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Instruction Book

PCD IB38-737-5
Power Control Device Issue F
Precautions ABB Power Control Device

Page 2 of 384 December 23, 2004 IB38-737-5


ABB Power Control Device Precautions

Precautions
Take the following precautions when using the Power Control Device (PCD):
1. Connect the current and voltage transformers for proper phase rotation and polarity to
ensure correct measurement of kilowatts and kiloVARs, and for the proper operation of the
46, 67P and 67N protection elements.
2. Incorrect wiring may result in damage to the PCD, recloser and/or electrical hardware
connected to the recloser. Be sure the wiring on the PCD and the recloser agree with the
electrical connection diagram before energizing.
3. Apply only the rated control voltage as marked on the PCD nameplate.
4. High-potential tests are not recommended. If a control wire insulation test is required, only
perform a DC high-potential test. Surge capacitors installed in the PCD do not allow AC
high-potential testing.
5. Follow test procedures to verify proper operation. To avoid personal shock, use caution
when working with energized equipment. Only competent personnel, familiar with good
safety practices should service these devices.
6. When the PCD self-checking function detects a system failure, the protective elements are
disabled and the alarm contacts are activated. Replace the PCD as soon as possible.

WARNING: Terminals on the back of PCD may be energized with dangerous voltage
levels. Use extreme care.

CAUTION: Do not insert hands or other foreign objects into the case for removal of
PCD modules while energized.

This instruction book contains the information necessary to properly install, operate and test the
PCD. It does not purport to cover all details or variations in equipment, or provide for every
possible contingency in conjunction with installation, operation or maintenance. Should
particular problems arise that are not sufficiently covered for the purchaser’s purposes, please
contact ABB Inc.
ABB Inc. has made every reasonable attempt to guarantee the accuracy of this document.
However, the information contained herein is subject to change at any time without notice, and
does not represent a commitment on the part of ABB Inc.

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ABB Power Control Device Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Table of Contents ................................................................................................ 5
List of Figures .................................................................................................................................. 12
List of Tables ................................................................................................................................... 16
1 Introduction..................................................................................................... 19
2 Exploring the Front and Rear Panels .............................................................. 21
2.1 Front Panel HMI......................................................................................................................... 21
2.2 Status-Indication LED Targets ................................................................................................... 22
2.2.1 Pickup............................................................................................................................................................ 22
2.2.2 Phase O/C..................................................................................................................................................... 22
2.2.3 Ground O/C ................................................................................................................................................... 22
2.2.4 Lockout.......................................................................................................................................................... 22
2.2.5 Self Check ..................................................................................................................................................... 22
2.2.6 USER 1 and USER 2 .................................................................................................................................... 22
2.3 Control Buttons with LED Targets.............................................................................................. 22
2.3.1 Remote Blocked ............................................................................................................................................ 22
2.3.2 Ground Blocked............................................................................................................................................. 23
2.3.3 Reclose Blocked............................................................................................................................................ 23
2.3.4 Alternate 1 Settings ....................................................................................................................................... 23
2.3.5 SEF Blocked.................................................................................................................................................. 23
2.3.6 Counters........................................................................................................................................................ 24
2.3.7 PROG 1 (Battery Test) .................................................................................................................................. 24
2.3.8 PROG 2 (Phase Select) ................................................................................................................................ 24
2.4 Recloser/Breaker Status LED and Direct Controls ..................................................................... 25
2.4.1 Close ............................................................................................................................................................. 25
2.4.2 Open.............................................................................................................................................................. 25
2.4.3 Recloser Position LED................................................................................................................................... 25
2.4.4 Hot Line Tag.................................................................................................................................................. 25
2.4.5 LCD ............................................................................................................................................................... 25
2.4.6 Enter Key....................................................................................................................................................... 25
2.4.7 Left and Right Arrow Keys............................................................................................................................. 26
2.4.8 Up and Down Arrow Keys ............................................................................................................................. 26
2.4.9 Clear Key....................................................................................................................................................... 26
2.4.10 PCD System Reset ....................................................................................................................................... 26
2.4.11 RS-232 Serial Front Port ............................................................................................................................... 26
2.5 Modules ..................................................................................................................................... 28
2.5.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 28
2.5.2 PS – Power Supply Module........................................................................................................................... 29
2.5.3 UPS – Uninterruptible Power Supply Module ................................................................................................ 30
2.5.4 DIO Type 1 – Digital Input Output Module..................................................................................................... 37
2.5.5 DIO Type 2 – Recloser Actuator Module ....................................................................................................... 38
2.5.6 CPU Module .................................................................................................................................................. 38
2.5.7 COM Type 2a – Communications Module..................................................................................................... 41
2.5.8 COM Type 3 – Communications Module....................................................................................................... 42
2.5.9 COM Type 4 – Communications Module....................................................................................................... 44
2.5.10 COM Type 5 – Communications Module....................................................................................................... 45
2.5.11 PT/CT Module ............................................................................................................................................... 46
2.5.12 CT/CVD Module ............................................................................................................................................ 50

3 Protection ....................................................................................................... 55
3.1 Introduction................................................................................................................................ 55
3.2 Configuration Settings................................................................................................................ 55
3.2.2 Phase Assignment ........................................................................................................................................ 58
3.2.3 Bushing Polarity ............................................................................................................................................ 58

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Table of Contents ABB Power Control Device

3.2.4 Recloser Type................................................................................................................................................59


3.2.5 Bank Enable...................................................................................................................................................59
3.3 Basic Protection......................................................................................................................... 59
3.3.1 Phase Time-Overcurrent Element 51P (3I>) - Phase Slow Curve .................................................................59
3.3.2 Ground Time-Overcurrent Element 51N (IN>) - Ground Slow Curve .............................................................62
3.3.3 Phase Instantaneous Overcurrent Element 50P-1 (3I>>1) – Phase Fast Curve............................................63
3.3.4 Ground Instantaneous Overcurrent Element 50N-1 (IN>>1) – Ground Fast Curve .......................................65
3.3.5 Phase Instantaneous Overcurrent Element 50P-2 (3I>>2) – Definite Time ...................................................67
3.3.6 Ground Instantaneous Overcurrent Element 50N-2 (IN>>2) – Definite Time.................................................68
3.3.7 Phase Instantaneous Overcurrent Element 50P-3 (3I>>3) – Definite Time ...................................................69
3.3.8 Ground Instantaneous Overcurrent Element 50N-3 (IN>>3) – Definite Time.................................................69
3.3.9 Recloser Element 79 (O I) ...........................................................................................................................70
3.3.10 Cold Load Time..............................................................................................................................................74
3.4 Advanced Protection.................................................................................................................. 74
3.4.1 Sensitive Earth Fault (SEF) Option ................................................................................................................74
3.4.2 Two-Phase 50P Tripping................................................................................................................................75
3.4.3 Negative Sequence Time Overcurrent Element 46 (Insc>)............................................................................76
3.4.4 Directional Phase Time Overcurrent Element 67P (3I> ).............................................................................77
3.4.5 Directional Ground Time Overcurrent Element 67N (IN> ) ..........................................................................79
3.4.6 Positive Directional Power Element 32P (I1 ) ..............................................................................................82
3.4.7 Negative Directional Power Element 32N (I2 ) ............................................................................................83
3.4.8 Frequency Load Shed and Restoration Elements 81 (f) ................................................................................83
3.4.9 Voltage Block Element 81V............................................................................................................................86
3.4.10 Undervoltage Element 27 (U<) ......................................................................................................................86
3.4.11 Overvoltage Element 59 (U>) ........................................................................................................................86
3.4.12 79 Cutout Time Element ................................................................................................................................87
3.4.13 79C Function..................................................................................................................................................87
3.5 Breaker Failure Element ............................................................................................................ 88
3.5.1 Introduction ....................................................................................................................................................88
3.5.2 Breaker Failure Mode of Operation................................................................................................................89
3.6 Counter and Alarm-Threshold Settings ...................................................................................... 90
3.7 Time Overcurrent Curves........................................................................................................... 94
4 AFSuite Configuration Software ......................................................................99
4.1 Introduction................................................................................................................................ 99
4.1.1 Requirements.................................................................................................................................................99
4.1.2 Compatibility with WinPCD ............................................................................................................................99
4.1.3 Software Features..........................................................................................................................................99
4.1.4 Installation....................................................................................................................................................100
4.2 Main Menu............................................................................................................................... 100
4.2.1 AFSuite Help Options ..................................................................................................................................101
4.2.2 Adding PCD Units ........................................................................................................................................102
4.2.3 Grouping PCDs............................................................................................................................................103
4.3 Using AFSuite.......................................................................................................................... 103
4.3.2 Unit (Online only) .........................................................................................................................................105
4.3.3 Metering (Online only)..................................................................................................................................105
4.3.4 Records (Online only) ..................................................................................................................................105
4.3.5 Basic Settings ..............................................................................................................................................105
4.3.6 Advanced Settings .......................................................................................................................................107
4.3.7 Communication Settings ..............................................................................................................................107
4.3.8 Utilities .........................................................................................................................................................108
4.3.9 Waveform Capture.......................................................................................................................................108
4.3.10 Operations Menu .........................................................................................................................................108
4.3.11 Test Menu ....................................................................................................................................................109
4.3.12 Programmable Curves Menu .......................................................................................................................110
4.3.13 Miscellaneous Commands Menu .................................................................................................................111
4.4 Programming Example ............................................................................................................ 112
4.4.1 STEP 1: Determine Protection Settings .......................................................................................................112
4.4.2 STEP 2: Obtain the Proper Hardware for Communication...........................................................................115
4.4.3 STEP 3: Communicate with Unit..................................................................................................................115
4.4.4 STEP 4: Program Configuration Settings.....................................................................................................116
4.4.5 STEP 5: Program Overcurrent Protection Settings ......................................................................................117
4.4.6 STEP 6: Program Recloser Settings............................................................................................................118
4.4.7 STEP 7: Copy Settings to Alternate Setting Groups ....................................................................................119

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4.4.8 STEP 8: Modifying Alternate Settings ......................................................................................................... 119


4.4.9 STEP 9: Verify Settings ............................................................................................................................... 119
4.4.10 STEP 10: Set the Clock............................................................................................................................... 119
4.4.11 STEP 11: Set the Passwords ...................................................................................................................... 119
4.4.12 STEP 12: Testing ........................................................................................................................................ 120

5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ............................................................... 123


5.1 Binary Input Contacts............................................................................................................... 123
5.1.1 Logical Inputs .............................................................................................................................................. 123
5.1.2 Programmable Input Example ..................................................................................................................... 128
5.1.3 Programming Inputs .................................................................................................................................... 129
5.2 Binary Output Contacts............................................................................................................ 131
5.2.1 Logical Outputs ........................................................................................................................................... 131
5.2.2 Programmable Output Example .................................................................................................................. 139
5.2.3 Programmable Output Contacts .................................................................................................................. 140
5.2.4 Programming Outputs ................................................................................................................................. 140
5.3 Feedback Contacts.................................................................................................................. 142
5.3.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................................................. 142
5.3.2 Feedback Example...................................................................................................................................... 143
5.4 User Logical Inputs/User Logical Outputs ................................................................................ 145
5.4.1 User Logical Example ................................................................................................................................. 145
5.4.2 USER LEDs................................................................................................................................................. 145
5.5 Programmable Logic Rules and Tips ....................................................................................... 147
5.5.1 Logic Summary ........................................................................................................................................... 147
5.5.2 Logic Rules and Tips ................................................................................................................................... 148
5.6 Additional Programmable Logic Examples............................................................................... 149
5.6.1 Hot Line Tag Programming ......................................................................................................................... 149
5.6.2 Undervoltage Trip Programming ................................................................................................................. 149
5.6.3 Set/Reset Latch Programming .................................................................................................................... 149
5.6.4 Other Programmable Logic Examples Available ......................................................................................... 150
5.7 Default Inputs and Outputs ...................................................................................................... 150
6 Monitoring..................................................................................................... 163
6.1 Load Metering.......................................................................................................................... 163
6.2 Energy Meter Rollover ............................................................................................................. 165
6.3 Demand Metering .................................................................................................................... 166
6.4 Minimum and Maximum Metering ............................................................................................ 167
6.5 Power Quality Functions .......................................................................................................... 168
6.5.1 Voltage Sag Calculation Unit....................................................................................................................... 168
6.5.2 Voltage Swell Calculation Unit..................................................................................................................... 169
6.5.3 PQ Oscillographics...................................................................................................................................... 170
6.6 Definitions................................................................................................................................ 171
7 Event Records .............................................................................................. 177
7.1 Downloading Records.............................................................................................................. 177
7.1.1 Fault/Operation Records Download Menu................................................................................................... 177
7.2 Fault Summary ........................................................................................................................ 178
7.3 Fault Record ............................................................................................................................ 178
7.4 Fault Locator............................................................................................................................ 179
7.5 Operation Records................................................................................................................... 180
7.6 Self-Test Failure & Editor Access Codes ................................................................................. 181
7.6.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................................................. 181
7.6.2 Example of a Self-Test Failure .................................................................................................................... 183
7.6.3 Example of an Editor Access....................................................................................................................... 183
7.7 PCD Settings Tables Diagnostics ............................................................................................ 184
7.8 Operations Log Listing ............................................................................................................. 184
7.9 Operations Summary ............................................................................................................... 192
7.10 Load Profile Records ............................................................................................................. 193

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Table of Contents ABB Power Control Device

7.11 Unreported Records .............................................................................................................. 193


8 Communication .............................................................................................197
8.1 PCD Communication Environment .......................................................................................... 197
8.2 PCD Communications Settings................................................................................................ 197
8.3 Communications Port Descriptions .......................................................................................... 199
8.3.1 RS-232 Communication Port .......................................................................................................................199
8.3.2 RS-485 Communication Port .......................................................................................................................199
8.3.3 Fiber Optic Port............................................................................................................................................200
8.4 Communication Module Descriptions....................................................................................... 200
8.4.2 CPU Direct ...................................................................................................................................................200
8.4.3 Type 2a Communication Module Description...............................................................................................201
8.4.4 Type 3 and Type 4 Communication Module Description..............................................................................201
8.4.5 COM Type 5 Communication Module Description .......................................................................................205
8.5 Modem Application .................................................................................................................. 206
8.5.1 External Modem...........................................................................................................................................206
8.5.2 Using a Modem............................................................................................................................................207

9 Accessory Programs .....................................................................................211


9.1 Oscillographic Analysis Tool .................................................................................................... 211
9.1.1 System Requirements and Installation.........................................................................................................211
9.1.2 Using OAT ...................................................................................................................................................212
9.1.3 Analog Display Windows..............................................................................................................................212
9.1.4 Menu Commands.........................................................................................................................................212
9.1.5 Math Button..................................................................................................................................................213
9.1.6 Spectral Analysis .........................................................................................................................................213
9.2 User-Defined Time Overcurrent Curves................................................................................... 214
9.2.1 Using CurveGen ..........................................................................................................................................215

10 Acceptance, Testing and Maintenance........................................................219


10.1 Precautions............................................................................................................................ 219
10.2 Handling Electrostatic Susceptible Devices (ESD)................................................................. 219
10.3 Acceptance Testing ............................................................................................................... 220
10.3.1 Receipt of the PCD ......................................................................................................................................220
10.3.2 Initial Power-up ............................................................................................................................................220
10.3.3 Changing the Password...............................................................................................................................220
10.3.4 Verify Settings..............................................................................................................................................222
10.3.5 Initial Test.....................................................................................................................................................222
10.3.6 Initial Tripping and Reclose..........................................................................................................................222
10.3.7 Recloser.......................................................................................................................................................222
10.4 High-Potential Tests .............................................................................................................. 223
10.5 System Verification Tests ...................................................................................................... 223
10.6 Testing the PCD .................................................................................................................... 223
10.7 Functional Test Mode (Password Protected) ......................................................................... 227
10.8 Fault Test Mode (Password Protected).................................................................................. 227
10.9 Verify Self-Checking Test Via HMI ......................................................................................... 227
10.10 Metering Test....................................................................................................................... 228
10.11 51P — Phase Time Overcurrent .......................................................................................... 229
10.11.1 50P-1 — Instantaneous Overcurrent ...........................................................................................................230
10.11.2 50P-2 — Instantaneous Overcurrent ...........................................................................................................230
10.11.3 50P-3 — Instantaneous Overcurrent ...........................................................................................................230
10.12 51N — Neutral Time Overcurrent......................................................................................... 231
10.12.1 50N-1 — Neutral Instantaneous Overcurrent...............................................................................................231
10.12.2 50N-2 — Neutral Instantaneous Overcurrent...............................................................................................231
10.12.3 50N-3 — Neutral Instantaneous Overcurrent...............................................................................................231
10.13 46 – Negative Sequence Time Overcurrent Test ................................................................. 232
10.14 67P – Directional Time Overcurrent Test ............................................................................. 232
10.15 67N – Directional Time Overcurrent Test ............................................................................. 233
10.15.1 Negative Sequence Element........................................................................................................................233

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10.15.2 Zero Sequence Element.............................................................................................................................. 233


10.16 81 – Shed and Restore Frequency Test............................................................................... 233
10.17 Loss of Control Power and Self-Check Alarm Contact Test ................................................. 234
10.18 PCD Trouble Report Form ................................................................................................... 235
11 Single-Phase Tripping ................................................................................ 239
11.1 Overview of the Features in Single-Phase Tripping................................................................ 239
11.1.1 Conditions on Single Phase Tripping .......................................................................................................... 239
11.1.2 OPUP Mode - Only Picked Up Phases ....................................................................................................... 240
11.1.3 OOAP Mode - One Or All Phases ............................................................................................................... 241
11.2 Settings.................................................................................................................................. 242
11.2.1 Catalog Number Control.............................................................................................................................. 242
11.2.2 Settings Parameters.................................................................................................................................... 243
11.2.3 Permitted Intervals of Setting Changes ....................................................................................................... 243
11.2.4 Changing from Single-Phase to Three-Phase Operation ............................................................................ 243
11.3 Logical Input / Output............................................................................................................. 244
11.3.1 Logical Input Points ..................................................................................................................................... 244
11.3.2 Removed I/O Points .................................................................................................................................... 245
11.3.3 Modified I/O Points ...................................................................................................................................... 245
11.4 Event Logging and Counters.................................................................................................. 245
11.4.1 Operation Records ...................................................................................................................................... 245
11.4.2 Fault Records .............................................................................................................................................. 245
11.4.3 Counters...................................................................................................................................................... 246
11.5 Front Panel HMI..................................................................................................................... 246
11.5.1 Control Functions ........................................................................................................................................ 246
11.5.2 Breaker State LED ...................................................................................................................................... 247

12 Loop Control Module .................................................................................. 251


12.1 Introduction............................................................................................................................ 251
12.2 Loop Control Scheme ............................................................................................................ 251
12.3 Loop Control System Design ................................................................................................. 252
12.3.1 Typical Loop System Design ....................................................................................................................... 252
12.3.2 Sources ....................................................................................................................................................... 252
12.3.3 Sectionalizing Recloser ............................................................................................................................... 253
12.3.4 Midpoint Recloser........................................................................................................................................ 253
12.3.5 Tiepoint Recloser ........................................................................................................................................ 253
12.4 Three-Recloser Loop Control................................................................................................. 253
12.4.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................................................. 253
12.4.2 3-Recloser Fault 1 Scenario ........................................................................................................................ 254
12.4.3 3-Recloser Fault 1 Scenario Reset.............................................................................................................. 255
12.4.4 3-Recloser Fault 2 Scenario ........................................................................................................................ 255
12.4.5 3-Recloser Fault 2 Scenario Reset.............................................................................................................. 256
12.5 5-Recloser Loop Control ........................................................................................................ 256
12.5.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................................................. 256
12.5.2 5-Recloser Fault 1 Scenario ........................................................................................................................ 257
12.5.3 5-Recloser Fault 1 Scenario Reset.............................................................................................................. 258
12.5.4 5-Recloser Fault 2 Scenario ........................................................................................................................ 258
12.5.5 5-Recloser Fault 2 Scenario Reset.............................................................................................................. 259
12.5.6 5-Recloser Fault 3 Scenario ........................................................................................................................ 259
12.5.7 5-Recloser Fault 3 Scenario Reset.............................................................................................................. 260
12.6 Restoring Normal Operation .................................................................................................. 260
12.7 Four-Recloser System Operation........................................................................................... 261
12.8 Loop Control Components ..................................................................................................... 261
12.9 Basic Loop Control Settings................................................................................................... 263
12.10 LCM Operation .................................................................................................................... 264
12.10.1 Phase LEDs ................................................................................................................................................ 264
12.10.2 Reset Key and LED..................................................................................................................................... 264
12.10.3 Source Disabled Keys and LEDs ................................................................................................................ 265
12.11 PCD Loop Control Menu System ......................................................................................... 265
12.11.1 Loop Control Settings .................................................................................................................................. 266

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Table of Contents ABB Power Control Device

12.11.2 LCM Mode ...................................................................................................................................................267


12.11.3 Alt1 Select Enable........................................................................................................................................267
12.11.4 TiePoint ALT1 Enable ..................................................................................................................................267
12.11.5 Midpoint ALT1 Enable..................................................................................................................................267
12.11.6 Line Side Source..........................................................................................................................................268
12.11.7 Line VT Configuration ..................................................................................................................................268
12.11.8 Load VT Configuration .................................................................................................................................268
12.11.9 Line VT Enable ............................................................................................................................................269
12.11.10 Load VT Enable ...........................................................................................................................................269
12.11.11 Line VT Phase .............................................................................................................................................269
12.11.12 Load VT Phase ............................................................................................................................................269
12.11.13 Sectionalizing 3-Phase Operating Mode......................................................................................................269
12.11.14 Dead Bus Threshold ....................................................................................................................................270
12.11.15 Live Bus Threshold ......................................................................................................................................270
12.11.16 Dead Bus Time ............................................................................................................................................270
12.11.17 Live Bus Time ..............................................................................................................................................270
12.11.18 Voltage Regain Time ...................................................................................................................................270
12.11.19 Reset on Power Up......................................................................................................................................270
12.11.20 Sectionalizing Mode.....................................................................................................................................271
12.11.21 Sectionalizing Reset ....................................................................................................................................271
12.12 LCM Characteristics............................................................................................................. 271
12.12.1 Catalog Number Control ..............................................................................................................................271
12.12.2 Source 1.......................................................................................................................................................271
12.12.3 Source 2.......................................................................................................................................................271
12.12.4 Phase PT Configuration...............................................................................................................................271
12.12.5 Operational Modes.......................................................................................................................................271
12.12.6 LCM Parameters..........................................................................................................................................272
12.13 Loop Control Examples........................................................................................................ 274
12.14 Installing the Loop Control Module....................................................................................... 277
12.14.1 Setting the COM5 Jumper Options ..............................................................................................................277
12.14.2 Installing the COM5 Module and LCM .........................................................................................................277
12.14.3 Installing the COM5 Firmware......................................................................................................................277
12.14.4 Making the Phase Voltage Connections ......................................................................................................277
12.15 Testing the Loop Control Option .......................................................................................... 278
12.15.1 Test Mode Operation ...................................................................................................................................278
12.15.2 Source 1.......................................................................................................................................................279
12.15.3 Source 2.......................................................................................................................................................279
12.15.4 Disabled Source 1........................................................................................................................................279
12.15.5 Disabled Source 2........................................................................................................................................279
12.15.6 Alternate 2 Settings......................................................................................................................................279
12.15.7 Reset Loop Scheme ....................................................................................................................................279
12.15.8 Test..............................................................................................................................................................279
12.16 Definitions............................................................................................................................ 280
Application Note 1 - Zone Sequence Coordination...........................................285
AN1.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................. 285
AN1.2 Application .................................................................................................................. 285
AN1.3 ZSC in the PCD........................................................................................................... 286
Application Note 2 – Coordination of Automatic Circuit Reclosers with Fuses..289
Application Note 3 – Coordinating Multiple Automatic Circuit Reclosers in Series
......................................................................................................297
Application Note 4 – Using the PCD for Feeder Protection on a Primary Fused
Substation......................................................................................303
Application Note 5 – Breaker Failure Settings on Oil-Filled Recloser Retrofits &
Coordination with Hydraulic Reclosers...........................................307
AN5.1 Applying the PCD Retrofit on Oil-Filled Reclosers ....................................................... 307
AN5.2 Trip Failure Time & Close Failure Time ....................................................................... 307

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AN5.3 Applying the PCD on Systems with Downstream Hydraulic Reclosers ........................ 308
Application Note 6 – Tagging Function in the PCD: Programming with the
Enhanced Front Panel................................................................... 309
AN6.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................. 309
AN6.2 Programming the Hot Line Tag Settings...................................................................... 310
Application Note 7 – The Effect of Loop Reconfiguration and Single Phase
Tripping on Distribution System Reliability..................................... 313
AN7.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................. 313
AN7.2 Distribution Circuit ....................................................................................................... 313
AN7.3 Effect of 3-Phase Reclosing ........................................................................................ 313
AN7.4 Single Phase Tripping ................................................................................................. 316
AN7.5 Summary..................................................................................................................... 317
Appendix 1 Dimensions ................................................................................... 318
Appendix 2 Ratings and Tolerances ................................................................ 319
Appendix 3 Protection Curves ......................................................................... 321
A3.1 Notes on Applying Protection Curves .......................................................................... 321
A3.2 ANSI Curves ............................................................................................................... 321
A3.3 IEC Curves.................................................................................................................. 333
A3.4 Recloser Curves.......................................................................................................... 339
Appendix 4 Style Number Interpretation Key ................................................... 381

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List of Figures ABB Power Control Device

List of Figures
Figure 2-1 . Front Panel HMI for ANSI Units ................................................................................... 21
Figure 2-2 . HMI Menu.................................................................................................................... 27
Figure 2-3 . Typical Rear Panel ...................................................................................................... 29
Figure 2-4 . PS - Power Supply Module .......................................................................................... 30
Figure 2-5 . UPS - Uninterruptible Power Supply Modules.............................................................. 31
Figure 2-6 . DIO Type 1 - Digital Input Output Module .................................................................... 37
Figure 2-7 . DIO Type 2 - Recloser Actuator Module ...................................................................... 38
Figure 2-8 . CPU Module ................................................................................................................ 39
Figure 2-9 . COM Type 2a - Communications Module .................................................................... 41
Figure 2-10 . COM Type 3 - Communications Module .................................................................... 43
Figure 2-11 . COM Type 4 - Communications Module .................................................................... 45
Figure 2-12 . COM Type 5 – Communications Module ................................................................... 46
Figure 2-13 . PT/CT Module ........................................................................................................... 47
Figure 2-14 . PT/CT Module Jumper Locations............................................................................... 49
Figure 2-15 . Typical External Connections .................................................................................... 49
Figure 2-16 . CT/CVD Module ........................................................................................................ 50
Figure 2-17 . CT/CVD Module Jumper Locations............................................................................ 53
Figure 3-1 . Recloser Sequence ..................................................................................................... 70
Figure 3-2 . 67P (3I ) Maximum Torque Angles, Example Settings............................................... 78
Figure 3-3 . 67N (IN> ) Maximum Torque Angles, Example Settings............................................ 80
Figure 3-4 . 81S and 81 R Elements............................................................................................... 85
Figure 3-5 . 79 Cutout Time ............................................................................................................ 87
Figure 3-6 . 79C Function ............................................................................................................... 88
Figure 4-1 . AFSuite Fleet View .................................................................................................... 101
Figure 4-2 . AFSuite Help Menu ................................................................................................... 102
Figure 4-3 . Configuration / Entry Page......................................................................................... 103
Figure 4-4 . Physical I/O Status .................................................................................................... 109
Figure 4-5 . Programmable Curves Menu ..................................................................................... 110
Figure 4-6 . Miscellaneous Commands Menu ............................................................................... 111
Figure 4-7 . Protection Example - Phase Overcurrent Protection Curves...................................... 113
Figure 4-8 . Protection Example - Ground Overcurrent Protection Curves .................................... 113
Figure 4-9 . Basic Settings > Configuration Page.......................................................................... 116
Figure 4-10 . Basic Settings > Protection Page............................................................................. 117
Figure 4-11 . Basic Settings > Recloser Page............................................................................... 118
Figure 5-1 . Trip Coil Monitoring ................................................................................................... 128
Figure 5-2 . Programmable Inputs Example.................................................................................. 129
Figure 5-3 . Programmable Inputs Screen .................................................................................... 129
Figure 5-4 . Programmable Inputs Screen (Changed)................................................................... 130
Figure 5-5 . Programmable Output Example................................................................................. 140
Figure 5-6 . Programmable Outputs Screen ................................................................................. 140
Figure 5-7 . Programmable Outputs Screen (Changed)................................................................ 141
Figure 5-8 . Feedback connections................................................................................................ 143
Figure 5-9 . Feedback Example ..................................................................................................... 144
Figure 5-10 . User Logical Example............................................................................................... 145
Figure 5-11 . Programming User LEDs .......................................................................................... 146
Figure 5-12 . User LEDs Example Labeling. .................................................................................. 147
Figure 5-13 . PCD Programmable Logic ....................................................................................... 147
Figure 5-14 . Equivalent Gates ..................................................................................................... 148

Page 12 of 384 December 23, 2004 IB38-737-5


ABB Power Control Device List of Figures

Figure 5-15 . Set/Reset Latch ........................................................................................................ 149


Figure 6-1 . Load Metering Window in AFSuite............................................................................. 165
Figure 6-2 . Metering Conventions Used in the PCD..................................................................... 166
Figure 6-3 . Voltage Sag Operational Regions.............................................................................. 168
Figure 6-4 . Voltage Swell Operational Regions............................................................................ 169
Figure 7-1 . AFSuite Fault/Operation Record Download Screen ................................................... 178
Figure 7-2 . Fault Locator.............................................................................................................. 180
Figure 7-3 . Operations Summary Menu ....................................................................................... 192
Figure 7-4 . Load Profile, Wye connected VTs (firmware version 2.6 and earlier) ......................... 193
Figure 7-5 . Load Profile, Wye connected VTs (firmware version 2.7 and later) ............................ 193
Figure 7-6 . Load Profile, Delta connected VTs (all firmware versions) ......................................... 193
Figure 7-7 . Unreported Fault Records Window ............................................................................ 194
Figure 7-8 . Unreported Operations Records Window................................................................... 194
Figure 8-1 . Type 2a Communications Module.............................................................................. 201
Figure 8-2 . Type 4 Communications Module Jumper Locations................................................... 202
Figure 8-3 . Typical Application – Type 3 or 4 Comm. Module RS-485 & RS-232 ......................... 203
Figure 8-4 . Typical Application - Type 2a or 4 Communication Module Radial Mode ................... 204
Figure 8-5 . Typical Application - Analog Cellular Network............................................................ 205
Figure 10-1 . Typical Test Circuit .................................................................................................. 229
Figure 10-2 . 81S-1 and 81R-1 Mapping Programmable Outputs ................................................. 234
Figure 11-1 . OPUP Mode Logic ................................................................................................... 241
Figure 11-2 . OOAP Mode Logic................................................................................................... 242
Figure 11-3 . Single Phase Operation Records............................................................................. 245
Figure 12-1 . 5-Recloser Loop Control System ............................................................................. 252
Figure 12-2 . 3-Recloser Loop Control .......................................................................................... 254
Figure 12-3 . 3-Recloser Fault 1 Sequence of Events................................................................... 254
Figure 12-4 . 3-Recloser Fault 1 Sequence of Events................................................................... 255
Figure 12-5 . 5-Recloser Loop Control .......................................................................................... 257
Figure 12-6 . 5-Recloser Fault 1 Sequence of Events................................................................... 258
Figure 12-7 . 5-Recloser Fault 2 Sequence of Events................................................................... 259
Figure 12-8 . 5-Recloser Fault 3 Sequence of Events................................................................... 259
Figure 12-9 . Loop Control HMI..................................................................................................... 261
Figure 12-10 . Loop Control Enhanced HMI.................................................................................. 262
Figure 12-11 . COM5 Loop Control Processing Module ................................................................ 263
Figure 12-12 . Loop Control HMI in Test Mode ............................................................................. 279
Figure AN1-1 . Series Combination of Substation and Down-line Reclosers................................. 285
Figure AN1-2 . Down-Line and Backup Recloser Operations w/Zone Sequence Coordination ..... 286
Figure AN1-3 . Down-Line and Backup Recloser Operations w/o Zone Sequence Coordination .. 287
Figure AN2-1 . Time Characteristics of Fuses............................................................................... 290
Figure AN2-2 . Time Characteristics of Protective Relays............................................................. 290
Figure AN2-3 . Fuse “Downstream” of Recloser ........................................................................... 291
Figure AN2-4 . Recloser Accumulative Heating Time ................................................................... 292
Figure AN2-5 . Affect of Time Dial Setting .................................................................................... 293
Figure AN2-6 . Affect of Time Curve Adder Setting....................................................................... 293
Figure AN2-7 . Affect of Minimum Response Time Setting ........................................................... 294
Figure AN2-8 . Fuse “Upstream” of Recloser ................................................................................ 294
Figure AN3-1 . Coordination of Multiple Reclosers........................................................................ 297
Figure AN3-2 . Phase Overcurrent Curves ................................................................................... 298
Figure AN3-3 . Multiple Reclosers ................................................................................................ 298
Figure AN3-4 . Coordination of High-Set Instantaneous (50P-3) Times of Multiple Reclosers ...... 299
Figure AN3-5 . Coordination of Low-Set Instantaneous (50P-2) Times of Multiple Reclosers ....... 299

IB38-737-5 December 23, 2004 Page 13 of 384


List of Figures ABB Power Control Device

Figure AN3-6 . Relationship Between Slow Curve (51P) and Fast Curve (50P-1)......................... 300
Figure AN3-7 . Coordination of Slow (51P) and Fast (50P-1) Curves for Multiple Reclosers......... 300
Figure AN4-1 . Feeder Protection on a Primary Fused Substation................................................ 303
Figure AN4-2 . Delta-Wye Transformer......................................................................................... 303
Figure AN4-3 . Programmable Logic Diagram .............................................................................. 304
Figure AN6-1 . Hot Line Tagging Buttons on HMI ......................................................................... 309
Figure AN6-2 . Programmable Outputs for Hot Line Tag .............................................................. 310
Figure AN6-3 . Programmable Inputs for Hot Line Tag ................................................................. 311
Figure AN7-1 . Model Distribution System .................................................................................... 313
Figure AN7-2 . Radial Distribution System.................................................................................... 314
Figure AN7-3 . Use of Line Reclosers........................................................................................... 314
Figure AN7-4 . Loop Configuration with Manual Switch ................................................................ 315
Figure AN7-5 . Automatic Recloser Loop Scheme........................................................................ 315
Figure AN7-6 . 5-Recloser Loop Scheme ..................................................................................... 316
Figure AN7-7 . 3-Recloser Loop Scheme with Single Phase Tripping........................................... 317
Figure AN7-8 . 5-Recloser Loop Scheme with Single Phase Tripping........................................... 317
Figure A1-1 . PCD Dimensions..................................................................................................... 318
Figure A1-2 . PCD Panel Cutout ................................................................................................... 318
Figure A3-1 . ANSI Extremely Inverse ..................................................................................................... 322
Figure A3-2 . ANSI Very Inverse ............................................................................................................ 323
Figure A3-3 . ANSI Inverse ................................................................................................................... 324
Figure A3-4 . ANSI Short Time Inverse .................................................................................................... 325
Figure A3-5 . ANSI Short Time Extremely Inverse ...................................................................................... 326
Figure A3-6 . ANSI Definite Time ........................................................................................................... 327
Figure A3-7 . ANSI Long Time Extremely Inverse ....................................................................................... 328
Figure A3-8 . ANSI Long Time Very Inverse.............................................................................................. 329
Figure A3-9 . ANSI Long Time Inverse .................................................................................................... 330
Figure A3-10 . ANSI Standard Instantaneous ............................................................................................ 331
Figure A3-11 . ANSI Inverse Instantaneous .............................................................................................. 332
Figure A3-12 . IEC Extremely Inverse ..................................................................................................... 334
Figure A3-13 . IEC Very Inverse ............................................................................................................ 335
Figure A3-14 . IEC Inverse ................................................................................................................... 336
Figure A3-15 . IEC Long Time Inverse ..................................................................................................... 337
Figure A3-16 . IEC Definite Time............................................................................................................ 338
Figure A3-17 . Recloser Curve 1 (102) .................................................................................................... 341
Figure A3-18 . Recloser Curve 2 (135) .................................................................................................... 342
Figure A3-19 . Recloser Curve 3 (140) .................................................................................................... 343
Figure A3-20 . Recloser Curve 4 (106) .................................................................................................... 344
Figure A3-21 . Recloser Curve 5 (114) .................................................................................................... 345
Figure A3-22 . Recloser Curve 6 (136) .................................................................................................... 346
Figure A3-23 . Recloser Curve 7 (152) .................................................................................................... 347
Figure A3-24 . Recloser Curve 8 (113) .................................................................................................... 348
Figure A3-25 . Recloser Curve 8+ (111) ................................................................................................... 349
Figure A3-26 . Recloser Curve 8* ........................................................................................................... 350
Figure A3-27 . Recloser Curve 9 (131) .................................................................................................... 351
Figure A3-28 . Recloser Curve 11 (141) ................................................................................................... 352
Figure A3-29 . Recloser Curve 13 (142) ................................................................................................... 353
Figure A3-30 . Recloser Curve 14 (119) ................................................................................................... 354
Figure A3-31 . Recloser Curve 15 (112) ................................................................................................... 355
Figure A3-32 . Recloser Curve 16 (139) ................................................................................................... 356
Figure A3-33 . Recloser Curve 17 (103) ................................................................................................... 357

Page 14 of 384 December 23, 2004 IB38-737-5


ABB Power Control Device List of Figures

Figure A3-34 . Recloser Curve 18 (151) ................................................................................................... 358


Figure A3-35 . Recloser Curve A (101) .................................................................................................... 359
Figure A3-36 . Recloser Curve B (117) .................................................................................................... 360
Figure A3-37 . Recloser Curve C (133) .................................................................................................... 361
Figure A3-38 . Recloser Curve D (116) .................................................................................................... 362
Figure A3-39 . Recloser Curve E (132) .................................................................................................... 363
Figure A3-40 . Recloser Curve F (163) .................................................................................................... 364
Figure A3-41 . Recloser Curve G (121) .................................................................................................... 365
Figure A3-42 . Recloser Curve H (122) .................................................................................................... 366
Figure A3-43 . Recloser Curve J (164)..................................................................................................... 367
Figure A3-44 . Recloser Curve K-Ground (165).......................................................................................... 368
Figure A3-45 . Recloser Curve K-Phase (162) ........................................................................................... 369
Figure A3-46 . Recloser Curve L (107) .................................................................................................... 370
Figure A3-47 . Recloser Curve M (118) .................................................................................................... 371
Figure A3-48 . Recloser Curve N (104) .................................................................................................... 372
Figure A3-49 . Recloser Curve P (115) .................................................................................................... 373
Figure A3-50 . Recloser Curve R (105) .................................................................................................... 374
Figure A3-51 . Recloser Curve T (161) .................................................................................................... 375
Figure A3-52 . Recloser Curve V (137) .................................................................................................... 376
Figure A3-53 . Recloser Curve W (138) ................................................................................................... 377
Figure A3-54 . Recloser Curve Y (120) .................................................................................................... 378
Figure A3-55 . Recloser Curve Z (134) .................................................................................................... 379

IB38-737-5 December 23, 2004 Page 15 of 384


List of Tables ABB Power Control Device

List of Tables
Table 2-1 . UPS Feature Summary................................................................................................. 32
Table 2-2 . AC/DC Specifications.................................................................................................... 33
Table 2-3 . Isolated Auxiliary Output Specifications ........................................................................ 33
Table 2-4 . PT/CT Module Tap Settings for Phase and Neutral ...................................................... 48
* Typical application of this module.................................................................................................. 48
Table 2-5 . CVD Worksheet ............................................................................................................ 51
Table 2-6 . CVD Worksheet – Jumper Positions ............................................................................. 52
Table 2-7 . CT ID and ratios / Catalog Number Digits ..................................................................... 52
Table 3-1 . Configuration Settings for Protection Elements ............................................................. 55
Table 3-2 . Bank 1 / Bank 2 settings ............................................................................................... 59
Table 3-3 . 51P (3I>) Element Settings ........................................................................................... 60
Table 3-4 . 51P (3I>) Curve-Settings Details................................................................................... 61
Table 3-5 . 51N (IN>) Element Settings .......................................................................................... 62
Table 3-6 . 51N (IN>) Curve-Settings Details.................................................................................. 63
Table 3-7 . 50P-1 (3I>>1) Element Settings.................................................................................... 64
Table 3-8 . 50P-1 Curve-Settings Details........................................................................................ 65
Table 3-9 . 50N-1 (IN>>1) Element Settings ................................................................................... 66
Table 3-10 . 50N-1 Curve-Settings Details...................................................................................... 67
Table 3-11 . 50P-2 (3I>>2) Elements Settings ................................................................................ 68
Table 3-12 . 50N-2 (IN>>2) Element Settings ................................................................................. 68
Table 3-13 . 50P-3 (3I>>3) Elements Settings ................................................................................ 69
Table 3-14 . 50N-3 (IN>>>>) Element Settings ............................................................................... 69
Table 3-15 . 79 (O I) Element Settings ......................................................................................... 71
Table 3-16 . Cold Load Time Settings............................................................................................. 74
Table 3-17 . SEF Element Settings................................................................................................. 75
Table 3-18 . Two-Phase 50P Tripping Setting................................................................................. 76
Table 3-19 . 46 (Insc>) Element Settings........................................................................................ 76
Table 3-20 . 46 Curve-Settings Details ........................................................................................... 77
Table 3-21 . 67P (3I> ) Element Settings...................................................................................... 78
Table 3-22 . 67P Curve-Settings Details ......................................................................................... 79
Table 3-23 . 67N (IN> ) Element Settings..................................................................................... 81
Table 3-24 . 67N Curve-Settings Details......................................................................................... 82
Table 3-25 . 32P (I1 ) Element Settings........................................................................................ 83
Table 3-26 . 32N (I2 )Element Settings ........................................................................................ 83
Table 3-27 . 81 Element Settings.................................................................................................... 85
Table 3-28 . 27 (U<) Element Settings............................................................................................ 86
Table 3-29 . 59 (U>) Element Settings............................................................................................ 87
Table 3-30 . Breaker Failure Settings ............................................................................................. 89
Table 3-31 . Alarm Settings ............................................................................................................ 90
Table 3-32 . Initial Values of Counters Settings .............................................................................. 91
Table 3-33 . Curve Settings that Apply to All Time Overcurrent Elements....................................... 94
Table 4-1 . AFSuite Menu Structure.............................................................................................. 104
Table 4-2 . Protection Example – Phase Protection Settings ........................................................ 114
Table 4-3 . Protection Example – Ground Protection Settings ...................................................... 114
Table 4-4 . Protection Example – Recloser Settings ..................................................................... 115
Table 5-1 . Logical Input Functions ............................................................................................... 124
Table 5-2 . Logical Output Functions ............................................................................................ 132
Table 5-3 . Set/Reset Latch Programming .................................................................................... 149

