•Dramatic conflict. Usually the basis of the


story. Source of the problems which may or may not be
overcome in the climax.

•Foreshadowing, may be used to leave clues in


the story to lure readers to try to predict the ending.

•Repetition. At the least, it helps drive home a


point. It can also be used to create other literary devices.

•Suspense. Draws readers to the work

Practical Application

Group Task

Form 5 groups. Each group will be working with


another group. All groups will relate a story for five minutes.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 64


This can be a simple story from a fairy tale or any book. You
have 5 minutes to recreate the story. Present it in class.

Evaluating Learning

Relate your personal experience with the events in


the video clip considering the elements of short story and
you as the main character.

LESSON REFLECTION…

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 65


(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)
QUARTER II Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 3 Week: 7
Lesson: Reading and Writing Fiction (Modes of short story)
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of fiction as genre and are able
to analyze its elements and techniques.
Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce at least one striking scene
for a short story.
Competency (Code):The learners determine various modes of short story.
(HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ig-i-12)
Objectives: 1. Write sample fiction.
2. Develop short story using the elements of the plot.
Initial Activities : Springboard Other Suggested
Task Reading of the short story entitled “AUREA” by Marissa Dela Activities
Cruz Reodizo-Redburn from the book Dain Linaw an Hinaw

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 66


(Day1 (Where there is no clarity in divination) p.74-84
-4 )
Students may
create/write
their own
vignette, mini
saga, flash
fiction and etc.
after each
presentation and
discussion of the
topic.
They may
opt to choose
any of which or
let them try
writing all of the
types and reflect
on their
experiences on
writing taking
into
consideration
the elements and
structure of a
fiction.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 67


Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 68
Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 69
Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 70
Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 71
Presentation of other sample works/ excerpts. Students will
identify elements used by the writer in presenting the text.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 72


Discussion on the different modes of short story.

Types of Short Stories


1. Anecdote
An anecdote is a short account of something interesting
and amusing, which usually tells a story about a real person and/or
incident.  Often, anecdotes are used to illustrate or support a point in
an essay, article, or chapter.  They are very short, but have no
specific limits.

2.Drabble
A drabble is an exceptionally short piece of fiction,
usually of exactly 100 words in length – not including the title.  The
purpose of a drabble is extreme brevity and to test an author’s skill at
expressing himself/herself meaningfully and interestingly in a very
confined space.

3.Fable
A fable is a succinct story featuring anthropomorphic
creatures (usually animals, but also mythical creatures, plants,
inanimate objects, or forces of nature) to tell a story with a moral.
Often the moral is explicitly told at the end.  A fable is similar to a
parable, but differs most in the fact that fables use animals to tell a
story but parables do not.

4. Feghoot
A feghoot is an interesting short story type also known as
a story pun or a poetic story joke.  It is a humorous piece ending in
an atrocious pun.  It can be very short, only long enough to
sufficiently illustrate the context of the piece enough to lead up to
the pun.

5. Flash Fiction
Flash fiction refers to an extremely short piece of
literature.  It has no widely accepted length, but has a debated cap of
between 300 and 1000 words.

6.Frame Story
A frame story is also known as a frame tale or a nested
narrative.  It is a literary technique of placing a story within a story,
for the purpose of introducing or setting the stage for a main
narrative or a series of short stories.

7. Mini-saga
A mini-saga is a short story told in exactly 50 words.  It is
a test in brevity – about saying a lot with a little.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 73


8.Story Sequence
A story sequence, also called a short story cycle or a
composite novel, is a group of short stories that work together to
form a longer piece, while still functioning as complete short stories
on their own.

9. Sketch Story
A sketch story is a shorter than average piece containing
little or no plot.  It can be merely a description of a character or a
location.  Character sketches are common, and a good way to build a
character that will eventually be part of a longer piece.

10. Vignette
A vignette is a short, impressionistic piece that focuses on
a single scene, character, idea, setting, or object.  There is little
emphasis on adhering to conventional theatrical or literary structure,
or story development.  It can be a stand-alone piece or part of a
larger work.
https://awaitingthemuse.wordpress.com/2014/06/09/on-writing-10-types-of-short-
stories/

Develop a story following the four elements of the plot shown in


the pyramid above. You can choose from the five categories below.
(Beginning)

(Rising Action)

(Climax)

(Falling Action)

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 74


LESSON REFLECTION…

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 75


(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)

Quarter II Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 3 Week: 7


Lesson: Reading and Writing Fiction (Journal Writing)
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of fiction as genre and are able
to analyze its elements and techniques.
Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce at least one striking scene
for a short story.
Competency (Code):The learners write journal entries and other short exercises
exploring key elements of short story. (HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ig-i-13)
Objectives:1. Write a journal entry
Initial Activities: Student application Other
Task Read the text then determine the type of text presented Suggested
11/18/12 Activities
(Day1 I’m really enjoying my reading of “Into The River” for Mr. Hudson’s class. We
are just moving through the first hundred pages, and wow! Lots of cool stuff happening
-4 ) right now. Jake, the main character, has just moved to a new house by the river in a
very rural area. Coming from Boise, a pretty large city, it’s a shock.
Though I’ve never really lived in the city, I can really see why Jake feels the way
he does. I don’t need to live around entertainment to miss it. My house is way out in
the country and, without internet connection, I often feel as though I’m missing out on
the world around me.
The outdoor scenes are really cool and true to nature. There’s a stream by Jake’s
house that’s really similar to one I live by. Seeing the description and having my own
picture in my head made all the scenes where Jack goes down to the river—to reflect or
vent or just yell—that much more realistic. I’ve certainly gone out behind the house
and skipped some rocks against the water a few times. Again, maybe not as extreme as
something Jake would pull, but still very similar.
In class, we had a question-and-answer session about what we’d read so far.
Jamie, another student in the class, said Jake had to be easy to write because all
teenagers have problems. I agreed at first, but after having some time to think about it,
I’ve changed my mind. In this book, at least the problems seem real. Some of the books
we’ve read about psychic kids and stuff like that hasn’t really interested me because it
seems so fake, actually.
Overall, though, I really enjoy this book so far. I can’t wait to read more. I hate
to go so far ahead, but I may have to spend a few hours with it tonight. I want to make
sure I have some well thought-out points for our next class discussion.
If possible, I’d also like to bring up the argument about Jake being easy to write
from last class back up. Not because I’m mad about it, of course, but because I think it
doesn’t do the author justice. If you haven’t taken it from what I’ve said so far, I think
it’s a very, very good book. One worth defending, for sure!

