Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 10

LA COURROUZE

RENNES  PHILIPPE GAZEAU


INTRODUCTION
PHILIPPE GAZEAU FOUNDED HIS PRACTICE IN 1984 IN PARIS, AFTER
HAVING GRADUATED FROM A CERTIFIED ARCHITECT IN THE SCHOOL OF
ARCHITECTURE PARIS LA VILLETTE. HE HELPED FOUND THE AGENCY'S
PLANNING FGP (U), IN 2004. HE TEACHES AT THE ECOLE NATIONALE
SUPERIEURE D'ARCHITECTURE PARIS VAL DE SEINE. HE IS A MEMBER
OF THE COLLECTIVE FRENCH TOUCH. 
NOR
TH T RA
OWE ILW
R
AY
A LIN
E

This new eco-district is located on a former


military and industrial wasteland in La
Courrouze, Rennes, The residential development
features two towers and two rows of houses
CENTRAL GARDEN
surrounding a patch of grass with a car park
underneath  B

The completed project provides a total of 76


new homes for the La Courrouze development D

zone, a growing neighborhood that covers an


area of 140 hectares 
A: 26 flats, 2 duplexes Building
C
C: 17, 2 duplexes Building
B: 6 terraced houses Building
TERRACED HOUSES
D: 23 terraced duplexes  SOUTH TOWER
NORTH TOWER
The North tower block, the taller
one, is the most imposing in the
distant urban landscape, in
particular from Rennes city center.
This is why the top section is
different, the last two floors
having special volumetric: pulled
back from the main body, creation of
a kind of parapet walk. On the
ground floor, the tower fuselage is
set on a brick base on the plaza
ground or on the slightly sloping
ground of the grassy areas. 
These architectural arrangements
assert the desire to turn towards
the city and its centre, even though
due to the orientation and the noise
pollution from the railway line the
north facade is less opened up and
more height is given to the south
facade, thereby giving the tower a
rather unusual skyline.  
The tower’s main body is wrapped on the north,
east and west facades in a smooth, shiny
mantle of vertical metallised ribbed cladding
covering insulation on the outside of the
building structure, in contrast with the more
sculptural, mineral appearance of the south
facade. On the ground floor, the tower
fuselage is set on a brick base on the plaza
ground or on the slightly sloping ground of the
grassy areas. 
SOUTH TOWER
The South tower block, which is lower and less
slender in its proportions, has a
dissymmetrical fuselage, thinner to the east
on the inner garden side, broader to the west
on the ZAC park side. This differentiation
between the east and west facades is also
emphasised in the colour of the casing of
vertical ribbed cladding which wraps around
and insulates the north, east and west
facades. The treatment of the south facade,
and the ground floor base, are the same as on
the first tower block. Any different
treatment on the last two storeys would have
had the effect of making the tower look
stockier, being less tall than the other. 
INDIVIDUAL UNITS
The volumetric of the six housing
units at the foot of the tower blocks
is similar to a typology of houses
grouped in threes. They are one-story
houses with sloping roofs opening
widely onto the park They have an
east-west exposure so that the two
towers bookending them to the north
and south will interfere with the
view or block the sunlight. 
NORTH TOWER SOUTH TOWER
The facades on the north tower are The entire height of the south front
covered on the north, east and west is in surface coated concrete, its
sides from the first to the eighth taupe color verging on rust For the
floors with vertical corrugated cladding covering the South tower,
metallized cladding The same the colors are treated
cladding for the last two floors. The dissymmetrical: dark green on the
ground floor base is lined with black inner garden side, metal grey on the
brick.  west side. The south façade is
handled in the same way as the
North tower.  
INNER FACES
The inner faces of the loggias are in
brighter colors, greens, yellows,
pinks and reds, to make these
"outdoor rooms" feel like part of
the home. On the top floors the solid
walls on the projecting boxes are
replaced by coloured glass guard
rails.