Page 16 of 384 December 23, 2004 IB38-737-5


ABB Power Control Device List of Tables

Table 5-4 . Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRxx-000x-xx-xxxx............ 150
Table 5-5 . Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRxx-001x-xx-xxxx............ 150
Table 5-6 . Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRxx-002x-xx-xxxx............ 151
Table 5-7 . Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRxx-003x-xx-x0xx............ 151
Table 5-8 . Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRxx-003x-xx-x1xx............ 152
Table 5-9 . Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRxx-004x-xx-x0xx............ 152
Table 5-10 . Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRxx-004x-xx-x1xx.......... 153
Table 5-11 . Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRx**x-x#01x-xx-xxxx ...... 153
Table 5-12 . Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRx**x***- x#02x-xx-xxxx (w/o
ISD Interposer)............................................................................................................ 154
Table 5-13 . Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRx**x***- x#02x-xx-xxxx (w/
ISD Interposer)............................................................................................................ 155
Table 5-14 . Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRx**x- x#03x-xx-x0xx ..... 156
Table 5-15 . Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRx**x- x#03x-xx-x1xx ..... 157
Table 5-16 . Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRx**x- x#04x-xx-x0xx ..... 158
Table 5-17 . Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRx**x- x#04x-xx-x1xx ..... 159
Table 6-1 . Voltage Sag Settings .................................................................................................. 169
Table 6-2 . Voltage Swell Settings ................................................................................................ 170
Table 7-1 . Operations Record Value Information – Pre-firmware version 3.0............................... 182
Table 7-2 . Operations Record Value Information – Firmware version 3.0 and later...................... 182
Table 7-3 . Operations Log ........................................................................................................... 184
Table 7-4 . Value Type Definitions ................................................................................................ 191
Table 8-1 . Communication Settings ............................................................................................. 198
Table 8-2 . RS-232 Port Pin Connections ..................................................................................... 199
Table 8-3 . RS-485 Port ................................................................................................................ 199
Table 8-4 . Communication Module Feature Sets ......................................................................... 200
Table 8-5 . Comm. Module Type 3 and Type 4 RTS/CTS Control, Jumper H302 Settings............ 203
Table 8-6 . Comm. Module Type 3 and Type 4 RTS Drop Delay Time, Jumper H202 Settings..... 203
Table 8-7 . Comm. Module Type 4 Fiber Optic Mode Control, Jumper H303 Settings .................. 204
Table 8-8 . Communication Module Type 5 Jumper Settings ........................................................ 205
Table 8-9 . Modem Dialing Modifiers............................................................................................. 207
Table 10-1 . When Password is Required..................................................................................... 221
Table 10-2 . Configuration Settings for Test Procedures............................................................... 224
Table 10-3 . Primary Settings for Test Procedures........................................................................ 225
Table 11-1 . Single-Phase Tripping Configuration Setting............................................................. 243
Table 11-2 . Single-Phase Tripping Primary and Alternate Settings.............................................. 243
Table 11-3 . Changing from Single-Phase to Three-Phase Operation........................................... 244
Table 11-4 . Single-Phase Tripping Counters ............................................................................... 246
Table 12-1 . 3-Recloser Fault 1 Sequence of Events .................................................................... 255
Table 12-2 . 3-Recloser Fault 2 Sequence of Events .................................................................... 255
Table 12-3 . 5-Recloser Fault 1 Sequence of Events .................................................................... 258
Table 12-4 . 5-Recloser Fault 2 Sequence of Events .................................................................... 259
Table 12-5 . 5-Recloser Fault 3 Sequence of Events .................................................................... 260
Table 12-6 . Loop Control Settings ............................................................................................... 266
Table 12-7 . LCM Operational Models .......................................................................................... 272
Table 12-8 . LCM Parameters....................................................................................................... 272
Table 12-9 . Typical Sectionalizing Recloser Settings for 3-Recloser System ............................... 274
Table 12-10 . Typical Tie-Point Recloser Settings for 3-Recloser System..................................... 275
Table 12-11 . Typical Sectionalizing Recloser Settings for 5-Recloser System ............................. 275
Table 12-12 . Typical Midpoint Recloser Settings for 5-Recloser System ..................................... 276
Table 12-13 . Typical Tie-Point Recloser Settings for 5-Recloser System..................................... 276

IB38-737-5 December 23, 2004 Page 17 of 384


List of Tables ABB Power Control Device

Table AN4-1 . Protection Settings................................................................................................. 304


Table AN4-2 . Programming of PCD Inputs and Outputs .............................................................. 305
Table AN4-3 . Programmable Inputs for Single-Phase Trip Units in Single-Phase Mode .............. 305
Table AN5-1 . Minimum Reclose Time, Trip and Close Failure Settings for Retrofit Applications.. 307
Table AN7-1 . Summary of Benefits of Reclosing ......................................................................... 316
Table A2-1 . Ratings and Tolerances............................................................................................ 319
Table A3-1 . Device Interrupting Times......................................................................................... 321
Table A3-2 . ANSI Curves............................................................................................................. 321
Table A3-3 . IEC Curves............................................................................................................... 333
Table A3-4 . Recloser Curves....................................................................................................... 339

Page 18 of 384 December 23, 2004 IB38-737-5


ABB Power Control Device 1 Introduction

1 Introduction

1 INTRODUCTION
The Power Control Device (PCD) is an easy to use, powerful, microprocessor-based control unit
that provides extensive recloser protection on distribution automation systems. The
environmentally hardened unit combines control, monitoring, protection, reclosing elements and
communication, in one economical package. Power quality, accurate metering, load profile and
monitoring provide crucial system information for managing competitive distribution systems.
Available for 5A- or 1A- secondary current transformers (CT), the PCD uses recloser 52A and
52B auxiliary contacts for logic input signals. The PCD can be applied with voltage transformers
(VT) connected for operation at 69 or 120 volts AC phase-to-ground (wye), or 120 volts AC
phase-to-phase (delta or open delta with phase B grounded).
The PCD empowers distribution automation solutions for the electric power system because it is
equipped with DNP 3.0, Modbus® RTU, Modbus® ASCII and IEC60870-5-101 communication
protocols. The PCD operates remotely via these protocols using an auto-detect protocol
algorithm that allows system reconfiguration, fault analysis and transfer of protection settings,
making any distribution system more efficient. In addition, the PCD is equipped with a powerful
data gathering capability to allow analysis of system loading, planning and upgrading. The
integrated battery charger monitors and maximizes battery life and remote battery testing, and
fault interruption accumulation simplifies maintenance planning and eliminates time-based
maintenance procedures. All of these features save user time and resources.
The PCD provides the following features in one integrated package:
• Local human-machine interface (HMI)
• Six front panel Light Emitting Diode (LED) status indicators for: Pickup, Lockout, Phase
O/C, Ground O/C, USER 1 and USER 2
• USER 1 and USER 2 status indicators are user programmable
• Large backlit 2 x 20 character Liquid Crystal Display (LCD)
• Simple menu-driven configurator for Meter, Settings, Records, Operations and Test using
four arrow (◄ ► ▲ ▼), Enter and Clear pushbuttons
• LCD displays phase currents (IA, IB, IC and IN) during normal operation with P for Primary
Settings employed
• LCD displays fault information after a trip
• Front panel pushbuttons with red LED indicators for Remote Blocked, Ground blocked,
Reclose Blocked, Alt 1 Settings, Counters, PROG 1 and PROG 2
• PROG 1 and PROG 2 are user programmable outputs
• Hot Line Tag red LED with ON and OFF pushbuttons
• Self Check LED, green means normal and red means fail
• Front panel OPEN and CLOSE pushbuttons
• OPEN with green LED and CLOSE with red LED indicator
• Front-mounted isolated RS-232 data port for easy download and upload of data on-site
• Two levels of password protected settings and controls
• Expanded operating temperature range, from -40°C to +70°C

IB38-737-5 December 23, 2004 Page 19 of 384


1 Introduction ABB Power Control Device

• AC or DC powered for flexibility


• Integrated battery charging and monitoring for AC-powered units
1 INTRODUCTION

• Metering: currents, voltages, watts, VARs, watt and VAR-hours, power factor, frequency
• Peak demand currents, watts and VARs with time stamp
• Load profile capability: currents, power factor and voltage for 13, 40, 80 or 160 days
• Summation of recloser interrupting duty and recloser operation counter
• Three selectable protection setting groups: Primary, Alternate 1 and Alternate 2
• Phase time and instantaneous overcurrent protection: 51P, 50P-1, 50P-2, 50P-3
• Ground time and instantaneous overcurrent protection: 51N, 50N-1, 50N-2, 50N-3
• Negative sequence (I2) time overcurrent protection: 46
• Multishot reclosing: 79-1, -2, -3, -4, -5
• Positive sequence phase directional time overcurrent protection: 67
• Negative sequence ground directional time overcurrent protection: 67N
• Two load shed, two restoration and two overfrequency elements: 81S-1/2, 81R-1/2, 81O-1/2
• Single- and three-phase undervoltage and single-phase overvoltage elements: 27-1P, 27-3P,
59-1P and 59-3P
• Breaker failure detection
• Cold load timer element
• Zone sequence coordination element
• Fault locator algorithm estimates fault resistance and distance to fault
• Oscillographic data storage captures 64 cycles of current and voltage waveform data
• Fault summary and detailed fault records for last 32 trips
• Operations (sequence of events) record for last 128 operations
• Continuous self-diagnostics on power supply, memory elements and microprocessors
• Battery backed-up clock maintains date and time during control power interruptions
• Isolated dual rear port RS-232 and RS-485 ports (only one active at a time)
• Optional fiber optic communications for superior noise-free communications
Due to its fully integrated package, the PCD can function as a control for several types of
reclosers and circuit breakers. The following are various operating combinations available:
• Control for the ABB VR-3S or OVR (Outdoor Vacuum Recloser)
• Control for ABB R-Breakers
• Control for Switchgear
• Retrofit Control for ABB ES and ESV Reclosers
• Retrofit Control for some non-ABB electronically controlled reclosers
For comprehensive information on the PCD, including application notes, FAQ’s, update letters,
contacts, etc, register for our feeder automation website at www10.abb.com.

Page 20 of 384 December 23, 2004 IB38-737-5


ABB Power Control Device 2 Exploring the Front and Rear Panels

2 Exploring the Front and Rear Panels


2.1 Front Panel HMI
The PCD HMI (Human Machine Interface) directly allows programming, interrogation and
control of the recloser or circuit breaker. Figure 2-1 represents the current production front panel
HMI for ANSI units. The changes included in the current version reflect substantial feedback
from customers. Notably, the size of the LCD has been increased, the LCD temperature

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


compensation improved, and the optical port has been replaced by a standard RS-232 port.

Figure 2-1. Front Panel HMI for ANSI Units

IB38-737-5 December 23, 2004 Page 21 of 384


2 Exploring the Front and Rear Panels ABB Power Control Device

2.2 Status-Indication LED Targets


2.2.1 Pickup
The pickup indicates the value on either phase or neutral is above the minimum pickup setting as
programmed in the PCD overcurrent elements. This indicator is only illuminated when the
overcurrent condition is present.

2.2.2 Phase O/C


The phase O/C is the target indicator for phase overcurrent trip. This indicator is latched on after
2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

a trip, and reset by pressing the “C” button once on the HMI, or by resetting the targets from
SCADA.

2.2.3 Ground O/C


Ground O/C is the target indicator for ground overcurrent trip. This indicator is latched on after a
trip, and reset by pressing the “C” button once on the HMI, or by resetting the targets from
SCADA.

2.2.4 Lockout
Lockout indicates the recloser/breaker has completed its programmed reclosing sequence, and has
locked out with the recloser/breaker in the open position. It also illuminates when the recloser is
opened manually. If using single phase tripping mode, refer to Section 11 for single-phase
lockout indication.

2.2.5 Self Check


Self-Check is an LED that indicates the functional status of the PCD. Green indicates the PCD
has successfully passed its internal diagnostic test and is functioning properly. Red indicates the
PCD has failed its internal diagnostic test. Whenever the Self Check red LED is illuminated, all
protection elements are disabled, the Self-Test dedicated contact on the rear panel (on the PS or
UPS module) will drop out, and alarm contacts are activated. Remove the faulty module from
service and replace as soon as possible.

2.2.6 USER 1 and USER 2


The USER 1 and USER 2 LEDs located at the top, upper right corner of the HMI, are assigned to
logical inputs using the Programmable Inputs menu in AFSuite. See 5.4.2 for further details on
setting up these LEDs

2.3 Control Buttons with LED Targets


2.3.1 Remote Blocked
Remote Blocked is enabled whenever the red LED is lit. During this time, no control or setting
changes can be made through the rear communication port, including communication through
AFSuite and SCADA.
The Remote Blocked condition can be enabled either by pressing the Remote Blocked pushbutton
on the front panel or by using the Remote Blocked logical input (RBI). A logical output (RBA)
can be mapped to a physical output using the programmable I/O (see Section 5).

Page 22 of 384 December 23, 2004 IB38-737-5


ABB Power Control Device 2 Exploring the Front and Rear Panels

Important: Exercise caution if using the Remote Blocked logical input in the programmable
mapping. Setting this will disallow further change of settings from the control if the
contact is energized.

2.3.2 Ground Blocked


When lit, Ground Blocked will disable all ground overcurrent elements (50N-1, 50N-2, 50N-3,
51N, 67N and Sensitive Earth Fault (SEF)). The Ground Blocked condition can be enabled using
three different methods: (1) press the Ground Blocked pushbutton on the front panel, (2) use the
Ground Torque Control logical input (GRD), or (3) use the SCADA Ground Block/Unblock data
points. Any one of these procedures will turn on the front panel LED and enable the blocking.

2.3.3 Reclose Blocked

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


Reclose Blocked control is used to disable the 79 (reclose) elements. The Reclose Blocked
condition can be enabled three ways: (1) press the Reclose Blocked pushbutton, (2) use the
recloser enable logical input (43A), or (3) use the remote (SCADA) 43A Block/Unblock points.
The front panel LED will illuminate for any source of blocking.
It is important to note that the Reclose Blocked affects only automatic reclosing functions.
Manual close operations, such as the front panel close, logical input close, and HMI menu
selection close are not blocked by Reclose Blocked, though there is a SCADA point available to
permit closing based on the status of the 43A logical input.

2.3.4 Alternate 1 Settings


The Alternate 1 setting is active when the ALT1 pushbutton is pressed and the red LED is lit.
When this setting is active, A1 is displayed in the lower right corner of the LCD display.
Alternate 1 settings can be enabled either by pressing the ALT1 settings pushbutton on the front
panel or by using the Alternate 1 settings logical input (ALT1). This is conveniently used for
storm or seasonal settings during maintenance operations.
Alternate 1 settings take priority over Primary Settings, i.e., alternate settings cannot be
overridden by Primary settings. Likewise, Alternate 2 settings have priority over Alternate 1
settings. If Alternate 2 settings are activated by SCADA, a logical input, or by the Loop Control
Module (LCM) (for units with the loop control option), they cannot be overridden by Alternate 1
or Primary settings.
If the PCD and the LCM are in a Mid-Point or Tie-Point loop control scheme, Alternate 1 settings
may be enabled. The setting logic for this method is described in Section 12 of this manual.
Important note on Ground Blocked, Reclose Blocked, & Alternate Settings Buttons: The
front panel control buttons and remote control are mutually resetting, i.e., if block
functions or alternate settings are set remotely, they can be overridden using the HMI.
The opposite is also true: the remote source can clear a block set locally at the HMI.
However, this is NOT true when using logical inputs (using the PCDs programmable logic
feature). Activation of these functions using logical inputs cannot be overridden by
remote or local sources.

2.3.5 SEF Blocked


Units prior to the “Enhanced Front Panel” have an SEF (Sensitive Earth Fault) Blocked button. If
applicable, when illuminated, the SEF element is blocked. The SEF Blocked control works
essentially the same as the Ground Blocked, except it affects only the SEF element. The SEF
Blocked condition can be enabled by pressing the SEF Blocked pushbutton on the front panel,
using the SEF Blocked logical input (SEF), or activating the ground block function. The front
panel LED will illuminate on any of these blocking sources.

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2.3.6 Counters
Pressing the Counters pushbutton reports the status of the recloser/breaker operation counter
(BrkrOp) and overcurrent trips (OC Trip). When activated from a key, the counters will appear in
the LCD in alternating screens as follows:
When the unit is in three-phase mode as defined in Configuration Settings:

BrkrOp: nnnn OC Trip: A: nnnn B: nnnn


C: nnnn N: nnnn

When the unit is in single-phase mode as defined in Configuration Settings:


2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

BrkrOp: A: nnnn B: nnnn OC Trip: A: nnnn B: nnnn


C: nnnn C: nnnn N: nnnn

The above information appears for 10 seconds and then the view returns to what was displayed
before the Counters button was pressed. While the PCD displays the counters, the Counters LED
remains on.

2.3.7 PROG 1 (Battery Test)


Pressing this pushbutton will initiate a battery test sequence (Section 2.5.3.6.1). The LED target
will remain illuminated for the duration of the test.

2.3.8 PROG 2 (Phase Select)


For all PCDs with older versions of the HMI (e.g. without Hot Line Tag buttons on HMI) that are
using firmware version 2.52 or higher, the PROG 2 function is enabled to report the status of the
recloser/breaker operation counter. Refer to Counters (Section 2.3.6) for a functional description.
In firmware version 3.0, the PROG 2 provides the ability to select a phase for manual
independent phase trip or close. For this feature to be enabled, the following conditions must be
met:
• The PCD control must have the single phase tripping option
• Configuration Settings > Trip Mode = “1 Phase”
• Configuration Settings > Prog2 Func. = “PhasSel” (default is “Disabled”)
When this criteria is met, the PROG 2 button will permit the selection of a phase for manual
independent phase operation.
Press the PROG 2 button. “Operate Phase A” will appear in the LCD.
If you want to TRIP or CLOSE A phase, press the OPEN or CLOSE button while the desired
phase is displayed.
If a different phase is desired, press PROG 2 again to advance to the B or C phase.
Pressing the Clear button, Enter button, or Counters button will exit the PROG 2/Independent
phase select menu. Likewise, when in the PCDs menu, or when Counter information is being
displayed, the PROG 2 button will be disabled.
When in Hot Line Tag mode, closing is disallowed.

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2.4 Recloser/Breaker Status LED and Direct Controls


2.4.1 Close
Pressing the Close pushbutton sends a close signal to the recloser or circuit breaker. An
additional setting allows a fixed time delay before closing the recloser or circuit breaker. This
setting is accessible via the Configuration Settings menu. The Close Delay Time setting will
allow a delay close of 0 to 250 seconds after pressing the Close button. A red LED adjacent to
the Close button signifies the recloser or circuit breaker is closed. The Close button is disabled
by the Hot Line Tag / Close Block (CLSBLK) function.

2.4.2 Open

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


Pressing the Open pushbutton sends an open signal to the recloser or circuit breaker. A green
LED adjacent to the Open button signifies the recloser or circuit breaker is open.

2.4.3 Recloser Position LED


A blinking LED, alternating between red and green, indicates that the integrity of the 52A or 52B
contacts is indeterminate, or that the recloser or circuit breaker is in a breaker failed state.

2.4.4 Hot Line Tag


Pressing the Hot Line Tag button activates the TAGBTN logical output. Programming to activate
the CLSBLK logical input (and any other desired logical inputs) through Programmable I/O
mapping is required. The associated LED for the Hot Line Tag button illuminates whenever the
CLSBLK input is activated. Refer to Application Note 6 for details on programming the Hot Line
Tag function.

2.4.5 LCD
The LCD of the PCD displays two lines of 20 characters.
High or low temperature extremes will affect the illuminated visibility of this display. In the
event the display becomes unreadable, increase the LCD contrast by pressing the down-arrow key
while the normal LCD display is in view (which displays the present load current values). The
default contrast setting of the LCD can also be changed with a similar setting in the Configuration
Menu of AFSuite.
The following displays and menus are available through the HMI:
Continuous Display—shows currents and which settings are enabled
Post-Fault Display—shows faulted elements, phase(s) and fault currents for last fault
until targets are reset
Remote Tagging Message—When set to do Remote Tagging in the Programmable I/O,
and tagging is activated by SCADA, will display “Warning: Remote Tag Applied”.
Figure 2-2 shows an outline of all the menus available through the HMI.

2.4.6 Enter Key


Press the Enter key first to enter the menu tree for displaying information or changing settings.
To move down the menu tree to a sub-menu, scroll to the sub-menu name using the up and down
arrow keys, and then press the Enter key. The Enter key also accepts a new setting value or
records the choice selected using the left and right arrow keys.

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2.4.7 Left and Right Arrow Keys


Use the left and right arrow keys to decrease or increase, respectively, a setting value or record
number. Also, use them to move from left to right within the password string. Hold down or
repeatedly press the arrow keys to change the setting value.

2.4.8 Up and Down Arrow Keys


Use the up and down arrow keys to move through the various menus and to change the character
value when you enter the alphanumeric password.
When the LCD display is in normal view (which shows the present load-current values), press the
down arrow key to increase the contrast of the LCD display and pres the up arrow key to reduce
the LCD display contrast.
2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

2.4.9 Clear Key


Clear key usage:
• Return to the previous menu (i.e., move up the menu tree)
• Reset LED targets and the LCD display after a fault (push “C” once)
• Scroll through all metered values (push “C” twice). This menu scrolls through Demand
Values, then Min/Max Demands, and lastly Load Values. To skip over any of these sets of
values, press the “C” button again. After the last Load Value is displayed, the screen will
return to the normal metered values.
• Reset the peak demand values (push “C” three times)

2.4.10 PCD System Reset


Simultaneously press the “C”, “E” and up-arrow keys to reset the system. This resets the
microprocessor and re-initiates the software program. During a system reset, no information or
settings are lost. In addition, the breaker will not operate upon a system reset as it only “reads”
the position of the 52a/b switches.

2.4.11 RS-232 Serial Front Port


A RS-232 serial port on the front panel HMI is useful for connecting a PC to the PCD for data
acquisition. This is an independent port from the rear panel port, and can be used for
programming locally while the rear port remains on SCADA. The front port is fixed to 9600
baud and address 0.

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Figure 2-2. HMI Menu

Main Menu
Meter
Settings
Records
Operations
Test

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


Meter Menu Settings Menu Records Menu Operations Menu* Test Menu
Load Show Settings Fault Summary Trip Breaker Self Test
Demand Change Settings* Fault Record Close Breaker Contact Inputs
Max/Min Demand Unit Information Operations Record Force Phy. Input Output Contacts
Reset Energy Mtrs Set Fact. Defaults* Operations Summary Force Phy. Output Func. Test Mode
Power Quality PQ Record Set/Clear ULO Fault Test Mode
Force Logical Input Battery Test Mode
Select Sett.Bank

Show Settings Change Settings Unit Information Set Fact. Defaults


Prim Settings Prim Settings CAT xxxxxxxxxxxxxx Allows resetting of all
Alt1 Settings Alt1 Settings SERIAL #: xxxxxx settings to original
Alt2 Settings Alt2 Settings CPU ROM: Vx.xx factory defaults.
Configuration B2 Prim Settings ** FP ROM: Vx.xx Includes protection,
Alarm Settings B2 Alt1 Settings ** COMM ROM: Vx.xx logic and
communication
Clock B2 Alt2 Settings ** UPS ROM : Vx.xx
settings
Communications Configuration CT/PT CAL: Vx.xx
PQ Settings Counter Settings MthrBd ID: xxx xx
LCM Settings Alarm Settings Slot a ID: xxx xx
Clock Slot b ID: xxx xx
Communications Slot c ID: xxx xx
Slot d ID: xxx xx
Slot e ID: xxx xx
Slot f ID: xxx xx

* Password protected

** If enabled in Configuration settings

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2.5 Modules
2.5.1 Introduction
The PCD is packaged in a metal case suitable for conventional flush mounting in a pole-mounted
cabinet. All connections to the PCD are made at clearly identified terminals on the rear of the
unit. The PCD uses a six-slot card case with the slots defined as follows:
Slot A: PS or UPS
Slot B: VR Recloser Control DIO (Type 2) or DIO (Type 1)
2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

Slot C: DIO (Type 1) – if applicable


Slot D: CPU (Type 2)
Slot E: COM (Type 3, Type 4 or Type 5)
Slot F: PT/CT (Type 5, Type 6, Type 7, Type 8, Type 9 or Type A)

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Figure 2-3. Typical Rear Panel

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

2.5.2 PS – Power Supply Module


The Power Supply (PS) module accepts only DC voltage. The PS module can only reside in the
first slot (Slot A) of the PCD case. Depending on the PCD catalog number, the PS module is
available for operation with three different voltage levels: 24 VDC, 48 VDC or 125 VDC. In
addition, the PS module provides three binary output contacts, a self-check (Form C) relay
output, and four binary input contacts. Each of the three binary output contacts have factory
default settings for normally open (NO). Binary output 1 (Out 1) is programmable as a normally
closed (NC) contact.
To change Out 1a from a NO to NC configuration, ensure the PCD is de-energized. Remove the
two green Phoenix connectors from the PS module terminal block and the nut securing the

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ground wire. Remove the two screws securing the PS module to the PCD housing. Insert a thin
flat screwdriver along the right edge of the module and firmly wedge the screwdriver against the
PCD case to slide the PS module out of the PCD case. With the PS module removed, locate a red
jumper labeled “J1” on the printed circuit board; looking at the printed circuit board, the red
jumper is vertically orientated. Carefully remove the orange jumper then re-insert with a
horizontal orientation. Out 1a is now configured for NC output. Reinsert the PS module into the
PCD housing, following the procedure in reverse order. Energize the PCD and verify Out 1a is
now a NC contact.

Figure 2-4. PS - Power Supply Module


2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

2.5.3 UPS – Uninterruptible Power Supply Module


The UPS is supplied on all AC powered units. In early 2004, three new modules have been
introduced, each having a specific purpose and are identified as UPS Type 2 (UPST2), UPS Type
3 (UPST3), and UPS Type 4 (UPST4). Refer to Figure 2-5 for pin arrangements of all modules.
The original UPS will herein be identified as UPS Type 1. For information on the UPS Type 1,
refer to any manual prior to this issue.
The Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) module can only reside in the first slot (Slot A) of the
PCD. The UPS module contains AC power input, 24/48 V battery charger, a 12/24 VDC
auxiliary output, temperature sensor and self-check contact.
The UPS Module provides battery backup and maintenance functions for the PCD. Features
include:
• Operation from an AC or DC input
• Supports 24 VDC or 48 VDC lead acid batteries
• Battery float voltage is temperature compensated for maximum battery capacity
• Battery temperature, voltage and charger currents are available for display via the PCD HMI
• A battery test can be performed on request from the PCD front panel (PROG 1), via SCADA,
or configuration software

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• Provides a status check single-pole-double-throw (SPDT) relay output

Figure 2-5. UPS - Uninterruptible Power Supply Modules

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


2.5.3.2 UPS Type 2, Type 3 and Type 4

The UPS Type 2 is primarily intended as a direct replacement/upgrade for the UPS Type1 (all
legacy units). No other changes (control wiring or PCD firmware) are required. The most
important new features are as follows:
• Universal AC/DC input ranges
• Addition of isolated 12/24V auxiliary output
The UPS Type 3 and UPST Type 4 have new features that are not reverse compatible with the
UPS Type 1. The most important new features are as follows:

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• Universal AC/DC input ranges


• Addition of isolated 12/24V auxiliary output
• Input isolation
• Integration of Battery Assist Module
• Faster battery charge (due to integration of capacitor assist circuitry)
• Requires PCD firmware version 2.7 or later
Table 2-1 gives a feature summary for the UPS Type 2, Type 3 and Type 4.
2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

Table 2-1. UPS Feature Summary


Feature UPST2 UPST3 UPST4
Backwards compatible to UPST1 X
Isolated AC/DC Input 90->265 VAC, 50->150 VAC,
250 VDC 125 VDC
Battery Voltages (set by style number – not field 24V, 48V
changeable)
Battery Charge Voltage varies with ambient X X X
temperature for maximum battery capacity
Battery Test: Automatic or Manual X X X
Isolated 12V, 8W Auxiliary Output (can be X X X
configured for 24V)
Switched DC output X
Status “Self Check” Relay (SPDT output) X X X
Integrated Battery Assist Module X X

2.5.3.2.2 AC/DC Input:


See the Table 2 for specific rating information for each type UPS.
The UPST2, UPST3 and UPST4 are designed to operate on a wide range of AC or DC inputs.
Above this range, surge suppression devices will clear fuse F1. For low inputs the UPS will shut
down non-critical features such as battery charge and battery test. For even lower inputs, the UPS
will shut down the input and the UPS will power the PCD from the external battery. If operating
without AC, if the battery is not available or it is depleted, the PCD will be powered down.

The Type 2 and Type 3 are intended to operate from nominal voltages in the 110VAC to 208
VAC range, or from a 250 VDC station battery. The module functions correctly at up to 265
VAC input and down to 90 VAC. For sustained voltages above 265 VAC, fuse F1 will blow. For
voltages below 100 VAC battery charge is disabled. For sustained voltages below 90 VAC, the
power supplies input converter will shut down and the lead acid battery will be used to power the
PCD.
The Type 4 is intended for 125 VDC station batteries and for 90 VAC nominal power systems.
For voltages above 150 VAC, F1 will blow. For voltages below 50 VAC, the power supplies
input will shutdown and the lead acid battery will be used to power the PCD.

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Table 2-2. AC/DC Specifications


Feature UPST2 and UPST3 UPST4
Recommended nominal voltage 110<->208 VAC or 90 VAC or 125 VDC
250 VDC Station Station Battery
Battery
Battery charger stops <100 VAC <60 VAC
Input converter shuts down, PCD runs off <90 VAC <50 VAC
battery
Maximum input (F1 may blow above this 265 VAC 150 VAC
level)

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


Fuse F1 (5x20mm) 2 Amp Slow Blow 4 Amp Slow Blow
Isolation (hipot) is to ANSI C37.90 Yes Yes
PCD and Aux Out shutdown voltage (while 48VDC modules - 40V 48VDC modules - 40V
on battery power) 24VDC modules - 20V 24VDC modules - 20V

2.5.3.2.3 Auxiliary Output voltages


There are two types: Non isolated and isolated.
Isolated Auxiliary Output:
The isolated auxiliary voltage is switch selectable for 12V or 24V. Both voltage settings can
supply 8 W outputs. The output is protected by fuse F2. All UPST2/3 and 4 units ship with the
isolated auxiliary voltage set to 12V.
The UPS or the PCD does not detect the isolated auxiliary voltage setting.
If the voltage is changed to 24V, a label clearly indicating 24V needs to be placed on the modules
faceplate.
To configure the Isolated Auxiliary Output for 24V:
1. Remove the UPS from the PCD.
2. Move the J10 jumper from pins 1&2 to pins 2&3.
3. Place a “24V Isolated Aux” label on the faceplate.
4. Reinstall the UPS card.
5. Power up the PCD and verify the auxiliary output voltage.

Table 2-3. Isolated Auxiliary Output Specifications


Availability All UPST2/3/4
Voltage 12V or 24V jumper selected.
Ships as 12V.
Power 8W Continuous (20W peak)
Isolation (hipot) To ANSI C37.90
Fuse F2 (5x20mm) 2 Amp Slow Blow

2.5.3.2.4 Nonisolated Auxiliary Output:


This output has the same features as the auxiliary output on the UPST1. Basically, the output
tracks the battery charge voltage when available; otherwise the output tracks the battery voltage.
At least 10 W is available. The output is not fused.

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2.5.3.2.5 Battery Functions

UPST2/3/4 modules support 24 or 48 V batteries (by build option). The basic features are:
• Battery charge with charge voltage a function of temperature
• Operation off of the battery during AC input failure
• Battery test
• Controlled shutdown of the PCD for low battery voltage
Battery Charge:
2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

Charge current for UPST3 and UPST4 modules peaks at 1 amp. The time to charge a 12 amp-
hour battery bank is approximately one day.
Note on UPST2: Most UPST2 applications will be used with the external Capacitor Assist
Module (CAM). This external CAM will restrict battery charge to a trickle charge only. Battery
charge times for UPST2 applications with the CAM will be unchanged from PCDs with the
USPT1. Typically will require 8 days for full charge.
The battery charger only runs when the AC/DC input voltage is above a minimum level (see the
summary), and when the UPSs internal temperature is not excessive.
The charge voltage is a function of ambient temperature, with the temperature sensed by an
external thermistor. However, if the external thermistor is missing, the module’s onboard
temperature is used for calculating the battery voltage.
Operation off of battery:
During AC/DC input failure, the UPS powers the PCD from the battery. The UPS then monitors
the battery voltage and shuts down the PCD on a low battery condition (See Table 2).
Once the UPS has shutdown due to low battery voltage, the only way to restart the PCD is by
restoring the AC/DC input or by pressing the battery start button (provided the battery voltage is
an acceptable level.)
Note on UPST2: The battery start feature is functional on the UPS Type 2. However, most
UPST2 installations will include an external Capacitor Assist Module. This external
module will defeat the battery start feature. With the CAM you must restore the AC/DC
input to restart the PCD.

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Battery Test:
The UPS tests the battery when requested by the PCDs CPU card. The battery test simulates the
energy draw similar to that for operation of a recloser. The request for a test can be manually or
automatically generated. Battery test requests are refused under these conditions:
• Must have one minute cool down between tests
• Loss of AC/DC input
• High ambient temperature

2.5.3.3 AC Input and Isolation


The AC input requires a nominal supply of 120 VAC at 80 VA maximum. The operating voltage

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


range is -15% to +10%, or 102 to 132 VAC.
The AC power input is not internally isolated from the switched DC output, battery, or
temperature sense terminals. Any connection between the AC power inputs and the other UPS
terminals (except for the self-check relay outputs, which are fully isolated) will damage the UPS
module. Unwanted connections can occur via a grounded battery, grounded load on the Switched
DC Output, or during testing.
Note: The UPS module AC input power uses an isolation transformer. Use of a 120/240 V dual-
primary transformer affords the additional option of 240 VAC input from a voltage
transformer, with 120 VAC input voltage to the PCD.

2.5.3.4 Startup
With proper AC voltage applied to the UPS AC input, the UPS module automatically begins
operation. However, if no AC voltage is present and the UPS module is connected to a charged
battery, the UPS does not start automatically. This is a safety feature designed to avoid
unexpected startups, saving both the UPS module and the battery.

2.5.3.5 Switched DC Out


The Switched DC Out provides DC voltage to auxiliary equipment such as a radio transceiver or
telephone modem. The Switched DC Output supplies an output voltage of 50 – 60 VDC.
Auxiliary devices connected to the Switched DC Output can reduce the available current for
battery charging. Switched DC Out loading must be carefully limited to a long time average of
0.50 A. Higher current levels, up to 2.50 A, are allowed for short periods, although extended
periods will limit the battery charging and may promote deep discharge of the battery.
The Switched DC Out may support one MDS-2310A radio or the equivalent using a DC-to-DC
converter to power 12/24 V accessories. A 48/12 V DC-to-DC converter is available from ABB;
contact your ABB sales office for this information.
The Switched DC Out is not fuse-protected against short circuits. If fuse protection is required,
use the recommended external limiting resistor and fuse. Install in series with the Switched DC
Output. The recommended parts are:
Resistor: 3 Ohm, 10%, 25 W wire wound—Ohmite L25J3R0 or equivalent
Fuse: 2.5 A Fast Acting

2.5.3.6 Operation without a Battery


The UPS safely operates without a connected battery by using the capacitor assist module. The
capacitor-assist module charges whenever the PCD is energized with AC. The capacitor-assist
module allows for start-up, commissioning, testing and configuration of the recloser while the
battery charges. Charging time for the capacitor assist module is approximately 30 seconds after
the input AC voltage is applied to the PCD. For optimal use, the PCD and VR-3S or OVR

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require a connected battery when the system is in service. Note that when AC is lost, a record is
logged in the Operations Records. “Loss of AC” alarm engages approximately 12 seconds after
AC is lost. When AC is restored, a “Restoration of AC” alarm is logged approximately six
seconds after restoration.

2.5.3.6.1 Battery Monitoring with Test


The PCD provides battery monitoring and tests to facilitate battery management through the UPS
module.
A battery test measures battery capacity and health. The battery test initiates from the PCD HMI
or through any of the communication protocols. To initiate the battery test from the HMI, press
the PROG 1 pushbutton on the PCD. The battery test function applies a 1-ohm load to the battery
2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

for 100 milliseconds. The change in battery voltage during the test (no-load voltage minus loaded
voltage) is reported as “Delta V.” If the difference of battery voltage is equal to or greater than
10% of the battery voltage, the battery is weak and may require replacement.
For firmware version 2.7 and later, when the test is done locally, a “Passed” or “Fail” indication
will be displayed on the LCD.
Note: More than one battery test is not permitted within a two-minute interval.
The battery voltage measured at the UPS depends on the AC input voltage. If the AC voltage is
applied, then the battery is under charge and the battery will eventually charge to the float voltage
determined by the battery temperature.
If the AC voltage is not applied, then the battery will discharge to support the PCD and auxiliary
devices. The battery discharge voltage may generally be lower than the battery voltage under
charge. When the battery is at deep discharge, 40 V for a 48 V battery or 20 V for a 24 V unit,
the UPS shuts down and the Switched DC Output turns off.
The total current delivered by the UPS charger to the battery, PCD internal circuits, or any other
battery load, is 1.0 A for either battery voltage setting. The internal PCD circuits consume
approximately 0.2 A at 48 V or 0.4 A at 24 V. The charging current to the battery is the total
indicated current, minus the PCD current, minus any accessory current loads.
The status of the AC input is easily determined from the UPS charger current. If AC is off, the
indicated current will be near zero. When AC is on, the current is the amount required to support
the PCD.

2.5.3.6.2 Automated Battery Test


For firmware version 2.7 and later, a periodic battery test can be conducted. In Configuration
Settings, select one of the following options:
• Disabled - No automatic test will be done (default).
• One time per day - A load test will be performed on a daily basis at 1:00 am per the
PCD clock. The first day will not have a test performed.
• One time per week - A load test will be performed on a weekly basis at 1:00 am per
the PCD clock. The first test will be performed seven days from the initiation of the
function. A change in Configuration settings will reset the start date of the test to 7
days from the day of the change.

If a manual or automated test fails when the Automated Battery Test is enabled, the
PROG 1 LED will remain illuminated until either the battery is recharged or replaced, or
the Automated Battery Test feature is disabled. Additional tests may be done, but the
LED will remain lit until the battery is recharged or replaced.

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Note: When using the automated battery test, ABB recommends the weekly option for
optimal battery life.

2.5.3.7 Self Check Relay Output


A Form C SPDT self-check relay output signals proper operation of the PCD. When the PCD
operates normally, the NC contacts will open and the NO contacts will close. If the PCD
experiences a failure, the NC contacts will close and the NO contacts will open.
The contact ratings of the self-check relay are 10 A maximum at 240 VAC and eight A maximum
at 24 VDC. The minimum recommended load is 12 V and 100 mA.

2.5.4 DIO Type 1 – Digital Input Output Module

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


The Digital Input Output (DIO) Type 1 Module can reside in the second slot (Slot B), the third
slot (Slot C), or both slots (Slot B and C) in the back of the PCD. DIO Type 1 module provides
four binary (contact) outputs and six binary (contact) inputs.
These binary inputs and outputs provide programmability for a variety of logic functions using
the AFSuite configuration software. The DIO Type 1 module is optionally supplied in
conjunction with the DIO Type 2 for VR-3S or OVR reclosers.
The four binary outputs have a factory default configuration of NO. Binary contact outputs two,
three and four are configured as NC outputs.
To change the NC contacts to NO contacts use the following procedure. Remove the two green
Phoenix connectors from the DIO Type 1 module terminal block and the nut securing the ground
wire. Remove the two screws securing the DIO Type 1 module to the PCD housing. Insert a thin
flat screwdriver along the right edge of the module and firmly wedge the screwdriver against the
PCD case to slide the DIO Type 1 module out of the PCD case. With the DIO Type 1 module
removed, locate three red jumpers labeled J1, J2 and J3 on the printed circuit board. Looking at
the printed circuit board, the red jumpers are vertically orientated. Carefully remove the red
jumpers and re-insert them with a horizontal orientation. Out 2, 3 and 4 are now configured for
NC output. Reinsert the DIO Type 1 module into the PCD housing following the procedure in
reverse order. Energize the PCD and verify Out 2, 3 and 4 are now NC contacts.

Figure 2-6. DIO Type 1 - Digital Input Output Module

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2.5.5 DIO Type 2 – Recloser Actuator Module


The Digital Input Output (DIO) Type 2 Recloser Actuator module is designed for use only with
the ABB VR-3S and 15/27 kV OVR reclosers. It provides three outputs for the magnetic
actuators, and three inputs for the position indication switches, one for each phase.
PCD units using a Recloser Control Module (DIO Type 2) drive the magnetic actuators in a
unique method of operation. The recloser is actually three, independent, single-pole units, that
are driven in unison but operate independently. In addition, the trip and close circuits are driven
by short-term current pulses to cause linear motion, not a continuous current flow as with a
conventional breaker. Therefore, the trip circuit cannot “stand” on the trip; the trip output must
be re-pulsed periodically to continue an attempt to open or close.
2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

The DIO Type 2 module drives a magnetic actuator on each of the VR-3S or OVR poles. The
magnetic actuator is a device composed of a permanent magnet and an electrical coil, which has
only one moving part. The magnetic actuator is a bi-stable device, meaning that it does not
require energy to keep it in the open or closed position.
When an open or close command initiates from the PCD, a current pulse from the DIO Type 2
module energizes the magnetic actuator coil, typically 12.4 ms to trip and 34.0 ms to close.
Install the DIO Type 2 module in either Slot B or Slot C in the PCD case.
Note: The DIO Type 2 module contacts are not for customer use. Grounding or cross wiring
one of the output contacts can cause the output driver circuit to fail, and the internally
wetted input circuits do not have a great enough rating to wet external test equipment. Use
the Recloser itself or the DIO Type 1 card to monitor contact status for testing purposes.

Figure 2-7. DIO Type 2 - Recloser Actuator Module

2.5.6 CPU Module


The CPU module is the control center for the PCD. The processing power of the CPU provides a
true multi-tasking environment that combines protection, metering and control. The CPU
includes: a 32-bit Motorola microprocessor operating at 20 MHz.

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Located on the back panel of the CPU Module, is a System Reset pushbutton and a non-isolated
RS-232 communications port. Pressing the System Reset pushbutton resets the PCD
microprocessor, re-initiates the internal start-up program and saves all settings in non-volatile
RAM.
A non-isolated RS-232 port provides local communication with a PC to upgrade the PCD
firmware using the ABB WinFlash program. Because this port is not isolated, it is not
recommended for remote communications. This port is inactive whenever there is a
communications module installed in Slot E. The CPU module can only reside in Slot D of the
PCD case.
An internal clock time tags all faults in the Fault Record, all events in the Operations Record and
Oscillographic Capture, and all values in the Load Profile record. There is an internal battery

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


located on the CPU that powers this clock in the event of a power loss. This battery must be
installed when unit is operational.
Note: In the event this battery is dead or removed, Fault Records, Operation Records,
Oscillographic records and Load profile data will be lost. Programmed settings and
counters, however, will be retained.
For prolonged storage, stop the PCD clock to ensure long battery life. The battery should last the
life of the PCD. To turn off the internal battery backed-up clock use the following procedure:
1. Press Enter [↵] to activate the menu.
2. Scroll to Settings and press Enter [↵].
3. In the Settings menu, scroll to Change Settings and press Enter [↵].
4. In the Change Settings menu, scroll to Clock Settings and press Enter [↵].
5. Set the unit clock using the arrow keys.

Figure 2-8. CPU Module

2.5.6.2 Procedure to Load New Firmware


1. Load WinFlash on your PC. The program is located on the PCD Software CD.

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2. If you do not have WinFlash, contact ABB.


3. WinFlash is a utility program that allows you to download firmware to the PCD. It does not
contain the actual firmware.
4. For the firmware, contact ABB PTMV at 1-800-929-7947 x 5 x 1 or +1-407-732-2000 x
2510 and request a copy of the latest firmware file.
5. Copy the firmware file to your hard drive under C:\Program Files\WinFlash.
6. Power down the PCD by opening the L1, L2, Batt(+) and Batt(-) fuse blocks. Verify that
the power is removed by visual inspection of the front of the control. All of the LED
indicators and the backlit display should be off.
7. Remove the COM2, COM3 or COM4 module (depending upon your PCD style number),
2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

the second module from the right when facing the back of the PCD, from the back of the
PCD. With a small Phillips screwdriver, remove the two Phillips screws that secure the
module to the PCD. You will also need a small standard screwdriver to slide out the
COM2, COM3 or COM4 module. This module will remain disconnected from PCD during
the entire WinFlash process. Note that if you have a COM5 module in the PCD you can
connect directly to the upper “RP” 9 pin serial port for the flash and not remove any
modules.
8. Re-power-up the PCD.
9. Connect the RS-232 port from the PC to the NON-ISOLATED RS-232 port on the CPU
card (using a null modem cable or adapter).
10. Start WinFlash and press Quick Autodetect. This should bring up a screen verifying
connection of the PC to the PCD. If this doesn’t occur, check the following through the
HMI: Go to Settings, Change Settings, Communications. The PCD should be set for
Address 001; Frame = N, 8,1; baud = 9600 and the protocol must be set to MODBUS
ASCII. Try Quick Autodetect or Full Autodetect again.
11. Once communication is established, select Utilities - Update Flash ROM. A new window
will appear.
12. In the new window, choose Select File, then from C:/Program Files/WinFlash select from
Files of Type: All Files (*.*), the file, then click Download Flash.
13. The process should take approximately 20 - 35 minutes.
14. You are finished when the slide bar displays 100%.
15. If for some reason the download fails, WinFlash will report an error and the PCD will
continue to display “PCD Monitor” on the screen. In this event, check your connections,
close all programs (e.g. screen saver) and restart WinFlash. Do another Autodetect.
WinFlash should locate the unit by indicating that it “Received Monitor Response”.
Proceed with step 11 above. If this is not successful, contact ABB.
16. If for some reason the download fails again, an alternative method for flashing is to power
down the PCD and remove the CPU module and install a jumper labeled “J7”. This will
force the PCD into Monitor mode. This jumper is labeled J7 at the lower left area of the
CPU board. If no jumper is present, one may be taken from an unused jumper socket on the
COM board, such as the RTS timing jumper. Once this jumper is installed, replace the CPU
and power up the unit. The display should read PCD Monitor on the screen. Resume
flashing at step 8 above. When the flash is complete, remove the jumper and replace it on
the COM board.
17. When the download is successful, power down the PCD, reinsert the COM2, COM3,
COM4 or COM5 module into the PCD, and insert the two Phillips screws to secure the
module into the PCD.