After reading, what have you discovered?


What type of text is presented in the reading selection?
How did you come up with your answer?
What are your proofs?

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 76


Tips on preparing a journal entry

Journaling is a great way to process what you've read and develop


your understanding of the text. Giving response journal assignments help
students clarify what's read, solidify their reactions to and opinions on the
text, and organize their thoughts before working on a larger assignment.

1. Summarize the reading. Address what the main thesis is for the
reading. What is the reading about, and why did the author write
the text?
2. Respond to the reading with your own commentary. The second
half of a journal response should be your commentary on the
text. While the summary focuses on the "what" of the reading,
your commentary should focus on the "why."
3. Don't be afraid to make connections between the book and your
own life; if there is a theme or character that speaks to you, write
about why.
4. Develop your ideas over time. The goal of a reading response
journal is to give yourself a semi-private space to reflect on the
text and develop your thoughts and opinions.
5. Organize your response journal. At the very least, your journal
entries should be dated. You may also want to use headings and
titles so that you can easily identify a given response to a
particular text.
6. Consider using clear and descriptive headings in your journal. It
will help you more easily find your thoughts and insights as you
read through your journal at a later date.
7. Read the text critically. Critical analysis of a text may require more
than one reading. Try to absorb the general ideas during the first
reading, then come back to the particular ideas and concepts
while you re-read (if you have time to do a second reading
8. Contextualize the text in terms of its historical, biographical, and
cultural significance.
9. Ask questions about the text. Don't just passively read the book;
analyze what's being said and have an "argument" in your notes
when you disagree with the author.
10. Be aware of your personal response to the text. What shaped
your beliefs on that subject, and how might your beliefs be similar
to or different from the author's (or a reader of his or her time)?
.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 77


Concept application
Read the sample text then write your own journal entry.

Kun Tag-uran
Elbert O. Baeta

Kun tag-Uran asin an mga katagasan kan syudad


Sa’gum sa tubig na benditado kan mga kauslaan
Minakurahaw an kapay sa gilid kan tinampo
Maranog asin sayod.

Maruluwasan an mga lapok


Mga basura na garung nakilhagan
Hali sa pagturog sa kairaruman kan embornal.
‘Nay! Tag-uran na’

Kun an syudad lantop-tubig


Minakurahaw an kapay sa gilid kan tinampo
Sayod asin nagaaniningal

Aban-aban maburutwaan an mga patod


Asin daing kapadis na tsinelas, mga kinapihan na baso
Mga ruweda, mga plastic na manlain-lain an kolor,
‘tag-uran na’

Kun an syudad lamos sa masag’ad na tubig baha


Minakurahaw an kapay sa gilid kan tinampo
Sayod asin nagaaniningal
Drama and
Aban-aban maburutwaan an mga patod Poetry for Play
Asin daing kapadis na tsinelas, mga kinapihan na baso
Mga ruweda, mga plastic na manlain-lain an kolor, In groups, read
‘tag-uran na’ the poem below
then decide
Kun an syudad lamos sa masag’ad na tubig baha how best to
Minakurahaw an kapay sa gilid kan tinampo represent the
Makusog! theme of the
poem in a
Maruluwasan an mga aking nagaabrakan sa tableau.
Asgad kan tubig baha
Makurahaw an kapay sa gilid kan tinampo
‘tag-uran na’

Maburutwaan an mga gadan na hawak nin tawo


Nagpapataw-pataw garong mga istiripon na malulungsi
Makurahaw an kapay

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 78


‘tag-uran na sa paslong syudad
Sa tubig kita gabus mapara’ -3 Agosto 201

LESSON REFLECTION…

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 79


(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)
QUARTER II Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 4 Week: 5
Lesson: Reading and Writing Drama (One-act)
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of drama as genre and are able to
analyze its elements and techniques.
Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to compose at least one scene for a
one-act play that can be staged.
Competency (Code): The learners identify the various elements, techniques, and literary
devices in drama. (HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ij-IIc-15)
Objectives: 1. Describe the nature of drama and its origin;
1. Identify the basic elements, techniques, and literary devices in drama.
Initial Activities
Task Other Suggested
Pick a picture from the five pictures below then make a short script Activities
(Day1 based on your personal interpretation.
-4 )

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 80


1. What elements in the picture served as the basis of your
interpretation?
2. What were the things that you first considered when you wrote
your script?

Concept Discovery

What is Drama?

1. Drama is basically a literary form intended to represent


experiences through a theater performance. It involves
characters portrayed and impersonated by actors. Also, the
performer imitates actions and reproduce dialogue.

2. Drama, based on Aristotle’s Poetics, is the “imitation of an


action”. This mainly points out that drama imitates life but not
one’s actual experiences but those which are perceived to be
imagined experiences.

3. Typically, a complete story with structure and unity can be


dramatic or comical, having a beginning, middle, and an end.

