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3 Grade Poetry
Reading Handouts
Poetry – is a piece of writing in which words and their sounds are
used to show images and express feelings and ideas.
Noticings Book Examples
Author’s Purpose: to entertain or Author’s Purpose: to entertain the
express reader with a funny poem that tells
the story about a how a man lost his
Form: includes free verse, narrative,
leg
humorous and lyrical
Form: narrative poem-tells a story
Stanzas: the sections of a poem; a
stanza may focus on one central idea free verse-poems written without
or thought; lines in a stanza are rhythm
arranged in a way that looks and
humorous-poem that’s funny
sounds pleasing
lyrical-poem expressing feelings of
Rhyme: words that have the same
the speaker (narrator, poet)
ending sound may be used at the ends
of lines to add interest to the poem Stanzas:
and to make it fun to read I saw the other day when I went shopping in the store
A man I hadn't ever, ever seen in there before,
A man whose leg was broken and who leaned upon a crutch-
I asked him very kindly if it hurt him very much.
"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.

I ran around behind him for I thought that I would see


The broken leg all bandaged up and bent back at the knee;
But I didn't see the leg at all, there wasn't any there,
So I asked him very kindly if he had it hid somewhere.

"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.


Rhyme:
I ran around behind him for I thought that I would see
The broken leg all bandaged up and bent back at the knee;
But I didn't see the leg at all, there wasn't any there,
So I asked him very kindly if he had it hid somewhere.
"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.
Poetry – is a piece of writing in which words and their sounds are used to show images and
express feelings and ideas.

Noticings Book Examples


Rhythm: the beat of how the words are read; Rhythm:
may be fast or slow
The pickety fence
Add these to anchor chart with Lesson 2

The pickety fence The rhythm in this poem is


Sound Effects:
Give it a lick it's fast – to match the speed of
The pickety fence
 Repetition occurs when poets repeat Give it a lick it's
the stick striking the fence.

words, phrases, or lines in a poem to create A clickety fence


a pattern, increase rhythm, and strengthen
feelings, ideas and mood in a poem. When the night begins to fall The rhythm in this poem is
And the sky begins to glow slow – to match the night
 Rhyme Scheme the pattern of rhyme You look up and see the tall gently falling and the lights
that the poet uses City of lights begin to grow – slowly coming on.

 Alliteration the repetition of the first


consonant sound in words, as in the nursery Sound Effects:
rhyme “Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled
peppers.”  Repetition
 Onomatopoeia words that represent the Someone tossed a pancake,
actual sound of something are words of A buttery, buttery, pancake.
onomatopoeia. Thunder “booms,” rain Someone tossed a pancake
And flipped it up so high,
“drips,” and the clock “ticks.”Appeals to the
That now I see the pancake,
sense of sound. The buttery, buttery pancake,
 Imagery & Sensory Detail the use of Now I see that pancake
Add with

words to create pictures, or images, in your Stuck against the sky.


Lesson 3

mind. Appeals to the five senses: smell,


sight, hearing, taste and touch.
 Rhyme Scheme
 Alliteration
 Onomatopoeia see pwpt
Imagery & Sensory Detail: for
examples
Topic: State Fair

Read the State Fair poem. Use this graphic organizer to collect sensory language that helps the reader create imagery.

See Hear Smell

Taste Feel Feelings


State Fair

The energy—
thousands of people swarming about
Moms pushing strollers
couples holding hands
teenagers bored with excitement
kids running
back and forth, around in circles
laughing Eyes wide open—
screaming, Big Tex smiles and waves
hot and sweaty. “Howdy Folks!”
cotton candy, corn dogs
each ride sings its own
music Ferris Wheel
stops at the top
“Hurry! Hurry! Step right up!”
sticky and sunburned.
Everything at once—
auto show
carmel apples, nachos
farm animals
extreme rides
squeal in delight
“Announcing! The beginning of a
show!” ice cream cone, funnel cake
BMX bike show
pig races
spin the wheel
toss the rings Long day ending—
shoot the ball one more ride
“I won! I won!” on the carousel,
stuff the Snoopy under my arm enough of
chili and cheese fries the fried food
Texas Skyway the sweet cakes,
thirsty, the voices and laughter
dusty and dirty. of a thousand people
fading
away, slowing
down, dragging
feet, dragging
Snoopy, hot and
sweaty, sticky,
sunburne
d, dusty,
dirty,
“Where’s the car?”
Topic: State Fair
***The highlighted Sensory Details are the ones you can use for modeling during your Minilesson.
See Hear Smell
Big Tex “Hurry, hurry! Step right up!” Fried food
Ferris Wheel People laughing Sweet cakes
Thousands of people People screaming (on rides) Beer
Auto Show Music playing Animal smells in the barns
Bike Show An announcer shouting the beginning Straw in the barns
Farm Animals of a performance
Crafts Everything is loud
Rides – Texas Skyway, Extreme
Rides, Carousel
Games