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18. The PCD is now updated. Power up the PCD and verify the CPU Software Version Number
you require in the Unit Information Menu.

2.5.7 COM Type 2a – Communications Module


The COM Type 2a Communications Module provides an isolated RS-232 port, RS-485 port and
fiber optic port on the back panel of the PCD.
Please refer to Section 8 for detailed information on the communication ports available and
required jumper settings.
The COM Type 2a module only installs in Slot E in the PCD case.

2.5.7.1 COM 2a Operation

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


The COM 2a is a communication module with three serial connectors: RS-232, RS-485 and Fiber
Optic (FO). Each port on this module must be used exclusively, i.e., only one port can be used at
a time. There are jumpers that must be set correctly depending on which connector is to be used.
The user must set jumpers “J2” and “J9” to either RS-232, RS-485, or position the jumper only
on one pin (no connection) for Fiber Optic. When set in one position, the other connections will
be disabled.
The Fiber Optic connection may be used to build a star network. The module can also be used to
bridge several units using the RS-485 ports, provided the communication channel is converted to
RS-485 before the first PCD, and that each device is set to a different address. A converter may
be required to convert the RTU output from RS-232 to RS-485. See the Section 8 for further
details on communication.
Note: Some Radios require Ready to Send (RTS)/Clear to Send (CTS) handshaking. If this is the
case a COM3 or COM4 module may be required.

Figure 2-9. COM Type 2a - Communications Module

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2.5.8 COM Type 3 – Communications Module


The COM Type 3 Communications Module provides an isolated RS-232 port with selectable
RTS/CTS handshaking and RS-485 port on the back panel of the PCD.
Please refer to Section 8 for detailed information on the communication ports available and
required jumper settings.
The COM Type 3 module only resides in Slot E on the PCD case.

2.5.8.1 COM3 Operation


The COM3 is a circuit card with a central processor and two serial communications connectors,
2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

RS-232 and RS-485. These serial communication ports build a communication network. It may
be a looped network, a star network, a one-to-one/single network, or a combination of the
different types of networks. The COM3 module may also perform a hardware interface bridge
function, meaning that it can receive on one type of interface, such as RS-485, and transmit on
another interface, such as RS-232.
The unique function of this COM3 module is its ability to delay, route and regenerate data at
mixed baud rates, mixed character framing bits and mixed protocols. This function is
accomplished without any setup (such as selecting baud select, number of stop bits, or number of
data bits, etc.) before operation. This is possible because the data is converted into time domain
values upon reception and then played back to accomplish transmission by the central processor.
This concept can be broken down into three steps.
1. Data received through the COM3 serial communication ports is delivered to the micro
controller timer. The received data on time and off time is measured in the time domain by
the micro controller timer module. These time measurement values, which represent the
received data, are then stored in the micro controller memory, along with the port indicator
that indicates which port received the data.
2. An algorithm determines if any error correction is necessary to the value that is equal to the
time necessary to transmit a single bit at the highest speed baud rate. The COM3 maximum
baud rate is 19,200 with transmission of a single bit equal to 52 microseconds. All other
COM3 baud rates are multiples of 52 microseconds. When the received data pulse converts
into a time value, an arithmetic division by 52 microseconds occurs. The remainder from
the quotient determines the amount of error adjustment applied to the time value. If the
remainder is less than 26 microseconds, then the remainder amount subtracts from the time
value. If the remainder is greater than 26 microseconds, then the remainder amount adds to
the time value. The algorithm rounds off the time measurements to the nearest 52-
microsecond interval. Although the amount of correction is small, this action is necessary
to support looped networks. This is due to a small amount of distortion introduced into the
data during transmission by the transmitter.
3. The time values move back sequentially into the micro controller’s timer module where
they reconstruct or play back the data received with error corrections. As a rule, the data
will transmit over all ports, except for the receiving data port. All data is handled this way
by this COM3 module. The COM3 module also has a delay function to support radio
communications via the RTS and CTS lines on the RS-232 interface. Some radio receiver
transmitters need time to make their transmitter operational before they can transmit. The
COM3 assists in accomplishing this by activating the RS-232 port RTS line to the radio to
inform the radio that it has data ready to transmit. The radio then activates its transmitter.
Next, the radio activates the CTS into the hub to indicate to the hub that the radio is ready to
transmit. The hub then releases all data for transmission. The maximum amount of time

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that data may be delayed is dependent on memory storage, baud rate, character framing,
protocol and value of characters.

Figure 2-10. COM Type 3 - Communications Module

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

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The COM3 uses a 16 MHz crystal with full 16-bit timer resolution. The firmware initializes the
timer module such that the minimum unit of time resolution is 125 nanoseconds and the
maximum amount of time that can be accumulated without register overflow is 819 milliseconds.
The amount of time needed to receive, error correct and retransmit a single bit of data is 41
microseconds. The COM3 can handle pulse widths as narrow or short as 41 microseconds and as
long as 819 milliseconds. These times are what determine the minimum and maximum baud
rates processed by the COM3. These numbers equate to a minimum baud of 1,200 and a
maximum of 19,200.

2.5.9 COM Type 4 – Communications Module


The COM Type 4 Communications Module provides an isolated RS-232 port, RS-485 port and
fiber optic port on the back panel of the PCD.
2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

Please refer to Section 8 for detailed information on the communication ports available and
required jumper settings.
The COM Type 4 module only installs in Slot E in the PCD case.

2.5.9.1 COM4 Operation


The COM4 is a circuit card with a central processor and several serial communications
connectors: RS-232, RS-485 and fiber optic. These serial communication ports build a
communication network. The network may be a looped network, a star network, a one-to-
one/single network, or a combination of the different types of networks. The COM4 module may
also perform a hardware interface bridge function, meaning that it can receive on one type
interface such as RS-485 and transmit on another interface such as RS-232 or fiber optic. This
design meets needs of the power distribution industry.
The unique function of this COM4 module is its ability to delay, route and regenerate data at
mixed baud rates, mixed character framing bits and mixed protocols. This function accomplished
without any setup (such as selecting baud select, number of stop bits and number of data bits,
etc.) before operation. This is possible because the data is converted into time domain values
upon reception and then played back to accomplish transmission by the central processor. This
concept can be broken down into three steps as follows.
1. Data received through the COM4 serial communication ports are delivered to the micro
controller timer. The received data on time and off time is measured in the time domain by
the micro controller timer module. This time measurement values, which represent the
received data, is then stored in the micro controller memory along with the port indicator,
indicating which port received the data.
2. An algorithm determines if any error correction is necessary to the value that is equal to the
time necessary to transmit a single bit at the highest speed baud rate. The COM4 maximum
baud is 19,200 with transmission of a single bit equal to 52 microseconds. All other COM4
baud rates are multiples of 52 microseconds. When the received data pulse converts into a
time value, an arithmetic division by 52 microseconds occurs. The remainder from the
quotient determines the amount of error adjustment applied to the time value. If the
remainder is less than 26 microseconds then the remainder amount subtracts from the time
value. If the remainder is greater then than 26 microseconds then the remainder amount
adds to the time value. The algorithm rounds off the time measurements to the nearest 52-
microsecond interval. Although the amount of correction is small, this action is necessary
to support looped networks. This is due to a small amount of distortion introduced into the
data during transmission by the transmitter.
3. The time values move back sequentially into the micro controller’s timer module where
they reconstruct, or play back, the data received with error corrections. As a rule, the data
will transmit over all ports except when on a looped fiber network. In that case, all data

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received by the fiber optic port transmits back out the fiber optic port, as well as the usual
transmission by all other ports. The COM4 module also has a delay function incorporated
to support radio communications via the RTS and CTS lines on the RS-232 interface. Some
radio receiver transmitters need time to make their transmitter operational before they can
transmit. The COM4 assists in accomplishing this by activating the RS-232 port RTS line
to the radio to inform the radio that it has data ready to transmit. The radio then activates its
transmitter. Next, the radio activates the CTS into the hub to indicate to the hub that the
radio is ready to transmit. The hub then releases all data for transmission. The maximum
amount of time that data may be delayed is dependent on memory storage, baud rate,
character framing, protocol and value of characters.
The performance of the COM4 uses a 16 MHz crystal with full 16-bits of timer resolution. The
firmware initializes the timer module such that the minimum unit of time resolution is 125

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


nanoseconds and the maximum amount of time that can be accumulated without register overflow
is 819 milliseconds. The amount of time needed to receive, error correct and retransmit a single
bit of data is 41 microseconds. The COM4 can handle pulse widths as narrow or short as 41
microseconds and as long as 819 milliseconds. These times are what determine the minimum and
maximum baud rates processed by the COM4. These numbers equate to a minimum baud of
1,200 and a maximum of to 19,200.

Figure 2-11. COM Type 4 - Communications Module

2.5.10 COM Type 5 – Communications Module


The COM Type 5 communications module provides an isolated RS-232 serial port and RS-485
port. This communication module is required for the loop control option (LCM).
Please refer to Section 8 for detailed information on the communication ports available and
required jumper settings.
The COM Type 5 module only installs in Slot E in the PCD case.

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Figure 2-12. COM Type 5 – Communications Module


2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

2.5.11 PT/CT Module


The PT/CT Module accepts four voltage inputs and four current inputs as shown in Figure 2-13.
The PT/CT phase inputs can be reassigned for firmware version 2.9 or higher. For more details
refer to 3.2.2. The PT/CT bushing polarity can also be reassigned for firmware version 2.9 or
higher. For more details refer to 3.2.3

The PT/CT Module only installs in Slot F in the PCD case.

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Figure 2-13. PT/CT Module

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


The PT/CT Module has two tap settings: HIGH tap and LOW tap. Refer to Table 2-4 for the
range and tap settings.

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Table 2-4. PT/CT Module Tap Settings for Phase and Neutral
Range for SEF (50N-2
CT Module Group Tap Range for Phase Range for Neutral setting for Types 6 and C
Setting modules only)
Multi-Ratio
Feeder CT - 5.0 to 200 mA (0.5 mA
Types 5, 6, B and 0.2 to 3.2 A (.02A steps)
C (Circuit Low steps) 0.2 to 3.2 A
Breakers*) High 1.0 to 16.0 A (0.1 A 1.0 to 16.0 A 5.0 to 200 mA (0.5 mA
(setting in steps) steps)
secondary current)

Range for SEF (50N-2


2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

CT Module Group Tap Range for Phase Range for Neutral setting for Types 8 and
Setting E modules only)
600:1 - Types 7,
8, D and E (VR-3
20 to 320 A (2A
and OVR
Low steps) 10 to 160 A (1A steps) 3.0 to 200 A (5A steps)
Reclosers*)
High 100 to 1600A (10 A 50 to 800 A (5A steps) 3.0 to 200 A (5A steps)
(Setting in primary
steps)
current)

Range for SEF (50N-2


CT Module Group Tap Range for Phase Range for Neutral setting for Types A and
Setting G modules only)
1000:1 – Types 9,
A, F and G
20 to 320 A (2A 10 to 160 A (1A 5.0 to 200 A (5A steps)
(Recloser
Low steps) steps)
Retrofits*)
High 100 to 1600 A (10A 50 to 800 A (5 A 5.0 to 200 A (5A steps)
(Setting in primary
steps) steps)
current)

* Typical application of this module.

To change the tap setting range:


1. Remove the PT/CT module from the PCD housing and identify the four red jumpers as
shown in Figure 2-14. For each phase and neutral, notice an “L” for LOW tap and an “H”
for HIGH tap. Insert the jumper across the “H” to configure each phase for HIGH tap and
across the “L” for LOW tap.
2. For correct operation, each phase CT (T1, T2 and T3) must have the same tap setting.
However, the neutral (T4) tap setting can be different from the phase tap setting.
3. When the range settings for each CT is finished, locate the jumper labeled J1 to establish
proper operation of the PCD.
4. Insert the black jumper with “H” to configure the PCD for HIGH range or across “L” for
LOW range.
5. Phase and Neutral jumpers should match the respective Phase and Neutral CT
configuration. The CPU through U1, located directly above J1, reads this jumper
connection.

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Figure 2-14. PT/CT Module Jumper Locations

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


Figure 2-15. Typical External Connections
LINE
0A 0B 0C 0A 0B 0C

VA VA

VB VB

VC VC

VN VN

C
USER SELECTABLE Optional Delta Connected PT's
RECLOSER PHASE ROTATION A
A - B - C or A - C - B

Ic Ib Ia

In
LOAD

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2.5.12 CT/CVD Module


The CT/CVD module, shown in Figure 2-16, accepts three voltage inputs and four current inputs.
In addition to supporting conventional voltage sources, this module includes the ability to accept
capacitive voltage and resistive voltage divider inputs to the PCD. These sensor devices typically
require high impedance sensing type inputs. This module is designed for Wye connected voltage
inputs only.
The CT/CVD module only installs in Slot F in the PCD case.
The CVD module is available in supported by firmware version 3.0 and later. As with the CT/PT
module, the phase inputs can be reassigned for firmware version 2.9 or higher. For more details
2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

refer to section 3.2.2. The PT/CT bushing polarity can also be reassigned for firmware version 2.9
or higher. For more details refer to section 3.2.3.
With respect to the current input portion of the CVD board, the electrical characteristics are
equivalent to those on the PT/CT module for a given CT ratio module. Refer to Table 2-4 for
current range availability and settings. This module also has the same CT jumper selections, A, B,
C, J1 PHASE must be set for the phase selection, and N, J1 NEUTRAL must be set for the
neutral selection. Jumpers are clearly identified and located in the lower right quadrant of the
board.
With respect to the voltage input portion of the CT/CVD module, there is a MolexTM connector to
which voltage inputs are connected. The PS+ and PS- are not used at this time. It is recommended
to use twisted pair wire for high impedance voltage inputs, and to connect both the hot and
neutral wires to each phase.

Figure 2-16. CT/CVD Module

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2.5.12.2 CVD Jumper Settings


The CVD voltage inputs utilize several jumpers on the module to accept various input voltages.
When supplied with ABB internal OVR type recloser sensors, the jumpers on the module must be
set to accept the appropriate voltage for the system. If not preset by the factory for the exact
system voltage, a procedure must be followed to determine the appropriate jumper settings for a
given system.

Caution: The default configuration for voltage sensing using the ABB OVR recloser
utilizes very low magnitude signal inputs. Applying 120VAC to the CVD inputs will
damage the module. In the event of this occurrence, there are factory replaceable fuses

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


on the module designed to protect the PCD from this condition in most cases. Contact
ABB for service. Also see section 2.5.12.3 for further precautions.

Even if preset by the factory, it is recommended as a minimum to verify the jumper settings in the
PCD control by using the worksheet in Table 2-5. As indicated in this table, the jumper settings
can be verified without removing the module by powering up the PCD and checking the Unit
Information Menu. Press <Enter> then go to Settings > Unit Information > SLOT F ID. The first
number is the CVD/CT module ID, which would always be 144. The second number identifies
the Type of CT inputs the module supports (see Table 2-7), and the last number identifies the
CVD jumper settings (see Table 2-5).

Table 2-5. CVD Worksheet


Description Name / Setting Value
System Primary Line to line voltage Nominal l-l Voltage V
VLL

System Primary Line to ground voltage VNP = VLL/√3 Nominal l-g Voltage V

Sensor ratio / turns ratio n VT/VD ratio

PCD input voltage VNS = VNP/n Nominal Secondary V


From table, select the next higher PCD
VRS Rated Secondary V
sensor input range available
On the VD/CT board, set the jumpers J101 – J103, 203, 303, 403
J103, 201 – 203, 301 – 303, 401 – 403 as per
J102, 202, 302, 402
Table 2-6. See Figure 2-17 for jumper
locations. J101, 201, 301, 401
Plug the VD/CT board in the PCD and power
it up
PCD front panel menu: “Settings / Unit
Settings / Unit
Information / Slot f” displays “144 / CT ID / VD / /
Information / Slot f
ID” (See Table 2-6 and Table 2-7.)
Load defaults and power cycle the PCD.
Change the “Config / VT ratio” setting to the
Config / VT ratio
value “n”
Change the “Config / Nominal l-g volts”
Config / Nominal l-g V
setting to the value “VNP” calculated above.
Energize the voltage inputs to the PCD.
Normally, the voltage input to the PCD should
not be higher than “VRS”.

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Table 2-6. CVD Worksheet – Jumper Positions


Board Hardware Jumpers
No. Sensor input range / J103, 203, J102, 202, J101, 201, VD ID
Rated Secondary 303, 403 302, 402 301, 401
1 1.189 Down None Right 245
2 2.177 Down None Left 246
3 2.636 Down None None 247
4 6.512 Up Left Right 249
5 11.921 Up Left Left 250
6 14.437 Up Left None 251
7 65.547 Up Right Right 253
2 FRONT & REAR PANELS

8 120.0 Up Right Left 254


9 145.324 Up Right None 255
Notes:
The board jumper selection must be such that the sensor input range is greater than or
equal to the nominal PCD input.
View the board with the CTs near you and the shield on the left.

Table 2-7. CT ID and ratios / Catalog Number Digits


CT ID CT type PT catalog VD catalog
digit digit
0–3 600 wo/SEF 1
4–7 600 w/SEF 2
8 -11 1000 3
wo/SEF
12 - 15 1000 w/SEF 4
16 - 19 Fdr wo/SEF 5 B
20 - 23 Fdr w/SEF 6 C
24 - 31 Not used
32 - 35 600 wo/SEF 7 D
36 - 39 600 w/SEF 8 E
40 - 43 1000 9 F
wo/SEF
44 - 47 1000 w/SEF A G

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Figure 2-17. CT/CVD Module Jumper Locations

2 FRONT & REAR PANELS


2.5.12.3 Testing and Precautions

The PCDs CT/CVD module uses a sensitive high impedance analog input monitor for voltages.
The CT portion of the module remains as conventional wire wound transformers. The following
precautions must be observed when testing and applying the CVD.
The input voltage must not exceed the VNS voltage set by the jumpers. Never apply 120 V to the
jumpers unless the jumpers are specifically set to accept this voltage. Over-voltage on these
inputs can damage the CT/CVD module. This module contains on board fuse protection, but is
only factory replaceable.
For testing purposes on the ABB integral voltage sensors, primary voltage can be applied to the
H2 bushings. Voltage is, however, calibrated at the factory.
Due to high input impedance on the voltage dividers, measurement of the inputs with
conventional analog meters is not recommended, and may not be accurate, due to the meter’s
internal impedance.

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ABB Power Control Device 3 Protection

3 Protection
3.1 Introduction
Distribution systems are designed to operate safely with protective devices to sense and isolate
faults, limiting the time and magnitude of power system interruptions. Protective relaying
elements in the PCD are important to accomplish safe and reliable power to customers, by
preventing large losses of power due to unnecessary equipment outages or equipment damage as
a result of a fault or overload.
Application of protective relaying elements on a power system requires knowledge and
experience, since there is a philosophy involved toward making the appropriate selections.
Reading and understanding how the protective relaying elements within the PCD operate together
will create a thorough understanding of the PCD. Ensuring maximum protection, minimum
equipment cost, high sensitivity to faults, insensitivity to normal load currents and selectivity in
isolating a small section in the system are the goals of a well-coordinated distribution system.
For additional information on setting up protective elements, refer to the Application Notes in the
last section of this instruction booklet.

3.2 Configuration Settings

3 PROTECTION
The general parameters of the PCD protection functions are specified in the Configuration
Settings. These settings are common to all protective groups: Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2. It is
necessary to select and program these settings before proceeding to protection settings.
Configuration Settings are listed and explained in Table 3-1. Note that several of the settings are
shaded. These settings show up only in particular style PCDs including units with the single-
phase trip option, units that accept multi-ratio CT inputs, and units equipped with the SEF
function.

Table 3-1. Configuration Settings for Protection Elements


Selection Description Value
Optional setting for single phase tripping PCDs
Trip Mode only. This globally sets the PCD to 3-phase or 3-Phase/1-Phase
1-phase tripping mode.
Optional setting for CT ratio applying to PCDs
CT Ratio w/ 5 A secondary inputs only - Not required for 1-2000
Cooper Retrofit, VR-3S or OVR.
Optional setting for PCDs with the SEF option,
SEF CT Ratio used for connecting a separate CT directly to 1-2000
the neutral terminals on the CT/PT module.
Primary to Secondary voltage transformer
VT Ratio 1-32000
ratio.

Secondary VT connection. For delta 69 V Wye


connected voltage transformers, 2 or 3 120 V Wye
VT Connection
transformers may be used, and the neutral 120 V Delta
connection on the PT/CT board is not used.
208 V Delta

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

Table 3-1. Configuration Settings for Protection Elements


Selection Description Value

This setting will appear only through the HMI. Xa=(A, B or C)


Phase Assignment It allows the user to assign each bushing to a Xb=(A, B or C)
particular phase. See section 3.2.2 Xc=(A, B or C)
This setting will appear only through the HMI. H1>H2 (Norm)
Bushing Polarity It allows the user to assign power flow
direction on the recloser. See section 3.2.3 H2>H1 (Rvrs)

Enables the use of a second set of protection


Bank Enable groups (Primary, Alt 1 and Alt2), permitting the
use of up to 6 protection groups. See section
Parameter used for fault location, determined
Positive Seq Reactance/mi (X/M)
from utility feeder system study.
Parameter used for fault location, determined
Positive Seq Resistance/mi (R/M)
from utility feeder system study.
Parameter used for fault location, determined
Zero Seq Reactance/mi (X/M)
from utility feeder system study.
Parameter used for fault location, determined
Zero Seq Resistance/mi (R/M)
from utility feeder system study.
Length of subject feeder from recloser to end
Line Length Miles
of line, used only for fault location.
Time that the PCD waits to signal a breaker
failure alarm and follow breaker failure logic
Trip Failure Time after issuing a close operation to the breaker. 5 – 60 Cycles
3 PROTECTION

Note: Refer to Application Note 5 for more


details on applying the Trip Failure time.
Time that the PCD waits to signal a breaker
failure alarm and follow breaker failure logic.
Close Failure Time 18 – 999 Cycles
Note: Refer to Application Note 5 for more
details on applying the Close Failure time.
Time that the PCD waits to close the breaker
from the time the front panel close pushbutton
Close Delay Time 0 – 250 Seconds
is pressed. Function does not apply to
reclosing or remote close operations.
Choice of whether the curve-choice setting for
the time-overcurrent elements will be from a
list of ANSI, IEC or Recloser curves. (User-
defined curves are available for any Curve Set
Curve Set ANSI/IEC/Recloser
setting). Note: Changing the curve set will
change the curve characteristics. Settings
must be corrected in Primary, Alt 1 and Alt
2 settings.
Forward (ABC) or reverse (ACB) rotation,
used for directional elements. This setting is
Phase Rotation determined by the utility generation. This ABC/ACB
setting does not affect the phase assignment
of the bushings.
Method of determining overcurrent values.
Fundamental filters harmonic content of fault
currents and most of the DC offset in the
calculation of fault currents. RMS responds to
Protective Mode Fundamental/RMS
the total RMS current with no filtering. Note:
The recommended setting is Fundamental,
which will prevent any nuisance tripping at
lower pickup levels.

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Table 3-1. Configuration Settings for Protection Elements


Selection Description Value
Choice of whether to have time-overcurrent
elements reset instantaneously when they
drop out, or reset in a delayed manner that
simulates the behavior of an
electromechanical protection element. After
an overcurrent trip, the PCD has a reset
Instantaneous/
Reset Mode calculation given by the formula shown in
Delayed
Appendix A3.2. This choice only applies when
the time-overcurrent curve is an ANSI curve.
Note: If the control operates faster on the
same characteristic curve through multiple
operations, this is likely caused by a
Delayed Reset Mode setting.
Alternate 1 Setting Global selection for Alternate Settings group 1 Enable/Disable
Alternate 2 Setting Global selection for Alternate Settings group 2 Enable/Disable
Cold Load timer disables instantaneous
tripping for a set amount of time. This setting is
a global setting of scale for the cold load time.
Cold Load Timer Mode Note: If the control operates faster on the Seconds/Minutes
same characteristic curve through multiple
operations, this is likely caused by a
Delayed Reset Mode setting.
79 V function prevents reclosing if there is a
single-phase undervoltage condition. All three
voltages must be present to reclose. If any

3 PROTECTION
phase is in an undervoltage state according to
79 V Timer Mode the 27 setting, the unit will not reclose. At the Seconds/Minutes
expiration of the 79V Timer setting (specified
in each protection group), the unit will lockout.
The setting is a global setting of scale for the
cold load time.
Voltage Display Mode Display format for voltage metering. Vl-n/Vl-l
Frequency System Frequency. 50/60 Hertz
Selection for enabling zone-sequencing logic
Zone Sequence Coordination used for coordinating with downstream Enable/Disable
reclosers.
Selection for displaying only the last fault on
the phase/ground indicating targets on the
Target Mode front of the PCD vs. displaying all previous Last/All
faults. Pressing the [C] button clears the
targets.
HMI setting: Remote Edit - Allows the
programmer to disable the ability to change
settings from AFSuite or other remote device.
Remote Edit / Local Edit AFSuite setting: Local Edit - Allows the Enable/Disable
programmer to disable the ability to change
settings from the HMI. Data records can still
be accessed.
WHr Display Selection for power metering. KWHr/MWHr
Setting for LCD light, Timer Mode is
LCD Light On/Timer
recommended to save life on light.
Up to 15 Alpha
ID Data label for Customer use. Numeric
Characters

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

Table 3-1. Configuration Settings for Protection Elements


Selection Description Value
Value for use in load profile and demand
Demand Minutes 5/15/30/60 Minutes
metering.
0 – 100
LCD Contrast Default setting for LCD contrast.
Default = 50
Disabled/ 1 per
Battery Test Sets the Automated Battery Test interval.
Day/ 1 per Week
This setting will appear only through the HMI.
It sets the type of recloser that the control is VR-3S or OVR
Recloser Type
connected to, and is only an option for PCDs (default = OVR)
with the actuator driver module (DIO Type 2)
When the recloser is in 1-Phase mode, this
setting programs the Prog 2 button to allow
Prog2 Function Disable/PhasSel
selection of individual phases for Open or
Close operation. See section 2.3.8.
Automatically resets the fault target LEDs on
the HMI, and the fault information on the LCD
Target Reset display upon a successful reclose or manual Disable/Enable
close. The targets will be reset at the end of
the programmed Reset Time.
Password required to access all menus in the 4 Alpha Numeric
Relay Password
PCD. Characters
Password required to access the test and 4 Alpha Numeric
Test Password
operation menus only. Characters
3 PROTECTION

3.2.2 Phase Assignment


For firmware version 2.9 and later, the PCD user has the ability to reassign phases. This setting is
accessible only from the HMI. When reassigned, all metering, protection, fault and operation
logging will reflect the reassigned phase. This applies to both single phase and three phase PCD
control styles.
The settings are Xa, Yb, Zc, where the “a”, “b”, and “c” correlate to the default phase assignment
printed on the rear modules. When reassigning the phases via the HMI, the first selection will be
Xa, where the choices are “A”, “B” or “C”. The Yb setting will allow the choice of the remaining
two phases, and the Zc will be assigned to the last unselected phase.

Caution: When phases have been reassigned, care must be taken to identify the proper
arrangement on the pole for operators. Labeling on the recloser is recommended.

3.2.3 Bushing Polarity


For firmware version 2.9 and later, the PCD user has the ability to reassign bushing polarity. By
default, the polarity is set so that when the line (source) side is connected to the H1 bushing,
power flow is positive. However, if the line side is connected to the H2 bushing, power flow will
show a negative value. The Bushing Polarity allows reassigning the direction so that the power
flow is shown as positive. Also, it allows changing line/load side arrangement for programming
directional overcurrent elements. This setting does not affect the non-directional protective
elements.
This setting is accessible only from the HMI. When reassigned, all metering, protection, and fault
logging will reflect the assigned polarity.

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ABB Power Control Device 3 Protection

3.2.4 Recloser Type


For PCDs interfaced with the ABB recloser types VR3S and OVR, there is a recloser setting that
is set by the factory for shipment. This setting adjusts the drive strength for optimal performance
on each type recloser.
If the user moves this control from an OVR to a VR3S type recloser, this setting must be
changed. The setting is accessible from the HMI only.

3.2.5 Bank Enable


In firmware version 3.0, the protection groups have been expanded from 3 to 6. If the Bank
Enable setting is “B1/B2”, a second set of Primary, Alt1, and Alt2 settings is available for
programming to the user. If set to “B1 Only” the PCD will not allow turning B2 on, or setting
parameters in the Bank 2 protection groups.
By default, Bank 2 settings are stored in “reserve memory”. The active memory is the normal
Primary, Alt1 and Alt2 settings (the same as exists in all previous firmware versions), and is
referred to as Bank 1. From DNP or Modbus SCADA, AFSuite software, or the front panel
Operations menu, Bank 2 “reserve memory” settings can be loaded into the “active memory”
wherein the PCD will perform all operations based on the programmed Bank 2 settings. Turning
Bank 2 off will restore the normal Bank 1 settings. The setting Bank cannot be selected by
programmable logic, or by any one single key press on the front panel.
The PCD LCD will display the following when Both Bank 1 and Bank 2 are enabled in
Configuration Settings:

Table 3-2 . Bank 1 / Bank 2 settings

3 PROTECTION
Bank Enable Selection LCD display when in Bank 1 (lower LCD display when in Bank 2 (lower
right corner) right corner)
B1 Only P, A1, A2 n/a
B1/B2 P, A1, A2 2P, 2A1, 2A2

For PCDs interfaced with the ABB recloser types VR3S and OVR, there is a recloser setting that
is set by the factory for shipment. This setting adjusts the drive strength for optimal performance
on each type recloser.
If the user moves this control from an OVR to a VR3S type recloser, this setting must be
changed. The setting is accessible from the HMI only

3.3 Basic Protection


3.3.1 Phase Time-Overcurrent Element 51P (3I>) - Phase Slow Curve
The 51P element contained in the PCD is set based on the desired minimum tripping value for
phase time-delay overcurrent (“slow phase curve”). The time overcurrent protection element is
the most commonly used protective element for distribution systems, and is used in both primary
and back-up protection. The time overcurrent element provides a time delay characteristic versus
current for tripping using an inverse time curve characteristic, and is based upon four factors:
pickup value, curve type, time dial setting and reset mode. This inverse characteristic means that
the 51P element operates slowly on small values of current above the pickup value and faster
when current increases significantly above the pickup value. The 51P element is always Enabled
in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 setting groups.
Multiple time curves and time dials are available for the 51P element to closely coordinate with
other protection elements within the PCD and other external devices on the distribution system.

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

ANSI, IEC and Recloser time overcurrent curves are included in the PCD. A User Programmable
curve option is also available, allowing the user to create custom time current curves for more
enhanced coordination than the standard curve types provide.
There is another global setting that is also required to be selected, the Reset mode. The Reset
mode can be either instantaneous or time delayed. The time delayed reset mode simulates the
reset disk on an electromechanical relay. This aids in coordinating with upstream
electromechanically controlled devices. This feature applies to the ANSI/IEEE curves only. The
instantaneous mode (default) is used to coordinate with other instantaneous reset devices, such as
a recloser or other electronically controlled protective equipment on the distribution system. In
the instantaneous mode, the 51P element will reset instantaneously when the current level
measured by the PCD drops below the pickup setting for one-half cycle.
The 51P element is enabled by factory defaults.
The 51P element can be supervised (torque controlled) by mapping the PH3 logical input to a
physical input for external supervision. This feature can be used to place the control into “Switch
Mode”. Note that if the PH3 is mapped in the programmable logic and is not energized, all phase
protection will be turned OFF, except for 50P-3.
Note: PCD units ordered with the single-phase option have the ability to operate independently
on each phase. The protection curves and modifiers are the same for single phase tripping
and three phase tripping. The settings chosen apply to all phases, i.e., each phase uses the
same pickup setting, curve, etc. For further information on the single-phase protection
functions and programming, see Section 11.

Table 3-3. 51P (3I>) Element Settings


3 PROTECTION

51P (3I>) Setting Description


51P Curve Select Selection of the time-overcurrent curve function used to calculate the time
3I> Curve delay between pickup and trip.
The 51P element picks up when the measured current rises above the
51P Pickup A
specified value. The setting range and increment depend on the
3I> A
configuration of the PT/CT module (see Section 2.5.11).
51P Time Dial/Delay
Value that is a variable in the time-overcurrent curve function.
3I> Time Delay
An additional fixed time delay added to the time delay, resulting from the
time-overcurrent curve function. This setting is not available when using an
51P Time-Curve Adder
IEC curve. The setting range is 0.00 to 2 seconds with an increment of 0.01
second.
The minimum time delay that will occur between pickup and trip, even if the
51P Minimum
time delay would otherwise be shorter. The setting range is 0.00 to 2
Response
seconds with an increment of 0.01 second.

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ABB Power Control Device 3 Protection

Table 3-4. 51P (3I>) Curve-Settings Details


Curve Set * Curve Time Dial/Delay Increment See
Setting Range Page
ANSI Extremely Inverse 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 322
Very Inverse 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 323
Inverse 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 324
Short Time Inverse 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 325
Definite Time 0.0 to 10.0 0.1 327
Long Time Extremely Inverse 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 328
Long Time Very Inverse 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 329
Long Time Inverse 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 330
Recloser Curve #8 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 348
User Curve 1 ** 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 214
IEC Extremely Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 334
Very Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 335
Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 336
Long Time Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 337

3 PROTECTION
Definite Time 0.0 to 10.0 0.1 338
User Curve 1 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
Recloser All 39 Recloser (Hydraulic) Curves*** 0.10 to 2 0.01 339
User Curve 1 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
* Choice of Curve Set is a Configuration Setting that applies to all protection elements.
** See page 214 for information on how to specify a custom time-overcurrent curve.
*** See page 339 for listing of all 39 Recloser (Hydraulic) Curves.

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

3.3.2 Ground Time-Overcurrent Element 51N (IN>) - Ground Slow Curve


The 51N element contained in the PCD is set based on the desired minimum tripping value for
ground time-delay overcurrent (“slow ground curve”). A ground or residual time overcurrent
protection element similar to the 51N is the most commonly used protective element for
distribution systems and are used in both primary and back-up protection. The time overcurrent
element provides a time delay characteristic versus current for tripping using an inverse time
curve characteristic, and is based upon four factors: pickup value, curve type, time dial setting
and reset mode. This inverse characteristic means that the element operates slowly on small
values of current above the pickup value and faster when current increases significantly above the
pickup value. The 51N element can be Enabled or Disabled in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2
setting groups.
Multiple time curves and time dials are available for the 51N element to closely coordinate with
other protection elements within the PCD and other external devices on the distribution system.
ANSI, IEC and Recloser (hydraulic) time current curves are included in the PCD. A User
Programmable curve option is also available in the PCD, allowing the user to create custom time
current curves for more enhanced coordination than the standard curve types.
There is another global setting that is also required to be selected, the Reset mode. The Reset
mode can be either instantaneous or time delay. The time delay reset mode simulates the reset
disk on an electromechanical relay. This aids in coordinating with upstream electromechanically
controlled devices. This feature applies to the ANSI/IEEE curves only. The instantaneous mode
(default) is used to coordinate with other instantaneous reset devices such as a recloser or other
electronically controlled protective equipment on the distribution system. In the instantaneous
mode, the 51N element will reset instantaneously when the current level measured by the PCD
3 PROTECTION

drops below the pickup setting for one-half cycle.


The 51N element is disabled by factory defaults.
The 51N element can be disabled by pressing the Ground Blocked button on the front panel, or
supervised (torque controlled) by mapping the GRD logical input to a physical input for external
supervision. Note that if the GRD is mapped in the programmable logic and is not energized, all
ground protection will be turned OFF, except for 50N-3.

Table 3-5. 51N (IN>) Element Settings


51N (IN>) Setting Description
51N Curve Select Selection of the time overcurrent function used to calculate the time delay
IN> Curve between pickup and trip.
51N Pickup A The 51N element will pickup when the measured current rises above the
IN> A specified value. The setting range and increment depend on the
configuration of the PT/CT module (see Section 2.5.11).
51N Time Dial/Delay A specified value that is a variable in the time-overcurrent curve function.
IN> Time Delay
51N Time-Curve Adder An additional fixed time delay added to the time delay resulting from the 51N
Curve Select and 51N Time Dial settings. This setting is not available when
using an IEC curve. The setting range is 0.00 to 2 seconds with an
increment of 0.01 second.
51N Minimum The minimum time delay that will occur between pickup and trip, even if the
Response time delay based on the time-overcurrent curve is shorter.

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Table 3-6. 51N (IN>) Curve-Settings Details


Curve Set * Curve Time Dial/Delay Increment See
Setting Range Page
ANSI Extremely Inverse 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 322
Very Inverse 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 323
Inverse 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 324
Short Time Inverse 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 325
Definite Time 0.0 to 10.0 0.1 327
Long Time Extremely Inverse 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 328
Long Time Very Inverse 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 329
Long Time Inverse 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 330
Recloser Curve #8 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 348
User Curve 1 ** 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 214
IEC Extremely Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 334
Very Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 335
Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 336
Long Time Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 337
Definite Time 0.0 to 10.0 0.1 338

3 PROTECTION
User Curve 1 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
Recloser All 39 Recloser (Hydraulic) Curves*** 0.10 to 2 0.01 339
User Curve 1 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
* Choice of Curve Set is a Configuration Setting that applies to all protection elements.
** See page 214 for information on how to specify a custom time-overcurrent curve.
*** See page 339 for listing of all 39 Recloser (Hydraulic) Curves.

3.3.3 Phase Instantaneous Overcurrent Element 50P-1 (3I>>1) – Phase Fast Curve
The 50P-1 is a phase instantaneous (“fast phase curve”), overcurrent element that is a multiple of
the 51P element for accurate coordination. It should be enabled when instantaneous phase
tripping is desired. The operating time the 50P-1 should be set to operate equal to or faster than
the 51P element. The 50P-1 element can be Enabled or Disabled in the Primary, Alternate 1 and
Alternate 2 setting groups.
Multiple time curves and time dials are available for the 50P-1 element to closely coordinate with
other protection elements within the PCD and other external devices on the distribution system.
User Programmable curve option is also available in the PCD allowing the user to create custom
time current curves for more enhanced coordination than the standard curve types.
There is another global setting that is also required to be selected, the Reset mode. The Reset
mode can be either instantaneous or time delay. The time delay reset mode simulates the reset
disk on an electromechanical relay. This aids in coordinating with upstream electromechanically

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

controlled devices. This feature applies to the ANSI/IEEE curves only. The instantaneous mode
(default) is used to coordinate with other instantaneous reset devices such as a recloser or other
electronically controlled protective equipment on the distribution system. In the instantaneous
mode, the 50P-1 element will reset instantaneously when the current level measured by the PCD
drops below the pickup setting for one-half cycle.
The 50P-1 element is disabled by factory defaults.
The 50P-1 element can be supervised (torque controlled) by mapping the PH3 logical input to a
physical input for external supervision. This feature can be used to place the control into “Switch
Mode”. Note that if the PH3 is mapped in the programmable logic and is not energized, all phase
protection will be turned OFF, except for 50P-3.
When the device is closed using the CLOSE button on the front panel or by an external source,
such as a control switch or via SCADA, the 50P-1 can be disabled from tripping for a period by
setting the cold load pickup function.

Table 3-7. 50P-1 (3I>>1) Element Settings


50P(3I>>1) Setting Description
50P-1 Curve Select Selection of the time overcurrent curve used to calculate the time delay
3I>>1 Curve between pickup and trip.
50P-1 Pickup A The 50P-1 element will pickup when the measured current rises above the
3I>>1 A specified value. The value is specified as a multiple of the 51P pickup
setting. The setting range 0.5 to 20.0 multiples with an increment of 0.1.
50P-1 Time Dial/Delay A specified value that is a variable in the time-overcurrent curve function.
3I>>1 Time Delay
3 PROTECTION

50P-1 Time-Curve An additional fixed time delay added to the time delay resulting from the 50P-
Adder 1 Curve Select and 50P-1 Time Dial settings. This setting is not available
when using an IEC curve. The setting range is 0.00 to 2 seconds with an
increment of 0.01 second.
50P-1 Minimum The minimum time delay that will occur between pickup and trip, even if the
Response time delay based on the time-overcurrent curve is shorter. The setting range
is 0.00 to 2 seconds with an increment of 0.01 second.
50P-1 Curve Block The 50P-1 element will not pickup if the current is higher than this setting.
Pickup Use this setting to allow another protection element to handle higher-current
faults. The setting range is 1 to 20, or disabled (the default).

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Table 3-8. 50P-1 Curve-Settings Details


Curve Set * Curve Time Dial/Delay Increment See
Setting Range Page
ANSI Standard Instantaneous - - 331
Inverse Instantaneous 0.50 to 10.0 0.05 332
Definite Time 0.0 to 9.99 0.01 327
Short Time Inverse 0.50 to 10.0 0.05 325
Short Time Extremely Inverse 0.50 to 10.0 0.05 326
Extremely Inverse 0.50 to 10.0 0.05 322
Very Inverse 0.50 to 10.0 0.05 323
User Curve 1 ** 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 214
IEC Standard (Instantaneous) - - 331
Definite Time 0.0 to 9.99 0.01 338
User Curve 1 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
Recloser All 39 Recloser (Hydraulic) Curves*** 0.10 to 2 0.01 339

3 PROTECTION
User Curve 1 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
* Choice of Curve Set is a Configuration Setting that applies to all protection elements.
** See page 214 for information on how to specify a custom time-overcurrent curve.
*** See page 339 for listing of all 39 Recloser (Hydraulic) Curves.

3.3.4 Ground Instantaneous Overcurrent Element 50N-1 (IN>>1) – Ground Fast Curve
The 50N-1 is a ground or residual instantaneous (“fast ground curve”) overcurrent element that is
a multiple of the 51N element for accurate coordination. It should be enabled when ground or
residual instantaneous phase tripping is desired. The operating time of the 50N-1 element should
be set to operate equal to or faster than the 51N element. The 50N-1 element can be Enabled or
Disabled in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 setting groups.
Multiple time curves and time dials are available for the 50N-1 element to closely coordinate with
other protection elements within the PCD and other external devices on the distribution system.
A User Programmable curve option is also available, allowing the user to create custom time
current curves for more enhanced coordination than the standard curve types.
There is another global setting that is also required to be selected, the Reset mode. The Reset
mode can either be instantaneous or time delay. The time delay reset mode simulates the reset
disk on an electromechanical relay. This aids in coordinating with upstream electromechanically
controlled devices. This feature applies to the ANSI/IEEE curves only. The instantaneous mode
(default) is used to coordinate with other instantaneous reset devices such as a recloser or other
electronically controlled protective equipment on the distribution system. In the instantaneous
mode, the 50N-1 element will reset instantaneously when the current level measured by the PCD
drops below the pickup setting for one-half cycle.

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

The 50N-1 element is disabled by factory defaults.


The 50N-1 element can be disabled by pressing the Ground Blocked button on the front panel, or
supervised (torque controlled) by mapping the GRD logical input to a physical input for external
supervision. This feature can be used to place the control into “Switch Mode”. Note that if the
GRD is mapped in the programmable logic and is not energized, all phase protection will be
turned OFF, except for 50N-3.
When the device is closed using the CLOSE button on the front panel or by an external source,
such as a control switch or via SCADA, the 50N-1 can be disabled from tripping for a period by
setting the cold load pickup function.

Table 3-9. 50N-1 (IN>>1) Element Settings


50N Settings Description
50N-1 Curve Select Selection of the time overcurrent function used to calculate the time delay
IN>>1 Curve between pickup and trip.
50N-1 Pickup A The 50N-1 element will pickup when the measured current rises above the
IN>>1 A specified value. The value is specified as a multiple of the 51N pickup setting
(range 0.5 to 20.0 multiples, increment 0.1).
50N-1 Time Dial/Delay A specified value that is a variable in the time-overcurrent curve function.
IN>>1 Time Delay
50N-1 Time-Curve An additional fixed time delay added to the time delay resulting from the 50N-
Adder 1 Curve Select and 50N-1 Time Dial settings. This setting is not available
when using an IEC curve. The setting range is 0.00 to 2 seconds with an
increment of 0.01 second.
3 PROTECTION

50N-1 Minimum The minimum time delay that will occur between pickup and trip, even if the
Response time delay based on the time-overcurrent curve is shorter. The setting range
is 0.00 to 2 seconds with an increment of 0.01 second.
50N-1 Curve Block The 50N-1 element will not pickup if the current is higher than this setting.
Pickup Use this setting to allow another protection element to handle higher-current
faults. The setting range is 1 to 20, or disabled (the default).