4. It is mainly an artistic depiction of how a writer views and sees


life through the use of a conflict which is significant to make
the events interesting and the creation of characters that take
part in the actions of the story and are motivated by their needs
and objectives.

5. A work of literature which considers series of events


developed to be acted out or performed on stage, with lines,
actions, inactions, and silences which are all intended to be
delivered and projected by the characters to establish the
impression that the events are lifelike before a crowd.

Essential Features of Drama (Fumar, 2009)

1. Drama as a form of Dramatic Art- Drama bears some


emotional force or effect and vitality.

2. Drama as a form of Visual Art- Drama mainly involves the


depiction of scenes and action on stage. Thus, to make the
depiction forceful and engaging, various elements are also
used like lights, set design, images, and media

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 81


experimentations.

3. Drama as an Auditory Art- The lines and silences delivered by


the characters bear important dramatic impacts that can make Activity
the performance much appealing and moving.
Make a timeline
4. Drama is physically produced art- Playwrights can establish of the evolution
an intimate and very close connection to their audience. The of drama in the
work can mainly touch and tap all major senses. Philippines and
in the Bicol
5. Drama is a Spectator Art- A dramatic work is always open to Region.
some necessary changes during rehearsals and after the
performance as may be revealed by reviews.

6. Drama is a Continuous Art- The audience must receive the


story at any pace as the playwright may decide as to whatever
pace the play may be set.

History of Drama

Ancient religious ceremonies had been viewed as the cradle


of the earliest forms of drama. In ancient Greece, Greek drama
originated from rituals to venerate Dionysus, the god of wine and
fertility. In such ceremony, dancing of the chorus was introduced and
later on, the dialog was added. An actor was also introduced among
singers and dancers. Aeschylus and Sophocles added the second and
third character respectively.

Activity

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 82


Make a timeline of the evolution of drama in the Philippines and in
the Bicol Region.

Elements of Drama

1. Setting- Just like in fiction, it pertains to the time and place of


the action. It also covers the scenery and physical elements
that transpire on stage to depict the writer’s perspective as to
stage design.

2. Characters- they are mainly the ones involved in the actions


and situations in a story. As the story develops, the characters
are revealed. Their behaviors are revealed by their words,
behaviors toward other characters, movements, gestures, and
ways on how they express their thoughts and feelings.

3. Plot- Heavily refers to the action of a drama. It also involves


the sequence of related events and scenes. The plot greatly
depends and lies on the conflict of the characters.

4. Dialog- The conversation and exchanges between or among


characters. It helps to tell the whole story. It is also an element
that helps reveal the characters, emotions, conflicts, further
actions, and themes. Soliloquy is a speech of a character to
reveal personal thoughts aloud alone on-stage. An aside is a
short speech of character which is directly addressed to the
audience, not to the other characters performing on stage since
they pretend of not hearing it.

5. Movements- It mainly involves the pacing and transition of


acts.
6. Music- This serves as a background used during
performances. This is somewhat used occasionally to establish
a dramatic effect. This can be done live or provided
technically.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 83


7. Theme- This tells what the play is about or the message the
play attempts to reveal. A play may convey a number of
themes.

In modern theater, convention, genre, and audience were added to the


list.

1. Convention- This is the different types of methods and


techniques used by the director to create a specific style or
effect.

2. Genre- plays can be categorized into different genres such as


tragedy, comedy, mystery and historical play.

3. Audience- the most crucial part is keeping in mind your target


audience. They are the reason for the creation of such play.

Technical Elements

1. Set/Scenery- technical equipment such as curtains, flats,


backdrops, etc.

2. Costumes- clothing and accessories

3. Props- any movable objects that appear on stage (e.i.


telephone, tables, etc.)

4. Lights- choice of light colors, intensity, and placement of


lights

5. Sound- the effects that audience hears which provide context,


communicative character, and establish the environment.

Performance Elements

1. Acting- the use of body, face, and voice to portray a certain


role or character

2. Character motivation- the force that influences the behavior


of the character

3. Character analysis- the process used in evaluating how the


elements in drama/play are used to create impact to the
audience

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 84


4. Empathy- is how you relate to the experiences of other
people.

Activity

Read the play “Sulog nin Pagkamoot” by Eilyn L. Nidea and


identify the elements of the drama by accomplishing the table below.

Elements of Drama
Setting
Characters
Plot
Dialog
Movements
Theme

Sulog nin Pagkamoot


(dula na may sarong tagbo)
Panurat asin direksyon
ni Eilyn L. Nidea
Adaptasyon na Musika ni Iluminada G. Lorico
asin Digna T. Jarabejo
sa tabang kan mga paragitara nin Teatro Ragayano:
Cleo D. Gueriba, Noe B. Broἥosa, Aljohn Paul B. Marcaida, Hazel Ann R.
Gile,
asin Sheila Mae R. Ducay

Tawohan:

Bakawan, Kulago, Sapsap - hadit sindang tolo sa pagkapuho ninda nin


huli sa climate change
asin human abuse

Salvador - 15, estudyante sa pagsira, may adbokasiya sa pangataman kan


kadagatan

Ligaya - 45, paratahi, ina ni Salvador

(Sa pagliwanag sa entablado, mahihiling an sarong parte kan pampang kan


dagat. Mahihiling an sarong dakulang bakawan, an mga sanga haralaba,
darakula, nakabuka na garo kamot na nangangadyi. May sarong kulago na
nakatugdon, nakapiyong, sa sarong sanga nin bakawan. May sarong sapsap

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 85


na nagpapaipli sa irarom kan darakulang ugat nin puon. An mag-inang
Ligaya dangan Salvador yaon sa gilid kan toong parte kan entablado.
Nakasulot nin kolor nin dahon sagkod sa bukong-bukong na palda, na may
ternong amarilyong haluwag na pan-itaas an babayi. Nagsusulsi ini nin
lambat. Nakaatubang sa laptop, dangan may kaolay sa cellphone an aki
kaini, na nakasulot nin itom na pantalon dangan puting polo shirt sa ibabaw
nin puting kamiseta.)