Taste Feel Feelings

Cotton Candy Hot Excited


Corn Dogs Sweaty Lots of energy
Ice Cream Cones Sticky Want to do everything at once
Funnel Cakes Sun burned Eyes are wide
Soda Dusty
Carmel Apples Dirty
Nachos
Chili & Cheese Fries
What it Looks Like on a
Test…
Read line 8 the poem
___________________________________________
___________________________________________

The poet uses this line to show that the


speaker is –

3.10/Fig 19D
Read lines 15 and 16 from the poem

The poet uses these lines to show-


In the poem, which words help the
reader imagine the speaker’s
experience?

3.10A
What it Looks Like on a
Test…
Which of these lines from the poem
rhyme?
This poem is an example of narrative
poetry mostly because it-

3.6A
Why does the poet use the exclamation
points in the first stanza?
How does the speaker feel throughout the
poem?
Read the lines 17 and 18 from the poem.

These lines best support the idea that the


speaker-
The poet uses these lines mainly to show
that the speaker-
By the end of the poem, the reader realizes
that the speaker-

3.6/Fig19D
The speaker in this poem is-

3.6/Fig 19E
"The Broken-Legg'd Man" by John Mackey Shaw

I saw the other day when I went shopping in the store


A man I hadn't ever, ever seen in there before,
A man whose leg was broken and who leaned upon a crutch-
I asked him very kindly if it hurt him very much.
"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.

I ran around behind him for I thought that I would see


The broken leg all bandaged up and bent back at the knee;
But I didn't see the leg at all, there wasn't any there,
So I asked him very kindly if he had it hid somewhere.
"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.

"Then where," I asked him, "is it? Did a tiger bite it off?
Or did you get your foot wet when you had a nasty cough?
Did someone jump down on your leg when it was very new?
Or did you simply cut it off because you wanted to?"
"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.

"What was it then?" I asked him, and this is what he said:


"I crossed a busy crossing when the traffic light was red;
A big black car came whizzing by and knocked me off my feet."
"Of course you looked both ways," I said, "before you crossed the street."
"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.

"They rushed me to the hospital right quickly, "he went on,


"And when I woke in nice white sheets I saw my leg was gone;
That's why you see me walking now on nothing but a crutch."
"I'm glad," said I, "you told me, and I thank you very much!"
"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.
For hours and hours they let it cook.
It swelled inside till the windows shook.
It was piping hot when they took it out,
And the villagers raised a mighty shout.
"Isn't it crusty, Aren't we clever!"
But the wasps were just as bad as ever.
The loaf was left to cool, and then
TI1e people watched while six strong men
Took a great big saw and sliced right through.
Everybody clapped, and they cut slice two.
The village bus, they all agreed,
Would spoil the fields of Farmer Seed,
So eight fine horses pulled the bread
To where the picnic cloth was spread.2
Think Aloud A truck drew up and dumped out butter,
And they spread it out with a flap and a flutter.
2
/wonder how they are Spoons and spades! Slap and slam!
going to get the bread And they did the same with the strawberry jam.
to Farmer Seed's field?
Maybe they will put it on Meanwhile, high above the field,
a truck. Six flying machines whirred and wheeled,
Ready for the wasps to take the bait.
And then there was nothing to do but wait.
Suddenly the sky was humming!
All four million wasps were coming!
They smelled that jam, they dived and struck!
And they ate so much that they all got stuck.
The other slice came down-kersplat!-
On top of the wasps, and that was that.
There were only three that got away,
And where they are now I cannot say.

126
Poetry Elements: Rhythm and Sound Effects
Sound Rhyme Alliteration Onomatopoeia
Effect Scheme
The pattern of The repetition of Words that represent the
rhyme that the the first consonant actual sound of
poet uses sound in words, as something are words of
in the nursery onomatopoeia. Thunder
Definition rhyme “Peter Piper “booms,” rain “drips,”
picked a peck of and the clock “ticks.”
pickled peppers.”
Appeals to the sense of
sound.
AABB Rhyme Scheme I jiggled it
Snow makes whiteness where it falls. A
The bushes look like popcorn balls. A jaggled it
And places where I always play, B jerked it. Scrunch, scrunch, scrunch.
Look like somewhere else today. B
I pushed Crunch, crunch, crunch.
ABAB Rhyme Scheme and pulled Frozen snow and brittle ice

Example I love noodles. Give me oodles.