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Table 3-10. 50N-1 Curve-Settings Details


Curve Set * Curve Time Dial/Delay Increment See
Setting Range Page
ANSI Standard Instantaneous - - 331
Inverse Instantaneous 0.50 to 10.0 0.05 332
Definite Time 0.0 to 9.99 0.01 327
Short Time Inverse 0.50 to 10.0 0.05 325
Short Time Extremely Inverse 0.50 to 10.0 0.05 326
Extremely Inverse 0.50 to 10.0 0.05 322
Very Inverse 0.50 to 10.0 0.05 323
User Curve 1 ** 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.5 to 10.0 0.05 214
IEC Standard (Instantaneous) - - 331
Definite Time 0.0 to 9.99 0.01 338
User Curve 1 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
Recloser All 39 Recloser (Hydraulic) Curves*** 0.10 to 2 0.01 339

3 PROTECTION
User Curve 1 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
* Choice of Curve Set is a Configuration Setting that applies to all protection elements.
** See page 214 for information on how to specify a custom time-overcurrent curve.
*** See page 339 for listing of all 39 Recloser (Hydraulic) Curves.

3.3.5 Phase Instantaneous Overcurrent Element 50P-2 (3I>>2) – Definite Time


The 50P-2 is a phase instantaneous, definite time, overcurrent element that is set as a multiple of
the 51P element for accurate coordination. It should be enabled when a second level of high-
speed instantaneous phase tripping is desired. The 50P-2 element has a user-defined definite time
characteristic. The 50P-2 element can be Enabled or Disabled in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2
setting groups.
The instantaneous mode is used to coordinate with other instantaneous reset devices such as a
recloser or other protective equipment on the distribution system. In the instantaneous mode, the
50P-2 and all other instantaneous overcurrent elements will reset instantaneously when the
current level measured by the PCD drops below the pickup setting for one-half cycle.
The 50P-2 element is disabled by factory defaults.
The 50P-2 element can be supervised (torque controlled) by mapping the PH3 logical input to a
physical input for external supervision. This feature can be used to place the control into “Switch
Mode”. Note that if the PH3 is mapped in the programmable logic and is not energized, all phase
protection will be turned OFF, except for 50P-3.
If the circuit breaker is closed by pressing the CLOSE button on the front panel or by an external
source, such as a control switch or via SCADA, the 50P-2 element is disabled from tripping for a
period specified by the Cold Load Time setting.

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Table 3-11. 50P-2 (3I>>2) Elements Settings


50P-2 (3I>>2) Setting Description
50P-2 Select Choice of whether the 50P-2 element is usually enabled or disabled. The
(3I>>2) Curve choice can be temporarily changed by the logical input PH3.
50P-2 Pickup A The 50P-2 element will pickup when the measured current rises above the
(3I>>2) A setting value, which is specified as a multiple of the 51P pickup setting. The
range 0.5 to 20.0 multiples with an increment of 0.1.
50P-2 Time Delay The definite time delay between a 50P-2 pickup and a 50P-2 trip output. The
(3I>>2) Time Delay range is 0.00 to 9.99 seconds with an increment of 0.01.
50P-2 Curve Block The 50P-2 element will not pickup if the current is higher than this setting.
Pickup Use this setting to allow another protection element to handle higher-current
faults. The setting range is 1 to 20, or disabled (the default).

3.3.6 Ground Instantaneous Overcurrent Element 50N-2 (IN>>2) – Definite Time


The 50N-2 is a ground or residual instantaneous, definite time, overcurrent element that is set as a
multiple of the 51N element for accurate coordination. It should be enabled when a second level
of high-speed instantaneous ground or residual tripping is desired. The 50N-2 element has a user
defined definite-time characteristic. The 50N-2 element can be Enabled or Disabled in the
Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 setting groups.
The instantaneous mode is used to coordinate with other instantaneous reset devices such as a
Recloser or other protective equipment on the distribution system. In the instantaneous mode the
50N-2 element will reset instantaneously when the current level measured by the PCD drops
3 PROTECTION

below the pickup setting for one-half cycle.


The 50N-2 element is disabled by factory defaults.
The 50N-2 element can be disabled by pressing the Ground Blocked button on the front panel, or
supervised (torque controlled) by mapping the GRD logical input to a physical input for external
supervision. This feature can be used to place the control into “Switch Mode”. Note that if the
GRD is mapped in the programmable logic and is not energized, all phase protection will be
turned OFF, except for 50N-3.
If the circuit breaker is closed by pressing the CLOSE button on the front panel, or by an external
source such as a control switch or via SCADA, the 50N-2 element is disabled from tripping for a
period specified by the Cold Load Time setting.

Table 3-12. 50N-2 (IN>>2) Element Settings


50N-2 (N>>2) Settings Description
50N-2 Select Choice of whether the 50N-2 element is enabled or disabled.
IN>>2 Curve
50N-2 Pickup A The 50N-2 element will pickup when the measured current rises above the
IN>> A setting value, specified as a multiple of the 51N pickup setting. The range
0.5 to 20.0 multiples with an increment of 0.1.
50N-2 Time Delay The definite time delay between a 50N-2 pickup and a 50N-2-trip output. The
IN>>2 Time Delay range is 0.00 to 9.99 seconds with an increment of 0.01.
50N-2 Curve Block The 50N-2 element will not pickup if the current is higher than this setting.
Pickup Use this setting to allow another protection element to handle higher-current
faults. The setting range is 1 to 20, or disabled (the default).

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3.3.7 Phase Instantaneous Overcurrent Element 50P-3 (3I>>3) – Definite Time


The 50P-3 is a phase instantaneous, definite time, overcurrent element that is set as a multiple of
the 51P element for accurate coordination. It should be enabled when a third level of high-speed
instantaneous phase tripping is desired. The 50P-3 element has a user-defined definite time
characteristic. The 50P-3 element can be Enabled or Disabled in the Primary, Alternate 1 and
Alternate 2 setting groups.
The instantaneous mode is used to coordinate with other instantaneous reset devices such as a
recloser or other protective equipment on the distribution system. In the instantaneous mode, the
50P-3 and all other instantaneous overcurrent elements will reset instantaneously when the
current level measured by the PCD drops below the pickup setting for one-half cycle.
The 50P-3 element is disabled by factory defaults. The cold load time setting has no effect on the
50P-3 element.

Table 3-13. 50P-3 (3I>>3) Elements Settings


50P-3 (3I>>3) Setting Description

50P-3 Select Choice of whether the 50P-3 element is usually enabled or disabled. The
3I>>3 Curve choice can be temporarily changed by the logical input PH3.
50P-3 Pickup A The 50P-3 element will pickup when the measured current rises above the
3I>>3 A setting value, which is specified as a multiple of the 51P pickup setting. The
range 0.5 to 20.0 multiples with an increment of 0.1.
50P-3 Time Delay The definite time delay between a 50P-3 pickup and a 50P-3 trip output. The
3I>>3 Time Delay range is 0.00 to 9.99 seconds with an increment of 0.01.

3 PROTECTION
3.3.8 Ground Instantaneous Overcurrent Element 50N-3 (IN>>3) – Definite Time
The 50N-3 is a ground or residual instantaneous, definite time, overcurrent element that is set as a
multiple of the 51N element for accurate coordination. It should be enabled when a third level of
high-speed instantaneous ground or residual tripping is desired. The 50N-3 element has a user
defined definite time characteristic. The 50N-3 element can be Enabled or Disabled in the
Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 setting groups.
The instantaneous mode is used to coordinate with other instantaneous reset devices such as a
recloser or other protective equipment on the distribution system. In the instantaneous mode, the
50N-3 elements will reset instantaneously when the current level measured by the PCD drops
below the pickup setting for one-half cycle.
The 50N-3 element is disabled by factory defaults. The cold load time setting has no effect on
the 50N-3 element.
The 50N-3 element can be disabled by pressing the Ground Blocked button on the front panel.

Table 3-14. 50N-3 (IN>>>>) Element Settings


50N-3 (IN>>3) Settings Description
50N-3 Select Choice of whether the 50N-3 element is usually enabled or disabled. The
IN>>3 Curve choice can be temporarily changed by the logical input PH3.
50N-3 Pickup A The 50N-3 element will pickup when the measured current rises above the
IN>>3 Amps setting value, which is specified as a multiple of the 51N pickup setting. The
range 0.5 to 20.0 multiples with an increment of 0.1.
50N-3 Time Delay The definite time delay between a 50N-3 pickup and a 50N-3 trip output. The
IN>>3 Time Delay range is 0.00 to 9.99 seconds with an increment of 0.01.

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

3.3.9 Recloser Element 79 (O I)


After a fault trips open the recloser or circuit breaker, the 79 Reclosing Element closes the unit
when the programmed open time interval expires. One to five operations (four recloses) may be
selected, and each reclose has its own open interval timer.
The reset timer begins timing down from the Reset Time setting to zero after each reclosure,
provided the phase and ground currents are below the lowest pickup setting of all the elements.
At each step in the reclose sequence, you can enable or disable the 50P-1, 50P-2, 50P-3, 51N,
50N-1, 50N-2 or 50N-3 elements or set the element to lockout reclosing as a result of tripping on
any one of these elements. Disable the reclosing element in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 Settings
by selecting LOCKOUT for the first Reclose Open Interval Time.
A lockout state occurs under any of the following conditions:
• A fault persists for the entire programmed reclosing sequence.
• The unit is manually closed and a fault occurs before the expiration of the reset timer.
• A TRIP occurs and the fault current is not removed or the 52A and 52B contacts do not
indicate that the unit opened. Both the removal of the fault current and the opening of the
unit must occur before the Breaker Failure Timer (5 to 60 cycles) expires, or the PCD will
proceed to lockout.
• The recloser element is programmed to LOCKOUT after one (51P, 50P-1, 50P-2, 50P-3,
51N, 50N-1, 50N-2, 50N-3, 67P or 67N) overcurrent trip.
• The 79V element is enabled, the bus voltage is below the voltage block setting, and the block
time delay has expired.
3 PROTECTION

• A Reclose Block is activated from the HMI or via SCADA and an overcurrent trip occurs.
• In addition to a front panel target (LED) indication that the unit is in the Lockout State, a
programmable lockout alarm (79LOA) contact is available. The Lockout State is cleared
when the 52A and 52B contact inputs indicate that the unit has been manually closed and the
reset time has expired.

Figure 3-1. Recloser Sequence

79-1 79-2..5

50P-1 50P-2 50P-3 51N 50N-1 50N-2 50N-3

Enable Enable Enable Enable Enable Enable Enable


Disable Disable Disable Disable Disable Disable Disable
Lockout Lockout Lockout Lockout Lockout Lockout Lockout

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Table 3-15. 79 (O I) Element Settings


79 (O I) Setting Description
Reclose Mode Default three-phase or PCD with the single-phase tripping and reclosing
option, this setting specifies the tripping mode three-phase or single-
phase (OPUP or OOAP). See Section 11. This is a configuration setting.
79 Reset Time Specification of the recloser reset time. The setting range is 3 to 200
seconds increment 1 second.
79-1 Mode Select: 51P Specifies which protective elements are active and how each is to operate
79-1 Mode Select: 50P-1 during Step 1 of the reclose sequence.
79-1 Mode Select: 50P-2 • Disabled (not an option for 51P)
79-1 Mode Select: 50P-3
79-1 Mode Select: 51N • Enabled
79-1 Mode Select: 50N-1 • Lockout
79-1 Mode Select: 50N-2 • Alarm. Alarm has no effect on the reclose sequence, but allows
79-1 Mode Select: 50N-3 alarm logical outputs to operate (not an option for 51P)
79-1 Mode Select: 46
79-1 Mode Select: 67P PCDs ordered with the single-phase tripping option, the choices are:
79-1 Mode Select: 67N • Disable (not an option for 51P)
• Enable with single-phase operation
• Enable with three-phase operation
• Lockout with single-phase operation
• Lockout with three-phase operation
• Alarm. Alarm has no effect on the reclose sequence, but allows
alarm logical outputs to operate (not an option for 51P)
79-1 Open Interval Time Specification of the Step 1 open interval time. The setting range is 0.1 to
200 seconds increment 0.1 second.

3 PROTECTION
79-2 Select Specification of whether Step 2 reclosing is enabled or disabled.
79-2 Mode Select: 51P Specifies which protective elements are active and how each is to operate
79-2 Mode Select: 50P-1 during Step 2 of the reclose sequence.
79-2 Mode Select: 50P-2 • Disabled (not an option for 51P)
79-2 Mode Select: 50P-3
79-2 Mode Select: 51N • Enabled
79-2 Mode Select: 50N-1 • Lockout
79-2 Mode Select: 50N-2 • Alarm. Alarm has no effect on the reclose sequence, but allows
79-2 Mode Select: 50N-3 alarm logical outputs to operate (not an option for 51P)
79-2 Mode Select: 46
79-2 Mode Select: 67P PCDs ordered with the single-phase tripping option, the choices are:
79-2 Mode Select: 67N • Disable (not an option for 51P)
• Enable with single-phase operation
• Enable with three-phase operation
• Lockout with single-phase operation
• Lockout with three-phase operation
• Alarm. Alarm has no effect on the reclose sequence, but allows
alarm logical outputs to operate (not an option for 51P)
79-2 Open Interval Time Specification of the Step 2 open interval time. The setting range is 0.1 to
200 seconds increment 0.1 second.
79-3 Select Specification of whether Step 3 reclosing is enabled or disabled.

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Table 3-15. 79 (O I) Element Settings


79 (O I) Setting Description
79-3 Mode Select: 51P Specifies which protective elements are active and how each is to operate
79-3 Mode Select: 50P-1 during Step 2 of the reclose sequence.
79-3 Mode Select: 50P-2 • Disabled (not an option for 51P)
79-3 Mode Select: 50P-3
79-3 Mode Select: 51N • Enabled
79-3 Mode Select: 50N-1 • Lockout
79-3 Mode Select: 50N-2 • Alarm. Alarm has no effect on the reclose sequence, but allows
79-3 Mode Select: 50N-3 alarm logical outputs to operate (not an option for 51P)
79-3 Mode Select: 46
79-3 Mode Select: 67P PCDs ordered with the single-phase tripping option, the choices are:
79-3 Mode Select: 67N • Disable (not an option for 51P)
• Enable with single-phase operation
• Enable with three-phase operation
• Lockout with single-phase operation
• Lockout with three-phase operation
• Alarm. Alarm has no effect on the reclose sequence, but allows
alarm logical outputs to operate (not an option for 51P)
79-3 Open Interval Time Specification of the Step 3 open interval time. The setting range is 0.1 to
200 seconds increment 0.1 second.
79-4 Select Specification of whether Step 4 reclosing is enabled or disabled.
79-4 Mode Select: 51P Specifies which protective elements are active and how each is to operate
79-4 Mode Select: 50P-1 during Step 2 of the reclose sequence.
79-4 Mode Select: 50P-2 • Disabled (not an option for 51P)
79-4 Mode Select: 50P-3
3 PROTECTION

79-4 Mode Select: 51N • Enabled


79-4 Mode Select: 50N-1 • Lockout
79-4 Mode Select: 50N-2 • Alarm. Alarm has no effect on the reclose sequence, but allows
79-4 Mode Select: 50N-3 alarm logical outputs to operate (not an option for 51P)
79-4 Mode Select: 46
79-4 Mode Select: 67P PCDs ordered with the single-phase tripping option, the choices are:
79-4 Mode Select: 67N • Disable (not an option for 51P)
• Enable with single-phase operation
• Enable with three-phase operation
• Lockout with single-phase operation
• Lockout with three-phase operation
Alarm. Alarm has no effect on the reclose sequence, but allows alarm
logical outputs to operate (not an option for 51P)
79-4 Open Interval Time Specification of the Step 4 open interval time. The setting range is 0.1 to
200.0 seconds increment 0.1 second.
79-5 Select Specification of whether Step 5 reclosing is enabled or disabled.

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Table 3-15. 79 (O I) Element Settings


79 (O I) Setting Description
79-5 Mode Select: 51P Specifies which protective elements are active and how each is to operate
79-5 Mode Select: 50P-1 during Step 2 of the reclose sequence.
79-5 Mode Select: 50P-2 • Disabled (not an option for 51P)
79-5 Mode Select: 50P-3
79-5 Mode Select: 51N • Enabled
79-5 Mode Select: 50N-1 • Lockout
79-5 Mode Select: 50N-2 • Alarm. Alarm has no effect on the reclose sequence, but allows
79-5 Mode Select: 50N-3 alarm logical outputs to operate (not an option for 51P)
79-5 Mode Select: 46
79-5 Mode Select: 67P PCDs ordered with the single-phase tripping option, the choices are:
79-5 Mode Select: 67N • Disable (not an option for 51P)
• Enable with single-phase operation
• Enable with three-phase operation
• Lockout with single-phase operation
• Lockout with three-phase operation
Alarm. Alarm has no effect on the reclose sequence, but allows alarm
logical outputs to operate (not an option for 51P)
79-5 Open Interval Time The setting range is Lockout only.
79 Cutout Time Specification of the recloser cutout time (see page 87). The setting range
is 1 to 200 seconds increment 1 second.
79V Select Specification of whether the 79V element is enabled or disabled.
79 Pickup Voltage Specification of the 79V element’s pickup voltage. The setting range is 10
to 200 volts AC, increment 1 volt.

3 PROTECTION
79V Time Delay Specification of the 79V element’s time delay voltage. The setting range
is 4 to 200, increment 1. (See next setting concerning the units used.)
79V Timer Mode Specification of whether the 79V-time delay is in second or minutes.

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3.3.10 Cold Load Time


The cold load time is set individually in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 setting groups. It is used to
block unintentional tripping of protection elements due to inrush currents detected by the PCD
after the recloser circuit has been open for a specified period. The time is set from 0 to 254 with a
resolution of 1.0 in either seconds or minutes. During the cold load time, a logical output CLTA
is asserted. This logical output can be mapped to a physical output for alarm and control
purposes. The cold load time is operational only after the recloser has been closed manually after
lockout. It does not operate during a normal PCD reclose sequence. The cold load time is
disabled in the factory default settings.
Cold load time in the PCD allows for restoration current sensed as cold load current, which may
exceed the normal load current level of the distribution circuit. This is due to the amount of time
the circuit has been de-energized, along with quantity, size and type of motors on the system.
The cold load time should be set for the time required for the load current to normalize. During
this time, the cold load current may exceed normal time overcurrent relay settings. Therefore, to
restore the circuit cold load pickup settings, allow for restoration of the load and simultaneously
protect the circuit.
Cold load time creates a minimum response time for the phase and neutral instantaneous
overcurrent elements. When the cold load timer expires, the instantaneous curve immediately
goes into effect using its normal pickup setting and time characteristics. During the cold load
time, the 51P and 51N (time delayed) elements remain active and unaltered. This provides
backup protection for closing into faults. Whenever the cold load pickup is inactive, the phase
and neutral instantaneous overcurrent elements operate normally. When cold load time becomes
active, the protection elements associated with cold load time are extended, while keeping the
3 PROTECTION

same time dial and time overcurrent curves to maintain coordination with other protection devices
upstream and downstream after the cold load time expires.

Table 3-16. Cold Load Time Settings


Cold Load Time Setting Description
Cold Load Time Mode Choice of the time unit for the Cold Load Timer (seconds or minutes). This is
a Configuration setting.
Cold Load Time Duration of Cold Load Timer. Setting is either “disabled”, or a value in the
range 1 to 254, located in each of the protective groups. The unit of time is
either seconds of minutes.

3.4 Advanced Protection


3.4.1 Sensitive Earth Fault (SEF) Option
SEF is applicable only to systems where all loads are connected line-to-line and there is no
neutral or earth current flow unless an earth fault occurs. This option is not recommended for use
on four-wire multi-grounded systems. The SEF element can be Enabled or Disabled in the
Primary, Alternate 1 and Alternate 2 setting groups. The default is disabled.
The SEF element is available as an option with the PCD and is set using the 50N-2 element. If
the PCD was ordered without the SEF option, the SEF Blocked target LED on the front panel will
be lit at all times, except on the enhanced front panel (the enhanced front panel has a “3” as the
third digit in the PCD catalog. In the case of the enhanced front panel, the SEF function can be
controlled through programmable logic and an external toggle switch, or via SCADA. Note that
the SEF function is also controlled by the Ground Block operation. The SEF Disable control
operation, however, does not control the Ground block status.

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All CT/PT modules have a separate IN connection. In order to use the SEF function, place the IN
input in series with three external CTs, one on each phase, or connect one large window CT
placed around all phase conductors. See Table 3-17 below for applicable SEF settings. The SEF
element also has a user-defined definite time characteristic.
The SEF pickup current is always set in secondary amperes (milliamps), regardless of whether
the other protective settings are in primary or secondary amperes. To determine the desired
pickup level for the SEF element, divide the desired minimum trip current (primary amperes) by
the CT ratio of the selected CT. The value must fall within the range given in Table 3-16. Enter
this value in the Pickup Amps field for the 50N-2 element. The accuracy of this feature is
dependent on the accuracy of the CT at the fault level.

Table 3-17. SEF Element Settings


SEF Setting Description
SE CT Ratio Specification in Configuration Settings indicating the neutral CT ratio. The
setting range is 1 to 2000. Note: This is only for the CT connected to the IN
terminals.
50N-2 Curve Sets the type of ground fault protection to be used. Selections are: Disable,
Enable (uses regular definite time curve), SEF and Directional SEF.
SEF Pickup Pickup threshold setting in amperes (secondary current). The setting range is
3 to 200 mA, increment 0.5 mA.
50N-2 Time Delay Delays tripping. The setting range is 0.5 to 180 sec, increment 0.1 sec.
50N-2 Torque Angle Applies only when Directional SEF element is used. Torque angle is the
normal angle at which I0 lags/leads V0. The unit will be set to trip in the

3 PROTECTION
opposite hemisphere. See the section on 67N for more details. The setting
range is 0° to 355° in 5° steps. Requires three voltage transformers.
N Cold Ld Time This setting is a separate Neutral Cold Load Timer that applies only to the
SEF element.

The analog and digital filtering provide a rejection ratio of third harmonic greater than 50:1 to
prevent incorrect operation due to the effects of distribution transformer excitation currents. For
closed loop schemes or ungrounded systems, a directional SEF model is available. The
directional unit is polarized by a separate zero sequence voltage input (V0). The potential
transformers should be connected wye-grounded. The minimum polarization voltage is 2 volts
and the torque angle can be set from 0° to 355° in 5° steps with a sector width of 180°.
The SEF tripping can be enabled or disabled in each step of the reclose sequence. It can also be
supervised torque controlled by mapping the SEF logical input to a physical input for external
supervision or logical output and feedback for internal supervision.

3.4.2 Two-Phase 50P Tripping


If two-phase-50P tripping is enabled, the 50P-1, 50P-2 and 50P-3 elements will trip only if two or
three phases exceed the trip setting for phase-to-ground faults. Note that the residual current must
exceed the instantaneous 50N-1, 50N-2 or 50N-3 pickup settings. Note that if two-phase 50P
tripping is enabled, the 50P elements will not respond to single-phase-to-ground faults.
On distribution lines, the phase and ground instantaneous overcurrent elements are often set very
high in order to coordinate with large downstream fuses. By enabling two-phase-50P tripping,
the 50N-1 element can be set to coordinate with the large downstream fuses, while the 50P-1
element can be set below the 50N-1 pickup setting to increase sensitivity and improve clearing
time for three-phase, phase-to-phase and two-phases-to-ground faults on the main section of
radial distribution lines.
For example, a 100 A downstream fuse may require the upstream 50N-1 pickup setting to be
4000 A or more. By enabling two-phase-50P tripping, the 50P-1 element can be set at 2000 A.

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

For three-phase, phase-to-phase and two-phase-to-ground faults greater than 2000 A, a 50P-1
instantaneous trip will occur. No 50P-1 trip occurs for single-phase-to-ground faults when the
fault current is between 2000 and 4000 A. For single-phase-to-ground faults where the current is
greater than 4000 A, a 50N-1 instantaneous trip will occur.

Table 3-18. Two-Phase 50P Tripping Setting


2-Phase 50P Trip Setting Description
2 Phase Voting Selection of whether the two-phase 50P tripping is enabled or disabled
(default).

3.4.3 Negative Sequence Time Overcurrent Element 46 (Insc>)


The negative sequence overcurrent element (46) measures the amount of unbalanced current on
the distribution line. Since the negative sequence element measures the amount of negative
sequence current in the system, it can be set to pickup just above the maximum negative sequence
current level produced by a single-phase load unbalance. This makes the PCD much more
sensitive to phase-to-phase faults. The 46 element can be enabled or disabled in the Primary, Alt
1 and Alt 2 setting groups.
The negative sequence overcurrent element can also be used to detect phase-to-ground and phase-
to-phase-to-ground faults, but whenever an unbalance condition occurs in association with
ground, then zero sequence quantities are predominately present, and the neutral elements of the
PCD can detect these faults. The negative sequence element can be used to backup these type of
faults.
3 PROTECTION

Multiple time curves and time dials are available to closely coordinate with other devices in the
system. User programmable curves are also available. The 46 pickup, curve type and time dial
are all set in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 settings groups. There are two selectable reset modes
available for the 46 element. The instantaneous mode is used to coordinate with other
instantaneous reset devices. In the instantaneous mode, the 46 will reset when the current drops
below the pickup setting for one-half cycle. The delayed mode simulates the action of an
electromechanical induction disk relay. In this mode the 46 reset follows a slow reset
characteristic that depends upon the duration of the overcurrent condition and the amount of load
current flowing after the event.

Table 3-19. 46 (Insc>) Element Settings


46 (Insc>) Setting Description
46 Curve Select Selection of the time overcurrent function used to calculate the time delay
Insc> Curve between pickup and trip. Note that the Reset Mode may also affect the time
delay (see page 55).
46 Pickup A The 46 element will pickup when the measured current rises above the
Insc> A specified value. The setting range and increment depend on the
configuration of the PT/CT module (see page 46).
46 Time Dial/Delay A specified value that is a variable in the time-overcurrent curve function.
Insc> Time Multiplier
46 Time-Curve Adder An additional fixed time delay added to the time delay resulting from the 46
Curve Select and 46 Time Dial settings. This setting is not available when
using an IEC curve. The setting range is 0.00 to 2 seconds with an
increment of 0.01 second.
46 Minimum Response The minimum time delay that will occur between pickup and trip, even if the
time delay based on the time-overcurrent curve is shorter. The setting range
is 0.00 to 2 seconds with an increment of 0.01 second.

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Table 3-20. 46 Curve-Settings Details


Curve Set * Curve Time Dial/Delay Increment See
Setting Range Page
ANSI Extremely Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 322
Very Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 323
Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 324
Short Time Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 325
Definite Time 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 327
Long Time Extremely Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 328
Long Time Very Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 329
Long Time Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 330
Recloser Curve #8 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 348
User Curve 1 ** 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 214
User Curve 2 ** 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 214
User Curve 3 ** 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 214
IEC Extremely Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 334
Very Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 335
Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 336
Long Time Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 337

3 PROTECTION
Definite Time 0.0 to 10.0 0.1 338
User Curve 1 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
Recloser All 39 Recloser (Hydraulic) Curves*** 0.10 to 2 0.01 339
User Curve 1 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
* Choice of Curve Set is a Configuration Setting that applies to all protection elements.
** See page 214 for information on how to specify a custom time-overcurrent curve.
*** See page 339 for listing of all 39 Recloser (Hydraulic) Curves.

3.4.4 Directional Phase Time Overcurrent Element 67P (3I> )


The directional phase time overcurrent element provides directional time overcurrent protection.
This element is typically used on either looped or networked distribution systems. Radial
configurations have only one source of supply for the distribution line and seldom require
directional elements. Therefore, directional determination of the fault may not be required.
The 67P element can be Enabled or Disabled in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 setting groups.
Depending on the Configuration of the PCD, all time curves are available to closely coordinate
protection settings with other devices in the system. User programmable curves are also
available. The 67P settings are independently settable in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 setting
groups.
The positive sequence voltage (V1) provides polarizing of the 67P in the distribution system. It is
sensitive down to 1 volt AC line-to-line. If the polarizing voltage drops below this level, (< 2

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

VAC) the 67P will lose its reference direction and will not operate. Therefore, any tripping on
the distribution line may be backed-up by the 51P element which is non-directional. The 67P
element works by comparing the positive sequence voltage (V1) to the direction of the positive
sequence current (I1). The torque angle is set between 0° to 355° in 5° steps (I1 lagging/leading
V1) with a sector width of 180°. See Figure 3-2 for examples of the different positive sequence
torque angle settings. When the voltage detected by the PCD is at or near the minimum
sensitivity point of 1 volt AC line-to-line, the set angle might shift between ±10°.

Figure 3-2. 67P (3I ) Maximum Torque Angles, Example Settings

Reverse
Direction Reverse
Direction
V1 V1 V1
Reverse
Direction
I1
Forward Forward
Direction Direction
Forward
Direction
I1
I1
0 degree setting 315 degree setting 270 degree setting

There are two selectable reset modes available for the 67P element. The “instantaneous mode” is
used to coordinate with other instantaneous reset devices. In the instantaneous mode, the 67P
will reset when the current drops below the pickup setting for one-half cycle. The “delayed
3 PROTECTION

mode” simulates the action of an electromechanical induction disk relay. In this mode, the 67P
reset follows a slow reset characteristic that depends upon the duration of the overcurrent
condition and the amount of load current flowing after the event. The reset mode setting applies
to all time overcurrent elements in the PCD.

Table 3-21. 67P (3I> ) Element Settings


67P (3I ) Setting Description
67P Select Selection of whether the 67P element is enabled or disabled (default).
3I> Select
67P Curve Select Selection of the time overcurrent function used to calculate the time delay
3I> Curve between pickup and trip. Curve Selections are the same as the 51P. Note
that the Reset Mode may also affect the time delay (see page 55).
67P Pickup A The 67P element will pickup when the measured current rises above the
3I> A specified value. The setting range and increment depend on the
configuration of the PT/CT module (see page 46).
67P Time Dial/Delay A specified value that is a variable in the time-overcurrent curve function.
3I> Time Multiplier
67P Torque Angle Specification of the torque angle. The setting range is 0° to 355° in 5° steps
3I> Torque Angle with a sector width of 180°.
67P Time-Curve Adder An additional fixed time delay added to the time delay resulting from the 67P
Curve Select and 67P Time Dial settings. This setting is not available when
using an IEC curve. The setting range is 0.00 to 2 seconds with an
increment of 0.01 second.
67P Minimum The minimum time delay that will occur between pickup and trip, even if the
Response time delay based on the time-overcurrent curve is shorter. The setting range
is 0.00 to 2 seconds with an increment of 0.01 second.

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Table 3-22. 67P Curve-Settings Details


Curve Set * Curve Time Dial/Delay Increment See
Setting Range Page
ANSI Extremely Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 322
Very Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 323
Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 324
Short Time Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 325
Definite Time 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 327
Long Time Extremely Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 328
Long Time Very Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 329
Long Time Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 330
Recloser Curve #8 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 348
User Curve 1 ** 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 214
User Curve 2 ** 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 214
User Curve 3 ** 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 214
IEC Extremely Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 334
Very Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 335
Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 336
Long Time Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 337

3 PROTECTION
Definite Time 0.0 to 10.0 0.1 338
User Curve 1 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
Recloser All 39 Recloser (Hydraulic) Curves*** 0.10 to 2 0.01 339
User Curve 1 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
* Choice of Curve Set is a Configuration Setting that applies to all protection elements.
** See page 214 for information on how to specify a custom time-overcurrent curve.
*** See page 339 for listing of all 39 Recloser (Hydraulic) Curves.

3.4.5 Directional Ground Time Overcurrent Element 67N (IN> )


The directional phase time overcurrent element provides time overcurrent protection. This
element is typically used on either looped or networked distribution systems. Radial
configurations, have only one source of supply for the distribution line and seldom require
directional elements. Therefore, directional determination of the fault may not be required.
The 67N element can be Enabled or Disabled in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 setting groups.
Depending upon the Configuration of the PCD, all time curves are available to closely coordinate
protection settings with other devices in the system. User programmable curves are also
available. The 67N settings are independently settable in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 setting
groups. However, the 67N when enabled is active only when the 51N is active.
The negative sequence voltage (V2) provides polarizing of the 67N in the power system. It is
sensitive down to 1 volt AC line to line. If the polarizing voltage drops below this level, the 67N

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

will lose direction and will not trip. Then any tripping on the distribution line may be backed-up
by the 51N element, which is non-directional.
Note: If the PCD contains a directional sensitive earth unit, the 67N element can be polarized
with negative sequence voltage (V2) or zero sequence voltage (V0). The 67N element is
achieved by comparing the negative sequence voltage (V2) to the direction of the negative
sequence current (I2).
The torque angle is set between 0° to 355° in 5° steps (I2 leading V2) with a sector width of 180°.
See Figure 3-3 for examples of the different negative sequence torque angle settings. When the
voltage detected by the PCD is at or near the minimum sensitivity point of 1 volt AC line-to-line,
the set angle might shift ±10°.

Figure 3-3. 67N (IN> ) Maximum Torque Angles, Example Settings


Forward I2
I2
Direction Forward
Forward
Direction
Direction

V2 V2 V2

Reverse
I2 Direction
Reverse
Direction Reverse
Direction

180 degree setting 135 degree setting 90 degree setting


3 PROTECTION

There are two selectable reset modes available for the 67N element. The instantaneous mode is
used to coordinate with other instantaneous reset devices. In the instantaneous mode, the 67N
will reset when the current drops below the pickup setting for one-half cycle. The delayed mode
simulates the action of an electromechanical induction disk relay. In this mode, the 67N reset
follows a slow reset characteristic that depends on the duration of the overcurrent condition and
the amount of load current flowing after the event. A minimum trip time delay of 50 milliseconds
imposed on the 67N element ensures directionality before the PCD initiates a trip.

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Table 3-23. 67N (IN> ) Element Settings


67N (IN ) Setting Description
67N Select Choice of whether the 67N element is enabled or disabled (default).
IN> Select
67N Curve Select Selection of the time overcurrent function used to calculate the time delay
IN> Curve between pickup and trip. Curve Selections are the same as the 51N. Note
that the Reset Mode may also affect the time delay (see page 55).
67N Pickup A The 67N element will pickup when the measured current rises above the
IN> A specified value. The setting range and increment depend on the
configuration of the PT/CT module (see page 46).
67N Time Dial/Delay A specified value that is a variable in the time-overcurrent curve function.
IN> Time Multiple
67N Torque Angle Specification of the torque angle. The setting range is 0° to 355° in 5° steps
IN> Torque Angle with a sector width of 180°.
67N Time-Curve Adder An additional fixed time delay added to the time delay resulting from the 67N
Curve Select and 67N Time Dial settings. This setting is not available when
using an IEC curve. The setting range is 0.00 to 2 seconds with an
increment of 0.01 second.
67N Minimum The minimum time delay that will occur between pickup and trip, even if the
Response time delay based on the time-overcurrent curve is shorter.

3 PROTECTION

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

Table 3-24. 67N Curve-Settings Details


Curve Set * Curve Time Dial/Delay Increment See
Setting Range Page
ANSI Extremely Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 322
Very Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 323
Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 324
Short Time Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 325
Definite Time 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 327
Long Time Extremely Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 328
Long Time Very Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 329
Long Time Inverse 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 330
Recloser Curve #8 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 348
User Curve 1 ** 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 214
User Curve 2 ** 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 214
User Curve 3 ** 1.0 to 10.0 0.1 214
IEC Extremely Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 334
Very Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 335
Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 336
Long Time Inverse 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 337
3 PROTECTION

Definite Time 0.0 to 10.0 0.1 338


User Curve 1 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.05 to 1.00 0.05 214
Recloser All 39 Recloser (Hydraulic) Curves*** 0.10 to 2 0.01 339
User Curve 1 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
User Curve 2 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
User Curve 3 ** 0.10 to 2 0.01 214
* Choice of Curve Set is a Configuration Setting that applies to all protection elements.
** See page 214 for information on how to specify a custom time-overcurrent curve.
*** See page 339 for listing of all 39 Recloser (Hydraulic) Curves.

3.4.6 Positive Directional Power Element 32P (I1 )


The 32P positive directional power element supervises (torque control) other protection elements
of the PCD. The 32P element operates independently of the 67P element.
The 32P element compares the angle of the positive sequence current (I1) to the angle of the
positive sequence voltage (V1). Using the voltage angle as the reference (e.g. 0° degrees) the
positive sequence current angle is compared to the 32P torque angle setting. If the angular
difference is within ±90° degrees, the logical output “32P” enables. Although the 32P element is
independent of the 67P element, the torque angle setting is defined in the same manner: I1 leading
V1 (see Figure 3-2 on page 78).
The 32P element has two settings: (1) Enabled or Disabled, and (2) the torque angle. See Table
3-25. The 32P settings can be set differently in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 setting groups.

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ABB Power Control Device 3 Protection

Note: Setting the 32P function only sets up a logical output alarm for SCADA. In order to do
any control operations (such as tripping the recloser or to supervise external devices), its
logical output must be programmed into the Programmable I/O table.
Note: If the 32P element is used to supervise the 50P element, a minimum of 50 milliseconds
time delay on the 50P element is required for proper coordination. Also, note that the set
angle might shift ±10° when the voltage detected by the PCD is at or near the minimum
sensitivity point of 1-volt AC line-to-line.

Table 3-25. 32P (I1 ) Element Settings


32P (I1 ) Setting Description
32P Select Selection of whether the 32P element is enabled or disabled (default).
I1 Select
32P Torque Angle Specification of the 32P torque angle. The setting range is 0° to 355° in 5°
I1 Torque Angle steps with a sector width of 180°.

3.4.7 Negative Directional Power Element 32N (I2 )


The 32N negative directional power element supervises (torque control) other protection elements
of the PCD. The 32N element operates independently of the 67N element.
The 32N element compares the angle of the negative sequence current (I2) to the angle of the
negative sequence voltage (V2). Using the voltage angle as the reference (e.g. 0°), the negative
sequence current angle is compared to the 32N torque angle setting. If the angular difference is
within ±90°, the logical output “32N” goes HIGH. Although the 32N element is independent of

3 PROTECTION
the 67N element, the angle setting is defined in the same manner: I2 leading V2 (see Figure 3-3 on
page 80).
The 32N element has two settings: (1) Enabled or Disabled, and (2) the torque angle. See Table
3-26 below. The 32N settings can be different in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 setting groups.
Note: Setting the 32N function only sets up a logical output alarm for SCADA. In order to
perform any control operations (such as tripping the recloser or supervising external
devices), its logical output must be programmed into the Programmable I/O table.
Note: If the 32N element is used to supervise the 50N element, a minimum of 50 milliseconds
time delay on the 50N element is required for proper coordination. Also, note that the set
angle might shift ±10° when the voltage detected by the PCD is at or near the minimum
sensitivity point of 1 volt AC line-to-line.

Table 3-26. 32N (I2 )Element Settings


32N (I2 ) Setting Description
32N Select Selection of whether the element is enabled or disabled (default).
I2 Select
32N Torque Angle Specification of the torque angle. The setting range is 0° to 355° in 5° steps
I2 Torque Angle with a sector width of 180°.

3.4.8 Frequency Load Shed and Restoration Elements 81 (f)


The PCD provides two independent logical modules containing elements for frequency load
shedding (81S-1 and 81S-2) and load restoration (81R-1 and 81R-2). The reason to have two sets
is so one set (81S-1 and 81R-1) can be used for alarming purposes, and the second set (81S-2 and
81R-2) can be used for tripping purposes. The 81S and 81R elements can be Enabled or Disabled

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 setting groups. These elements use the frequency measured on
phase A voltage as their operating quantity.
Note: Setting the 81 function only sets up a logical output alarm for SCADA. In order to
perform any control operations (such as tripping the recloser or supervising external
devices), its logical output must be programmed into the Programmable I/O table.
The 81S is a frequency load shed element for under frequency when the 81S frequency setting is
below the nominal frequency set in Configuration Settings. When the distribution system
frequency drops below a threshold for a specified period an output is generated so the load can be
shed. The inverse element is the 81R; it restores load after a shed operation occurs when the
system frequency goes above a programmable threshold for a given amount of time.
There is an associated overfrequency element (81O), which activates when the frequency rises
above the 81R element. This can be used for shedding load in an overfrequency condition to
protect equipment.
The logical outputs from these modules can be assigned to physical outputs for tripping and
closing a recloser or circuit breaker based on frequency. The 81 element, in general, is used to
shed load on a recloser or circuit breaker when the distribution system becomes unstable and the
frequency begins to decrease. If the stability of the system is sacrificed due to overloading, the
frequency will generally drop off slowly. The time delay of the under frequency load shed trip
element can be set to a toleration point to allow time for the power system to recover.
The power system frequency is measured from the zero crossing on the VA-N voltage input for
Wye connected VT and VA-B for Delta connected VT.
Two independent logical frequency elements are provided with separate logical outputs. The first
3 PROTECTION

element has 81S-1, 81R-1 and 81O-1 for its logical outputs, while the second module has 81S-2,
81R-2 and 81O-2 for its logical outputs. These outputs become active when the frequency pickup
setting has reached its limit. There is one exception to that involves the 81V element, where the
system voltage is below the voltage block setting (see page 86).
The frequency-shed outputs 81S-1 and 81S-2 can be assigned to the same trip output contact,
with each setting at a different frequency threshold and trip time setting. This provides fast
tripping response for severe disturbances and slower trip times for tolerable system disturbances.
Example: Set 81S-1 to sense a slight under frequency condition and assign a longer time. Set
81S-2 to a lower frequency with a shorter time. This will allow a longer trip time for
slight under frequency conditions and shorter trip time for more severe under frequency
conditions.
The restoration elements (81R-1 and 81R-2) can be used to automatically restore load after a
frequency load shed trip operation of the recloser by the 81S-1 or 81S-2 element. The PCD
senses a load-shed trip by the operation of 81S-1 or 81S-2 and by the change of the 52A and 52B
contacts. During this condition, the 81R-1 and 81R-2 logical outputs are allowed to operate. The
81R element will activate when the frequency rises above the frequency setting and the associated
timer expires. If the power system frequency falls back below the 81 setting before expiration of
the load restore timer, the timer will reset and begin again when the frequency returns to normal.
The 81R logical outputs remain active until a successful recloser close or until the trip fail time
expires. The 81R element is not armed again until the next load shed operation.
Two overfrequency elements are also included (81O-1 and 81O-2). Their logical outputs activate
when the frequency rises above the 81R setting and the 81R time delay expires. They each can
be used to trip the recloser but they do not initiate an automatic restoration.
The hysteresis or dropout point for the 81S and the 81R logical outputs are 0.02 Hz above the
frequency setting. The hysteresis for the 81O element is 0.02 Hz below the frequency setting.

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ABB Power Control Device 3 Protection

Figure 3-4. 81S and 81 R Elements


Figure Description

81R Load Restoration function


activates the programmed
contact output after a load shed
occurs. The frequency is above
the 81R threshold and the time
delay has expired. Output is
active until the recloser closes
or close failure time elapses.
Frequency

81R Threshold

81S Threshold

81S Load Shed function


activates the programmed
contact output when frequency
is below the 81S threshold and
time delay has expired.

3 PROTECTION
Table 3-27. 81 Element Settings
81 (f) Setting Description
81 Select Choose whether the 81 element is enabled or disabled (default).
f Select
81S-1 Pickup Frequency Specification of frequency at which the 81S-1 element will pickup. Setting
f<1 Hz range is 56 to 64 Hz for 60 Hz models and 46 to 54 Hz for 50 Hz models,
with an increment of 0.01 Hz.
81S-1 Time Delay Time delay between 81S-1 pickup and load shed. Setting range is 0.08 to
tf<1 9.98 seconds, with an increment of 0.02 second.
81R-1 Pickup Frequency Specification of frequency at which the 81R-1 element will pickup. Setting
f>1 Hz range is 56 to 64 Hz for 60 Hz models and 46 to 54 Hz for 50 Hz models,
with an increment of 0.01 Hz.
81R-1 Time Delay Time delay between 81R-1 pickup and load restoration. Setting range is 0
tf>1 to 999 seconds with an increment of 1 second.
81S-2 Pickup Frequency Specification of frequency at which the 81S-2 element will pickup. Setting
f<2 Hz range is 56 to 64 Hz for 60 Hz models and 46 to 54 Hz for 50 Hz models,
with an increment of 0.01 Hz.
81S-2 Time Delay Time delay between 81S-2 pickup and load shed. Setting range is 0.08 to
tf<2 9.98 seconds, with an increment of 0.02 second.
81R-2 Pickup Frequency Specification of frequency at which the 81R-2 element will pickup. Setting
f>2 Hz range is 56 to 64 Hz for 60 Hz models and 46 to 54 Hz for 50 Hz models,
with an increment of 0.01 Hz.
81R-2 Time Delay Time delay between 81R-2 pickup and load restoration. Setting range is 0
tf>2 to 999 seconds with an increment of 1 second.
81V Voltage Block If the voltage is below the specified value, the 81-S and 81S-2 elements will
fU< Block be blocked (so load restoration will not be attempted). Setting range is 40
to 200 volts AC with an increment of 1 volt. See Section 3.4.9.