Kansyon sa Pagpoon: Ibalik an Gayon

BAKAWAN:
Hidaw ko an mga aldaw
na may ogma dangan pag-omaw sa kapalibotan.
Patos nin kagayonan an kadagaan, kadagatan.
Pinapadangat an Inang kinaban.

SAPSAP:
Hidaw ko an mga kairiba
sa dinamita nagin biktima.
Ano an sakong gigibuhon?
Igwa pa kayang paglaom
nganing kami liwat magdakul?

KULAGO:
Hidaw ko an kapamilya,
sa paglayog kasurog.
Ngunyan, hain na sinda?
Ngaran kan satong lugar naghira:
an Paculago nagin Ragay na.

KORO: (an tolo)


Mayong magigibo, mga katood ko.
Kita maghalat, mangadyi, maglaom
na an tawo magkasararo, maghiro.
An yaman, an gayon nin kadagatan
Magbalik giraray, magdanay! (2x)

(Mantang nagkakanta an bakawan, kulago asin sapsap, padagos sa saindang


paghiro an mag-ina: mapunas ganot si Ligaya, dangan iwawagwag an
lambat; mapindot sa laptop si Salvador gamit an toong kamot mantang
nakahuyom na nakikipag-olay sa cellphone na kapot kaini sa walang kamot.
Sa paghihinapos kan kansyon kan tolo, luway na malakaw si Ligaya pasiring
sa gawi kan mga ini. Matindog si Salvador dangan masunod sa ina, kapot pa
man giraray an cellphone alagad mayo na siyang kaolay.)

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 86


Kansyon ni Ligaya: Pangapodan sa Paghiro

LIGAYA:
Hidaw ko an mga panahon
Na an yaman nin dagat dakul.
Sa lambat, banwit nagpapadakop
mga sira asin boyod.
Mga tawo, nagmamangno
kapalibotan dai pig-aabuso.
An buhay tuninong
asin komportableng gayo.

Madiklom na banggi
an mga nakaagi:
Naggadan, naghabon sa kadagatan;
piglupigan an kapalibotan
abaanang pungaw.
Nagdara nin mga hilang
asin kasakitan
sa namamanwaan.

(Sa koro, masabay magkanta an mag-ina mantang nakatanaw sa


kadagatan.)

KORO:
Ngunyan na an tamang panahon
kita gabos dapat na magpoon magtanom.
Ipundo an dinamita, lambat, banwit an gamiton
Yaman nin dagat tugotan magsagom! (2x)

Kansyon ni Salvador: Paglaom kan Masurunod na Henerasyon

SALVADOR:
Kaming mga kaakian
danay na nag-aadal.
Inaaram kun pano makakatabang
Sa pamilya, komunidad, sosyedad
sa pangangataman
sa kapalibotan.

Kaipuhan mi an kadagatan
para sa masurunod na kaakian.
Maglinig sa mga baybayon
an bakawan atamanon.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 87


Maglaag coral reefs protection
Pati fish sanctuaries, himuon.
Sa tarabangan mapapatutuohan:
Kaakian paglaom nin banwaan!

Madya na kita gabos


magdangog sa pag-apod.
Maghiriro na kita,
mga mahihigos na katood.
Saro sana an satong istaran
Danay ta ining protektahan!

(Mantang nagkakanta an mag-ina, nagmamaan an bakawan, nagmumuklat-


piyong an kulago, naglalangoy-langoy an sapsap. Sa pagtapos kan kansyon
ni Salvador, luway na malakaw parani sa mga ini an mag-ina, matukaw sa
nakalutaw na dakulang ugat nin bakawan, matingag sa kulago, makawkaw
sa tubig harani sa sapsap, asin makanta nin simbag sa koro nin kansyon sa
pagpoon.)

Simbag sa Koro:

SALVADOR, LIGAYA:

Igwang magiginibo, mga katood ko:


Mga tawo magkakasararo, mahiriro
Mabalik giraray, madanay
An gayon, an yaman
nin satong kadagatan!

(Sa pag-otro sa koro, masabay na magkanta sa mag-ina an bakawan, sapsap


asin kulago.)

Simbag sa Koro 2:

BAKAWAN, SAPSAP, KULAGO, SALVADOR, LIGAYA:

Igwang magiginibo, mga katood ko:


Mga tawo magkakasararo, mahiriro.
Mabalik giraray, madanay
An gayon, an yaman
nin satong kadagatan!

(Sa pagtapos kan kansyon, mahihiling na magkakugos an mag-ina,


nagkakalampay an mga sanga asin nagbabarayle an mga dahon nin
bakawan, naglalangoy- naglulukso an sapsap, naghuhuyom an piyong-
muklat na kulago. Aban-aban, madiklom na sa entablado).