Make a mound up to the sun.
Noodles are my favorite foodles.
A
B
A
and poked it.
But –
Make a winter sound that’s nice
Underneath my stamping feet
I eat noodles by the ton. B As soon as I stopped, And the cars along the street.
ABBA Rhyme Scheme
And left it alone Scrunch, scrunch, scrunch.
Let me fetch sticks, A This tooth came out Crunch, crunch, crunch.
Let me fetch stones, B On its very own!
Throw me your bones, B
Teach me your tricks. A
Poetry Elements: Rhythm and Sound Effects
Sound Rhyme Alliteration Onomatopoeia
Effect Scheme
The pattern of The repetition of Words that represent the
rhyme that the the first consonant actual sound of
poet uses sound in words, as something are words of
in the nursery onomatopoeia. Thunder
Definition rhyme “Peter Piper “booms,” rain “drips,”
picked a peck of and the clock “ticks.”
pickled peppers.”
Appeals to the sense of
sound.

Example
Humorous Poem
Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout
by Shel Silverstein

Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout


Would not take the garbage out.
She'd wash the dishes and scrub the pans
Cook the yams and spice the hams,
And though her parents would scream and shout,
She simply would not take the garbage out.
And so it piled up to the ceiling:
Coffee grounds, potato peelings,
Brown bananas and rotten peas,
Chunks of sour cottage cheese.
It filled the can, it covered the floor,
It cracked the windows and blocked the door,
With bacon rinds and chicken bones,
Drippy ends of ice cream cones,
Prune pits, peach pits, orange peels,
Gloppy glumps of cold oatmeal,
Pizza crusts and withered greens,
Soggy beans, and tangerines,
Crusts of black-burned buttered toast,
Grisly bits of beefy roast.
The garbage rolled on down the halls,
It raised the roof, it broke the walls,
I mean, greasy napkins, cookie crumbs,
Blobs of gooey bubble gum,
Cellophane from old bologna,
Rubbery, blubbery macaroni,
Peanut butter, caked and dry,
Curdled milk, and crusts of pie,
Rotting melons, dried-up mustard,
Eggshells mixed with lemon custard,
Cold French fries and rancid meat,
Yellow lumps of Cream of Wheat.
At last the garbage reached so high
That finally it touched the sky,
And none of her friends would come to play,
And all of her neighbors moved away;
And finally, Sarah Cynthia Stout
Said, "Okay, I'll take the garbage out!"
But then, of course it was too late,
The garbage reached across the state,
From New York to the Golden Gate;
And there in the garbage she did hate
Poor Sarah met an awful fate
That I cannot right now relate
Because the hour is much too late
But children, remember Sarah Stout,
And always take the garbage out.
Lyrical
The Crocodile by Roald Dahl

'No animal is half as vile

As Crocky–Wock, the crocodile. On Saturdays he


likes to crunch Six juicy children for his lunch And
he especially enjoys

Just three of each, three girls, three boys. He smears the boys (to
make them hot) With mustard from the mustard pot.

But mustard doesn't go with girls,

It tastes all wrong with plaits and curls. With them, what goes
extremely well Is butterscotch and caramel.

It's such a super marvelous treat

When boys are hot and girls are sweet. At least that's Crocky's
point of view He ought to know. He's had a few.

That's all for now. It's time for bed. Lie down and rest your
sleepy head. Ssh. Listen. What is that I hear, Galumphing
softly up the stair?

Go lock the door and fetch my gun! Go on child, hurry!


Quickly run!

No stop! Stand back! He's coming in! Oh, look, that greasy
greenish skin! The shining teeth, the greedy smile! It's
Crocky–Wock, the Crocodile!'
The Fish with the Deep-Sea Smile
By Margaret Wise Brown

They fished and they fished!


Way down in the sea

Down in the sea mile

They fished among all the fish in the sea


For the fish with the deep-sea smile.

One fish came up from the deep of the sea


From down in the sea a mile

It had blue eyes


And whiskers three

But never a deep-sea smile.

One fish came up from the deep of the sea


From down in the sea a mile

With electric lights up and down its tail


But never a deep-sea smile.

They fished and they fished


Way down in the sea

Down in the sea a mile

They fished among all the fish in the sea


One fish came up with terrible teeth One fish with long,
strong jaws

One fish came up with long stalked eyes


One fish with terrible claws

They fished all through the ocean deep


For many and many a mile

And they caught a fish with a laughing eye


But none with a deep-sea smile.

And then one day they got a pull


From down in the sea a mile

And when they pulled the fish into the boat


HE SMILED A DEEP-SEA SMILE.

And as his smiled, the hook got free


And then, what a deep-sea smile!

He flipped his tail and swam away


Down in the sea a mile.