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

3.4.9 Voltage Block Element 81V


This element blocks operation of the logical outputs 81S-1 and 81S-2 when the power system
voltage is below the 81V setting. The 81V element can be Enabled or Disabled in the Primary,
Alternate 1 and Alternate 2 setting groups. Wye connected VTs use VA-N and Delta connected
VT suse VA-B for voltage monitoring. Operation of the logical outputs is restored when the
voltage returns to normal. The 81S-1 or 81S-2 elements will de-activate if they are active at the
time when the power system voltage falls below the 81V setting. The range for this setting is
from 40 to 200 VAC.

3.4.10 Undervoltage Element 27 (U<)


The undervoltage element provides for alarm and control purposes when the system voltage drops
below a preset threshold. The 27 element can be Enabled or Disabled in the Primary, Alt 1 and
Alt 2 setting groups. Two logical outputs are provided with the 27 element: one for single-phase
undervoltage 27P-1 and one for three-phase undervoltage 27-3P. The 27-1P element will operate
when one or more phases drops below the undervoltage setting. The 27-3P element will operate
only when all three phases drop below the undervoltage setting.
The 27 element threshold and time delays are set in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 setting groups
(see Table 3-28). The time delay range for each element is from 0 to 60 seconds. If trip times
below one second are desired, set the time delay to zero and place the desired trip time in the
physical output timers.
Note: Setting the 27 function only sets up a logical output alarm for SCADA. In order to
perform any control operations (such as tripping the recloser or supervising external
devices), its logical output must be programmed into the Programmable I/O table.
3 PROTECTION

PCD units ordered with the single-phase option have a separate 27 element for each phase for
each level: 27 becomes 27-A, 27-B and 27-C. All three elements for each level share the same
settings. Two additional logical outputs are provided: 27-1P is the logical OR of the three
separate phases, while 27-3P is the logical AND. For information about how they control logical
outputs for tripping, see Section 11.

Table 3-28. 27 (U<) Element Settings


27 (U<) Setting Description
27 Select Choice of whether the 27 element is enabled (default) or disabled.
U< Select
27 Pickup Voltage Pick will occur if the voltage drops below the specified value. The setting
U< Volts range is 10 to 200 volts with an increment of 1 volt.
27 Time Delay Time delay between pickup and trip. The setting range is 0 to 60 seconds
tU< with an increment of 1 second.

3.4.11 Overvoltage Element 59 (U>)


The overvoltage element 59 is provided for alarm and control purposes when the system voltage
rises above a preset threshold. The 59 element can be Enabled or Disabled in the Primary, Alt 1
and Alt 2 setting groups.
The 59 element threshold and time delays are set in the Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2 setting groups,
see Table 3-29. The time delay range for each element is from 0 to 60 seconds. For trip times
below one second are desired set the time delay to zero and place the desired trip time in the
physical output timers.
Note: Setting the 59 function only sets up a logical output alarm for SCADA. In order to
perform any control operations (such as tripping the recloser or supervising external
devices), its logical output must be programmed into the Programmable I/O table.

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ABB Power Control Device 3 Protection

PCD units ordered with the single-phase option have a separate 59 element for each phase for
each level: 59 becomes 59-A, 59-B and 59-C. All three elements for each level share the same
settings. Two additional logical outputs are provided: 59-1P is the logical OR of the three
separate phases, while 59-3P is the logical AND. For information about how they control logical
outputs for tripping, see Section 11.

Table 3-29. 59 (U>) Element Settings


59 (U>) Setting Description
59 Select Choice of whether the 59 element is enabled (default) or disabled.
U> Select
59 Pickup Voltage Pick will occur if the voltage drops below the specified value. The setting
U> Pickup range is 70 to 250 volts with an increment of 1 volt.
59 Time Delay Time delay between pickup and trip. The setting range is 0 to 60 seconds
tU>0 with an increment of 1 second.

3.4.12 79 Cutout Time Element


The 79 Cutout Time (79-CO) element allows for the detection of low-level or intermittent faults
before the resetting of the reclose sequence. At the end of the selected cutout time, all
overcurrent elements are re-enabled based on the 79-1 settings. For example, if the 79-3 reclose
sequence is set for ten seconds and the 79 Cutout Time is set for five seconds, the first five
seconds of the reclose sequence follow the overcurrent element settings for the 79-3 reclose
sequence. Nevertheless, the second five seconds (after the cutout time) follow the 79-1 settings.
The 79-CO setting is programmable from 1 to 200 seconds. When enabled, the 79-CO setting

3 PROTECTION
must be less than the 79 Reset Time.

Figure 3-5. 79 Cutout Time

0 seconds Reset

79 Reset Time

Protection based on the settings of the


Protection based on the settings of the
reclose sequence (79-1..-5) presently
reclose sequence 79-1.
occurring.

79 Cutout Time expires

3.4.13 79C Function


The 79C function is an independent reset timer from the 79 Reset Time and is only active when
enabled and the unit is closed manually. A manual close is defined as a close initiated by the
CLOSE button on the front panel through the Operations – Close Breaker option menu, from a
programmable input, or from a remote command through the RS-232 port. The available settings
for the 79C function are Disable and Enable. If Disable is selected (default setting), the control
will use the normal 79 Reset Timer for a manual close operation.

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

If the 79C function is set to Enable, an additional selection will appear for selecting a 79 Reset
Time. Options for this timer are “Disable” and 3-200 seconds. If “Disable” is selected for the 79
Reset Time, the unit will allow reclosing operations immediately upon a manual close.
If a 79C Reset Time value of between 3 and 200 seconds is selected, the unit will allow reclosing
operations after the expiration of that time. A flow chart shown in Figure 3-6 below describes the
logic of the 79C function.
Note: The 79C function only takes effect when the breaker is manually closed from one of the
indicated sources. An auto-reclose operation does not apply, and in that case, the PCD
sequences through operations using the normal 79 Reset Timer.

Figure 3-6. 79C Function

Close SCADA
Purshbutton Command - DNP

Operations Manual Close SCADA


Command -
Close Breaker Operation Modbus

Loop Control Programmable


Close Operation Input
3 PROTECTION

No 79C Enabled? Yes

Use
Normal
79C
Reset Load 79C
Timer No
Reset Timer

Range 3 to 200
seconds

Allow reclosing on
If Overcurrent Trip occurs Allow reclosing
Overcurrent Trip after 79C
within 79 Reset TimerPCD immediately if
Reset Timer expires, Or go
goes to Lockout Overcurrent Trip
to Lockout

3.5 Breaker Failure Element


3.5.1 Introduction
A Breaker Failure Alarm will energize if the PCD sends a TRIP signal and one or more of the
following occurs:
• The fault current fails to drop to ≤ 10 % of the pickup setting.
• The 52A and/or 52B contacts do not indicate that the recloser/breaker has opened.

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ABB Power Control Device 3 Protection

The drop in the fault current and the opening of the unit must occur before the Breaker Failure
Timer expires or the Breaker Failure Alarm (BFA) will activate. The status light for the unit will
blink, alternating red and green.
In the event of a BFA, the PCD continues to send a TRIP signal (by continuous energization of
the trip contact) until the recloser or circuit breaker opens. For PCDs driving magnetic actuated
reclosers with the DIO Type 2 module, there will be two breaker trip retries. When the PCD is
successfully tripped, the PCD goes into lockout and the Breaker Failure Alarm is removed. There
is a seal-in point maintained, and an operation record is logged.
For single phase tripping, the BFA does not apply. Instead, there is a failure alarm for each phase
(FAILA, FAILB, FAILC) that activates. However, in either case a sealed-in BFA alarm
activates. Refer to Section 11 for further information.
The logical outputs share the same logic and require a Breaker Fail Initiate (BFI) input and a
“starter” input. The starter input can be from an internal PCD phase and ground level detector,
52A contact or a combination of both.

Table 3-30. Breaker Failure Settings


Setting Description
Trip Failure Time Specification of the time allowed after a trip output for the recloser to report
that it has tripped (via the 52a and 52b contacts) and the current must fall
below 10% of the pickup value. This is a configuration setting with a range of
5 to 60 cycles with an increment of 1. The default is 18 cycles. It is NOT
recommended to set this value any lower than 18 cycles. Contact the factory
if such a change is desired.

3 PROTECTION
Close Failure Time Specification of the time allowed after a reclose command output for the
recloser to report that it has closed (via the 52a and 52b contacts). This is a
configuration setting with a range of 5 to 60 cycles with an increment of 1.
The default is 18 cycles. For recloser retrofit controls this setting should be
greater. See application note 5 in this manual for further details.

3.5.2 Breaker Failure Mode of Operation


In PCD units using a Recloser Control Module (DIO Type 2) to drive a magnetic actuator, the
breaker fail logic must account for the recloser’s unique method of operation. The recloser is
actually three independent single pole units that are driven in unison, but operate independently.
If one of the poles fails, there is pole inconsistency. In addition, the trip and close circuits are
driven by short-term current pulses to cause linear motion, not a continuous current flow as with a
conventional breaker. Therefore, the trip circuit cannot “stand” on the trip, the trip output must
be re-pulsed periodically to continue an attempt to open/close a malfunctioning pole.
The breaker failure mode will attempt to drive a malfunctioning pole to the open state. This is
normally used as the recloser open position is considered the “safe” state when failures occur.
Sequence of operation (starting from the closed state):
1. Trip is issued: trip pulses applied to all three phases.
2. Breaker fail to trip timer is started.
3. If all three poles of the breaker clear before the breaker fail to trip timer expires, the PCD
goes to the open state. This is normal operation.
4. If any pole remains closed after expiration of the fail to trip timer, a trip pulse is re-applied
after a one-second interval and the fail to trip timer is restarted. The breaker fail alarm will
be asserted and a failure logged.

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

5. This re-trip operation shall occur up to two times, after which the PCD will give up and
remain in the failure state.
Sequence of Operation (starting from the open state):
1. Close pulses are issued on all three poles (ARC, external, manual).
2. Breaker fail to close timer is started.
3. If all poles close before the close timer expires, the PCD goes to the closed state. This is
normal operation.
4. If any pole(s) remains open once the fail timer expires, a close pulse will be re-applied after
a one-second interval and the fail timer is restarted.
5. This reclose operation shall occur up to two times. If any pole(s) remains open at this point,
an attempt to drive all the poles open will be made. The BFA alarm picks up and a fail
operation is logged.
6. This operation, in itself, will make up to three attempts to open after which further
operations will be halted and breaker failure shall be logged.
7. If one of the attempts is successful, the BFA will expire.

3.6 Counter and Alarm-Threshold Settings


The PCD can issue alarms when internal event-counters reach a particular value, or when
monitored system-information values reach a particular threshold. These alarms control logical
outputs that can be programmed to control physical outputs, and communicate with external
3 PROTECTION

devices.

Table 3-31. Alarm Settings


HMI Abbreviation AFSuite Name and Description
KSI Sum KSI Accumulator Alarm Threshold (KSI)
When any KSI Accumulator reaches this setting value, the KSI logical output
will energize. Can be set to “Disable” (default) or to a value in the range 1 to
9999 kA, with an increment of 1. Each time a fault is interrupted, the
magnitude of the fault is added to the KSI accumulator, for example, 4
operations on a 1000A fault will add 4 to the KSI accumulator. Note that
Though the KSI displayed is rounded to the nearest KSI, the value stored is
precise to the ampere.
OC Trip Overcurrent Trip Counter Alarm (OCTC)
When any OCTC reaches this setting value, the OCTC logical output will
energize. Can be set to “Disable” (default) or to a value in the range 1 to
9999, with an increment of 1.
79 Counter 1 Recloser Counter Alarm 1
Used when any Recloser Counter 1 counter reaches this setting value, the
79CA1 logical output will energize. Can be set to “Disable” (default) or to a
value in the range 1 to 9999, with an increment of 1.
79 Counter 2 Recloser Counter Alarm 2
When any Recloser Counter 2 counter reaches this setting value, the 79CA2
logical output will energize. Can be set to “Disable” (default) or to a value in
the range 1 to 9999, with an increment of 1.
Phase Demand Phase Demand Alarm (PDA)
If the PDA of any phase goes above this setting value for 60 seconds, the
PDA logical output will energize. Can be set to “Disable” (default) or to a
value in the range 1 to 9999 A, with an increment of 1.

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Table 3-31. Alarm Settings


HMI Abbreviation AFSuite Name and Description
Neutral Dmnd Neutral Demand Alarm (NDA)
If the Neutral Current Demand goes above this setting value for 60 seconds,
the NDA logical output will energize. Can be set to “Disable” (default) or to a
value in the range 1 to 9999 A, with an increment of 1.
Dmnd 3P-kVAR 3-Phase kVAR Alarm
If the 3-Phase kVAR Demand goes above this setting value for 60 seconds,
the VarDA logical output will energize. Can be set to “Disable” (default) or to
a value in the range 0 to 99,990 kVar, with an increment of 10.
Low PF Low Power Factor (PF) Alarm
If the PF drops below this setting value for 60 seconds, the LPFA logical
output will energize. Can be set to “Disable” (default) or to a value in the
range 0.5 to 1.0 (lagging), with an increment of 0.01.
High PF High PF Alarm
If the PF goes above this setting value for 60 seconds, the HPFA logical
output will energize. Can be set to “Disable” (default) or to a value in the
range 0.5 to 1.0 (lagging), with an increment of 0.01.
Load Current Load Current Alarm
If the Load Current of any phase goes above this setting value for 60
seconds, the LOADA logical output will energize. Can be set to “Disable”
(default) or to a value in the range 1 to 9999 A, with an increment of 1.
Pos kVAR Positive kVAR Alarm
If the Positive 3-Phase kVAR Demand goes above this setting value for 60
seconds, the PVarA logical output will energize. Can be set to “Disable”

3 PROTECTION
(default) or to a value in the range 0 to 99,990 kVar, with an increment of 10.
Neg kVAR Negative kVAR Alarm
If the Negative 3-Phase kVAR Demand goes above this setting value for 60
seconds, the NVarA logical output will energize. Can be set to “Disable”
(default) or to a value in the range 0 to 99,990 kVar, with an increment of 10.
Pos kWatts 1 Positive Watt Alarm 1
If the Positive kWatts level goes above this setting value for 60 seconds, the
PWatt1 logical output will energize. Can be set to “Disable” (default) or to a
value in the range 0 to 9999 kWatts, with an increment of 1.
Pos kWatts 2 Positive Watt Alarm 2
If the Positive kWatts level goes above this setting value for 60 seconds, the
PWatt2 logical output will energize. Can be set to “Disable” (default) or to a
value in the range 0 to 9999 kWatts, with an increment of 1.

Table 3-32. Initial Values of Counters Settings


HMI Abbreviation AFSuite Name and Description
KSI Sum A KSI Sum A Counter
KSI Sum B KSI Sum B Counter
KSI Sum C KSI Sum C Counter
Each setting value will be the initial value of the corresponding counter after a
reset of the counters. Setting range is 0 (default) to 9999 kA, with an
increment of 1.

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

Table 3-32. Initial Values of Counters Settings


HMI Abbreviation AFSuite Name and Description
OC Trip Over Current Trip Counter
OC Trip A Overcurrent Trip A Counter
OC Trip B Overcurrent Trip B Counter
OC Trip C Overcurrent Trip C Counter
OC Trip N Overcurrent Trip N Counter
Each setting value will be the initial value of the corresponding counter after a
reset of the counters. Setting range is 0 (default) to 9999, with an increment
of 1.
Bkr Oper Breaker Operations Counter
Bkr Oper A Phase A Pole Operations Counter
Bkr Oper B Phase B Pole Operations Counter
Bkr Oper C Phase C Pole Operations Counter
Each setting value will be the initial value of the corresponding counter after a
reset of the counters. Setting range is 0 (default) to 9999, with an increment
of 1.
79 Cntr 1 Reclose Counter 1
79 Cntr 1 A Phase A Recloser Counter 1
79 Cntr 1 B Phase B Recloser Counter 1
79 Cntr 1 C Phase C Recloser Counter 1
Each setting value will be the initial value of the corresponding counter after a
reset of the counters. Setting range is 0 (default) to 9999, with an increment
of 1.
79 Cntr 2 Reclose Counter 2
79 Cntr 2 A Phase A Recloser Counter 2
79 Cntr 2 B Phase B Recloser Counter 2
3 PROTECTION

79 Cntr 2 C Phase C Recloser Counter 2


Each setting value will be the initial value of the corresponding counter after a
reset of the counters. Setting range is 0 (default) to 9999, with an increment
of 1.
1st Recl 1st Reclose Counter
1st Recl A Phase A Step 1 Reclose Counter
1st Recl B Phase B Step 1 Reclose Counter
1st Recl C Phase C Step 1 Reclose Counter
Each setting value will be the initial value of the corresponding counter after a
reset of the counters. Setting range is 0 (default) to 9999, with an increment
of 1.
2nd Recl 2nd Reclose Counter
2nd Recl A Phase A Step 2 Reclose Counter
2nd Recl B Phase B Step 2 Reclose Counter
2nd Recl C Phase C Step 2 Reclose Counter
Each setting value will be the initial value of the corresponding counter after a
reset of the counters. Setting range is 0 (default) to 9999, with an increment
of 1.
3rd Recl 3rd Reclose Counter
3rd Recl A Phase A Step 3 Reclose Counter
3rd Recl B Phase B Step 3 Reclose Counter
3rd Recl C Phase C Step 3 Reclose Counter
Each setting value will be the initial value of the corresponding counter after a
reset of the counters. Setting range is 0 (default) to 9999, with an increment
of 1.

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ABB Power Control Device 3 Protection

Table 3-32. Initial Values of Counters Settings


HMI Abbreviation AFSuite Name and Description
4th Recl 4th Reclose Counter
4th Recl A Phase A Step 4 Reclose Counter
4th Recl B Phase B Step 4 Reclose Counter
4th Recl C Phase C Step 4 Reclose Counter
Each setting value will be the initial value of the corresponding counter after a
reset of the counters. Setting range is 0 (default) to 9999, with an increment
of 1.

3 PROTECTION

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3 Protection ABB Power Control Device

3.7 Time Overcurrent Curves


The PCD is equipped with a comprehensive selection of time overcurrent curves. Standard
ANSI/IEEE curves, IEC curves and Recloser curves are available. A Configuration setting
determines whether the elements are set to use ANSI/IEEE curves reset instantaneously, or
according to the corresponding reset curve. In addition, the PCD can store up to three user-
defined curves (see page 214).
Protective curves cannot be mixed, i.e., once ANSI curves are selected in Configuration Settings,
IEC or Recloser curves are not available. However, user programmable curves may be used to
“emulate” a desired curve in another group. The complete list of curves with respective protective
curve plots are given in Appendix 3.

Table 3-33. Curve Settings that Apply to All Time Overcurrent Elements
HMI Abbreviation AFSuite Name and Description
Curve Set Curve Set
Choice of whether the curve-choice setting for the time-overcurrent elements
will be from a list of ANSI, IEC or recloser curves. (User-defined curves are
available for any Curve Set setting). This is a Configuration Setting, and
affects all three settings sets (Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2.
Reset Mode Reset Mode
Choice of whether to have time-overcurrent elements reset instantaneously
when they drop out, or reset in a delayed manner that simulates the behavior
3 PROTECTION

of an electromechanical protection element. This choice only applies when


the time-overcurrent curve is an ANSI curve (IEC and Recloser curves
always reset instantaneously). This is a Configuration Setting and so affects
all three settings sets (Primary, Alt 1 and Alt 2).

The PCD will report a subset of these counters with a quick front panel key labeled “Counters”
on the enhanced faceplate. See section 2.3.6 for further details.

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ABB Power Control Device 4 AFSuite

4 AFSuite Configuration Software


4.1 Introduction
4.1.1 Requirements
AFSuite is as full-featured Windows based configuration program used to program, control and
download event data from the PCD. The following are the system requirements for using
AFSuite:
• One of the following Operating Systems:
Windows 2000
Windows NT 4.0
Windows XP
Windows 98 Second Edition
• Internet Explorer 5.50 or higher
• .NET framework 1.1
(provided with the installation package and automatically installed if necessary)
• display with 1024 x 768 resolution or higher
• display set to 16-bit color or higher
• 128 MB of RAM or higher
The following are requirements for communication with the PCD:
• Firmware Version 2.52 or higher on the PCD.
• Serial RS-232 communications cable - null modem type.
• Available COM port on PC

4.1.2 Compatibility with WinPCD


AFSuite is the platform for PCD configuration and data extraction, replacing WinPCD. WinPCD

4 AFSuite
supports all versions of the PCD up to Version 2.8. WinPCD will remain available for download
to customers having older firmware versions not supported by AFSuite. Customers may elect to
upgrade the firmware on their PCD to allow the use of the AFSuite software. Both AFSuite and
WinPCD can be installed on a PC at the same time. However, only one of the programs can use
the PCs comm. port at a time for connecting to a PCD.

4.1.3 Software Features


The following are a list of features that are included in AFSuite:
• Offline configuration
• Online configuration
• Dial-up Modem
• Ability to view multiple units at a time offline (and on-line provided there are separate com
ports on your PC)

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4 AFSuite ABB Power Control Device

• Proxy Server (if PCD is connected to a PC on a network other PC’s can access the PCD)
• Export/Import files
• Numerous copy functions for settings
• Numerous upload/download options
• Comparison routine for online vs. offline settings
• Full Settings Report
• Versatile and easy to use event record download functions

4.1.4 Installation
Detailed instructions for installation and basic operation are provided with the software in a file
called “AFSuite Release Notes.doc”. Print this file before installing AFSuite.
You must uninstall any previous versions of AFSuite before installing a new version. Uninstall
AFSuite using the Settings > Control Panel > Add/Remove Programs function does not cause the
loss of unit records.
AFSuite is a licensed program. Permanent licenses are provided for customers who have placed
orders for reclosers or breakers requiring a PCD control. The license file provided is to be on the
hard drive for the installation. During the installation process, the user will reach a Registration
screen. At the bottom right corner select “I already have a license” and browse for the license
file. For users evaluating the software for a limited time, ABB can issue a Serial Number key.
Contact PCD Technical Support for a temporary key.

Warning: AFSuite is protected by copyright law and international treaties. Unauthorized


reproduction or distribution of this program, or any portion of it, may result in severe civil and
criminal penalties, and will be prosecuted to the maximum extent possible under the law.

4.2 Main Menu


The main menu of AFSuite is referred to as the Fleet View. It contains the list of all PCDs and
information about each one. Each PCD is an entry characterized by some configuration data.
From this page, the user can create PCD records, either online or offline, import records,
copy/paste, or export records. Each unit will have a separate configuration file on the PC. As
shown in Figure 4-1, in order to view detailed data on a particular unit, select File > Open, when
4 AFSuite

highlighting the unit of interest, or simply double click the unit. All the copy functions can be
accessed from the Edit menu.

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ABB Power Control Device 4 AFSuite

Figure 4-1. AFSuite Fleet View

4.2.1 AFSuite Help Options


AFSuite includes a help menu that explains each of the menu options in detail. It is accessed
from the Help > Help Topics pull down item. Each menu item is indexed as shown in Figure 4-2.
Additional help is provided within the program such as on the protection programming pages.

4 AFSuite

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4 AFSuite ABB Power Control Device

Figure 4-2. AFSuite Help Menu

4.2.2 Adding PCD Units


PCD records may either be added online or offline. The online method allows you to retrieve the
latest settings from the PCD, including any factory set settings that may have been specifically
prepared for you. If this is not convenient, records may be added offline. When an off-line unit
4 AFSuite

is generated, the configuration file is set up with factory defaults of the PCD.
The entry page for a unit is shown in Figure 4-3. From here it is possible to connect on-line or
access the settings offline. In order to access offline settings, simply select that option. For online
access, you have two options: 1. Add units using the Autodetect function, which allows the PC to
search for the unit, or 2. Enter the appropriate communications parameters corresponding to the
PCDs, and press Online without selecting the Autodetect box.
The following process is what AFSuite uses to Autodetect a PCD:
1. Checks all COM (1 to 4) ports at 19200 baud, and Unit Address 000.
2. If not found, it decrements the baud rate to 9600 and checks each COM
port again. It does not check any other baud rate.
3. If not found after both baud rates are checked, increments the unit address,
reverts back to step 1, and continues up to address 004.
4. If not found by this point, Autodetect will ask if you want to try a higher
address.

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ABB Power Control Device 4 AFSuite

Figure 4-3 . Configuration / Entry Page

After connection, the PCD will automatically receive all settings from the PCD, with one
exception: settings files generated offline. If you have generated settings in offline mode, when
you connect to the PCD for the first time with that record you will be asked if you want to
overwrite all your settings. Select “No” if you have previously prepared settings offline.
When the PCD receives settings in this process, every user setting in the PCD is retrieved,
including Communications settings.

4.2.3 Grouping PCDs


There is an option to subcategorize multiple units under a common group by selecting Edit >
Insert Group, then while highlighting that group, select Edit > Insert Unit. When Exporting or
Importing units, you can also group them by selecting several units before importing. This is

4 AFSuite
done by pressing the <ctrl> key while selecting each unit.

4.3 Using AFSuite


AFSuite provides the user an easy method for programming PCD. The pages are similar to the
structure of the HMI in the PCD, and while most settings can be made from the HMI, the
engineer will find AFSuite more beneficial, as this will provide permanent records of settings.
Table 4-1 shows the possible menu options for online and offline settings. Note that there are
some pages, such as protection that have “More” buttons which must be reviewed when setting
the parameters. Also note that some menus will not be available, such as loop control module,
based on the PCDs catalog number.

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4 AFSuite ABB Power Control Device

Table 4-1. AFSuite Menu Structure


Online Options: Offline Options:
Unit
Front Panel
Info
Meter
Load
Demand
Min/Max Demand
Records
Operation Records
Operation Summary
Fault Summary
Basic Settings Basic Settings
Configuration Configuration
Protection & Recloser Protection & Recloser
Primary Primary
Alternate 1 Alternate 1
Alternate 2 Alternate 2
Counters Counters
LCM (Loop Control Module) LCM (Loop Control Module)
Clock
Advanced Settings Advanced Settings
Programmable I/O Programmable I/O
Alarms Alarms
FLI Index FLI Index
ULI/ULO ULI/ULO
Waveform Capture
Communication Communication
Communication Parameters Communication Parameters
DNP Binary Inputs DNP Binary Inputs
DNP Analog Inputs DNP Analog Inputs
Utilities Utilities
Settings Report Settings Report
Fault/Operations/Load Profile (Reports)
Change Unit Password
4 AFSuite

Waveform Capture
Settings
Records
Start/Stop
Status
Operations
Alternate Settings
Block/Unblock
Seal In/User Alarms
Tests
Physical I/O
Logical In Status
Logical Out Status
FLI
Battery
Misc. Commands
Reset (Targets, Alarms, Demands)

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ABB Power Control Device 4 AFSuite

4.3.2 Unit (Online only)


The Unit tab provides information on the unit as well as an interactive front panel view. From the
unit information tab the PCD serial number, firmware version, and other version information on
the PCD can be obtained. From the Front Panel tab, the user can do direct control operation on
the PCD, emulating a SCADA system. Note that in this mode, the unit can be opened and closed
either by the button on the PCD or by the breaker icon on the right. If the PCD has the single-
phase option, and Single Phase Tripping is turned on in Configuration Settings, the unit can be
operated on a per phase basis from the three icons to the right. Clicking on the Metering
hyperlinks to the Metering Page

4.3.3 Metering (Online only)


The Metering tab allows the user to access all the metering parameters on the PCD. This page
refreshes once every 3 seconds. See Section 6 for details on metering information.

4.3.4 Records (Online only)


The Records tab allows the user to retrieve Operation, Fault Records, and Fault Summary on an
event-by-event basis, which is useful for reviewing records while performing tests on the unit.
When visiting a PCD in the field and event history is desired, it is preferred to use the Utilities
page. For more information on records, see Section 7

4.3.5 Basic Settings


The Settings are broken up into two parts, Basic and Advanced. The Basic settings are designed
to incorporate all the necessary protection and counter programming options for beginning users.
Advanced Settings include items for advanced logic, alarms, etc.
Basic Settings allow the user to set Configuration, Protection, Recloser, and Counter Settings.

4.3.5.1 Configuration
Configuration Settings consist of global settings that affect protection metering and other
necessary settings. It must be the first step in programming the relay. Settings that must be
programmed within this page are:
• VT Ratio
• VT Connection

4 AFSuite
• Frequency
• Recloser Mode
• Curve Set
• Alternate 1 Setting
• Alternate 2 Setting
• Zone Seq. Coordination

4.3.5.2 Protection Settings


Protection Settings include the overcurrent protection parameters, as well as over/under voltage
and frequency settings. The following is a listing of all the parameters as organized on this page.
Phase Protection:
• 51P Phase Time-Overcurrent Element - Phase Slow Curve
• 50P-1 Phase Instantaneous Overcurrent Element – Phase Fast Curve

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4 AFSuite ABB Power Control Device

• 50P-2 Phase Instantaneous Overcurrent Element – Definite Time


• 50P-3 Phase Instantaneous Overcurrent Element
Ground Protection:
• 51N Ground Time-Overcurrent Element - Ground Slow Curve
• 50N-1 Ground Instantaneous Overcurrent Element – Ground Fast Curve
• 50N-2 Ground Instantaneous Overcurrent Element – Definite Time
• 50N-3 Ground Instantaneous Overcurrent Element – Definite Time
Advanced Protection:
• 46 Negative Sequence Time Overcurrent Element
• 67P Directional Phase Time Overcurrent Element
• 67N Directional Ground Time Overcurrent Element
• 81 Frequency Load Shed and Restoration Elements
• 27 Under voltage Element
• 59 Over voltage Element
• 32P Positive Directional Power Element
• 32N Negative Directional Power Element
Other Settings:
• Cold Load Time (min/sec)
• Neutral Cold Load Time (SEF only)
• Two-Phase 50P Tripping
Each element has particular values associated with it and sub pages activated by the More > “+”
buttons. Verify these are correct for your application. For the overcurrent protection parameters,
you must set the appropriate pickup current. The settings identified in the “More” sub page
consist of curve modifiers, which include:
• Time Dial
• Minimum Response (sec)
• Time Curve Adder (sec)
4 AFSuite

• Curve Block (sec) (for instantaneous elements only)


Note that some curves do not support all the above modifiers

4.3.5.3 Recloser Settings


Recloser Settings include programming parameters related to the tripping elements and sequence
of operations. This page includes:
• 79-1 to 79-5 Recloser Sequence
• Open Interval Time (s)
• Single Phase Trip Mode
• 79 Reset Time (s)
• Cut Out Time (s)
• 79V Mode Select
• 79C Mode

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4.3.6 Advanced Settings


Advanced Settings include programming parameters used for specific application logic related to
the tripping elements and sequence of operations. The following sub pages are available:
• Programmable I/O
• Alarms (Counter and load related alarms)
• FLI Index (Force Logical Input Index names)
Notes on Programmable I/O:
• The shaded area of the programmable logic is not editable. This is reserved for the breaker
operation and must match the defaults at all times for proper breaker operations.
• When settings are changed, you will be prompted to save offline settings or not. This is
unique to Programmable I/O, and allows the user to test settings on the PCD without altering
the parameters.
• If more feedback contacts are needed, double click on the Physical Contact ID at the top.
Changing the Physical Input to a Feedback changes the Physical Output as well.
• Double Click on the timer in the Programmable Outputs to edit delay timers.
• Take care to save all of the above changes to the PCD
• Help is available for the Logical Outputs and Logical Inputs by selecting the hyperlink near
the top left.

4.3.7 Communication Settings


Communication Settings include all the available settings for programming the communication
parameters in the PCD, including DNP, Modbus ASCII or Modbus RTU. The following sub
pages are available for Communications
• Comm. Parameters
• DNP Binary Inputs
• DNP Binary Outputs
The Communication Parameters include general settings, as well as specific parameters used for

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DNP communication.
The Binary Inputs setting page provides the ability to reassign DNP binary input points as well as
the event class they belong to. To turn off points completely, first arrange the points that are
needed into the groups (identified as “Scan Groups”). Once all the necessary points are
rearranged, turn off the remainder of the points.
Turning off points using the Scan Group function automatically changes and sets the Scan Group
parameters in the Comm. Parameters page. Save data and send the data to the PCD will set the
Scan Group. Note that if the Scan Group parameter itself is changed, the respective groups in the
DNP Inputs and Outputs settings pages will be changed.
The Analog Inputs setting page is programmed in the same manner as the Binary Inputs page.
For more information on setting DNP parameters, refer to the ABB DNP3.0 Protocol
Implementation Document

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4.3.8 Utilities
The utilities menu in the PCD provides the ability to generate settings reports and download event
data. The following sub pages are available:
• Settings Report
• Fault/Operations/Load Profile (Online only)
• Change Unit Password (Online only)
The Settings Report generates a full report of all settings in the unit, including programmable
logic and communications settings. This provides a standard text file that can be printed or stored
on your hard drive. If printing a hard copy, it may be useful to reprint the programmable Inputs
and Outputs pages in landscape format.
Note that all reports that are generated are automatically stored on the hard drive of the PC, in the
location listed at the top of the document. The default directory is a subdirectory of the AFSuite
program called “PCD Reports\<unit name>”. The default directory can be changed by selecting
Setup > Set Report Directory from the top menu bar.
The Fault/Operations/Load Profile option provides a means to download all fault and operation
records, or load profile data at one time. This is the preferred method for downloading data in the
field. The amount fault/operation records can be limited by setting a number of records desired.
The Load Profile Data can be limited to receive only what has been recorded since the last
download by selecting the “Last” option.
For more details on Records, refer to Section 7.

4.3.9 Waveform Capture


The Waveform Capture menu provides a means for setting, controlling, and downloading
oscillographic waveform data. The available pages from this tab are:
• Settings – Specifies the trigger elements for oscillographic capture, record size, etc.
• Records (online only) – Allows the user to download specific (or all) oscillographic records
• Start/Stop (online only) – Allows the user to manually start/stop oscillographic capture
function
• Status (online only) – Indicates the status of the oscillographic capture function
Further details on the Waveform Capture function are given in Section 9.1.
4 AFSuite

4.3.10 Operations Menu


When connected to a PCD unit, choices in the Operations Menu enable you to activate Alternate
settings groups, reclose, ground and SEF block functions, and reset seal in alarms individually.
(Open and Close commands can be performed from the Unit > Front Panel page.)

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4.3.11 Test Menu


When connected to a PCD unit, pages in the Test Menu enable you to initiate tests on the PCD
and view the results through AFSuite. These pages include Physical I/O, Logical In Status,
Logical Out Status, FLI, and Battery.

4.3.11.1 Physical I/O


The physical I/O page identifies all the physical inputs and outputs associated with the PCD rear
panel contacts. In AFSuite, this page can be used to force physical contacts, and observe their
status. Clicking on the Physical I/O tab at the top refreshes this page.

Figure 4-4. Physical I/O Status

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4.3.11.2 Logical In Status
The Logical Input Status page shows the energized/deenergized status each Logical Input. This
page is refreshed once every 7 seconds. For a listing and description of the Logical Inputs, refer
to Table 5-1.

4.3.11.3 Logical Out Status


The Logical Output Status page shows the energized/deenergized status each Logical Output.
This page is refreshed once every 7 seconds. For a listing and description of the Logical Inputs,
refer to Table 5-2.

4.3.11.4 FLI (Forced Logical Input)


The FLI page allows the forcing of certain logical inputs for testing purposes.

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4.3.11.5 Battery
The Battery menu provides a means for testing and monitoring of the battery condition. Refer to
Section 2.5.3 for further details on the battery test function.

4.3.12 Programmable Curves Menu


Choices in the Programmable Curves Menu enable you to download and upload user-defined
time-overcurrent curves created with the CurveGen application (see Section 9.2).

Figure 4-5. Programmable Curves Menu


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4.3.13 Miscellaneous Commands Menu


When connected to a PCD unit, choices in the Miscellaneous Commands Menu enable you to
send additional types of commands to the PCD through AFSuite. (See also the Operations Menu
and Trip/Close Commands Menu.)

Figure 4-6. Miscellaneous Commands Menu

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4.4 Programming Example


This section presents a “step by step” procedure for programming a PCD by using an example
protection scheme. This is intended to assist new users in preparing the PCD for initial
installation, as well as provide a programming refresher for experienced users. This example
covers the “minimum required settings” that must be programmed to successfully place a unit
into service. The settings in this example can be programmed either by the HMI, or by AFSuite
software. This example utilizes the AFSuite software.

WARNING: This programming example is not intended to present actual data applied to
a distribution system. Only persons experienced in distribution protection procedures
shall determine the actual settings.

4.4.1 STEP 1: Determine Protection Settings


Determine the appropriate protection settings to use in the unit manually or using a software
package. For this example, we will program the PCD for a recloser set up in a “fuse saving”
application. This same method can also be used for setting up a protection scheme with two
reclosers in series. For this example, assume the protection curves resulting from settings study
are as shown in Figure 4-7 and Figure 4-8.
For this example, we determine the minimum pickup values to be 400 A on phase and 140 A on
ground. Also, assume that since this is a “fuse saving” application, we want two fast and two slow
operations to lockout on both phase and ground. The settings in Table 4-2, Table 4-3 and Table 4-
4 outline how these settings and the curves given are applied to the PCD.
It is important to realize that the protection curve(s) must be considered with two components, a
control response curve and a total clearing curve. The control response curve is as published in
Appendix 3 and the total clearing curve reflects the additional time required by the breaker to
clear the fault. In this case, 40 milliseconds are added, which is the interrupting time for the OVR
recloser. Refer to the respective interrupting device instruction books for other device interrupting
times. Most software packages allow the user to add a specified amount of time to the control
response time.
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Figure 4-7. Protection Example - Phase Overcurrent Protection Curves

Figure 4-8. Protection Example - Ground Overcurrent Protection Curves

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Table 4-2. Protection Example – Phase Protection Settings


Selection Description Example Value*
Slow phase curve selection. This curve cannot
51P Curve Select C (133) Curve
be disabled.
Minimum Tripping current for selected
overcurrent curve. Setting shown is in primary
51P Pickup A 400 Amps
amps for VRs or Cooper retrofits, secondary
amps for units w/ 5 A secondaries.
51P Time Multiplier Y axis (time) multiplier for selected curve. 1
Delays tripping to a minimum time. Does not
51P Min Resp apply for definite time or standard inverse 0 Seconds
curves
Adds a definite amount of time to each point in
51P Time Adder 0 Seconds
the curve selected
50P-1 Curve Select Fast phase curve selection R (105) Curve
Minimum Tripping current for selected
50P-1 Pickup X overcurrent curve. Setting is in multiples of 51P 1 X 51P pickup
setting
50P-1 Time Multiplier Y axis (time) multiplier for selected curve 1
Delays tripping to a minimum time. Does not
50P-1 Min Resp apply to definite time or standard inverse 0 Seconds
curves
Adds a definite amount of time to each point in
50P-1 Time Adder 0 Seconds
the curve selected
Disables tripping for this particular curve above
50P-1 Curve Block (C.Block) this value. Can be used to prevent co-tripping. Disabled
Setting is in multiples of 51P setting
* Example values shown in boldface are also factory defaults.
Note that all other protection settings are set to “disabled” for this example

Table 4-3. Protection Example – Ground Protection Settings


Selection Description Example Value*
51N Curve Select Slow ground curve selection. 11 (141)
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Minimum Tripping current for selected


overcurrent curve. Setting is in primary amps
51N Pickup A 140 A
for VRs or Cooper retrofits, secondary amps for
units w/ 5 A secondaries.
51N Time Multiplier Y axis (time) multiplier for selected curve 1
Delays tripping to a minimum time. Does not
51N Min Resp apply to definite time or standard inverse 0 Seconds
curves
Adds a definite amount of time to each point in
51N Time Adder 0 Seconds
the curve selected
50N-1 Curve Select Fast ground curve selection 8+ (111)
Minimum Tripping current for selected
50N-1 Pickup X overcurrent curve. Setting is in multiples of 51N 1 X 51N Pickup
setting.
50N-1 Multiplier Y axis (time) multiplier for selected curve. 1

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Table 4-3. Protection Example – Ground Protection Settings


Selection Description Example Value*
Delays tripping to a minimum time. Does not
50N-1 Min Resp apply to definite time or standard inverse 0 Seconds
curves.
Adds a definite amount of time to each point in
50N-1 Time Adder 0 Seconds
the curve selected.
Disables tripping for this particular curve above
50N-1 Curve Block (C.Block) this value. Can be used to prevent co-tripping. Disabled
Setting is in multiples of 51P setting
* Example values shown in boldface are also factory defaults.
Note that all other protection settings are set to “disabled” for this example.

Table 4-4. Protection Example – Recloser Settings


Selection Description Example Value*
Applies only for 1ph tripping. Reference
1-Ph Mode Section 11 of this manual for information on Disabled
single phase tripping.
After this time expires, unit resets its tripping
79 Reset Time 20 sec
sequence to the first operation.
Number of Operations the 51P (slow phase
Phase Total Operations 4
curve) will be active.
Number of Operations the 50P-1 (fast phase
Phase Fast Operations 2
curve) will be active.
Number of Operations the 51N (slow ground
Ground Total Operations 4
curve) will be active.
Number of Operations the 50P-1 (fast phase
Ground Fast Operations 2
curve) will be active.
79-1 Open Time Dead time after the first trip. 0.5 sec
79-2 Open Time Dead time after the second trip. 2.0 sec
79-3 Open Time Dead time after the third trip. 15 sec
79-4 Open Time Set to Lockout to end sequence. Lockout
* Example values shown in boldface are also factory defaults.

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Note that all other protection settings are set to “disabled” for this example.

4.4.2 STEP 2: Obtain the Proper Hardware for Communication.


1. You will need a serial 9-pin female to 9-pin male cable and a null-modem connector. The
null-modem connector swaps the #2 and #3 pins on the serial cable.
2. The PC must be running one of the following Operating Systems: Windows 98, Windows
NT, Windows 2000, or Windows XP.
3. Power up the PCD.

4.4.3 STEP 3: Communicate with Unit.


1. Either connect the 9 pin serial port of your PC to one of the 9 pin serial ports on the COM
card or the front panel port of the PCD.
2. Follow the instructions in Section 4.2.2 for communicating and creating a new record.

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Note: This example is based on programming the PCD in an online mode. Programming can
also be done on an offline mode, followed by an online session to transmit all settings to
the PCD.

4.4.4 STEP 4: Program Configuration Settings


On the Basic Settings > Configuration page, program the appropriate general settings in the
example, or for your application. All the settings shown the main portion of this page must be
set. Reference Figure 4-9 for programming settings in this example.
The following are some notes on these settings:
• The Recloser Mode is the global setting for single or three phase tripping. If the unit catalog
number does not include single phase tripping, this option will be grayed out. If it is an
option, setting this to 1-Phase Trip will allow you to enable/disable single-phase tripping in
each of the protection profiles. This example is based on 3-phase tripping.
• The Curve Set is the global parameter for whether Recloser, ANSI or IEC curves are to be
used. Note that anytime this setting is changed and saved, the selected curves on the
protection page, as well as the Time Dial/Multiplier values are changed. The protection
parameters must be reviewed. This example is based on Recloser curves.
• If the Alternate Setting group is turned off on this page, it cannot be activated locally or by
SCADA.
• Zone Sequence Coordination is useful whenever there is a down line recloser. Refer to
Application Note 1 for more details on this function.
• Fault Location Parameters: Applies to units that have the Recloser Mode set to 3-Phase
Tripping.
• Metering Parameters: Set the load profile data interval here. 15 minutes is a typical value,
and provides data logging for 40 days.
• Advance Parameters: Generally the defaults are acceptable; however, if the recloser is not a
VR-3S or an OVR type, set the breaker fail time according to Application Note 5. Also, if
using the CVD/CT sensor board, you must set the Nominal phase line-ground voltage.