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 88


CURTAIN CALL:
Salvador 1 Sante Niἥo R. Leones
2 Ronald S. Alcaide
Ligaya 1 Rebecca Jayra E. Paz
2 Rhea S. Nipay
Bakawan 1 Jane B. Osera
2 Jay Ann Samson
3 Reyna Roen Hermosa
Sapsap 1 Janna Denise A. Mandalihan
2 Christine Joy O. Pebenito
Kulago 1 Jelou B. Delen
2 Joel Evan Clark D. Haban

Playwright & Director:


Eilyn L. Nidea

Musical Adaptation: Iluminada G. Lorico & Digna T. Jarabejo


with Cleo D. Gueriba, Noe B. Broἥosa, Aljohn Paul B. Marcaida, Hazel Ann
R. Gile,
& Sheila Mae R. Ducay

Assistant Director:
Fatima D. Batoon

Stage Manager:
Grechelle Mae M. Lopez

Paisi: An pasali na ini igwa man Filipino translation.

LESSON REFLECTION…

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 89


(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)
Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 4 Week:
Lesson: Reading and Writing Drama (One-act)
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of drama as genre and are able to
analyze its elements and techniques.
Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to compose at least one scene for a
one-act play that can be staged.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 90


Competency (Code): The learners understand intertextuality as a technique of drama.
(HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ij-IIc-16)
Objectives: 1. Define intertextuality.
2. Identify intertextualities in a text
Initial Activities Other
Task Suggested
In five groups, list as many works in literature that stemmed from Activities
(Day1 Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.”
-2 )
Concept Discovery

Examples of Intertextuality

#1 Fan Fiction- In fan fiction, authors enter the fictional worlds of


other authors and create their own stories.

Types of Intertextuality

1. Deliberate Intertextuality
Sometimes, intertextuality is the result of an author’s choice.
When a heavy metal artist makes references to Norse
mythology, or when a novelist draws on the works of
Shakespeare as inspiration, these choices forge a relationship
between the old text and the new.

2. Latent Intertextuality
Even when an author isn’t deliberately employing
intertextuality, intertextuality is still there. You can’t escape it!
Everything you’ve ever seen or read sticks somewhere in your
memory and affects your understanding of the world. They all
contribute to building your specific worldview which, in turn,
determines how you write or create art.

Activity
Write for 15 minutes and include intertextuality.

LESSON REFLECTION…

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 91


(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)
Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 4 Week:
Lesson: Reading and Writing Drama (One-act)
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of drama as genre and are able to
analyze its elements and techniques.
Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to compose at least one scene for a
one-act play that can be staged.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 92


Competency (Code): The learners conceptualize a character/setting/plot for a one-act
play. (HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ij-IIc-17)
Objectives: 1. Analyze a character, setting and plot.
2. Create a character, setting and plot for a one-act play.

Initial Task Activities Other Suggested


Activities
(Day1-4) Listen and Act!
Emotional Hat
Listen to the song your teacher will play. Based
on the song, imagine that you are in a specific place, With a chair as your
really seeing everything around you, smelling the air and co-actor, wear a hat
touching things in this place. You can be anywhere, real that represents one
or imaginary. Let the music tell you where you are. emotion
consecutively and say
After three minutes, form a sitting circle in chairs this to the chair:
or on the floor and share the places they have imagined. “Bakit mo kinuha ang
lapis ko?”

Activity 1 Hat 1- Happy


Hat 2- Sad
Conceptualizing the Character Hat 3- Afraid
Hat 4- Excited
Cycle of the Character’s Story Hat 5- Angry

1. From a set of pictures of people, choose an image


that you would be choosing as a prompt.
2. Decide of a crisis event or wounding, learning
discovery that your character experiences in the course
of his or her life.
3. Create a scenario in your mind’s eye about the
way in which the critical incident is now applied to the
character’s life, that is, how does he or she use the
learning discovery to resolve new crises? Write as
much as you can about this learning and its application
to the character’s life.
4. With a partner, create a dialog for their two
characters and then perform it.

Activity 2

Conceptualizing the Setting

1. Where is your favorite room in your house?

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 93


2. What event would most likely happen in that
room?
3. What effect would that room have to the event?
4. With the character in Activity 1 in mind, where is
the best place for him/her to experience a critical
incident in his/her life?

Activity 3

Conceptualizing the Plot

With the character and setting you have conceptualized in


Activity 1 and 2 in mind, create a plot line for a one-act
play.

LESSON REFLECTION…

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 94


(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)
QUARTER II Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 4 Week: 7
Lesson: Reading and Writing Drama (One-act)
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of drama as genre and are able to
analyze its elements and techniques.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 95


Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to compose at least one scene for a
one-act play that can be staged.
Competency (Code): The learners explore different staging modalities vis-à-vis
envisioning the script. (HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ij-IIc-18)
Objectives: 1. Identify the different staging modalities in drama.
Initial Activities Other
Task Warm Up Suggested
Activities
(Day1 The teacher will call for four students who will act out whatever
-2 ) the teacher directs them to do. The students will use the whole front part
of the classroom to act.

Concept Discovery

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 96


The teacher will flash cards containing the different parts of the
stage then the students will stand at that part of the stage. The students
who fails to stand at the correct part of the stage indicated in the card,

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 97


he/she will be eliminated. The last students remaining will be declared
“Best Actor/Actress.”

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 98


LESSON REFLECTION…

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 99


(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)
QUARTER II Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 4 Week: 8
Lesson: Reading and Writing Drama (One-act)
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of drama as genre and are able to
analyze its elements and techniques.
Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to compose at least one scene for a
one-act play that can be staged.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 100


Competency (Code): The learners write at least one scene for one-act play applying the
various elements, techniques, and literary devices(HUMSS_CW/MPIj-IIc-20 )
Objectives:1. Explain the basic steps in script writing;
2. Analyze the essential contents of each step in writing the script; and
3. Demonstrate learning through script writing activities.
Initial Activities
Task Concept Discovery Other
Suggeste
(Day1 d
-4 ) Activities

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 101


Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 102
Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 103
Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 104
Activity 1: The Story I Want to Tell
In a group of five, brainstorm on what story you want to tell your
audience. Prepare the basic information and deepen on how the elements
will interact with each other. Write the results of your brainstorming in a
separate sheet of paper.