Figure 4-9. Basic Settings > Configuration Page


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4.4.5 STEP 5: Program Overcurrent Protection Settings


On the Basic Settings > Protection page, program the appropriate curves, pickup values, and
curve modifiers (listed under the “More / +” button) for phase and ground protection. You can
also view the recloser settings from this screen for reference. In the next step these will be
programmed.
In our example, the only settings being used are the 51P (slow phase), 50P-1(fast phase), 51N
(slow ground) 50N-1 (fast ground). All the remaining settings are to be set to “Disabled” for this
example. Reference Figure 4-10 for programming settings in this example.

Figure 4-10. Basic Settings > Protection Page

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4.4.6 STEP 6: Program Recloser Settings


Once all the phase and ground overcurrent settings are programmed, click on the Recloser tab.
On the Recloser tab first select the “Open Interval Time” for each step in the recloser sequence.
If the unit has single phase tripping, select the appropriate option for the Single Phase Tripping
Mode. For further information on this setting, refer to Table 11-2. Once these options are
selected, program the reclose sequence. The 79-x operations correspond to the step in the recloser
sequence, operations 1 to a possible 5 trip operations. In this example, for the 79-1 setting, the
51P, 50P-1, 51N and 50N-1 settings are all set to Enable-3P. Four total trips are applied in this
example. Reference Figure 4-11 for programming settings in this example.

Figure 4-11. Basic Settings > Recloser Page


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4.4.7 STEP 7: Copy Settings to Alternate Setting Groups


Once the Basic > Protection and Basic > Recloser settings pages are programmed, it is desirable
to copy the Primary Settings to the Alternate Settings groups as the basis for programming those
groups. To do this, perform the following steps:
1. From the top menu pull down select Tools > Copy Offline Protection/Recloser Groups
2. Copy Primary to Alt 1 and Primary to Alt 2, with “Protection” settings selected in the upper
right corner.
3. Copy Primary to Alt 1 and Primary to Alt 2, with “Recloser” settings selected in the upper
right corner.
4. If connected to a PCD, you must then send these settings to the unit, either by selecting
Tools > Transmit Offline Settings to PCD, or Tools > Transmit Selected Offline Settings to
PCD.

4.4.8 STEP 8: Modifying Alternate Settings


Alternate Settings groups can be programmed for variations in load and/or weather conditions.
For example, you may wish to set an increased pickup for Alternate 1 Settings.
If the Hot Line Tag feature is required, it is recommended to use Alternate 2 Settings group if it is
desired to change to a faster operating curve, or if 1-phase tripping is used in the Primary Group.
Alternate 2 is recommended since it is the highest priority of all the protection groups. Refer to
Application Note 6 for further details on Hot Line Tag programming.
If more than 3 protection groups are required, in firmware version 3.0 and later there is a
Configuration selection “Bank 1/Bank 2 Enable “ which provides a “reserve” set of setting
groups, allowing the expansion of settings groups from 3 to 6. Only three can be utilized at one
time (see section 3.2.5 for more details). When necessary, the main (Bank 1) settings can be
replaced with Bank 2 settings via SCADA command or by the Operation Menu in the HMI.
Note that if using Alternate 2 settings are being used for Hot Line Taging, and both banks are
being used, the Alternate 2 settings must be programmed in both banks for Hot Line Tagging.

4.4.9 STEP 9: Verify Settings


After the settings are programmed, select the “Print to File” button at the bottom of each page
programmed for the quickest review. When programming online, or sending settings online,
select the Tools > Compare Online vs. Offline Settings to generate a report of any discrepancies
between the PCDs settings and the settings on the PC for that unit. You can also generate a full

4 AFSuite
settings report from the Utilities > Settings Report page.

4.4.10 STEP 10: Set the Clock.


The clock on the PCD is important for time-stamping event records and metered data, as well as
SCADA communications.
1. Ensure your PC Clock is set properly.
2. Select the Basic Settings > Clock Settings
3. From the Clock screen, send the PC settings to the PCD.

4.4.11 STEP 11: Set the Passwords


Set the PCD passwords in the Utilities > Change Unit Passwords tab. The PCD has two user
passwords to protect against unauthorized access, the Relay Password and the Test Password. The
Relay Password allows full access to the relay, including all programming, operation and test
menus. The Test Password gives access only to the operation and test menus. It is important to

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program both of these passwords before putting the unit into service. The default password is
four spaces (or blanks).

4.4.12 STEP 12: Testing


There are various methods to test the PCD. Traditional methods using standard test equipment are
outlined in Section 10. Another method for testing PCDs used with ABB VR-3S or ABB OVR
reclosers is to use a McGraw Edison Type MET Control Tester set with an ABB Recloser Test
Adapter. In the case of PCD retrofit of non-ABB reclosers, the MET can be used directly on the
control.
Tip: For firmware version 2.8 and later, the PCD includes a detailed fault simulation algorithm,
which allows the user to simulate phase and ground fault currents, and allow the unit to sequence
through the programmed sequence. This test function is only available from the front panel of the
PCD. In order to access this test function, from the Main Menu > Test > Fault Test Mode. For
further details on this test method, reference 10.8.

Note: If connected to a recloser in functional test mode, the recloser will trip and
reclose per the programmed sequence and fault current level.
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ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs


All PCDs have a built in programmable logic controller (PLC) type functionality. This feature
allows the user to perform a variety of protection and control functions with the PCD. Though
this logic function is used for breaker driver logic as well as hot line tagging logic, it additionally
allows a great deal of customer customization. Programmable logic consists of three
components, Binary Input Contacts, Logical Inputs, Binary Output Contacts, Logical
Outputs, Feedback Contacts and User Logical Functions. These will be explained and
demonstrated in this section.

5.1 Binary Input Contacts


Binary Input (BI) contacts are used to feed logical commands to the PCDs processor, in order to
perform a function. There are 16 total BI contacts, some of which are external contacts used for
monitoring breaker status (on the rear panel but not for customer use), some of which are external
contacts (on the rear panel for customer use), and some which are internal Feedback (FB). FB
contacts are not physically accessible, but are directly tied to Binary Output (BO) FB contacts.
External BIs are programmable double-ended dry contacts. Double-ended inputs have two
terminal connections, marked “+” and “–”. The recognition time for the change in state of input
is two (2) cycles. These contacts must be externally wetted with the voltage listed on the module
itself. This is typically obtained from the DC source voltage supplied by the PCD for controls
with the UPS module, and obtained from the customer source for units with the PS module. A
generic wiring schematic for the input contacts is given in Figure 5-2.

5.1.1 Logical Inputs


Logical Inputs (LIs) are used to perform functions based on BI contact information sent to the
processor. When an LI is mapped to a particular BI contact in the programmable logic table, it
will be activated or deactivated by energizing or de-energizing that BI. There are a large number
of available LIs in the PCD, which are listed in Table 5-1. These LIs feed information about the
breaker position (using 52a/b switch input), permit control operations (such as Tripping), etc.
Programmable contact inputs with factory default settings include the following:
• 52A Breaker Position: Breaker Closed (input closed)/Breaker Open (input open)
• 52B Breaker Position: Breaker Closed (input open)/Breaker Open (input closed)
• CLSBLK Close Block – Hot Line Tag function: Enabled (input closed)/Disabled (input
opened). Applies only to PCDs with enhanced front panel.
Some logical inputs default to “HIGH” (activated) if they have not been mapped to a physical
input, specifically: GRD, PH3, 46, 50-1, 50-2, 50-3, 67P, 67N, TCM, ZSC.
The remaining logic inputs must be assigned to physical inputs for those functions to become
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

operational (Enabled). The user-programmable inputs monitor, initiate, or actuate the logic
functions shown in Table 5-1. The programmable inputs in the table are arranged in alphabetical
order.

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Table 5-1. Logical Input Functions


Logical Input Description
---- Entry Not Used
43A Reclose Blocked Function Supervision
When the 43A input is HIGH, reclosing is Enabled. When 43A is LOW, the recloser is Disabled. If the
recloser is Disabled, the “Reclose Blocked” LED will illuminate on the front of the PCD. 43A defaults to
HIGH (Enabled) when not programmed to a physical input or feedback term.
46 Negative Sequence Overcurrent Supervision
Use to supervise (torque control) the negative sequence time overcurrent element. When the 46 input is
HIGH, negative sequence time overcurrent protection is Enabled. 46 defaults to HIGH (Enabled) if not
assigned to a physical input or feedback term.
50-1 Instantaneous 50P-1 & 50N-1 Overcurrent Supervision
Use to supervise (torque control) phase and ground instantaneous overcurrent protection elements 50P-
1 and 50N-1. When the 50-1 input is a logical 1, these elements are enabled. Enabled. 50-1 defaults to
enabled if not assigned to a physical input or feedback term.
50-2 Instantaneous 50P-2 & 50N-2 Overcurrent Supervision
Use to supervise (torque control) phase and ground instantaneous overcurrent protection elements 50P-
2 and 50N-2. . When the 50-2 input is a logical 1, these elements are enabled. 50-2 defaults to
enabled if not assigned to a physical input or feedback term.
50-3 Instantaneous 50P-3 & 50N-3 Overcurrent Supervision
Use to supervise (torque control) phase and ground instantaneous overcurrent protection elements 50P-
3 and 50N-3. . When the 50-3 input is a logical 1, these elements are enabled. 50-3 defaults to
enabled if not assigned to a physical input or feedback term.
52A Breaker Position-Closed/Opened
This input corresponds to the physical input that is connected to the recloser 52A auxiliary contact. The
PCD requires this input along with the 52B logical input to determine recloser states for initiation of
recloser close, trip failure and close failure logical outputs. When 52A are a logical 1 and 52B is a logical
0, the PCD logic assumes a closed recloser. When 52A is a logical 0 and 52B is a logical 1; the PCD
logic assumes an open recloser. If the 52A and 52B are at equal logic states, the PCD will determine a
“CB Status Unknown” state as displayed on the front panel HMI LCD display.
52aA Phase A 52a
52aB Phase B 52a
52aC Phase C 52a
These inputs correspond to the physical input connected to the each phase of the recloser 52a position
auxiliary contact, applicable only to PCDs with the single phase tripping option. See 52A for
functionality.
52B Breaker Position-Opened/Closed
Assign this input to the physical input that is connected to the recloser 52B auxiliary contact. The PCD
requires this input along with the 52A logical input to determine recloser states for initiation of recloser
close, trip failure and close failure logical outputs. See 52A for valid recloser operating states.
52bA Phase A 52b
52bB Phase B 52b
52bC Phase C 52b
These inputs correspond to the physical input connected to the each phase of the recloser 52b position
auxiliary contact, applicable only to PCDs with the single phase tripping option. See 52A for
functionality.
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

67N Directional Ground Overcurrent Supervision


Use to supervise (torque control) the 67N time overcurrent element. When the 67N input is a logical 1,
the 67N time overcurrent protection is Enabled. 67N defaults to enabled if not assigned to a physical
input or feedback term.
67P Directional Phase Overcurrent Supervision
Use to supervise (torque control) the 67P time overcurrent element. When the 67P input is a logical 1,
the 67P time overcurrent protection is Enabled. 67P defaults to enabled if not assigned to a physical
input or feedback term.

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Table 5-1. Logical Input Functions


Logical Input Description
79M Multi-Shot Reclosing
Enables a multi shot of reclosing when the PCD determines that an external device has opened the
recloser. When 79M is a logical 1, multi shot reclosing is Enabled. 79M defaults to logical 0 (Disabled)
when not assigned to a physical input or feedback term.
79S Single Shot Reclosing
Enables a single shot of reclosing when the PCD determines that an external device has opened the
recloser. When 79S is a logical 1, single shot reclosing is Enabled. 79S default is logical 0 (Disabled)
when not assigned to a physical input or feedback term.
ALT1 Enables Alternate 1 Settings
When ALT1 is a logical 1, the Alternate 1 settings are placed into service if Alternate 1 setting is set to
“Enable” in Configuration Settings and Alternate 2 settings are not active. ALT1 defaults to a logical 0
(Alternate 1 settings not active) if not assigned to a physical input or feedback term. Alternate 1 Settings
has priority over Primary Settings. I.e., when deactivated, the control reverts back to Primary Settings.
ALT1Pon Enables Alternate 1 Settings by Momentary Signal
When ALT1Pon is sent a momentary logical 1, the Alternate 1 settings are placed into service if
Alternate 1 Setting is set to “Enable” in Configuration Settings and Alternate 2 settings are not active.
Alternate 1 settings activated in this manner can be turned off either by Alt1Poff, by pressing the Alt1
button, or by remotely turning Alternate 1 settings off.
ALT1Poff Disables Alternate 1 Settings by Momentary Signal
When ALT1Poff is sent a momentary logical 1, the Alternate 1 settings are turned off and the control
reverts back to Primary Settings.
ALT2 Enables Alternate 2 Settings
When ALT2 is a logical 1, the Alternate 2 settings are placed into service if Alternate 2 Setting is set to
“Enable” in Configuration Settings. ALT2 defaults to a logical 0 (Alternate 2 settings not active) if not
assigned to a physical input or feedback term. Alternate 2 Settings is the highest priority, and cannot be
overridden by Alternate 1 settings via SCADA input or the front panel button.
ALT2Pon Enables Alternate 2 Settings by Momentary Signal
When ALT2Pon is sent a momentary logical 1, the Alternate 2 settings are placed into service if
Alternate 2 Setting is set to “Enable” in Configuration Settings. Alternate settings activated in this
manner can be turned off either by Alt2Poff, by pressing the Alt2 button, or by remotely turning Alternate
2 settings off.
ALT2Poff Disables Alternate 2 Settings by Momentary Signal
When ALT2Poff is sent a momentary logical 1, the Alternate 2 settings are turned off and the control
reverts back to the next lower priority “pending” protection group. I.e., if Alternate 1 settings were
previously activated, the protection group would revert to Alternate 1 instead of Primary Settings.
ARCI Automatic Reclose Inhibit
This logical input stops the reclose open timer for the time when it is a logical 1. When ARCI is returned
to a logical 0, the reclose will be delayed by an additional amount of time preset by the Open Time
setting for that operation. If the ARCI is held as a logical 1 beyond the Recloser Reset Time, the
recloser will immediately lockout.
BFI Breaker Fail Initiate
Assign this input to a physical input or feedback term for initiation of the Breaker Failure Trip logic. See
“Breaker Failure Element” (Section 3.5). It is typically connected to an external protective device with a
BFI output contact. BFI defaults to a logical 0 (no input) when not assigned to a physical input or
feedback term.
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

CLOSE Close Initiate (3 Phase)


Initiates a 3 Phase close operation of the recloser. When CLOSE is a logical 1 for at least 1 cycle, a
close is issued. Note that if the PCD has the single-phase trip option, this command only works when
the Trip Mode in Configuration settings is set to “3 Phase”. If set to “1 Phase” the CLOSE A, CLOSE B,
CLOSE C inputs must be used.

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Table 5-1. Logical Input Functions


Logical Input Description
CLOSEA Direct Close A
CLOSEB Direct Close B
CLOSEC Direct Close C
Initiates Close Output for the corresponding pole.
Initiates a single-phase close of the designated phase, applicable only to PCDs with the single-phase
option. (Also applies only when the Trip Mode in Configuration settings is set to “1 Phase”. If the Trip
Mode is set to “3 Phase” the CLOSE logical input must be used.)
CLSBLK Close Block
Activates Hot Line Tagging
When HIGH, all sources of CLOSE will be blocked including SCADA and LOCAL. Tripping from any
source will still be allowed.
CRI Resets Overcurrent Trip and All Reclose Counters
Clear Reclose and Overcurrent Counters. Assign this input to a physical input or feedback term to
remotely clear the Reclose and Overcurrent Counters. When CRI is a logical 1, the reclose and
overcurrent counters are returned to 0. CRI defaults to a logical 0 (no clear) when not assigned to a
physical input or feedback term.
ECI1 Event Capture Initiated
Assign this input to a physical input to capture events from external devices. When ECI1 is a logical 1,
an event called “ECI1” is logged in the operations record. ECI1 defaults to a logical 0 (no event) when
not assigned to a physical input or feedback term.
ECI2 Event Capture Initiated
As with ECI1, assign this input to a physical input to capture events from external devices. When ECI2
is a logical 1, an event called “ECI2” is logged in the operations record. ECI1 defaults to a logical 0 (no
event) when not assigned to a physical input or feedback term.
ExtBFI External Started Input
This input is used to start the recloser failure tripping sequence. See “Breaker Failure Element” (Section
3.5). It is typically assigned to the same physical input as the 52a contact. EXTBFI defaults to a logical
0 (no input) when not assigned to a physical input or feedback term.
GRD Ground Block Control
Supervises the Ground Block function. Used to control the 51N, 50N-1, 50N-2 and 67N ground
overcurrent protection. The 50N-3 is not controlled by this function. When the GRD input is a logical 1,
all ground overcurrent protection except 50N-3 is enabled. GRD defaults to a logical 1 (Enabled) if not
assigned to a physical input or feedback term.
OPEN Trip Initiate (3 Phase)
Initiates a 3 Phase trip of the recloser.
When OPEN is a logical 1 for at least 1 cycle, a trip is issued. The OPEN logical input takes precedence
over any close command, whether coming from a reclose operation or from programmable logic. Note
that if the PCD has the single-phase trip option, this command only works when the Trip Mode in
Configuration settings is set to “3 Phase”. If set to “1 Phase” the TRIP A, TRIP B, TRIP C inputs must be
used.
PH3 Phase Torque Control
Enables 51P/50P-1/50P-2. Use to supervise (torque control) all phase overcurrent protection except
50P-3. When the PH3 input is a logical 1, all phase overcurrent protection except 50P-3 is enabled.
PH3 defaults to a logical 1 (Enabled) if not assigned to a physical input or feedback term.
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

RBI Remote Block Input


Input to block all remote operational commands sent through a data port.
RSA Reset Seal-in Alarms (added in firmware version 2.9)
Resets all seal-in alarms, which are those logical outputs identifed in Table 5-2 an asterisk, ex. 27-1P*.
RTA Reset Target Alarms (added in firmware version 2.9)
Resets all target alarms, which are those logical outputs including PTA, NTA, PATA, PBTA and PCTA,
desribed in Table 5-2.

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ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

Table 5-1. Logical Input Functions


Logical Input Description
SCC Spring Charging Contact
Connect to a physical input to monitor a recloser spring. If the SCC input is a logical 1, a “Spring
Charging” event is logged in the operations record. SCC defaults to a logical 0 (no spring charge event)
when not assigned to a physical input or feedback term. SCC only functions when the PCD determines
a recloser open state.
SEF Sensitive Earth Fault Enable
Enables the sensitive earth fault function (available in Sensitive Earth Fault models only). Use to
supervise (torque control) the SEF overcurrent element. When the SEF input is a logical 1, the SEF
overcurrent protection is Enabled. SEF defaults to a logical 1 (Enabled) if not assigned to a physical
input or feedback term.
TAGMSG Tag Message
Input to cause the Tag Message to appear on the LCD display. The message displayed is:
“ –-- Warning ---- , Remote Tag Applied”
TARC Initiate Trip and Auto Reclose
This input is used to issue a recloser trip and reclose. It is useful in the testing of the recloser trip and
close circuits as well as the recloser logic and timing settings. When TARC is a logical 1, a trip and
automatic reclose sequence is initiated. If the input is held at a logical 1, the PCD will continue to trip
and reclose through the recloser steps 79-1, 79-2, 79-3, etc., (See Recloser section for reclosing
details). If TARC is pulsed at a logical 1, the trip and auto reclose will occur once unless TARC is pulsed
again. TARC defaults to logical 0 (Disabled) when not assigned to a physical input or feedback term.
TCM Trip Coil Monitoring
Assign this to a physical input to monitor continuity of the trip coil. See Figure 5-1 for typical trip coil
monitoring connections. When input is a logical 1, TCM logic assumes breaker coil continuity. If a
logical 0, recloser trip coil is failed and logical output TCFA (Trip Circuit Failure Alarm) is asserted. TCM
is functional when the PCD determines that the recloser is closed. TCM defaults to a logical 1 (recloser
trip coil healthy) if not assigned to a physical input or feedback term. TCM only applies to reclosers and
breakers driven by the DIO Type 1 module that use a trip coil. It does not apply to reclosers operated
by the DIO Type 2 module, such as the VR-3S or OVR.
TRIPA Direct Trip A
TRIPB Direct Trip B
TRIPC Direct Trip C
Initiates a single-phase trip of the designated phase, applicable only to PCDs with the single-phase
option. (Also applies only when the Trip Mode in Configuration settings is set to “1 Phase”. If the Trip
Mode is set to “3 Phase” the OPEN logical input must be used.)
ULI1 User Logical Input Asserts ULO1
ULI2 User Logical Input Asserts ULO2
ULI3 User Logical Input Asserts ULO3
ULI4 User Logical Input Asserts ULO4
ULI5 User Logical Input Asserts ULO5
ULI6 User Logical Input Asserts ULO6
ULI7 User Logical Input Asserts ULO7
ULI8 User Logical Input Asserts ULO8 (ULI8 is pre-assigned to activate the USER 1 LED on S# 8R3x-xxxx-
ULI9 xx-xxxx)
User Logical Input Asserts ULO9 (ULI9 is pre-assigned to activate the USER 2 LED on S# 8R3x-xxxx-
xx-xxxx)
Input is used to enhance the PCD programmable logic capability. See “Advanced Programmable Logic”
later in this section for details. ULIx defaults to a logical 0 (no input) when not assigned to a physical
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

input or feedback term.


WCI Waveform Capture Initiated
Assign this input to either a physical input or feedback term for initiation of the oscillographic waveform
capture. WCI can be used to capture waveform for other devices in the system that does not contain
oscillographic capability. When WCI is a logical 1, the oscillographic waveform capture is initiated for the
number of cycles programmed in the oscillographic settings. WCI defaults to a logical 0 (no event) when
not assigned to a physical input or feedback term.

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Table 5-1. Logical Input Functions


Logical Input Description
ZSC Zone Sequence Coordination
Enables Zone Sequence Coordination scheme. Allows external supervision of the Zone Sequence
scheme. When the ZSC input is a logical 1, zone sequence is Enabled. ZSC defaults to a logical 1
(Enabled) if not assigned to a physical input or feedback term.

Figure 5-1. Trip Coil Monitoring


+ VDC

+
PCD Trip In1c
Contact (TCM)
-

52A

52 TC

- VDC

5.1.2 Programmable Input Example


One of the important functions of the input contacts is to perform control functions from SCADA.
One example is to trip the recloser from a contact closure from an RTU. Note that this
programming is not necessary when controlling serially using a communication protocol. To do
this, suppose we desire to close contact 1c to trip the breaker.
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

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ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

Figure 5-2. Programmable Inputs Example


+ VDC (from PCD)
PCD DIO Type 1
Module
+
In1c
(Trip)
-

SCADA Output
(dry contact)

- VDC

5.1.3 Programming Inputs


AFSuite is required to program logic in the PCD. Use AFSuite and follow these steps to program
the binary (contact) inputs:
1. Select the Advanced Settings > Programmable I/O tab.
2. The Programmable Input and Output Map screen will appear (see Figure 5-3).

Figure 5-3. Programmable Inputs Screen

5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

3. To program a function, select the correct LI from the list above. In the case of the example
above, and illustrated in Figure 5-2, we wish to OPEN the unit when there is a physical
input contact closure. To do this, click on the left column on any free line (avoiding the
52a/b lines). Scroll through the list until the LI you want is highlighted, which in this

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

example is OPEN. Alternatively, pressing “O” repeatedly will scroll through all the logic
functions starting with “O”.
4. Next, move to the right on the same line, and under a free column (again, avoiding the
52a/b logic), select a “C”. Note that selecting an “O” here will invert the logic, creating the
function when voltage is NOT present on the contact. See Figure 5-4.

Figure 5-4. Programmable Inputs Screen (Changed)

5. To change the logic of a LI:


a) Use the arrow keys to highlight the logic value of a LI.
b) Press the appropriate logic AND / OR.
c) Highlight AND / OR.
d) In the case of the above example, the logic does not matter since there is only one input
(In1c) that operates the LI OPEN
6. To assign a name to an input:
a) Double Click on the “-“ field at the top of the table.
b) A window appears prompting you to enter the new name. Type in the new name (up to
8 characters).
c) Presses ENTER to change the name or press ESC to close the input window without any
changes.
7. Save your changes.
a) Once programming is complete, the settings must be saved to the unit online and offline
separately. This allows experimentation with different schemes on the unit while
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

keeping the original scheme unchanged in the database. After programming, send these
settings to the unit, and after you are satisfied that the changes you made are correct,
select “Yes” for “Do you also want to update the offline settings?” as well in order to
save for future sessions.

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ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

5.2 Binary Output Contacts


Binary Output (BO) contacts are used to output logical commands from the PCDs processor.
There are 16 total BO contacts, some of which are physical contacts used for breaker operation
(on the rear panel but reserved for breaker operation), some which are physical contacts (on the
rear panel for customer use), and some which are used for Feedback (FB) output contacts which
are internally connected to corresponding FB input contacts.
External BIs are programmable double-ended contacts. Double-ended inputs have two terminal
connections, marked “+” and “–”. The recognition time for the change in state of input is two (2)
cycles. All logical outputs except “ALARM” are a logical 0 when the PCD is in a “no operation”
state. Also, ZSC (Zone Sequence Coordination) is a logical 1 when enabled in configuration
settings.
5.2.1 Logical Outputs
Logical Outputs (LOs) are output commands (ex. TRIP/CLOSE operations), status (ex. pickup
status - 51P) and alarms (ex. Loss of AC alarm – LOAC) generated by the processor which can
be used to CLOSE (or Energize) BO contacts. When a LO is mapped to a particular BO contact
in the programmable logic table, it will CLOSE that BO contact. There are a large number of
available LOs in the PCD, which are listed in Table 5-2.
Programmable contact inputs with factory default settings include the following:
• TRIP: Trip Breaker – Energize to trip breaker
• CLOSE: Close Breaker – Energize to close breaker
• TAGBTN: Tag Button – Hot Line Tag function: Energize to latch on (used to activate
CLSBLK using a feedback function.). Applies only to PCDs with enhanced front panel.
All LOs (with the exception of Self Check) default to “LOW” (de-activated) if they have not been
energized by the processor. A complete LOs list is given in Table 5-2. The LOs in the table are
arranged in alphabetical order.
Some of the LOs listed below will have duplicate elements, for example, 50P-1 and 50P-1*,
notice that an asterisk (*) follows one of the elements. LOs can have two different types of
outputs for the same function. The first type is a non-sealed-in type. This type of logical output
will be a logical 1 (logical output asserted) when the condition is present and a logical 0 (logical
output de-asserted) when the condition ceases. It is sometimes referred to as a “real-time” output.
The second type is a sealed-in type. This type of logical output will be a logical 1 (logical output
asserted) when the condition is present and will remain a logical 1 when the condition ceases. The
sealed-in type is denoted by an asterisk (*). It is reset by any of the following methods:
1. The front panel HMI “C” (clear) button is depressed once within a 5-second period. The
user will eventually be prompted to reset seal-ins.
2. By AFSuite program from the page Misc. Commands > Reset.
3. Depending on the communications protocol contained in the PCD, a command is issued to
reset the individual seal-in outputs or all seal-in outputs.
An example of where seal-in bits are applied: The PCD is connected directly onto a Modbus®
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

communications network and a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) are also on the network.
The PLC obtains fault information from the PCD over the Modbus® network for certain
restoration scheme. Since this is a token passing type network, a fault may occur and extinguish
before the token reaches the PCD. If the fault bit 51P for example, sensed by the PLC were a real
time bit, the PLC would never see the change. The seal-in bit, 51P* can be used to alert the PLC
to a fault even after the fault has extinguished. Once the PLC is finished with the logical output
bit 51P*, it can reset the bit to a logical 0 via the communication network. This eliminates hard
contact wiring between the relay and the PLC and assures that the PLC will always see a fault.

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Table 5-2. Logical Output Functions


Logical Output Description
---- Entry Not Used
27-1P Single Phase Under voltage Alarm
27-1P* Single Phase Under Voltage Seal In
Goes HIGH when any phase drops below the under voltage (27) setting for the specified time, and drops
out immediately when the voltage of all phases goes above the dropout level of the 27 element.
27-3P Three Phase Under Voltage
27-3P* Three-Phase Under Voltage Seal In
Goes HIGH when the voltages of all three phases drop below the under voltage (27) setting for the
specified time, and drops out immediately when the voltage of any phase goes above the dropout level
of the 27 element.
27A Undervoltage Phase A
27A* Undervoltage Phase A Seal-in Alarm
27B Undervoltage Phase B
27B* Undervoltage Phase B Seal-in Alarm
27C Undervoltage Phase C
27C* Undervoltage Phase C Seal-in Alarm
Each output goes HIGH if the corresponding phase drops below the under voltage (27) setting for the
specified time, and drops out when the voltage of any phase goes above the dropout level of the 27
element.
32N Negative Sequence Polarized Alarming Element
32N* 32N Trip Sealed-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the negative sequence current is within the 180-degree torque angle sector as set in
the 32N-2 settings.
32NA Alarm indicating 67N element is picked up
Goes HIGH when the negative sequence current is within the 180-degree torque angle sector as set in
the 67N settings. 32NA does not indicate that the 67N overcurrent element is picked up; it indicates only
that the negative sequence current is in the angular operating zone. 32NA will not operate if the 67N
overcurrent element is Disabled. For ground power directional supervision of other elements internal or
external, use the 32N-2 logical output.
32P Positive Sequence Polarized Alarming Element
32P* 32P Trip Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the positive sequence current is within the 180-degree torque angle sector as set in
the 32P-2 settings.
32PA Alarm indicating 67P element is picked up
Goes HIGH when the positive sequence current is within the 180-degree torque angle sector as set in
the 67P settings. 32PA does not indicate that the 67P overcurrent element is picked up, it indicates only
that the positive sequence current is in the angular operating zone. 32PA will not operate if the 67P
overcurrent element is Disabled. For phase power directional supervision of other elements internal or
external, use the 32P-2 logical output.
46 Negative Sequence Overcurrent
46* Negative Sequence Overcurrent Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the negative sequence time overcurrent element, 46, has timed out and energized.
50-1A Trip 50 1a
50-1A* Trip 50 1a Seal-in Alarm
50-1B Trip 50 1b
50-1B* Trip 50 1b Seal-in Alarm
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

50-1C Trip 50 1c
50-1C* Trip 50 1c Seal-in Alarm
50-1N Trip 50 1n
50-1N* Trip 50 1n Seal-in Alarm
Each output goes HIGH if the corresponding 50-1 element trips.

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ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

Table 5-2. Logical Output Functions


Logical Output Description
50-1D 50-1 Element Disable
Goes HIGH when a torque controlled Programmable Input, 50-1, is mapped but not energized. This
alarm indicates that the 50P-1 instantaneous unit is disabled form tripping. 50-1D will not operate if the
50P-1 element is disabled in the protective settings.
50-2A Trip 50 2a
50-2A* Trip 50 2a Seal-in Alarm
50-2B Trip 50 2b
50-2B* Trip 50 2b Seal-in Alarm
50-2C Trip 50 2c
50-2C* Trip 50 2c Seal-in Alarm
50-2N Trip 50 2n
50-2N* Trip 50 2n Seal-in Alarm
Each output goes HIGH if the corresponding 50-2 element trips.
50-2D 50-2 Element Disable
Goes HIGH when the torque control Programmable Input, 50-2, is mapped but not energized. This
alarm indicates that the 50P-2 instantaneous unit is disabled form tripping. 50-2D will not operate if the
50P-2 element is disabled in the protective settings.
50-3A Trip 50 3a
50-3A* Trip 50 3a Seal-in Alarm
50-3B Trip 50 3b
50-3B* Trip 50 3b Seal-in Alarm
50-3C Trip 50 3c
50-3C* Trip 50 3c Seal-in Alarm
50-3N Trip 50 3n
50-3N* Trip 50 3n Seal-in Alarm
Each output goes HIGH if the corresponding 50-3 element trips.
50N-1 1st Neutral Inst Overcurrent
50N-1* 1st Neutral Inst Overcurrent Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the neutral instantaneous (ground fast) overcurrent element, 50N-1, has timed out and
trips.
50N-2 2nd Neutral Inst Overcurrent
50N-2* 2nd Neutral Inst Overcurrent Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the definite time neutral instantaneous overcurrent element, 50N-2, has timed out and
trips.
50N-3 3rd Neutral Inst Overcurrent
50N-3* 3rd Neutral Inst Overcurrent Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the definite time neutral instantaneous overcurrent element, 50N-3, has timed out and
trips.
50P-1 1st Phase Inst Overcurrent
50P-1* 1st Phase Inst Overcurrent Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the phase instantaneous (phase fast) overcurrent element, 50P-1, has timed out and
trips.
50P-2 2nd Phase Inst Overcurrent
50P-2* 2nd Phase Inst Overcurrent Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the phase instantaneous overcurrent element, 50P-2, has timed out and trips.
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

50P-3 3rd Phase Inst Overcurrent


50P-3* 3rd Phase Inst Overcurrent Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the phase instantaneous overcurrent element, 50P-3, has timed out and trips.

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Table 5-2. Logical Output Functions


Logical Output Description
51A Trip 51a
51A* Trip 51a*
51B Trip 51b
51B* Trip 51b*
51C Trip 51c
51C* Trip 51c*
Each output goes HIGH if the corresponding 51 element trips.
51N Neutral Time Overcurrent
51N* Neutral Time Overcurrent Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the neutral time (ground slow) overcurrent element, 51N, has timed out and trips.
51P Phase Time Overcurrent
51P* Phase Time Overcurrent Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the phase time (phase slow) overcurrent element, 51P, has timed out and trips.
59 Over Voltage
59* Over Voltage Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when any phase voltage rises above the over voltage (59) setting for the specified time, and
drops out immediately when the voltage of all phases goes below the dropout level of the 59 element.
59-3P 3 Phase Over voltage Alarm
59-3P* 3 Phase Over voltage Alarm Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the voltages of all three phases rises above the under voltage (59) setting for the
specified time, and drops out immediately when the voltage of any phase goes below the dropout level
of the 59 element.
59A Phase A Overvoltage Alarm
59A* Phase A Overvoltage Seal-in Alarm
59B Phase B Overvoltage Alarm
59B* Phase B Overvoltage Seal-in Alarm
59C Phase C Overvoltage Alarm
59C* Phase C Overvoltage Seal-in Alarm
Each output goes HIGH if the corresponding voltage rises above the 59 over voltage setting.
67A Trip 67a
67A* Trip 67a Seal-in Alarm
67B Trip 67b
67B* Trip 67b Seal-in Alarm
67C Trip 67c
67C* Trip 67c Seal-in Alarm
Each output goes HIGH if the corresponding 67 element trips.
67N Negative Sequence Polarized Neutral-Overcurrent
67N* 67N Trip Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the ground directional time overcurrent element, 67N, has timed out and trips.
67P Positive Sequence Polarized Phase-Overcurrent
67P* 67P Trip Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the phase directional time overcurrent element, 67P, has timed out and trips.
79CA-1 Recloser Counter 1 Alarm
79CA1* Recloser Counter 1 Seal-in Alarm In
Goes HIGH when the recloser has operated beyond the number of counts set in the 79 counter alarm
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

settings.
79CA-2 Recloser Counter 2 Alarm
79CA2* Recloser Counter 2 Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the recloser has operated beyond the number of counts set in the 79 counter 2 alarm
settings.
Note: Two recloser counter alarms are provided 79CA1 and 79CA2. They can be set to different
thresholds or as typically applied; one can be reset to 0 on a monthly basis and the other on a yearly
basis, this way recloser operations can be tracked on a monthly and yearly basis.

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ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

Table 5-2. Logical Output Functions


Logical Output Description
79DA Recloser Disable Alarm
Goes HIGH when the recloser is disabled either by 43A logical input or the 79-1 recloser sequence is set
to lockout. This logical output operates in conjunction with the red front panel “Recloser Out” target.
79LOA Recloser Lockout Alarm
Goes HIGH when the PCD recloser is in lockout. For units with the single-phase option, 79LOA will
energize whenever any phase is locked out.
LOCKA Lockout A
LOCKB Lockout B
LOCKC Lockout C
Each output goes HIGH if the corresponding pole is in lockout. (Applies only to units with single phase
tripping option.)
81O-1 Over Frequency (1st Stage)
81O-1* Over Frequency (1st Stage) Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the 81R-1 setting has been exceeded and the 81R-1 time delay has expired.
81O-2 Over Frequency (2nd Stage)
81O-2* Over Frequency (2nd Stage) Seal In
Goes HIGH when the 81R-2 setting has been exceeded and the 81R-2 time delay has expired.
81R-1 Frequency Restore (1st Stage)
81R-1* Frequency Restore (1st Stage) Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the frequency setting 81R-1 has been met and the 81R-1 time delay has expired.
81R-1 does not activate the logical output “CLOSE”. 81R-1 can be mapped to the logical input “CLOSE”
via the feedback logic for operation. 81R-1 will only operate after an 81S-1 under frequency load shed
(trip).
81R-2 Frequency Restore (2nd Stage)
81R-2* Frequency Restore (2nd Stage) Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the frequency setting 81R-2 has been met and the 81R-2 time delay has expired.
81R-2 does not activate the logical output “CLOSE”. 81R-2 can be mapped to the logical input “CLOSE”
via the feedback logic for operation. 81R-2 will only operate after an 81S-2 under frequency load shed
(trip).
81S-1 Frequency Shed (1st Stage)
81S-1* Frequency Load (1st Stage) Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the system frequency has dropped below the 81S-1 setting and the 81S-1 time delay
has expired. 81S-1 does NOT activate the main trip contact of the PCD. 81S-1 must be mapped to the
logical input “OPEN” via the feedback logic for operation of the main trip contact. See the Frequency
Load Shed and Restoration section for more details.
81S-2 Frequency Shed (2nd Stage)
81S-2* Frequency Shed (2nd Stage) Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the system frequency has dropped below the 81S-2 and the 81S-2 time delay has
expired. 81S-2 does not activate the main trip contact of the PCD. 81S-2 must be mapped to the logical
input “OPEN” via the feedback logic for operation of the main trip contact. See the Frequency Load
Shed and Restoration section for more details.
ALARM Self Check Alarm
Is normally HIGH, indicating that the PCD is functioning normally. Goes LOW if the PCD internal self-
check indicates a problem. This logical output controls the dedicated, physical “Self Check Alarm”
contact and the front panel “G-NORMAL/R-FAIL” target.
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

BattFAIL Battery Test Failure


Goes HIGH when the battery test (initiated by SCADA or PROG 1 button) indicates a failed battery. The
criteria for a failed battery is a 10% drop in battery voltage during load test on the battery system.
Applies only to units with UPS module. BattFAIL will stay energized until the battery problem is
corrected and a successful test is performed. Available for firmware version 2.7 and later.
BF Retrip Breaker Failure Re-Trip
BF Retrip* Breaker Failure Re-Trip Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the stand-alone Breaker Failure Trip function in the PCD issues a ReTrip signal.

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Table 5-2. Logical Output Functions


Logical Output Description
BF Trip Breaker Failure Trip
BF Trip* Breaker Failure Trip Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the stand-alone Breaker Failure Trip function in the PCD issues a breaker failure trip.
BFA Breaker Fail
BFA* Breaker Failure Seal-in Alarm
Goes HIGH when the PCD detects that the recloser failed to trip.
BFUA Blown Fuse
Goes HIGH when the voltage of any phase drops below 7 volts for .5 seconds and no 51P or 51N
overcurrent pickup condition exists. This Logical Output seals in after a blown fuse condition exists. It
must be manually reset via the HMI or AFSuite after voltage has been restored. The BFUA is only active
when the PCD is in three-phase mode.
CLOSE Fixed Close
Goes HIGH when system conditions and the 79 settings conclude that an attempt should be made to
close the recloser. It also goes HIGH if the logical input CLOSE goes HIGH, if the CLOSE button on the
front panel is pressed, or if a close command is sent using AFSuite. CLOSE will remain HIGH until the
Close Fail Timer expires or the 52A and 52B contacts indicate that the recloser has successfully closed.
Note: This logical output must be programmed to control the physical output contact that is connected to
the recloser close coil.
CLOSEA Direct Close A
CLOSEB Direct Close B
CLOSEC Direct Close C
Each output goes HIGH to close the corresponding pole. (Applies only in units ordered with the single-
phase tripping option.)
CLTA Cold Load Timer
Goes HIGH when the Cold Load Timer is counting. Goes LOW when the Cold Load Timer expires.
CPUBattFail CPU Battery Failure
Goes HIGH when the CPU detects low voltage on the onboard CPU battery, requiring a battery change.
The onboard lithium battery stores event data and maintains the clock while the PCD is powered down.
Therefore, changing the battery will erase event data and reset the clock. No settings will be lost,
however. Available for firmware version 2.7 and later.
FAILA Phase A Failure
FAILB Phase B Failure
FAILC Phase C Failure
Each output goes HIGH to signal that the corresponding pole has failed. (Applies only in units ordered
with the single-phase tripping option.)
GRD-D Neutral Torque Control Disable
Goes HIGH when a physical input (or feedback function) that has been programmed to control the
ground torque control logical input (GRD) is not energized.
HPFA High Power Factor
Goes HIGH 60 seconds after the power factor rises above the Power Factor Alarm setting. If the
measured value drops below the Alarm setting before the 60-second timer expires, the timer will reset.
KSI Kilo Amp Summation
Goes HIGH when the KSI sum has exceeded the KSI Counter Alarm setting.
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

LCMTRIP Loop Control Trip


LCMTRIP* Goes High when the Loop Control Module issues a TRIP command to the PCD processor. Applies only
to units with the Loop Control Option, programmed for Sectionalizing Mode.
LCMCLOSE Loop Control Close
LCMCLOSE* Goes High when the Loop Control Module issues a CLOSE command to the PCD processor. Applies
only to units with the Loop Control Option, programmed for Tiepoint Mode.

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Table 5-2. Logical Output Functions


Logical Output Description
LCMMID Loop Control Midpoint Operation
LCMMID* Goes High when the Loop Control Module issues a Midpoint operation command to the PCD processor,
which consists of activating a timed Reclose Block command and optionally activates Alternate settings.
Applies only to units with the Loop Control Option, programmed for Midpoint Mode.
LOAC Loss of AC Alarm
LOAC* Loss of AC Seal-In Alarm
Goes HIGH if AC power is lost and DC backup supply is retained.
LOADA Load Current
Goes HIGH 60 seconds after any single phase of load current rises above the Load Alarm setting. If the
measured value drops below the Alarm setting before the 60-second timer expires, the timer will reset.
LPFA Low Power Factor
Goes HIGH 60 seconds after the load power factor drops below the Power Factor Alarm setting. If the
measured value drops below the Alarm setting before the 60-second timer expires, the timer will reset.
NDA Neutral Peak Demand
Goes HIGH 60 seconds after the demand current for the neutral input has exceeded the Neutral
Demand Alarm setting. This alarm is based on the incremental demand values and not the
instantaneous values (as are the load alarms).
NTA Neutral Target Alarm
Goes HIGH when Neutral Target Alarm is activated.
NVArA Negative Var
Goes HIGH 60 seconds after the negative 3-phase kiloVAR has exceeded the Negative kiloVAR Alarm
setting. If the measured value drops below the Alarm setting before the 60-second timer expires, the
timer will reset.
OCTC Overcurrent Trip Counter
Goes HIGH when the number of overcurrent trip operations has exceeded the Overcurrent Counter
Alarm setting.
PATA Phase A Target
Goes HIGH when there has been a fault on A phase. It also drives the displayed information on the LCD
screen after a fault. Goes LOW when reset either by the resetting targets from the front panel
pushbutton or by the AFSuite Program. This output is useful in remote communications and SCADA
applications where faulted phase information is required.
PBTA Phase B Target
Goes HIGH when there has been a fault on B phase. It also drives the displayed information on the LCD
screen after a fault. Goes LOW when reset either by the resetting targets from the front panel
pushbutton or by the AFSuite Program. This output is useful in remote communications and SCADA
applications where faulted phase information is required.
PCTA Phase C Target
Goes HIGH when there has been a fault on C phase. It also drives the displayed information on the
LCD screen after a fault. Goes LOW when reset either by the resetting targets from the front panel
pushbutton or by the AFSuite Program. This output is useful in remote communications and SCADA
applications where faulted phase information is required.
PDA Phase Peak Demand
Goes HIGH 60 seconds after the demand current for any phase has exceeded the Phase Demand
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

Alarm setting. This alarm is based on the incremental demand values and not the instantaneous values
as in the load alarms. If the measured value drops below the Alarm setting before the 60-second timer
expires, the timer will reset.
PH3-D Phase Torque Control Disable
Goes HIGH when a physical input (or feedback function) that has been programmed to control the phase
torque control logical input (PH3) is not energized.
PTA Phase Target Alarm
Goes HIGH when any Phase Target Alarm is activated.

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Table 5-2. Logical Output Functions


Logical Output Description
PUA Pickup
Goes HIGH when any enabled overcurrent element is in pickup. Hence, it will respond to the overcurrent
element that has the lowest pickup-level setting. It is instantaneous and ignores any overcurrent time-
delays.
PVArA Positive Var
Goes HIGH 60 seconds after the positive 3-phase kiloVAR exceed the Positive kiloVAR Alarm setting. If
the measured value drops below the Alarm setting before the 60-second timer expires, the timer will
reset.
Pwatt1 Positive Watt Alarm 1
Goes HIGH 60 seconds after the positive 3 phase kilowatts exceed the Positive Kilowatt Alarm 1 setting.
If the measured value drops below the Alarm setting before the 60-second timer expires, the timer will
reset.
Pwatt2 Positive Watt Alarm 2
Goes HIGH 60 seconds after the positive 3 phase kilowatts exceed the Positive Kilowatt Alarm 2 setting.
If the measured value drops below the Alarm setting before the 60-second timer expires, the timer will
reset.
Note: Two positive watt alarm logical outputs are provided: Pwatt1 and Pwatt2. If desired one alarm can
be set to a different threshold than the other (for example, one can be used for alarming purposes and
the other for tripping).
RBA Remote Block Alarm
Goes HIGH when Remote Block Alarm is activated.
SEF Sensitive Earth Fault Trip
SEF* Sensitive Earth Fault Trip Seal In
Goes HIGH when the SEF element trips.
STC Setting Table Change
Goes HIGH when the “Change Settings” menu is entered via front panel HMI or remote AFSuite
program.
TAGBTN Tag Button
Goes HIGH when the PCD is tagged via the “Hot Line Tag” front panel button. Must be mapped to
CLSBLK input using a feedback contact to activate tagging.
TAGCLS Tag Close
Goes HIGH when the PCD is remotely tagged. Same as TAGOPN. Must be mapped to CLSBLK input
using a feedback contact to activate tagging.
TAGOPN Tag Open
Goes HIGH when the PCD is remotely tagged. Same as TAGCLS. Must be mapped to CLSBLK input
using a feedback contact to activate tagging.
TCC Tap Changer Cutout
Goes HIGH when the PCD recloser begins operation and remains HIGH until the last recloser operation
is complete (reset time expires or recloser enters lockout state). When HIGH, the recloser in the PCD is
active. TCC can be used to block a tap changer during fault and recovery operations.
TCFA Trip Circuit Fail
Goes HIGH when the PCD determines that the recloser trip coil continuity has been broken. It is directly
tied to the operation of the logical input TCM. When the TCM logical input is LOW, the TCFA logical
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

output is HIGH, indicating a trip coil failure.


TRIP Fixed Trip
Goes HIGH when any enabled overcurrent protection element trips on any phase. It also goes HIGH if
the logical input OPEN goes HIGH, if the OPEN button on the front panel is pressed, or if an open
command is sent using AFSuite.
Note: This logical output must be programmed to control the physical output contact that is connected to
the recloser trip coil.

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Table 5-2. Logical Output Functions


Logical Output Description
TRIPA Single Pole Trip Phase A
TRIPA* Single Pole Trip Phase A Seal In
Goes HIGH when any enabled overcurrent protection element trips on phase A. Goes LOW when the
measured phase A current drops below 90% of the lowest pickup setting of the enabled overcurrent
elements. (Applies only in units ordered with the single-phase tripping option.)
TRIPB Single Pole Trip Phase B
TRIPB* Single Pole Trip Phase B Seal In
Goes HIGH when any enabled overcurrent protection element trips on phase B. Goes LOW when the
measured phase B current drops below 90% of the lowest pickup setting of the enabled overcurrent
elements. (Applies only in units ordered with the single-phase tripping option.)
TRIPC Single Pole Trip Phase C
TRIPC* Single Pole Trip Phase C Seal In
Goes HIGH when any enabled overcurrent protection element trips on phase C. Goes LOW when the
measured phase C current drops below 90% of the lowest pickup setting of the enabled overcurrent
elements. (Applies only in units ordered with the single-phase tripping option.)
ULO1 User Logical Output 1
ULO2 User Logical Output 2
ULO3 User Logical Output 3
ULO4 User Logical Output 4
ULO5 User Logical Output 5
ULO6 User Logical Output 6
ULO7 User Logical Output 7
ULO8 User Logical Output 8 (for version 2.52 and later reserved for USER 1 LED)
ULO9 User Logical Output 9 (for version 2.52 and later reserved for USER 2 LED)
Goes HIGH when the corresponding User Logical Input is HIGH.
VarDA Var Demand
Goes HIGH 60 seconds after the value of the three-phase demand VAR exceeds the Three Phase
Demand Alarm setting. This alarm is based on the incremental demand values and not the
instantaneous values as in the load alarms.
ZSC Zone Sequence Coordination
Goes HIGH when the Zone Sequence function is active. Zone Sequence must be enabled in the
“Configuration” menu. If a physical input (or feedback input) is programmed to the ZSC logical input, the
ZSC logical output will go HIGH when the input is energized. If the ZSC logical input has not been
programmed, it is always HIGH, and so the ZSC logical output is always HIGH.

5.2.2 Programmable Output Example


One of the important functions of the output contacts is to perform control functions from
SCADA. One example is to report the status of Reclose Block status to SCADA through a
hardwired RTU. Again, note that this programming is not necessary when controlling serially
using a communication protocol. To do this, suppose we desire to close contact 1c when the
reclosing function has been disabled. 5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Figure 5-5. Programmable Output Example

Programmable Outputs
Binary Output
Logical Output
Contact

Reclose Blocked SCADA Input


(79DA)

5.2.3 Programmable Output Contacts


Programmable output contacts are available to map and coincide with the programmable inputs.
Changing the Programmable Outputs requires the use of the AFSuite program. Whenever a
check mark appears then an output contact is mapped.

5.2.4 Programming Outputs


AFSuite is required to program logic in the PCD. Use AFSuite and follow these steps to program
the binary (contact) inputs:
4. Select the Advanced Settings > Programmable I/O tab.
5. The Programmable Input and Output Map screen will appear (see Figure 5-6).

Figure 5-6. Programmable Outputs Screen


5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

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ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

6. To program a function, select the correct LO from the list above. In the case of the example
above, and illustrated in Figure 5-5, we wish to close an output contact (for hardwired
SCADA) when reclosing is blocked in the unit. To do this, click on the left column on any
free line (avoiding the CLOSE/TRIP lines). Scroll through the list until the logical input
you want is highlighted, which in this example is 79DA. Alternatively, pressing “7”
repeatedly will scroll through all the logic functions starting with “7”.
7. Next, move to the right on the same line, and under a free column (again, avoiding the
52a/b logic), select a “ ”.

Figure 5-7. Programmable Outputs Screen (Changed)

5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

8. To change the logic of a LO:


b) Use the arrow keys to highlight the logic value of a LO.
c) Press the appropriate logic AND / OR.
d) Highlight AND / OR.
e) In the case of the above example, the logic does not matter since there is only one input
(In1c) that operates the LO 79DA.
f) To assign a name to an output:
g) Double Click on the “-“ field at the top of the table.
h) A window appears prompting you to enter the new name. Type in the new name (up to
8 characters).
i) Presses ENTER to change the name or press ESC to close the input window without any
changes.
9. Save your changes.
j) Once programming is complete, the settings must be saved to the unit online and offline
separately. This allows experimentation with different schemes on the unit while
keeping the original scheme unchanged in the database. After programming, send these
settings to the unit, and after you are satisfied that the changes you made are correct,
select “Yes” for “Do you also want to update the offline settings?” as well in order to
save for future sessions.
OUTPUT TIMERS: Additional time delay can be added to the function by means of the output
timers. The time delay interval is adjustable from 0 to 60 seconds in 0.01 steps.

5.3 Feedback Contacts


5.3.1 Introduction
Feedback (FB) contacts are used to pass logical outputs to logical inputs. This is a convenient
method of building a logic function, eliminating the need to “externally wire” output contacts to
input contacts to perform a certain function. For example, when Feedback Output 1 (FBO1) goes
HIGH, then Feedback Input 1 (FBI1) will automatically energize.
By default, binary input and binary output contacts that are not being used for breaker status and
operation or external input and output contacts are paired up and assigned as FB contacts.
However, with the feedback assignment function the user can add feedback connections by
reassigning external I/O contacts as FB contacts (see Figure 5-8). There are always 16 Input and
Output contacts on the PCD. The “Input/Output 1” setting refers to the first available contact
listed in Section 5.7 (Default Inputs and Outputs) for each of the available configurations. Note
that when a contact is changed to a feedback, it can no longer be used as an external contact.
When a contact is changed to a FB in the outputs, the corresponding input is immediately
changed. However, the settings must be saved and/or sent to the PCD
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

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ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

Figure 5-8. Feedback connections

5.3.2 Feedback Example


Suppose you want to open the breaker in the event you lose one or two source voltages, resulting
in a 27-1P condition. However, you do NOT want to open the device if the problem is a three
phase under voltage, or 27-3P, caused by the transmission system. The logic you want may be as
shown in Figure 5-9. To accomplish the desired scheme, the 27-1P and 27-3P LOs here are fed
back to the logical inputs using FB contacts. The FB1 contact is “AND’ed” with the inverse of
the FB2 contact to determine if an OPEN command should be issued by the processor. Full
details of the logic are shown in Application Note 4 at the back of this manual.

5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Figure 5-9. Feedback Example

Programmable Outputs Programmable Inputs

Logical Outputs Logical Input

27-1P FBo1
FBi1
Delay OPEN
FBo2 FBi2
27-3P
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

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ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

5.4 User Logical Inputs/User Logical Outputs


User Logical Inputs (ULIs) and User Logical Outputs (ULOs) are undefined variables, which
pass BI contacts status to BO contacts. A ULI in the input map is soft connected to the
corresponding ULO in the output map. This can be considered “FEEDFORWARD” logic.

5.4.1 User Logical Example


Suppose you desire to monitor the 52a status (breaker position) with an output contact. You
would use User Logical functions. When ULI1 goes HIGH, then ULO1 will automatically
energize. User Logical Example: Suppose you desire to program Output 1 on the “C” module to
follow the status of the 52a contact. The following Figure 5-10 shows the desired logic, using
User Logical Inputs and Outputs.

Figure 5-10. User Logical Example

Programmable Inputs Programmable Outputs

Binary Input Binary Output


Contact ULi1 ULo1 Contact

52a (bkr. pos.)


Out 1c
DC

User Logical Inputs can be disconnected from its corresponding User Logical Output via the
“Change Settings” menu under “ULI/ULO Configuration”. In this case, if ULI1 is disconnected
from ULO1, and ULI1 goes HIGH, then ULO1 will not be affected. This is used primarily for
applications where the user can SET or RESET a ULO for some control function. In this case,
the ULO will act as an S-R Flip Flop. ULOs can be SET or RESET via the HMI or through the
various communications protocols. When forcing ULOs HIGH or LOW, it is recommended that
the ULI-ULO connection be broken. Otherwise, the ULI can adversely affect the ULO.

5.4.2 USER LEDs


For firmware versions 2.5 and later, The ULI8 and ULI9 are reserved for activating the USER1
and USER2 LEDs on the HMI. The USER 1 and USER 2 LEDs are directly connected to the
User Logical Inputs 8 and 9 (ULI8 & ULI9) respectively. In order to utilize these LEDs, the user
must program a function to activate these logical inputs. For example, if it is desired to activate
the USER 1 LED when there is a Loss of AC condition, and to activate USER 2 LED when one
or more phases have had an over voltage condition (use seal in alarm 59*), you would prepare the
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

Programmable Outputs and Programmable Inputs as in Figure 5-11.


Feedbacks 1 & 2 are used to pass the logical output conditions to the ULI8 and ULI9. Note that in
this example the 59 (over voltage) function must be programmed with the desired pickup voltage
and time delay in each of the protection groups.

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Figure 5-11. Programming User LEDs

The User LEDs are located in the upper right hand corner of the HMI. In order to identify what
you program each User LED for, ABB has a set of labels preprinted with commonly used User
LED functions, and can be mounted on the cabinet swing panel as shown here:
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

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ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

Figure 5-12. User LEDs Example Labeling.

USER 1: Loss of AC Power (LOAC)


USER 2: Single Phase Overvoltage (59)
(Recommended location of User LED labels on swing panel)

5.5 Programmable Logic Rules and Tips


5.5.1 Logic Summary
The above definitions provide building blocks necessary to describe the logic features of the
PCD. Figure 5-13 summarizes the programmable logic functions in the PCD.

Figure 5-13. PCD Programmable Logic

5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

j = 1 to INt
k = 1 to 9
m = 1 to FBt
n = 1 to OUTt

Where:
INt = Total number of physical inputs available.

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

FBt = Total number of feedback logic terms available.


OUTt = Total number of physical outputs available.
INt + FBt = 16 max.

5.5.2 Logic Rules and Tips


1. Draw the logic diagram of the function using only “AND” and “OR” gates. Any logic gate
can have up to eight inputs.
2. Label the gates as either Prog Input or a Prog Output depending on these rules:
a) Any physical input (IN-n contact) must go to a Prog Input gate
b) Any protection functions must go into a Prog Output gate
c) Any physical outputs (contact operation) must come from a Prog Output gate
3. Add gates, CONNECTs, and FEEDBACKs to the diagram so that the following rules are
followed:
a) The output of a Prog Output gate connects to the input of a Prog Input gate through a
FEEDBACK. See Figure 5-14 (row a).
b) The output of a Prog Input gate can be connected to the input of a Prog Output by
making a CONNECT between the Input gates ULIk and ULOk. See Figure 5-14 (row
b).
c) The output of a Prog Output gate must go to the input of another Prog Output through a
FEEDBACK-Prog Input CONNECT combination. The logic of the added input gate
does not matter. See Figure 5-14 (row c).
d) The output of a Prog Input gate must go to the input of another Prog Input through a
CONNECT-Prog Output-FEEDBACK combination. The logic of the added output gate
does not matter. See Figure 5-14 (row d).

Figure 5-14. Equivalent Gates


LOGIC EQUIVALENT

OUTPUT INPUT
OUT
IN FEEDBACK

OR AND
a)

INPUT ULIk ULOk OUTPUT


IN
OUT CONNECT

AND AND
b)

OUTPUT INPUT ULIk ULOk OUTPUT


OUT
OUT FEEDBACK CONNECT
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

OR AND
c)

INPUT ULIk ULOk OUTPUT INPUT


IN
IN CONNECT FEEDBACK

AND OR
d)

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ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

5.6 Additional Programmable Logic Examples


5.6.1 Hot Line Tag Programming
The PCD has a customizable tagging feature that sets the recloser into non-reclose mode, and
disallows a manual close (remote or local) while it is tagged. The tagging functional is
customizable in that the user can choose to switch to an alternate protection profile while tagged,
and can display a remote tagged message if remotely tagged. The PCD control is supplied with a
front panel button labeled “Hot Line Tag”, and includes a red LED indicating the function is
turned on. With either remote or local tagging, the function must be activated by setting the
programmable inputs and outputs in the PCD, using AFSuite software. When the Hot Line Tag is
activated, the CLSBLK logical input is enabled. Programming for the activation of the CLSBLK
logical input (and any other desired logical inputs) through Programmable I/O mapping is
required.
Note: Refer to application note AN-6 at the back of this IB for details on programming the Hot
Line Tag function.
After the PCD has been programmed for the Hot Line Tag function, activation can be set from the
HMI, from SCADA, or through AFSuite. The source (remote or local) that enabled HLT must
disable it. Note that if SCADA activates the HLT function, and afterward the communication
channel goes down, the HLT can be removed using a PC with AFSuite.

5.6.2 Undervoltage Trip Programming


See Application Note 4 at the back of this manual

5.6.3 Set/Reset Latch Programming


A Set/Reset latch can be created using two physical inputs and a feedback term as the latch.
Suppose we want to be able to pulse In1c to enable Alternate 1 Settings, and pulse In2c to disable
Alternate 1 Settings. The corresponding logic diagram is given in Figure 5-15:

Figure 5-15. Set/Reset Latch

SET In1c
ULI1 ULO1
FB1
Binary
Input FB1 FB1 Logical Input
Contacts
ULO2
Alternate 1
In2c Settings
RESET ULI2

Programming into the logic diagrams will look like this:


5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

Table 5-3. Set/Reset Latch Programming


Inputs
Logic IN1c IN2c FB1
ULI1 OR C C
ULI2 AND 0
ALT1 AND C

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Outputs
FB1
Logic: AND
ULO1
ULO2

5.6.4 Other Programmable Logic Examples Available


Contact ABB technical support for application notes on the following topics, or for other
solutions to meet your needs:
• Configuring the PCD as a Switch Control
• Applying Hardwired SCADA connections to the PCD

5.7 Default Inputs and Outputs


The default programming of the inputs and outputs varies depending on the options that were
specified when the PCD unit was ordered. The following tables describe the defaults for different
model style numbers.

Table 5-4. Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRxx-000x-xx-xxxx
DC Power Supply
No I/O Modules
Total External Inputs: 4
Total External Outputs: 3

Inputs
Logic In1a In2a In3a N/A FB12 FB11 FB10 FB9 FB8 FB7 FB6 FB5 FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
52a AND C
52b AND C
Outputs
Out1a Out2a Out3a Out4a FB12 FB11 FB10 FB9 FB8 FB7 FB6 FB5 FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
Logic: OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR
TRIP
CLOSE

Table 5-5. Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRxx-001x-xx-xxxx
DC Power Supply
One Type 1 I/O Module
Total External Inputs: 10
Total External Outputs: 7

Inputs
Logic In1a In2a In3a In4a In1b In2b In3b In4b In5b In6b FB6 FB5 FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

52a AND C
52B AND C
Outputs
Out1a Out2a Out3a Out4a Out1b Out2b Out3b Out4b N/A N/A FB6 FB5 FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
Logic: OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR
TRIP
CLOSE

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ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

Table 5-6. Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRxx-002x-xx-xxxx
DC Power Supply
Two Type 1 I/O Modules
Total External Inputs: 16
Total External Outputs: 11

Inputs
Logic In1a In2a In3a In4a In1b In2b In3b In4b In5b In6b In1c In2c In3c In4c In5c In6c
52a AND C
52B AND C
Outputs
Out1a Out2a Out3a Out1b Out2b Out3b Out4b Out1c Out2c Out3c Out4c N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Logic: OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR
TRIP
CLOSE

Table 5-7. Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRxx-003x-xx-x0xx
DC Power Supply
One Type 2 I/O Module - Three-Phase Tripping
Total External Inputs: 4*
Total External Outputs: 3*
* Contacts on the b module are for driving magnetic actuators and are not available for customer use.

Inputs
Logic In1a In2a In3a In4a In1b In2b FB10 FB9 FB8 FB7 FB6 FB5 FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
52a AND C
52B AND C
Outputs
Out1a Out2a Out3a Out1b Out2b Out3b FB10 FB9 FB8 FB7 FB6 FB5 FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
Logic: OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR
TRIP
CLOSE

5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Table 5-8. Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRxx-003x-xx-x1xx
DC Power Supply
One Type 2 I/O Module - Single-Phase Tripping
Total External Inputs: 4*
Total External Outputs: 3*
* Contacts on the b module are for driving magnetic actuators and are not available for customer use.

Inputs
Logic In1a In2a In3a In4a In1b In2b In3b In4b In5b In6b In7b In8b FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
Ph A 52a AND C
Ph B 52a AND C
Ph C 52a AND C
Ph A 52b AND C
Ph B 52b AND C
Ph C 52b AND C
52a AND C
52b AND C
Outputs
Out1a Out2a Out3a Out1b Out2b Out3b Out4b Out5b Out6b Out7b Out8b N/A FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
Logic: OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR
TRIP A
CLOSE A
TRIP B

CLOSE B
TRIP C
CLOSE C

TRIP
CLOSE

Table 5-9. Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRxx-004x-xx-x0xx
DC Power Supply
One Type 2 I/O Module & One Type 1 I/O Module - Three-Phase Tripping
Total External Inputs: 10*
Total External Outputs: 7*
* Contacts on the b module are for driving magnetic actuators and are not available for customer use.

Inputs
Logic In1a In2a In3a In4a In1b In2b In1c In2c In3c In4c In5c In6c FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
52a AND C
52B AND C
Outputs
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

Out1a Out2a Out3a Out1b Out2b Out1c Out2c Out3c Out4c N/A N/A N/A FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
Logic: OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR
TRIP
CLOSE

Page 152 of 384 December 23, 2004 IB38-737-5


ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

Table 5-10. Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRxx-004x-xx-x1xx
DC Power Supply
One Type 2 I/O Module & One Type 1 I/O Module - Single-Phase Tripping
Total External Inputs: 8*
Total External Outputs: 7*
* Contacts on the b module are for driving magnetic actuators and are not available for customer use.

Inputs
Logic In1a In2a In3a In4a In1b In2b In3b In4b In5b In6b In7b In8b In1c In2c In3c In4c
Ph A 52a AND C
Ph B 52a AND C
Ph C 52a AND C
Ph A 52b AND C
Ph B 52b AND C
Ph C 52b AND C
52a AND C
52b AND C
Outputs
Out1a Out2a Out3a Out1b Out2b Out3b Out4b Out5b Out6b Out7b Out8b N/A Out1c Out2c Out3c Out4c
Logic: OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR
TRIP A
CLOSE A
TRIP B
CLOSE B
TRIP C
CLOSE C
TRIP
CLOSE

Table 5-11. Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRx**x-x#01x-xx-xxxx
AC Power Supply
One Type 1 I/O Module
Total External Inputs: 6
Total External Outputs: 4
** TAGBTN and CLSBLK apply only to xR3x style numbers.
# This digit can be a 1, 2, 3, or 4

Inputs
Logic In1b In2b In3b In4b In5b In6b FB10 FB9 FB8 FB7 FB6 FB5 FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
52a AND C
52B AND C
CLSBLK** AND C
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

Outputs
Out1b Out2b Out3b Out4b N/A N/A FB10 FB9 FB8 FB7 FB6 FB5 FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
Logic: OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR
TRIP
CLOSE
TAGBTN**

IB38-737-5 December 23, 2004 Page 153 of 384


5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Table 5-12. Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRx**x***- x#02x-xx-xxxx (w/o ISD Interposer)
AC Power Supply
Two Type 1 I/O Modules
Total External Inputs: 12
Total External Outputs: 8
** TAGBTN and CLSBLK apply only to xR3x style numbers.
*** This digit must be a 5,6, 9, A, B, or C
# This digit can be a 1, 2, 3, or 4

Inputs
Logic In1b In2b In3b In4b In5b In6b In1c In2c In3c In4c In5c In6c FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
52a AND C
52B AND C
CLSBLK** AND C
Outputs
Out1b Out2b Out3b Out4b Out1c Out2c Out3c Out4c N/A N/A N/A N/A FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
Logic: OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR
TRIP

CLOSE
TAGBTN**
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

Page 154 of 384 December 23, 2004 IB38-737-5


ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

Table 5-13. Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRx**x***- x#02x-xx-xxxx (w/ ISD Interposer)
AC Power Supply
Used for PCD with ISD interposer device to drive OVR recloser. Must be programmed with AFSuite. Applies for both single and three
phase trip modes.
Two Type 1 I/O Modules
Total External Inputs: 12
Total External Outputs: 8
** TAGBTN and CLSBLK apply only to xR3x style numbers.
*** This digit must be a 7,8, D, or E.
# This digit can be a 1, 2, 3, or 4

Inputs
Logic In1b In2b In3b In4b In5b In6b In1c In2c In3c In4c In5c In6c FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
52A AND O O O
52B AND C C C
52aA AND O
52aB AND O
52aC AND O
52bA AND C
52bB AND C
52bC AND C
ULI7 AND O
CLSBLK AND C
Outputs
Out1b Out2b Out3b Out4b Out1c Out2c Out3c Out4c N/A N/A N/A N/A FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
Logic: AND AND AND AND OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR
ISD_TripA
ISD_TripB
ISD_TripC

ISD_Trig
ULO7
TAGBTN**

5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

IB38-737-5 December 23, 2004 Page 155 of 384


5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Table 5-14. Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRx**x- x#03x-xx-x0xx
AC Power Supply
One Type 2 I/O Module - Three-Phase Tripping
Total External Inputs: 0*
Total External Outputs: 0*
* Contacts on the b module are for driving magnetic actuators and are not available for customer use.
** TAGBTN and CLSBLK apply only to xR3x style numbers.
# This digit can be a 1, 2, 3, or 4

Inputs
Logic In1b In2b FB14 FB13 FB12 FB11 FB10 FB9 FB8 FB7 FB6 FB5 FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
52a AND C
52b AND C
CLSBLK** AND C
Outputs
Out1b Out2b FB14 FB13 FB12 FB11 FB10 FB9 FB8 FB7 FB6 FB5 FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
Logic: OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR
TRIP

CLOSE
TAGBTN**
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

Page 156 of 384 December 23, 2004 IB38-737-5


ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

Table 5-15. Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRx**x- x#03x-xx-x1xx
AC Power Supply
One Type 2 I/O Module - Single-Phase Tripping
Total External Inputs: 0*
Total External Outputs: 0*
* Contacts on the b module are for driving magnetic actuators and are not available for customer use.
** TAGBTN and CLSBLK apply only to xR3x style numbers.
# This digit can be a 1, 2, 3, or 4

Inputs
Logic In1b In2b In3b In4b In5b In6b In7b In8b FB8 FB7 FB6 FB5 FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
Ph A 52a AND C
Ph B 52a AND C
Ph C 52a AND C
Ph A 52b AND C
Ph B 52b AND C
Ph C 52b AND C
52a AND C
52b AND C
CLSBLK** AND C
Outputs
Out1b Out2b Out3b Out4b Out5b Out6b Out7b Out8b FB8 FB7 FB6 FB5 FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
Logic: OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR
TRIP A

CLOSE A
TRIP B
CLOSE B

TRIP C
CLOSE C
TRIP

CLOSE
TAGBTN**

5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

IB38-737-5 December 23, 2004 Page 157 of 384


5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Table 5-16. Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRx**x- x#04x-xx-x0xx
AC Power Supply
One Type 2 I/O Module & One Type 1 I/O Module - Three-Phase Tripping
Total External Inputs: 6*
Total External Outputs: 4*
* Contacts on the b module are for driving magnetic actuators and are not available for customer use.
** TAGBTN and CLSBLK apply only to xR3x style numbers.
# This digit can be a 1, 2, 3, or 4

Inputs
Logic In1b In2b In1c In2c In3c In4c In5c In6c FB8 FB7 FB6 FB5 FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
52a AND C
52b AND C
CLSBLK** AND C
Outputs
Out1b Out2b Out1c Out2c Out3c Out4c N/A N/A FB8 FB7 FB6 FB5 FB4 FB3 FB2 FB1
Logic: OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR
TRIP
CLOSE
TAGBTN**
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

Page 158 of 384 December 23, 2004 IB38-737-5


ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

Table 5-17. Default Inputs and Outputs for Models with Style Number xRx**x- x#04x-xx-x1xx
AC Power Supply
One Type 2 I/O Module & One Type 1 I/O - Single-Phase Tripping
Total External Inputs: 6*
Total External Outputs: 4*
* Contacts on the b module are for driving magnetic actuators and are not available for customer use.
** TAGBTN and CLSBLK apply only to xR3x style numbers.
# This digit can be a 1, 2, 3, or 4

Inputs
Logic In1b In2b In3b In4b In5b In6b In7b In8b In1c In2c In3c In4c In5c In6c FB2 FB1
Ph A 52a AND C
Ph B 52a AND C
Ph C 52a AND C
Ph A 52b AND C
Ph B 52b AND C
Ph C 52b AND C
52a AND C
52b AND C
CLSBLK** AND C
Outputs
Out1b Out2b Out3b Out4b Out5b Out6b Out7b Out8b Out1c Out2c Out3c Out4c N/A N/A FB2 FB1
Logic: OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR
TRIP A
CLOSE A
TRIP B
CLOSE B
TRIP C
CLOSE C
TRIP
CLOSE
TAGBTN**

5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

IB38-737-5 December 23, 2004 Page 159 of 384


5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Page 160 of 384 December 23, 2004 IB38-737-5


ABB Power Control Device 5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs

5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

IB38-737-5 December 23, 2004 Page 161 of 384


ABB Power Control Device 6 Monitoring

6 Monitoring

6 Monitoring
The PCD contains a complete voltage and current metering package that calculates sequence
components, real and reactive power flow, power factor, demand and minimum/maximum values.
The proper setting of the Voltage Transformer (VT) and Current Transformer (CT) configurations
and ratios is required for proper metering operation. The VT and CT configuration (wye or delta)
and ratio settings are contained in the “Configuration Settings” menu. Load magnitudes for
current are displayed by default on the LCD display (if applicable). All metered values using the
metering menu in the PCD or by using AFSuite can be displayed in the AFSuite metering screen.
The voltage values displayed are phase to neutral for wye connected VTs and phase to phase for
delta connected VTs. A separate setting is required in the Configuration Menu to display in
either L-L or L-N. Voltage VA-N (for wye VTs) or VA-B (for delta VTs) is always shown at 0
degrees and is used as a reference for all other voltage and current phase angles. The calculated
sequence voltage components V1 and V2 are derived from the line voltages regardless of VT
configuration. If a balanced condition is assumed then: in a delta system, the angle of the positive
sequence voltage (V1) lags VA-B by 30 degrees. In a wye system the angle of the positive
sequence voltage (V1) equals that of VA-N. The metering screen can be used to verify proper and
healthy connections to the voltage and current input sensors of the PCD.

6.1 Load Metering


The metering function in the PCD is not revenue class, but is reasonably accurate. The accuracy
of the metering function is based on resolution of the Minimum Pickup settings in the Protection
Settings. Phase metering value accuracy is based on the 51P Minimum Pickup setting and neutral
metering value accuracy is based on the 51N Minimum Pickup setting. The accuracy also
depends on the type of CT/PT module used, and what its tap range jumpers are set at (see Section
2.5.11). Generally, the accuracy will be better than 1% or 3A, whichever is greater for metered
currents from 0.1 times to 20 times the Minimum Pickup setting. Also to be considered in the
accuracy is the additional error imposed by the connected current transformer.
The following load values are contained in the PCD and are accessible via the HMI or AFSuite
program:
All phase angles are referenced to VA-N that is set to be zero degrees.
• Phase Currents: Magnitude and Phase Angle
• Wye - IA-N, IB-N, IC-N
• Delta - IA-B, IB-C, IC-A
• Ground Current: Magnitude and Phase Angle
• Wye - IN
• Kilovolts: Magnitude and Phase Angle
• Wye - VA-N, VB-N, VC-N
• Delta - VA-B, VB-C,VC-A
• Kilowatts (or Megawatts):
• Single Phase - kW-A, kW-B, kW-C
• Three Phase for Wye and Delta connected VTs - kW-3P

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

• KiloVARs (or MegaVARs):


• Single Phase - kVAR-A, kVAR-B, kVAR-C
• Three Phase for Wye and Delta connected VTs - kVAR-3P
• Kilowatt-hours (or Megawatt-hours):
• Single Phase - kWHr-A, kWHr-B, kWHr-C
• Three Phase for Wye and Delta connected VTs - kWHr-3P
• KiloVAR-hours (or MegaVAR-hours):
• Single Phase - kVARHr-A, kVARHr-B, kVARHr-C
• Three Phase for Wye and Delta connected VTs - kVARHr-3P
• Kilovolt Sequence Components: Magnitude and Phase Angle
• Positive Sequence - kV1
• Negative sequence - kV2
• Current Sequence Components: Magnitude and Phase Angle
• Positive Sequence - I1
• Negative Sequence - I2
• Zero Sequence I0
• Power Factor
• Frequency
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

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ABB Power Control Device 6 Monitoring

Figure 6-1. Load Metering Window in AFSuite

6 Monitoring
The values for 3kV0, kV1 and kV2 are scaled in volts.
The values for Watts, Watt Hours, Vars and Var Hours are measured in watts, watt-hour, var and
var-hour respectively.
Note: For Load Profile recording functions, refer to the Records section in this manual

6.2 Energy Meter Rollover


The Watthour and VARhour energy meters can be set to display Kilowatt-hours or Megawatt-
hours. This setting is made in the Configuration menu.
Depending on the magnitude of the power flow detected by the PCD and the period between
meter readings, it may be necessary to switch the meter mode to megawatt-hours to avoid energy
meter rollover. Meter rollover is the point at which the PCD watthour meter has reached its
maximum count and returns to zero to begin incrementing again. The roll over point for the
energy meters is 6,000,000 kilowatt-hours (kiloVAR-hours) in the kWHr mode and
2,000,000,000 megawatt-hours (megaVAR-hours) in the MWHr mode.
The energy meters are capable of reading negative power. If the magnitudes are positive, the
meters will increment, if negative they will decrement. Figure 6-2 outlines the metering
conventions used in the PCD.

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

Figure 6-2. Metering Conventions Used in the PCD


(+) Vars
90o

II I

180o 90
9 0o
0
(-) Watts (+) Watts

III IV

270o
(-)
Vars

The update rate of the energy meters is based on the “Demand Constant” setting (see Demand
Meter section) as set in the “Configurations” settings. The meters will update every 1/15 of the
Demand Constant. For example: if the Demand Constant is set to 15 minutes the energy meters
will update every 1 minute (15min x 1/15 = 1 min).
The watt-hour and VAR-hour meters can be reset to 0 through the local Human Machine
Interface (HMI) by pressing “C” three times in the “Reset Energy Meters” found in the “Meter”
menu.

6.3 Demand Metering


Demand metering typically is used for analysis of equipment loading and system planning. The
demand values in the PCD are accessible via the HMI or AFSuite program. The following are the
measurements taken by the demand meter:
• Phase Currents: Magnitude
• Wye and Delta connections - IA, IB, IC
• Ground Current: Magnitude
• Wye connection - IN
• Kilowatts:
• Single Phase kW-A, kW-B, kW-C
• Three Phase for Wye and Delta connected VTs - kW-3P
• KiloVARs:
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

• Single Phase - kVAR-A, kVAR-B, kVAR-C


• Three Phase for Wye and Delta connected VTs - kVAR-3P
The demand meter takes a snapshot of the load every 1/15x Demand Constant minutes. Demand
currents are averaged using a log10 function over the period of the Demand Constant Interval to
replicate thermal demand ammeters. The demand kilowatts and kiloVARs are averaged values
that are calculated by sampling the kilowatt-hours and kiloVAR-hours every “Demand Constant”

Page 166 of 384 December 23, 2004 IB38-737-5


ABB Power Control Device 6 Monitoring

interval. The Demand Constant interval is a setting made in the “Configuration” settings and is
the period between demand meter updates. Current utility or industrial practice usually dictates
the setting of the demand constant interval.

6 Monitoring
6.4 Minimum and Maximum Metering
During each demand interval described, the PCD also captures and stores minimum and
maximum values for the measurements listed below. It functions as a standard minimum and
maximum meter. When a new maximum or minimum value is determined, the old value is
replaced. A time stamp in the following format, (date: month/day/year and time: hour:minute), is
placed with the latest minimum and maximum values.
The minimum and maximum metering can be reset to 0 through the local Human Machine
Interface (HMI) by pressing “C” three times in the “Reset Energy Meters” found in the “Meter”
menu. It can also be reset through a SCADA point.
The minimum and maximum meter measures:
• Phase Currents: Magnitude
• Wye and Delta connection
• Max IA, Max IB, Max IC
• Min IA, Min IB, Min IC
• Ground Current: Magnitude
• Wye and Delta connection
• Max IN; Min IN
• Kilowatts:
• Single Phase
• Max kW-A, Max kW-B, Max kW-C;
• Min kW-A, Min kW-B, Min kW-C
• Three Phase for Wye and Delta connected VTs
• Max kW-3P; Min kW-3P
• KiloVARs:
• Single Phase
• Max kVAR-A, Max kVAR-B, Max kVAR-C;
• Min kVAR-A, Min kVAR-B, Min kVAR-C
• Three Phase for Wye and Delta connected VTs
• Max kVAR-3P; Min kVAR-3P

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

6.5 Power Quality Functions


6.5.1 Voltage Sag Calculation Unit
The voltage sag calculation unit monitors all three-phase voltages independently and records
events where the voltage drops below a threshold for a specified period. Voltage sags are
implemented according to the IEEE 1159 standard.
Power Quality function is turned on by catalog number selection. Settings changes must be done
locally via the HMI. Power Quality records, however, can be downloaded either from the HMI or
by WinPCD software.
Four non-overlapping time and magnitude regions are defined for voltage sags as shown below in
Figure 6-3.

Figure 6-3. Voltage Sag Operational Regions


Voltage
(PU)

1.0

V3

V2

V1 Temporary
Momentary Overflow
Sag Sag
Sag
Instantaneous
Sag
Time
0.
(cycles)
0. T1 T2 T3 1 Hour

The voltage sag element is implemented with separate processing for each sag event. The voltage
sag element for each event processes rms voltage measurements from all three phases
independently every quarter cycle. Pickup thresholds are the same on each phase within an event.
A voltage sag on a particular phase goes into pickup when rms voltage drops below the rms
voltage threshold. This pickup time is also the event start time. Whenever the element is in
pickup, (rms voltage is below threshold) the minimum quarter cycle rms voltage detected is
stored for the event. The event ends when the rms voltage returns above the pickup threshold.
The event is triggered (stored permanently) if the duration of the event falls within the lower and
upper time window.
The adjustable rms voltage thresholds adhere to the following relationship:
V1 ≤ V2 ≤ V3
The upper time limit of the temporary sag-operating region is not adjustable and is set to 1 hour.
Any event longer than the upper coded limit is classified as overflow and the duration of the
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

event is set equal to the upper limit.

Page 168 of 384 December 23, 2004 IB38-737-5


ABB Power Control Device 6 Monitoring

Table 6-1. Voltage Sag Settings


HMI Abbreviation Description

6 Monitoring
Sag Unit Choice of whether voltage sag unit is Enabled or Disabled (default).
Sag V1 (pu) Instantaneous pickup voltage magnitude (in pu RMS volts). Range is 0.1 to
0.9, default is 0.8.
Sag T1 (c) Instantaneous lower trigger threshold (in cycles). Range is 0.5 to 50, default
is 3. Note that if Sag T1 is set higher than Sag T2 or Sag T3, then Sag T2
and Sag T3 are set equal to the new Sag T1.
Sag V2 (pu) Temporary pickup voltage magnitude (in pu RMS volts). Range is the Sag V1
setting to 0.9, default is 0.8.
Sag T2 (c) Upper instantaneous/lower momentary time trigger (in cycles). Range is 10
to 180, default is 30. Note that if Sag T2 is set higher than Sag T3, then Sag
T3 is set equal to the new Sag T2. If Sag T2 is set lower than Sag T1, the
entered Sag T2 is rejected.
Sag V3 (pu) Temporary pickup voltage magnitude (in pu RMS volts). Range is the Sag V2
setting to 0.9, default is 0.8.
Sag T3 (s) Upper momentary/lower temporary time trigger (in seconds). Range is 2 to
60, default is 3. Note that if Sag T3 is set lower than Sag T2, the entered
Sag T3 is rejected.

6.5.2 Voltage Swell Calculation Unit


The voltage swell unit monitors all three phases independently and records any event where the
voltage rises above a user-defined threshold for a user specified period. Voltage swells are
implemented according to the IEEE 1159 standard.
Four non-overlapping time and magnitude regions are defined for voltage swells as shown below
in Figure 6-4.

Figure 6-4. Voltage Swell Operational Regions


Voltage
(PU)
1.4

Instantaneous
Swell
Momentary
Swell Temporary
Overflow
V1 Swell
Swell

V2

V3

1.0

0. Time
(cycles)
0. T1 T2 T3 1 Hour

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5 Programmable Inputs and Outputs ABB Power Control Device

The voltage swell element is implemented with separate processing for each voltage swell event.
The voltage swell element processes rms voltage measurements from all three phases
independently every quarter cycle. Pickup thresholds are the same on each phase within an event.
A voltage swell on a particular phase goes into pickup when rms voltage rises above the rms
voltage threshold. This pickup time is also the event start time. While the element is in pickup,
(rms voltage is above threshold) the maximum quarter cycle rms voltage detected is stored for the
event. The event ends when the rms voltage returns below the pickup threshold. The event is
triggered (stored permanently) if the duration of the event falls within the lower and upper time
window.
The tunable rms voltage thresholds must adhere to the following relationship:
V1 ≥ V2 ≥ V3
The upper limit on each operating region is limited by saturation that is typically 1.4 pu. The
upper time limit of the temporary swell operating region is not adjustable and is set to 1 hour.
Any event longer than the upper coded limit is classified as overflow and the duration of the
event is set equal to the upper limit.

Table 6-2. Voltage Swell Settings


HMI Abbreviation Description
Swell Unit Choice of whether voltage swell unit is enabled or disabled (default).
Swell V1 (pu) Instantaneous pickup voltage magnitude (in pu RMS volts). Range is 1.0 to
1.4, default is 1.2.
Swell T1 (c) Instantaneous lower trigger threshold (in cycles). Range is 0.5 to 50, default
is 0.5. Note that if Swell T1 is set higher than Swell T2 or Swell T3, then
Swell T2 and Swell T3 are set equal to the new Swell T1.
Swell V2 (pu) Temporary pickup voltage magnitude (in pu RMS volts). Range is 1.0 to the
Swell V1 setting, default is 1.2.
Swell T2 (c) Upper instantaneous/lower momentary time trigger (in cycles). Range is 10 to
180, default is 10. Note that if Swell T2 is set higher than Swell T3, then Swell
T3 is set equal to the new Swell T2. If Swell T2 is set lower than Swell T1 the
entered Swell T2 is rejected.
Swell V3 (pu) Temporary pickup voltage magnitude (in pu RMS volts). Range is 1.0 to the
Swell V2 setting, default is 1.2.
Swell T3 (s) Upper momentary/lower temporary time trigger (in seconds). Range is 2 to
60, default is 2. Note that if Swell T3 is set lower than Swell T2, the entered
Swell T3 is rejected.

6.5.3 PQ Oscillographics
Oscillographic records can be triggered for any PQ event type. Oscillographic triggers are set
using the remote tunable parameters program. The trigger point is the time when a PQ functional
unit picks up due to a voltage threshold violation. In other words, the oscillographic record
captures the waveform at the start of the event. In some circumstances, it is possible that an
oscillographic record is captured due to the voltage violation but the PQ record is not triggered
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

because the event does not violate the minimum time constraint for the event type.
Oscillographic records are stored in the same format and structure as fault oscillographic records.

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6.6 Definitions

6 Monitoring
The definitions shown in this section are referred to as common terms used in metering. For
additional definitions, see the current version of ANSI C12.1 Code for Electricity Metering -
Definitions Section and ANSI/IEEE 100-1988 Standard Dictionary of Electrical and Electronics
Terms.
Active Power - for balanced three-phase systems it is the product of the voltage, the current and
the cosine of the phase angle between them, expressed in watts:

Watts = 3 E L I L cosθ
For unbalanced systems, it is the sum of the active power for individual phases :
Watts = VAIAcosθA + VBIBcosθB + VCICcosθC
= W A +W B +W C

= (VA)2 − (VAR )2

Ampere - the practical unit of electric current,


Apparent Power - the product of the RMS voltage and the RMS current in a balanced three-
phase system, expressed in volt-amperes (VA):

VA = 3 E L I L
For unbalanced systems apparent power is the square root of the sum of the squares of the active
and reactive powers:

VA = (W )2 + (RVA)2
Balanced Load - the term balanced load is used to indicate equal currents in all phases and equal
voltage between phases and between each phase and neutral with equal watts in each phase of
the load.
Base Load - the normal minimum load of a feeder load that is carried over a 24-hour day.
Burden - the load, expressed in volt-amperes (VA) at a specified power factor placed on
instrument transformer secondary by a connected device.
Capacitance - the property between two conducting bodies that determines the electric charge
induced on each when a voltage difference exists between the two.
Electric charge = capacitance * voltage difference
Capacitive Reactance (XC) - This is the impendance to the flow of AC current, such that V= XC*
I. It is determined by XC = (1/2πfC) where f = frequency of the applied AC signal and C =
capacitance.
Circular Mil - the area of a circle whose diameter is one mil (1/1000 in.), it is a unit of area equal
to π/4 or 0.7854 square mil. The area of a circle in circular mils is equal to the square of its
diameter in mils.
Clockwise Rotation - movement of electrical voltage and/or current phasors in the same
direction as the hands on a clock.