Activity 2: The Structure of my Story


After brainstorming on your story, develop the structure of your one-
act drama. Decide on what level of difficulty, regarding structure your
story will be. Then answer the following questions:

1. What type of structure did you choose for your play?


2. What influenced you to choose that particular type of structure?
3. In what way is the structure ideal for your story?

Cool Down
This activity will focus on the actual writing of your play. Since you have
already gone through the two essential processes in preparation for writing
your play, you are now ready to start writing. Use a separate sheet of paper
for this activity. In writing your play, these are some tips you might want
to bear in mind:
1. Prepare your outline
2. Start with your dialogues
3. Be mindful of the transitions
4. Don’t be afraid to use interruptions and fragments occasionally
5. Include stage directions in the script
6. Rewrite if you need to

References:
1. 21st Century Literature from the Philippines and the World, p. 63-
66
2. Creative Writing, p. 97-114

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 105


LESSON REFLECTION…

(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 106


QUARTER II Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 5 Week:
Lesson: The creative work in literary and/or sociopolitical context
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of the different orientations of
creative writing.
Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce a craft essay on the
personal creative process deploying a consciously selected orientations of creative
writing
Competency (Code): The learners situate the creative work in literary and/or
sociopolitical context. (HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ij-IIc-21)
Objectives: Demonstrate creatively the ability to produce writing in literary and/ or
sociopolitical context which is clear and logical, original and imaginative.
Initial Picture charade Other
Task Suggested
Analyze the different editorial cartoon depicting the sociopolitical issues Activities
(Day Sources:
https://www.google.com/search?biw=1050&bih=588&ei=iU9SW_3AHIrsvgTgvKyYDA&q=editorial+cartoons&oq=
1-2) editorial+cartoons&gs_l=psy-ab.3...8125879.8131952.0.8132808.18.14.0.0.0.0.0.0..0.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..18.0.0....0.qndblvstOhg

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 107


Suggested
Activities:

Flash
sample
excerpts
taken from
newspapers
and ask
students to
creatively
write an
essay about
it.

Conte
nt
Disco
very

Conc
ept
Elabo
ration

Conc
ept
Expa Write an essay about the editorial cartoons in clear and logical, original
nsion and imaginative.

Craft Essay- an essay that discusses matters of creative discussion that


may include reflections on writing strategies, genre elements and
contextual influences

https://www.writingforward.com/creative-writing/types-of-creative-
writing
Situate the craft essay in the sociopolitical context.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 108


LESSON REFLECTION…

(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 109


Quarter II Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 5 Week:
Lesson: The creative work in literary and/or sociopolitical context
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of the different orientations of
creative writing.
Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce a craft essay on the
personal creative process deploying a consciously selected orientations of creative
writing
Competency (Code): The learners demonstrate awareness of and sensitivity to the
different orientations of creative writing (HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ij-IIc-22)

Objectives: 1. Identify creative writing of literary pieces they have read and enjoyed.
2. Recall people who are educated, writers, artists whom they have talked
with or encountered and inspired them to become creative.
3. Verbalize thoughts and feelings that show appreciation and creativity in a
person or a word of art or a natural phenomenon.
Initial Other Suggested
Task Read and analyze the local poem below “Takore” by Activities
Jasper Ian U. Felezmiño.
(Day
3)

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 110


Concept Discovery

Group Activity:

Present literary piece/s of your favorite writer/s or


author/s and be able to present in class the reasons of liking their
works the most or gave inspiration to you to become creative as
well.

Concept Elaboration

Recall discussions on imagery, figures of speech,


techniques and types of creative writing.

Concept Extension

Work in groups of five and do the mood being set for each group
after reading the line of a song “Sirena” by Gloc9:

Ako'y isang sirena.


Kahit anong sabihin nila ako ay ubod ng ganda.
Ako'y isang sirena
Kahit anong gawin .nila bandera ko'y di tutumba.

Group 1- Happy Mood


Group II- Sad Mood
Group III- Angry Mood
Group IV- Horrified Mood
Group V- Depressed Mood

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 111


LESSON REFLECTION…

(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 112


QUARTER II Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 5 Week:
Lesson: The creative work in literary and/or sociopolitical context
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of the different orientations of
creative writing.
Performance Standard: The learners shall be able to produce a craft essay on the
personal creative process deploying a consciously selected orientations of creative
writing
Competency (Code):The learners write a craft essay (HUMSS_CW/MP11/12-Ij-IIc-23)
Objectives:
1. Define craft essay
2. Analyze a sample excerpts of a craft essay
3. Write a craft essay
Initial Other Suggested
Task Read and analyze the sample craft essay, “Visit” by Activities
Walter Dean Myers
(Day
4)

Sample Craft Essay – “Visit”

1.Sample INTRO Paragraph

“Visit” by Walter Dean Myers- is a short story about a


father visiting his son on deathrow. The two have not seen one
another in about 20 years and the story is primarily a
conversation between the two, with the son describing how he
ended up in prison. There is a great deal of regret, both from
the son for his actions, and from the father for his absence from
his son’s life. They try to use their very brief last-day visit to
make peace with one another and themselves. Myers makes the
reader feel compassion and a sense of urgency around this visit,
as there is so little time left for the two to reunite. A major
theme of this story is that time is too valuable to waste. Walter
Dean Myers makes craft choices to help the reader better
understand.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 113


“Visit” and its message.

Sample THEME Paragraph

Walter Dean Myers makes the theme that time is too


valuable to waste evident throughout his story. The story takes
place in 30 minutes and is told from the father’s point of view.
From the first lines of the story through the end, it is clear how
important time is, as the father feels urgency around making the
most of their visit. He starts out the story by noting how much
time he hast lost with his son when he thinks, “It is the first
time we have touched for twenty years” (83). Immediately, the
reader understands that there is lost time with his son that the
father regrets. As the two continue to visit together, they are
increasingly aware of how time is passing. They understand
they will not be able to say everything they need and want to,
but will do their best. The father later wonders to himself,
“How to get a thousand years into the minutes we have left”
(87). The father wants their time together to be significant, but
recognizes the limitations of having only thirty minutes. As the
story wraps up, the father and son share final confessions and
apologies, making their time as meaningful as possible. They
try to comfort each other, the way only family can. In the end,
they have tried to make the best of their short visit, not place
blame or become angry. While the circumstances of the visit
are heartbreaking, the father and son still recognize they should
value their time together.

Source:file:///C:/Users/arvee/Desktop/2015-2016%20Visit
%20Sample%20Craft%20Essay.pdf

Concept Elaboration

Craft Essay- an essay that discusses matters of creative discussion


that may include reflections on writing strategies, genre elements
and contextual influences.

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=Y3BzZC51
c3xtcy1idXJiYW5rLXMtOHRoLWdyYWRlLWVsYS1jbGFzc3xneDoyOGE2
YTFjOTBlNWYzNmQ

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 114


Concept Expansion

Activity 1. Produce a craft essay following the rubric below.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 115


Activity 2: Exchange your output with your seatmate and have
your essay evaluated by your classmate.

Indicators Rating (1-5)


The poem written is based on
the form.
The content of the essay is
clear.
It is in the proper form with
the correct grammar, spelling
and proper punctuations.

The essay captures the


interest of the reader.
Remarks:
What is/are the strong point/s of the essay? What needs to
be improved

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 116


LESSON REFLECTION…

(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 117


QUARTER II Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 6 Week:
Lesson: The creative work in literary and/or sociopolitical context.
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of the different orientations of
creative writing.
Performance Standard: The learners design a group blog for poetry and fiction, produce
a suite of poems, a full/completed short story, or a script for a one-act play, with the
option of staging and or create hypertext literature
Competency (Code): The learners create a group blog for poetry and/or fiction applying
ICT skills/any appropriate multimedia forms. (HUMSS_CW/MPIIg-j24)
Objectives:
1.Create a group blog for created poem or any created fiction article.
2. Save the created group blog for posting purposes.
Initial Task
Somebody brings a pocket Wi-Fi for the class to connect for Other Suggested
(Day1-2 ) the creation of group blog and saving it in their own account. Activities

Do you want to learn how to start a blog?

Starting a blog is not complicated at all, and we’re here to


assure you that creating a successful blog is not as daunting as
many people think.

In fact, by following the step-by-step instructions in this guide


you will be able to set up your own blog (no technical skills
needed).

Ready? Let’s get to it!

What you need to know before you start a blog


This section provides background information to help you
understand the basics of blogging. We also describe a number
of different benefits, how to choose your niche and blogging
topic.

What is a blog?
A blog (shortened from the phrase “weblog”) is known as
many things—a digital magazine, diary, newscast, collector’s
meeting place, a showcase for your art, information sharing,
teaching hub, place to learn and…well, almost anything you
want it to be. A typical blog combines text, images, videos
and links to relevant pages and media on the Web. Blog
readers can leave comments and communicate with the

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 118


author. In fact, dialogue and interaction are a popular part of a
blog’s success.

The benefits of blogging


Become a better writer and thinker
How to Blog Header
View How to Blog Infographic
Once you start blogging, you’ll find yourself becoming a
better writer and thinker. Mastering content takes creative
thought. When you become immersed in creating great pieces
of content for your blog, your writing, thinking and research
skills improve in the process.

Establish yourself as an expert


Blogs are wonderful tools to help people establish themselves
as experts in a field or niche. We all have some kind of
interest and expertise to share with others. If you’re able to
produce great content and/or have a unique point of view on
the topic, then be assured that your future audience will
recognize it and reward you for it. With a bit of effort, you too
can become an authority in your area of interest.

Increase your self-confidence


The more involved you become with blogging, the more your
creative juices will flow. That’s one reason why blogging is
so popular. As you gain knowledge about your topic, the
confidence you build in your followers and most importantly,
in yourself, will soar. All of this leads to increased creativity.
Keep an open mind and enjoy your new-found confidence in
your own abilities!

Make friends and have fun


With practice and a little effort, you can easily build your
base of fans and followers. As you become known as an
expert in your niche, you can inspire, encourage and help
your followers make a difference in their own lives. Along
with your blogging journey, you will make new friends and
connections throughout the world. If you like to travel, that
means a lot of couches are available for you to snooze on
while winging your way around the globe!

Make money from your blog


Blogging may well become your passion but you can also
make money. In fact, many authority bloggers are able to
make a living from blogging. There are many ways to
monetize your blog. You can place ads and receive

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 119


compensation from companies by promoting their products
and services. Or you can sell your own digital products and
merchandise.

How to choose a perfect niche


blogs solve problems
Before you create your own site and move forward to become
a successful blogger try to attain the highest form of
knowledge in the niche/topic of your choice. So pick the one
that appeals to you—the one you are passionate about and
most interested in. Aspire for success, happiness, security and
recognition. By choosing your niche of interest and having
your own point of view you’ll be able to position and
differentiate from the competition.

Brainstorm to find your topic


Following is a process that can help you determine which
niche is best for you:

blogger lifestyle
Make a list of your interests or hobbies. Which topics
fascinate you? List them all, for instance: golf, fishing, yoga,
playing games or cooking.

Next, list accomplishments you are proud of, such as musical


talent, artistic talent or sports achievements.

Now, list difficulties you have overcome or defeated, such as:


losing a significant amount of weight, recovering from a
financial setback or managing a disease.

During the course of this exercise, you will get a better


feeling for the topics that resonate with you. The ones you are
most passionate about are the best candidates for your niche.
Read this article on How to choose a niche for more
information.

Five easy steps to starting a blog:


1.Choose a blogging platform
2.Pick a domain name
3.Get a web hosting account
4.Install blogging software and set up a blog
5.Select a blog design and layout
Source: https://firstsiteguide.com/start-blog/

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 120


Concept Elaboration

Given the steps how to start a group blog, you are now ready
to try creating it on your own.

Submit to your teacher a print out of your account in making


a group blog.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 121


LESSON REFLECTION…

(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 122


QUARTER II Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 6 Week:
Lesson:
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of the different orientations of
creative writing.
Performance Standard: The learners design a group blog for poetry and fiction, produce
a suite of poems, a full/completed short story, or a script for a one-act play, with the
option of staging and or create hypertext literature
Competency (Code):The learners explore various modes of publishing media for
manuscripts (HUMSS_CW/MPIIg-j25)
Objectives: 1. Post a blog in a Facebook Wall account, Email account, Instagram
Account, Web Page.
2.Ask a friend to write a one-line comment/ emoji comment in the blog
posted on the net.
Initial Differentiated Small Group
Task Other
Task: Each group will be given a task to do. They will post a blog entry Suggested
(Day the topic assigned for each group on the created group blog of the class. Activities
1-2) Group 1. Poetry
Group 2. Fiction
Group 3. Short Story
Group 4. Drama (One Act Play)

https://www.google.com/search?q=poetry+blog+entry+rubric&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=-BTUTlV-k7HrlM%253A%252CVbYCdmfae8tK0M%252C_&usg=__f6-nicWG0C6tjwHALZQBdzzxI9U
%3D&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj0gd33sK_cAhWEA4gKHZ7vAdgQ9QEwAHoECAQQBA#imgrc=sPHvDeQIGZSjYM:

Concept Elaboration

Ask a friend to write a one-line comment/ emoji comment in the blog


posted on the net.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 123


LESSON REFLECTION…

(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 124


QUARTER II Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 6 Week:
Lesson:
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of the different orientations of
creative writing.
Performance Standard: The learners design a group blog for poetry and fiction, produce
a suite of poems, a full/completed short story, or a script for a one-act play, with the
option of staging and or create hypertext literature
Competency (Code): The learners understand the possibilities of intertextual forms.
(HUMSS_CW/MPIIg-j26)
Objectives:1. Identify the intertextuality in the different literary test.
2.Enumerate the possibilities of the intertextuality forms.
3. Explain the intertextual forms found in the literary text.
Initial Text analysis:
Task Analyze the story of Florante at Laura Other
Suggested
(Day1 Activities
-2 )

Conce
pt
Disco
very

Identify the intertextuality in the different literary text.

Debriefing Question:
1.What are the possibilities of the intertextuality forms?

2.How can you identify the intertextual forms within the literary text

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 125


LESSON REFLECTION…

(This part is provided to write significant insights after each lesson)


QUARTER II Subject: CREATIVE WRITING Module: 6 Week:

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 126


Lesson:
Content Standard: The learners have an understanding of the different orientations of
creative writing.
Performance Standard: The learners design a group blog for poetry and fiction, produce
a suite of poems, a full/completed short story, or a script for a one-act play, with the
option of staging and or create hypertext literature
Competency (Code): The learners write a suite of poems, a full/completed short story or
a script for a one-act play. (HUMSS_CW/MPIIg-j27)
Objectives:1. Write a poem or a short story.
Initial Other
Task Look for samples of haiku poems and analyze them. Suggested
Activities
(Day1 Concept Discovery
-2 ) Create 3 haiku poems that talks about environment that could be written in
Filipino or English Language following the rubric below.

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 127


Reference Books:
Rimpos, Vol. III, Issue I. Copyright 2015
Buhisan, AJF G. & Sayseng, A. H. (2016) Creative Writing: K-12 Compliant Worktext
for the Senior High School. JFS Publishing Services. Pasay City, Philippines.
Redburn, Marissa Dela Cruz Reorizo (2016) Dain Linaw an Hinaw. Reorizo-Redburn
Press, Del Rosario Naga City, Philippines.
Marantan, R. M. (2016) Creative Writing. Jimczyville Publications, Malabon City,
Philippines.
https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=Y3BzZC51
Source:https://ecdn.teacherspayteachers.com/thumbitem/Haiku-evaluation-and-scoring-
rubric-1453431697/original-34802-1.jpg
c3xtcy1idXJiYW5rLXMtOHRoLWdyYWRlLWVsYS1jbGFzc3xneDoyOGE2YTFjOTB
lNWYzNmQ
Source:file:///C:/Users/arvee/Desktop/2015-2016%20Visit%20Sample%20Craft
%20Essay.pdf
Source:https://ecdn.teacherspayteachers.com/thumbitem/Haiku-evaluation-and-scoring-
rubric-1453431697/original-34802-1.jpg

Sources and Citations

1.  http://www.und.edu/instruct/weinstei/writejournal.htm

2. http://www.und.edu/instruct/weinstei/writejournal.htm

3. https://www.dlsweb.rmit.edu.au/lsu/content/2_assessmenttasks/assess_pdf/diffbet_re
portsessays.pdf

www.bicol-u.edu.ph

Creative Writing (Malikhaing Pagsulat) Module Page 128