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Conductance - the ability of a substance or body to pass an electric current, conductance is the
reciprocal of resistance.
Conductor Losses - the watts consumed in the wires or conductors of an electric circuit. Power
that heats wires doing no useful work, it may be calculated for I2R where I is the conductor
current and R is the circuit resistance.
Connected Load - the sum of the continuous ratings of the connected load consuming apparatus.
Counter-Clockwise Rotation - the movement of voltage and/or current phasors direction
opposite that of the front view of hands on a clock.
Cutout - a means of disconnecting an electric circuit, the cutout generally consists of a fuse block
and latching device or switch.
Demand - the average value of power or related quantity over a specified interval of time.
Demand is expressed in kilowatts, kilovolt-amperes, kilovars, or other suitable units. The interval
may be 5, 15, 30 or 60 minutes.
Electrical Degree - the 1/360th part of one complete alternating current cycle.
Energy - the integral of active power with respect to time.
Ground - a conducting connection whether intentional or accidental between an electric circuit or
equipment and earth. It is used for establishing and maintaining the potential of the earth.
Grounding Conductor - a conductor used to connect any equipment device or wiring system
with a grounding electrode or electrodes.
Grounding Electrode - a conductor embedded in the earth used for maintaining ground potential
on conductors connected to it and for dissipating into the earth current conducted to it.
Hertz - the unit of frequency of an alternating current or voltage, it is the number of cycles
occurring in one second.
Impedance - the total opposing effect to the flow of current in an alternating current circuit.
Impedance may consist of resistance or resistance and reactance, determined in ohms from the
effective value of the total circuit voltage divided by the effective value of total circuit current.
Inductance - any conductor that is carrying current is cut by the flux of its own field when
current changes in value. A voltage is induced in the conductor by definition of Lenz’s law
opposes the change in current in the conductor. Therefore, if current decreases the induced
voltage will try to maintain the current, if current increases the induced voltage tends to keep the
current down. In alternating current circuits the current is constantly changing so the inductive
effect is considerable. Changing current produces changing flux producing induced voltage. The
induced voltage opposes the change in applied voltage consequently the opposition to the change
in current. As current changes more rapidly with increasing frequency the inductive effect also
increases with frequency. Inductance is expressed in henrys (L).
Inductive Reactance - inductance has a definite current limiting effect on alternating current.
This effect is directly proportional to the magnitude of the inductance and is proportional to the
rate of change of current that is a function of the frequency of the supply voltage. The total
limiting effect of inductance on current may be calculated by the following equation, where XL
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

inductive reactance expressed in ohms, f frequency in hertz and L inductance in henrys.

X L = 2πfL
Kilo - a prefix meaning one thousand of a specified unit (kilowatt), 1,000 watts = 1 kilowatt.
KVA - the abbreviation for kilovolt-ampere, equal to 1,000 volt-amperes.
Kirchhoff’s Laws - Kirchhoff’s laws are used in solving for the various unknown values of
current, voltage and resistance of complex circuits. Kirchhoff’s laws are used in conjunction with

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Ohm’s law, where the voltage law is adapted from series circuits and the current law is adapted
from parallel circuits.
Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law states; the sum of the voltage drops around a circuit is equal to the

6 Monitoring
supply voltage or voltages and that the algebraic sum of the voltages around a circuit is equal to
zero.

E S = E1 + E 2 + E 3
E S − E1 − E 2 − E 3 = 0
Kirchhoff’s Current Law states; the sum of the currents flowing into a junction point is equal to
the sum of the currents flowing away from the junction point and that any junction of conductors
the algebraic sum of the currents is zero.

I TOTAL = I 1 + I 2 + I 3
I TOTAL − I 1 − I 2 − I 3 = 0
Lagging Current - an alternating current that in each half-cycle, reaches its maximum value less
than a half cycle later than the maximum value of the voltage .
Leading Current - an alternating current that in each half-cycle reaches its maximum value less
than a half cycle sooner than the maximum value of the voltage.
Lenz’s Law - the induced current in a conductor because of an induced voltage is such that the
change in magnetic flux due to it is opposite to the change in flux that caused the induced voltage.
Mega - a prefix meaning on million of a specified unit (megawatt), 1,000,000 watts = 1
megawatt.
Memory - electronic devices that store electronic instructions and data. Volatile memories can
be written to and read from repeatedly. Random access memories (RAM) require uninterrupted
power to retain their contents. Read Only Memories (ROM) is programmed once and may be
read repeatedly. They do not require constant power to retain their contents. ROMs are typically
used to store firmware in dedicated systems.
Micro - a prefix meaning on millionth part of a specified unit (microhm), 0.000001 ohm = 1
microhm.
Ohm - the unit of electrical resistance, it is the resistance, that allows one ampere to flow when
the impressed electromotive force is one volt.
Ohm’s Law - Ohm’s law states; the current that flows in an electrical circuit is directly
proportional to the electromotive force impressed on the circuit and inversely proportional to the
impedance in an alternating current circuit.
Peak Load - the maximum demand on an electric system during any particular period. Units
may be kilowatts or megawatts.
Phase Angle - the phase angle or phase difference between two sinusoidal quantities
(voltage/current) is defined as the number of electrical degrees between the beginning of the
cycle of each .
Phase Sequence - the order in which the instantaneous values of the voltages or currents of a
polyphase system reach their maximum positive values.
Phasor - a complex number associated with sinusoidally varying electrical quantities such that
the absolute value of the complex number corresponds to either the peak amplitude or RMS value
of the quantity and the phase to the phase angle at zero time. Phasors are used to represent
sinusoidal voltages and currents by plotting on rectangular coordinates.

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Phasor Diagram - a phasor diagram contains two or more phasors drawn, showing the relative
magnitude and phase, or time, relationships among the various voltages and currents.
Power Factor - for balanced three-phase systems it is the cosine of phase angle between the
voltage and the current:
PF = cos θ
In an unbalanced three-phase system, it is the ratio of the active power to the apparent power:
W
PF =
VA
Reactance - the measure of opposition to current flow in an AC electric circuit caused by the
circuit properties of the inductance and capacitance, normally expressed in ohms.
Reactive Power - reactive power is the product of the voltage, the current and the sine of the
phase angle between them with the current taken as reference. With non-sinusoidal quantities, it
is the sum of all the harmonic components each determined as above. In a polyphase circuit, it is
the sum of the reactive powers of the individual phases.
Reactive Volt-Amperes - for balanced three-phase systems it is the product of the voltage, the
current and the sine of the phase angle between them, expressed in VARs:

VARs = 3 E L I L sin θ
For unbalanced systems, it is the sum of the reactive power for the individual phases.
VAR = VAIAsinθA + VBIBsinθB + VCICsinθC
= VARA + VARB + VARC

= (VA)2 − (W )2

Resistance - the opposition offered by a substance or body to the passage of an electric current.
Resistance it the reciprocal of conductance. Current flowing through a resistance results in a
power loss in the resistor. This loss is equal to I2R.
VAR - the term used for volt-amperes reactive.
Volt - the unit of electromotive force or potential difference, where one volt will cause one
ampere to flow when impressed across a one-ohm resistor.
Volt-Ampere - volt-amperes in a balanced system is the product of volts and the total current that
flows because of the voltage, expressed in VA:

VA = 3 E L I L
In an unbalanced circuit VA is equal to the square root of active power squared plus reactive volt-
amperes squared:
5 PROGRAMMABLE I/O

VA = (W )2 + (RVA)2
Watt - the unit of active power that is defined as the rate energy is delivered to a circuit. It is the
power expended when a current of one ampere flows through a resistance of one ohm.
Watthour - a unit of electric energy that is consumed in one-hour when the average power during
the hour is one watt.

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7 Event Records
The PCD provides fault and operations records. It also provides a list of records not yet reported.
This section covers the following record features: Fault Summary, Fault Records, Fault Location,
Operation Records, Self Test Records, Operation Summary (counters) and Load Profile.

7.1 Downloading Records


The PCD has 4 basic methods to retrieve records, as follows:
• Front Panel Download – All records in the device can be obtained from the front panel using

6 Records
the 6 menu buttons. Though it is easy to obtain any information for the last few records using
this method, a computer is preferred for obtaining bulk data. The Counters Button on the
HMI gives useful data for tracking breaker counters and operations.
• Personal Computer Download – All records in the device can be downloaded to a PC from
either the front panel serial port or the rear port. The front port is permanently set to the
necessary Modbus® ASCII protocol, the rear port must either be set to Modbus® ASCII or
DNP3.0 protocol with Communication Parameter 24 (Protocol Autodetect) set to “Enabled”.
There are two options in AFSuite that may be used to download records. The first is by the
Utilities > Faults/Operations/Load Profile records page and the second is through the Records
page. Both menus can only be accessed when on-line. Using the first method is easiest
when retrieving all the records in the field, while the latter method allows interactive
downloading, viewing and storage of records.
• SCADA Download – All of the records can be downloaded using Modbus® ASCII SCADA,
and some records can be downloaded using DNP3.0 protocol. For DNP3.0 protocol, counters
can be downloaded as well as the last fault record. Operation records can effectively be
obtained in DNP3.0 protocol by recording report by exception or binary change events.

7.1.1 Fault/Operation Records Download Menu


AFSuite provides a quick way to retrieve data records from the PCD called the Utilities >
Faults/Operations/Load Profile page. This option appears when you are online with a unitThe
page is shown in Figure 7-1. Select the desired number of records to retrieve (maximum number
is shown) and press the corresponding button. When you select “Append”, if there is a matching
filename already in the PC root software directory, it will append the new file to the existing one.
The filename will be otherwise stored with the date and time included in the filename.

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Figure 7-1. AFSuite Fault/Operation Record Download Screen


7 Records

Note: The downloads shown in this figure will be stored in the directory specified by the Setup > Set Report Directory.

7.2 Fault Summary


The PCD provides a summary of the last 128 faults. The Fault Summary includes the:
• Record number (most recent listed first as “1”)
• Fault number (numbered in order occurred)
• Enabled settings table (Primary, Alternate 1 or Alternate 2) and recloser sequence number 1,
2, 3, 4 or L for lockout)
• Tripping element
• Date and time
• Phase and neutral currents (magnitude only)
After a fault, the HMI continuously displays the apparent distance to the fault (3 phase tip units
only) in miles and the fault currents (magnitude only) until the targets are reset. The Fault
Summary can be saved as a file via AFSuite or can be retrieved using the HMI.

7.3 Fault Record


The Fault Record contains the last 128 faults. The Fault Record displays one fault at a time and
includes the following information:

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• Record number
• Fault number
• Enabled settings table and Reclose sequence number
• Date and time
• Tripping element
• Apparent distance to the fault in miles
• Fault resistance
• Relay operate time
• Breaker clearing time
• Phase and neutral currents (magnitude and angle)

6 Records
• Positive, negative and zero sequence currents (magnitude and angle)
• Phase voltages (magnitude and angle)
• Positive and negative sequence voltages (magnitude and angle)
The Fault Record can be saved as a file by using AFSuite or can be retrieved using the HMI.

7.4 Fault Locator


The PCD fault algorithm is used to calculate estimated fault resistance and apparent distance to
the fault. This calculation is performed by comparing the pre-fault current and voltage to the
fault current and voltage and by analyzing the positive and zero sequence reactance per mile.
Three to six cycles of fault current are needed to analyze the fault values. The system parameters
are used to estimate the source impedance (known impedance) and source voltage. The fault
values are used to estimate the load impedance (estimated impedance) and determine fault type.
The known impedance and estimated impedance are used to calculate the fault impedance. Once
the fault impedance is calculated, the distance to fault can be calculated using the fault
impedance, the line impedance and the line length.
The Fault algorithm designed to be used on a homogenous radial three-phase distribution line
without many taps. Therefore, the fault locator may not be intended for use on a distribution line
with many different types of conductors or multiple single-phase laterals due to the accuracy of
the algorithm.
Fault data may not be accurate for a close-into-fault condition where there is no pre-fault power
flow. In the case of closing into a fault during a reclose sequence, the apparent distance to the
fault in miles for the first fault appears on the first line of the LCD for the entire reclose sequence.
The fault records also display the original fault distance in each record of that reclose sequence.
The algorithm for the fault locator is most applicable to a radial three-phase feeder.
The fault locator algorithm is only active when the PCD is in 3-phase mode.

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Figure 7-2. Fault Locator


Source Line
Impedance Impedance
7 Records

Impedance
Resistance
Source

Load
Voltage

Fault
7.5 Operation Records
The PCD provides an operations log in which any operation within the PCD is recorded. This
includes internal operations such as logical tripping elements and relay failures. The operations
recorder also logs external events such as settings changes, circuit breaker operations and logical
input operations. During a fault the operations recorder does not know or care what element
actually tripped and cleared the fault. It only knows that certain logical element became active
and logs them with a time stamp. It is very possible that many elements may be logged for a
specific fault but only one was responsible for fault clearing. See the Fault Records for the
element responsible for fault clearing. A complete listing of all the possible operations logs is
listed along with a description in Table 7-3. For detailed definitions to the actual logical elements
(51P, 27-1P, 81S-1, etc.) see the Programmable Outputs section. It is important to note that the
operations record logs only those elements that change state. These states can change by actual
events or by “forcing” an event to occur via the Operations Menu. See the Operations Menu
section (page 108) for complete details on forcing events.
Multiple methods can be used to obtain operations information from the PCD.
1. The front panel HMI Main Menu item “Records” is accessed.
2. The AFSuite menu item “Records” is accessed through the AFSuite program.
3. Depending on the communications protocol contained in the PCD, a command is issued to
send the operations records.
The Operation Records log is also used to record any Editor Access (user setting change) events
and Self Test Failures. The Self Test diagnostic tool constantly runs in the background of the
relay, verifying that the power supply components, CPU hardware and other parameters of the
PCD are functioning properly. In the event of a Self Test Failure, protection will in most cases be
disabled. Remove the control from service and replace the failed component. If a temporary Self
Test Failure has been recorded but is no longer present, contact ABB for further
instruction/analysis.
Notice in Table 7-1 that the values for “Editor Access” and “Self Test Failure” mean different
things. For example: if the Operations Log records an “Editor Access” with a value of 256 it will
not mean the same as a “Self Test Failure” value of 256.
The Operations Record contains the last 1024 operations. The Operations Record includes the:
• Record number (most recent listed as “1”)
• Operation number (numbered sequentially in order of occurrence)
• Description of the operation

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• Date and time of the operation


When the operation number reaches 9999, the screen resets to 0001.

7.6 Self-Test Failure & Editor Access Codes


7.6.1 Introduction
The PCD provides continuous self-testing of its power supply voltages, its memory elements,
digital signal processor (DSP), and its program execution. During normal operation a form C
contact on the PS or UPS module is held in an energized state. In case of a system failure, or if
all power is removed from the control, this contact falls to the reverse position. When the Self
Check Alarm is not energized, the protective functions must be considered as inactive. Normal
status is also indicated by a green Self Check LED and system failure indicated by the red Fail

6 Records
LED. In addition, if the LED is not lit, it is likely due to a loss of control power.
Unless the problem causing the self-check failure prevents the processor code from running, a
Self-Test failure code will be logged. Self-Test Failures are recorded as a decimal number in the
Operations Record. After converting this number to binary, the binary bit pattern indicates the
Self-Test Failure or Editor Access Status code. The 1’s in the bit pattern indicate where a failure
or editor access event has occurred. Count from the right of the bit pattern (starting with zero) to
the position where a “1” occurs. Compare that bit position with Table 7-1 to reveal the failure.
See the examples below for further explanation.

Warning: If the self-test fails, the PCD no longer provides protection. Contact ABB for
any necessary replacement modules as soon as possible.

To interpret the value field (result) of the Self Test or Editor Access record, it must first be
converted to binary. The easiest way to perform this conversion is to use the Scientific Calculator
on your PC. Refer to Table 7-1 to determine what operation(s) occurred.
Some codes are directly listed with the appropriate value field, but often there are multiple events
that require decoding of the number into binary.

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Table 7-1. Operations Record Value Information – Pre-firmware version 3.0


Bit Position Self-Test Failure Code Editor Access Code Decimal Value
7 Records

0 CPU RAM NOT USED 1


1 CPU FLASH REMOTE EDIT DISABLED 2
2 CPU NVRAM LOCAL EDIT DISABLED 4
3 CPU EEPROM EDIT VIA FRONT PANEL HMI 8
4 SPARE EDIT VIA FRONT RS-232 PORT 16
5 SPARE EDIT VIA REAR RS-232 PORT 32
6 SPARE SPARE 64
7 SYSTEM BOOT CLOCK SETTING EDIT 128
8 DSP ROM PROGRAMMABLE I/O EDIT 256
9 DSP INTERNAL RAM PRIMARY SETTINGS EDIT 512
10 DSP EXTERNAL RAM ALTERNATE 1 SETTINGS EDIT 1024
11 DSP ANALOG POWER ALTERNATE 2 SETTINGS EDIT 2048
12 DSP ± 15V POWER CONFIGURATION SETTINGS EDIT 4096
13 DSP +5V POWER COUNTER SETTINGS EDIT 8192
14 DSP STALL OR +5V ALARM SETTINGS EDIT 16384
POWER
15 DSP TO CPU COMMUNICATIONS SETTINGS EDIT 32768
COMMUNICATION
16 SPARE PQ SETTINGS EDIT 65536

Table 7-2. Operations Record Value Information – Firmware version 3.0 and later
Bit Position Self-Test Failure Code Editor Access Code Settings Bank Activation Decimal
Value
0 CPU RAM Front panel menu access SCADA, bank1 1
1 CPU FLASH Primary protection edit Front panel, bank 1 2
2 CPU NVRAM Alternate 1 protection edit 4
3 CPU EEPROM Alternate 2 protection edit 8
4 SPARE Configuration settings edit SCADA, bank 2 16
5 SPARE Alarm settings edit Front panel, bank 2 32
6 SPARE Programmable curve edit 64
7 SYSTEM BOOT LCM settings edit 128
8 DSP ROM Communications settings edit 256
9 DSP INTERNAL RAM Programmable I/O settings edit 512
10 DSP EXTERNAL RAM Bank 2 Primary protection edit 1024
11 DSP ANALOG POWER Bank 2 Alternate 1 protection edit 2048
12 DSP ± 15V POWER Bank 2 Alternate 2 protection edit 4096
13 DSP +5V POWER All other settings edit 8192
14 DSP STALL OR +5V PWR. Not used 16384
15 DSP TO CPU COMM. Not used 32768

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7.6.2 Example of a Self-Test Failure


Value: 256 has a binary bit pattern of 0000000100000000 (bit order 15…0)
The 1 is in bit position 8 as you count from the right. This bit position correlates to DSP ROM
failure.

7.6.3 Example of an Editor Access


Value: 145 has a binary bit pattern of 0000000010010001 (bit order 15…0)
The 1s in this bit pattern have the following bit positions and corresponding Editor Access Status:
Bit 0: Interrupt logging bit (ignore this bit because it will always be set in this example).
Bit 4: Front communications port initiated the editor access and change.
Bit 7: Real-time clock settings were changed.

6 Records

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7.7 PCD Settings Tables Diagnostics


Three copies of each settings table are stored in a nonvolatile memory device, preventing data
7 Records

loss during control power cycling. When you finish editing any settings table, the changed
table’s data is transferred from a temporary edit buffer into three separate locations in the
nonvolatile memory device.
A background diagnostics task continuously runs a checksum on each copy of the settings tables
to verify data consistency. If an invalid copy is detected, the diagnostic task attempts self-
correction by transferring a valid copy to the invalid copy location. If this is unsuccessful, the
task marks the copy as unusable and switches to the next available copy.
When the PCD detects that not all three copies of a settings table are valid, the diagnostic task
adds a self-diagnostic error in the Operations Record, drops the self-check alarm and disables all
protective functions. In addition, the Self Test display under the HMI Test Menu shows the
current status (PASS or FAIL) for all memory devices.

7.8 Operations Log Listing


Table 7-3 lists and describes all possible entries in the Operations Log. Many of the records have
an associated value field. These meaning of these values can be determined by looking up the
Value Type Definitions given in Table 7-4.

Table 7-3. Operations Log


Log Entry Value Description
Type
27-1P Alarm 2 Indicates that the single-phase undervoltage element, 27-1P, has operated.
27-3P Alarm 2 Indicates that the three phase voltage element, 27-3P, has operated
27A / 27B / 27C Indicates an undervoltage condition on a particular phase. Will accompany a 27-1P alarm.
Alarm
32N Trip - Indicates that the ground directional power element, 32N, has operated.
32P Trip - Indicates that the phase directional power element, 32P, has operated.
46 Trip - Indicates that the negative sequence time overcurrent element, 46 has timed out and
operated.
46 Unit Disabled - Indicates that the programmable input, “46” transitioned from a logical 1 to a logical 0,
disabling the negative sequence time overcurrent element if used. This log indicates the
state of the “46” input only.
46 Unit Enabled - Indicates that the programmable input, “46” transitioned from a logical 0 to a logical 1,
enabling the negative sequence time overcurrent element if used. This log indicates the
state of the “46” input only.
50N-1 Trip - Indicates that the ground instantaneous overcurrent element, 50N-1 has timed out and
operated.
50N-2 Trip - Indicates that the ground instantaneous overcurrent element, 50N-2 has timed out and
operated.
50N-3 Trip - Indicates that the ground instantaneous overcurrent element, 50N-3 has operated.
50P/N-1 - Indicates that the “50-1” programmable input was de-asserted and the active 50P-1 and
Disabled 50N-1 instantaneous overcurrent elements disabled. The “50-1” programmable input must
be assigned to a physical input or feedback term for this record to appear. It will also
appear if the “50-1” logical input is forced open in the Operations Menu. This record
indicates the state of the “50-1” input only. This log will appear even if the 50P-1 and 50N-1
elements are disabled in the active settings group.

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Table 7-3. Operations Log


Log Entry Value Description
Type
50P/N-1 - Indicates that the “50-1” programmable input was asserted and the active the 50P-1 and
Enabled 50N-1 instantaneous overcurrent elements enabled. The “50-1” programmable input must
be assigned to a physical input or feedback term for this record to appear. It will also
appear if the “50-1” logical input is forced open in the Operations Menu. This record
indicates the state of the “50-1” input only. This log will appear even if the 50P-1 and 50N-1
elements are disabled in the active settings group.
50P/N-2 - Indicates that the “50-2” programmable input was de-asserted and the active the 50P-2 and
Disabled 50N-2 instantaneous overcurrent elements disabled. The “50-2” programmable input must
be assigned to a physical input or feedback term for this record to appear. It will also
appear if the “50-2” logical input is forced open in the Operations Menu. This record
indicates the state of the “50-2” input only. This log will appear even if the 50P-2 and 50N-2
elements are disabled in the active settings group.
50P/N-2 - Indicates that the “50-2” programmable input was asserted and the active the 50P-2 and

6 Records
Enabled 50N-2 instantaneous overcurrent elements enabled. The “50-2” programmable input must
be assigned to a physical input or feedback term for this record to appear. It will also
appear if the “50-2” logical input is forced open in the Operations Menu. This record
indicates the state of the “50-2” input only. This log will appear even if the 50P-2 and 50N-2
elements are disabled in the active settings group.
50P/N-3 - Indicates that the “50-3” programmable input was de-asserted and the active the 50P-3 and
Disabled 50N-3 instantaneous overcurrent elements disabled. The “50-3” programmable input must
be assigned to a physical input or feedback term for this record to appear. It will also
appear if the “50-3” logical input is forced open in the Operations Menu. This record
indicates the state of the “50-3” input only. This log will appear even if the 50P-3 and 50N-3
elements are disabled in the active settings group.
50P/N-3 - Indicates that the “50-3” programmable input was asserted and the active the 50P-3 and
Enabled 50N-3 instantaneous overcurrent elements enabled. The “50-3” programmable input must
be assigned to a physical input or feedback term for this record to appear. It will also
appear if the “50-3” logical input is forced open in the Operations Menu. This record
indicates the state of the “50-3” input only. This log will appear even if the 50P-3 and 50N-3
elements are disabled in the active settings group.
50P-1 Trip 1 Indicates that the phase instantaneous overcurrent element, 50P-1 has timed out and
operated.
50P-2 Trip 1 Indicates that the phase instantaneous overcurrent element, 50P-2 has timed out and
operated.
50P-3 Trip 1 Indicates that the phase instantaneous overcurrent element, 50P-3 has operated.
51N Trip - Indicates that the ground time overcurrent element, 51N has timed out and operated.
51P Trip Indicates that the phase time overcurrent element, 51P has timed out and operated.
52a Closed 1 Indicates that the 52a switch has energized and the breaker has been closed. For single-
phase mode, the value field will show a 0 (3 phase), 1 (A phase), 2 (B phase), or 3 (C
phase).
52a Opened 1 Indicates that the 52a switch has de-energized and the breaker has been opened. For
single-phase mode, the value field will show a 0 (3 phase), 1 (A phase), 2 (B phase), or 3 (C
phase).
52b Closed 1 Indicates that the 52b switch has energized and the breaker has been opened. For single-
phase mode, the value field will show a 0 (3 phase), 1 (A phase), 2 (B phase), or 3 (C
phase). Normally this is the paired with 52a Closed in Operation Records.
52b Opened 1 Indicates that the 52b switch has de-energized and the breaker has been closed. For single-
phase mode, the value field will show a 0 (3 phase), 1 (A phase), 2 (B phase), or 3 (C
phase). Normally this is the paired with 52a Closed in Operation Records.
59 Alarm 2 Indicates that overvoltage element, 59, has operated due to an overvoltage condition on any
phase. This log indicates only that the programmable logical output, 59, has operated.

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Table 7-3. Operations Log


Log Entry Value Description
Type
7 Records

59-3P Alarm 2 Indicates that overvoltage element, 59-3P, has operated due to an overvoltage condition on
all three phases. This log indicates only that the programmable logical output, 59, has
operated.
59A / 59B / 59C 2 Indicates an overvoltage condition on a particular phase. Will accompany a 59-1P alarm.
Alarm
67 Unit Disabled - Indicates that the programmable input, “67N” transitioned from a logical 1 to a logical 0,
disabling the ground directional time overcurrent element if used. This log indicates the
state of the “67N” input only.
67N Trip - Indicates that the directional ground time overcurrent element, 67N has timed out and
operated. It is possible that this will not have been the actual tripping element.
67N Unit - Indicates that the programmable input, “67N” transitioned from a logical 0 to a logical 1,
Enabled enabling the ground directional time overcurrent element if used. This log indicates the
state of the “67N” input only.
67P Trip 1 Indicates that the directional phase time overcurrent element, 67P has timed out and
operated. It is possible that this will not have been the actual tripping element.
67P Unit - Indicates that the programmable input, “67P” transitioned from a logical 1 to a logical 0,
Disabled disabling the phase directional time overcurrent element if used. This log indicates the state
of the “67P” input only.
67P Unit - Indicates that the programmable input, “67P” transitioned from a logical 0 to a logical 1,
Enabled enabling the phase directional time overcurrent element if used. This log indicates the state
of the “67P” input only.
79 Counter 1 - Indicates that the number of reclose operations has exceeded the Reclose Counter 1 Alarm
Alarm setting.
79 Counter 2 - Indicates that the number of reclose operations has exceeded the Reclose Counter 2 Alarm
Alarm setting.
79M Input Indicates the state of the multi shot reclose,“79M”, programmable input. This record will
Disabled appear when the “79M” input transitions from a logical 1 to a logical 0.
79M Input - Indicates the state of the multi shot reclose,“79M”, programmable input. This record will
Enabled appear when the “79M” input transitions from a logical 0 to a logical 1.
79S Input - Indicates the state of the single shot reclose,“79S”, programmable input. This record will
Disabled appear when the “79S” input transitions from a logical 1 to a logical 0.
79S Input - Indicates the state of the single shot reclose,“79S”, programmable input. This record will
Enabled appear when the “79S” input transitions from a logical 0 to a logical 1.
79V Block 2 Indicates that one or more phases of voltage fell below the 79V threshold setting. Will log a
79V Block only during a reclose operation.
81O-1 - Indicates that the overfrequency module 1 element, 81O-1, has timed out and operated.
Overfrequency This log indicates only that the programmable logical output, 81O-1, has operated.
81O-2 - Indicates that the overfrequency module 2 element, 81O-2, has timed out and operated.
Overfrequency This log indicates only that the programmable logical output, 81O-2, has operated.
81R-1 Restore - Indicates that the frequency restoration module 1 element, 81R-1, has timed out and
operated. This log indicates only that the programmable logical output, 81R-1, has
operated.
81R-2 Restore - Indicates that the frequency restoration module 1 element, 81R-2, has timed out and
operated. This log indicates only that the programmable logical output, 81R-2, has
operated.
81S-1 Trip - Indicates that the frequency load shed module 1 element, 81S-1, has timed out and
operated. This log indicates only that the programmable logical output, 81S-1, has
operated.

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Table 7-3. Operations Log


Log Entry Value Description
Type
81S-2 Trip - Indicates that the frequency load shed module 2 element, 81S-2, has timed out and
operated. This log indicates only that the programmable logical output, 81S-2, has
operated.
81V Block 2 Indicates that one or more phases of voltage fell below the 81V threshold setting.
Accumulated - Indicates that the KSI summation has exceeded the KSI Alarm setting.
KSI
Alt 1 Set Active - Indicates that a transition from an Alternate 2 or Primary settings group took place and that
the Alternate 1 settings are active at this point in the record.
Alt 2 Set Active - Indicates that a transition from an Alternate 1 or Primary settings group took place and that
the Alternate 2 settings are active at this point in the record.
ARC Blocked - Indicates that the programmable input Auto Reclose Timer Block, “ARCI”, transitioned from

6 Records
a logical 0 to a logical 1.
ARC Enabled - Indicates that the programmable input Auto Reclose Timer Block, “ARCI”, transitioned from
a logical 1 to a logical 0.
BFT Operation - Indicates operation of the Breaker Failure Trip (BFT) logical output.
Battery Failure - Indicates that a battery load test has failed. (A passed battery test will not be logged).
Blown Fuse - Indicates that “BFUA” programmable logical output has operated.
Alarm
Breaker Closed 1 Indicates that the breaker has been closed according to the 52a/b switch.
Breaker Opened 1 Indicates that the breaker has been closed according to the 52a/b switch and that the
current has reduced to less than 5% of the 51P setting on each phase.
CB Failed to 1 Indicates the Close Fail Timer has expired.
Close
CB Failed to Trip 1 Indicates the Trip Fail Timer has expired.
CB Pops Open 1 Indicates that the current detected in an open interrupter (as reported by the 52a/b switch)
has fallen to less than 5 percent of the 51P setting. This could occur if an up line device
removes current through a failed interrupter. Also can occur during testing if current is not
removed when the breaker opens. See also “Current Detected in Breaker”
CB State 1 Indicates that the 52A and 52B breaker auxiliary contact inputs to the PCD are in an invalid
Unknown state.
Cold Load Alarm - Logs when the cold load timer has started to count down.
Control Power - Indicates that the control power has dropped below the control power operating threshold as
Fail outlined in the Specifications section
CPU Battery - Indicates that the on-board battery has failed and can no longer support backup of clock or
Failure event records. The 3 V lithium battery (part no.
CRI Input - Indicates that the programmable input Clear Reclose and Overcurrent Counters, “CRI”,
Closed transitioned from a logical 0 to a logical 1.
CRI Input - Indicates that the programmable input Clear Reclose and Overcurrent Counters, “CRI”,
Opened transitioned from a logical 1 to a logical 0.
Current 1 Indicates that current above 5% of the 51P setting is detected in the breaker when the 52a/b
Detected in switch reports the breaker as being in the open state.
Breaker
Direct Close/ 1 Indicates that a Close or Trip has been initiated by programmable logic.
Direct Trip
Editor Access 4 Indicates that a settings change has been made. The value field indicates which setting
group was accessed and saved. See Section 7.6.

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Table 7-3. Operations Log


Log Entry Value Description
Type
7 Records

Event Cap 1 Init - Indicates that the programmable input “ECI1” was asserted and an event capture taken.
The data from the event is stored in the Fault Records.
Event Cap 1 - Indicates that the programmable input “ECI1” was de-asserted.
Reset
Event Cap 2 Init - Indicates that the programmable input “ECI2” was asserted and an event capture taken.
The data from the event is stored in the Fault Records.
Event Cap 2 - Indicates that the programmable input “ECI2” was de-asserted.
Reset
Ext Close 1 Indicates that the programmable input “Close” was de-asserted.
Disabled
Ext Close 1 Indicates that the programmable input “Close” was asserted. This record indicates the state
Enabled of the programmable input “Close” only. It does not imply an actual breaker close.
Ext Trip 1 Indicates that the programmable input “Open” was de-asserted.
Disabled
Ext Trip Enabled - Indicates that the programmable input “Open” was asserted. This record indicates the state
of the programmable input “Open” only. It does not imply an actual breaker trip.
Ext. Trip & ARC - Indicates that the TARC (Trip and Auto Reclose) logical Input became a logical 1 and the
relay went through the reclose cycle.
Ext. Trip CB 1 Indicates that the 52A contact opened and the 52B contact closed but current is still flowing
Stuck through the relay.
External 1 Indicates that the PCD saw the breaker close/trip via the 52A and 52B Programmable Logic
Close/Trip inputs, but the relay did not cause the breaker to close or trip. Typically occurs when the
manual trip lever is pulled or when a circuit breaker is manually closed with a tool.
Fault Test Start/ Indicates the initiation and termination of the Fault Test Mode
Fault Test End
Ground Block - Indicates that ground block has been turned on or off. Source of activation is indicated.
On/Off
Grnd. TC - Indicates that the “GRD” programmable input was asserted and the active ground
Enabled overcurrent elements enabled. The “GRD” programmable input must be assigned to a
physical input or feedback term for this record to appear. It will also appear if the “GRD”
logical input is forced Closed in the Operations Menu. This record indicates the state of the
“GRD” input only.
High PF Alarm - Indicates that the power factor has risen above the High Power Factor Alarm setting.
KVAr Demand - Indicates that the demand KiloVArs have exceeded the Demand KiloVAr Alarm setting.
Alarm
AC Failure - Indicates that AC has been lost and the unit is running on DC backup. May take up to 15
Alarm seconds to lose AC after removing power.
AC Restoration - Indicates that AC has been restored. May take up to 15 seconds to restore after applying
Alarm power.
LCM Close - Indicates that a Loop Control Tiepoint device has done a CLOSE operation.
LCM Midpoint - Indicates that a Loop Control Midpoint device has done a Midpoint operation, which signifies
Oper. the activation of the switch on to fault timer (reclose block) and Alternate Settings 1 mode (if
enabled).
LCM S1/S2 ON - Indicates that Loop Control Source 1 and/or Source 2 voltages are live (monitored phases),
loop control is RESET, and the recloser is in the normal state (closed for sectionalizing or
midpoint, open for tiepoint).

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Table 7-3. Operations Log


Log Entry Value Description
Type
LCM S1/S2 OFF - Indicates that Loop Control Source 1 and/or Source 2 voltage have fallen below the
deadbus voltage threshold (monitored phases), loop control is RESET, and the recloser is in
the normal state (closed for sectionalizing or midpoint, open for tiepoint). If voltage
subsequently returns for the Voltage Regain Time, an LCM S1/S2 ON is logged.
LCM Trip - Indicates that a Loop Control Sectionalising device has done a Trip operation.
LCM Reset - Indicates that the Loop Control System has been reset for another operation. See also
LCM S1/S2 ON and OFF logs.
Load Alarm - Indicates that the load current has exceeded the Load Current Alarm setting.
Low PF Alarm - Indicates that the power factor has gone below the Low Power Factor Alarm setting.
Manual Close/ 1 Indicates that a close or trip operation has been initiated from the front panel.
Manual Trip

6 Records
Neg. KVAr - Indicates that the negative KiloVArs have exceeded the negative KiloVAr Alarm setting.
Alarm
Neutral Demand - Indicates that the neutral demand current has exceeded the Neutral Demand Current Alarm
Alarm setting.
OC Trip Counter - Indicates that the Overcurrent Trip Counter has exceeded the Overcurrent Trip Counter
Alarm setting.
Phase Demand - Indicates that the phase demand current has exceeded the Phase Demand Current Alarm
Alarm setting.
Phase TC - Indicates that the “PH3” programmable input was de-asserted and the active phase
Disabled overcurrent elements disabled. The “PH3” programmable input must be assigned to a
physical input or feedback term for this record to appear. It will also appear if the “PH3”
logical input is forced open in the Operations Menu. This record indicates the state of the
“PH3” input only.
Phase TC - Indicates that the “PH3” programmable input was asserted and the active phase overcurrent
Enabled elements enabled. The “PH3” programmable input must be assigned to a physical input or
feedback term for this record to appear. It will also appear if the “PH3” logical input is forced
closed in the Operations Menu. This record indicates the state of the “PH3” input only.
Pos Watt Alarm - Indicates that the positive kilowatts have exceeded the Positive Kilowatt Alarm 1 setting.
1
Pos Watt Alarm - Indicates that the positive kilowatts have exceeded the Positive Kilowatt Alarm 2 setting.
2
Pos. KVAr Alarm - Indicates that the positive KiloVArs have exceeded the Positive KiloVAr Alarm setting.
Primary Set - Indicates that a transition from an Alternate settings group took place and that the Primary
Active settings are active at this point in the record.
Reclose Initiated 1 Indicates that the PCD is reclosing the breaker.
Recloser - Indicates that the 43A programmable input became de-asserted or was mapped to a non-
Disabled active physical input or feedback term. This record indicates the state of the “43A” input
only. This log will appear even if the Recloser is disabled at 79-1 in the active settings
group.
Recloser - Indicates that the “43A” programmable input became asserted or was unmapped to a
Enabled physical input or feedback term. This record indicates the state of the “43A” input only.
This log will appear even if the Recloser is disabled at 79-1 in the active settings group.
Recloser 1 Indicates a recloser lockout state.
Lockout
ReTrip 1 Indicates operation of the ReTrip logical output.
Successful/
Unsuccessful

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Table 7-3. Operations Log


Log Entry Value Description
Type
7 Records

SCADA CLOSE/ 1 Indicates that a close or trip operation has been initiated from any RS-232 port using serial
SCADA TRIP communications.
SEF Disabled - Indicates that the Sensitive Earth Fault programmable logic input, “SEF” has transitioned
from a logical 1 to a logical 0 disabling the SEF element if used. (SEF model only.)
SEF Enabled - Indicates that the Sensitive Earth Fault programmable logic input, “SEF” has transitioned
from a logical 0 to a logical 1 enabling the SEF element if used. (SEF model only.)
Self Test Failed 3 Indicates a failure of the PCD during the self-check procedure. The value field indicates the
type of problem. See Section 7.6.
Springs Charged - Indicates the state of the Spring Charging Contact, “SCC”, programmable input. This record
will appear when the “SCC” input transitions from a logical 0 to a logical 1.
Springs - Indicates the state of the Spring Charging Contact, “SCC”, programmable input. This record
Discharged will appear when the “SCC” input transitions from a logical 1 to a logical 0.
Supervisory - Indicates that the logical input “Local/Supv” has transitioned from a logical 1 to a logical 0.
Disable
Supervisory - Indicates that the logical input “Local/Supv” has transitioned from a logical 0 to a logical 1.
Enabled
TARC Closed - Indicates that the programmable input Trip and Auto Reclose, “TARC”, transitioned from a
logical 0 to a logical 1. Logs when an External Trip and Auto reclose occurred.
TARC Opened - Indicates that the programmable input Trip and Auto Reclose, “TARC”, transitioned from a
logical 1 to a logical 0.
TCM Input - Indicates the state of the Trip Coil Monitor, “TCM,” programmable input. This record will
Closed appear when the “TCM” input transitions from a logical 0 to a logical 1.
TCM Input Indicates the state of the Trip Coil Monitor, “TCM,” programmable input. This record will
Opened appear when the “TCM” input transitions from a logical 1 to a logical 0.
Trip Coil Failure - Indicates that the logical input “TCM” indicated a trip coil failure.
ULIx Input - Indicates that the User Logical Input, ULI1, transitioned from a logical 0 to a logical 1.
Closed
ULIx Input - Indicates that the User Logical Input, ULI1, transitioned from a logical 1 to a logical 0.
Opened
Wave Cap Init - Indicates that the programmable input “WCI” was asserted and an oscillographic record
stored. The data from the event is stored in the Waveform Capture Records.
Wave Cap Reset - Indicates that the programmable input “WCI” was de-asserted.
Zone Seq. - Indicates that the programmable input “ZSC” was de-asserted and the Zone Sequence
Disabled Coordination function was disabled. This is only valid when Zone Sequence Coordination
function is enabled in the Configuration settings.
Zone Seq. - Indicates that the programmable input “ZSC” was asserted and the Zone Sequence
Enabled Coordination function was enabled. This is only valid when Zone Sequence Coordination
function is enabled in the Configuration settings.
Zone Step - Indicates that a zone sequence coordination operation occurred.

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Table 7-4. Value Type Definitions


Value Type Value Description
Code
1 0 Three phase operation
1 Phase A operation
2 Phase B operation
3 Phase C operation
2 - Secondary voltage value (Volts)
3 - Self Test failure code – Refer to Section 7.6
4 - Editor access code – Refer to Section 7.6

6 Records

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7.9 Operations Summary


7 Records

The Operations Summary menu (see Figure 7-3) includes:


• Breaker Ops. Counter (3 phase mode) increments each time the breaker is opened (due to
overcurrent or manual open operations). This counter does not increment when the
Configuration Setting Recloser Mode is set to 1-phase tripping.
• Recloser Counter 1 & 2 increments each time the breaker recloses. These are used for
alarming purposes in programmable logic or SCADA (79CA-1 & 2, Table 5-2), and can be
reset using the Clear Recloser Initiate (CRI, Table 5-1) command in programmable inputs.
Caution: CRI resets all counters, except for the KSI fault duty accumulator.
• 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th Reclose Counters increment when there is a successful reclose on that
particular step. A permanent fault that sequences to lockout will not increment any of these
counters. These counters are used for tracking intermittent type faults.
• KSI Sum A, B & C counters increment based on how much fault is interrupted for each
breaker trip. For example, if the breaker trips two times and successfully recloses on a one
thousand amp fault, the KSI accumulator will increment by 2. The PCD stores this value
internally at a greater resolution to capture faults < 1000 amps.
• Overcurrent Trips increment based on the particular phase that is picked up during an
overcurrent trip. These counters increment for both single and three-phase mode.
• The sub-menus for Phase A, B & C Counters apply only to single-phase mode. These
counters behave in the same manner as those above, except on a per phase basis. These
counters do not increment when in three-phase mode.

Figure 7-3. Operations Summary Menu

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7.10 Load Profile Records


The PCD has a load profile feature that stores historical load data. The type of data stored
depends on what you have the Voltage connection set to Wye or Delta. Example Wye connection
data is given in the format shown in Figure 7-4 and Figure 7-5. Delta configuration is shown in
Figure 7-6:

Figure 7-4. Load Profile, Wye connected VTs (firmware version 2.6 and earlier)
YYYYMMDDHHMM, KWA, KWB, KWC,KVARA,KVARA,KVARA, Val-g, VBl-g, VCl-g
199808131700,6668,6692,6688, -116, -128, -124,11397,11404,11395

Figure 7-5. Load Profile, Wye connected VTs (firmware version 2.7 and later)

6 Records
YYYYMMDDHHMM, pf*,ld/lg**, Ia, Ib, Ic, In, Val-g, VBl-g, VCl-g
200305220630, 86, 0, 179, 180, 179, 0,19920 ,19870 ,19890

* pf=Power Factor, where value is expressed as 100 X pf


** ld/lg=Leading or Lagging power factor, where 0=leading, 1=lagging

Figure 7-6. Load Profile, Delta connected VTs (all firmware versions)
YYYYMMDDHHMM, 3φKW,3φKVars, Ia, Ib, Ic, In, Val-g, VBl-g, VCl-g
199808131700, 6668, 6692, 116, 128, 124, 0,11404,11395,11397

7.11 Unreported Records


This feature applies to Modbus® protocol only. When an event occurs, the fault and operations
information is sent to the Unreported Fault and Operations Records. At the same time the
information also appears in the Fault and Operations Records. Records remain in the Unreported
Records until either SCADA downloads the information, or you physically view the Unreported
Records screen. When SCADA downloads the information, the entire Unreported Records is
cleared, the record counter on the Unreported Records Status screen drops to 0. When you view a
screen of Unreported Records, the record counter decreases by the number of records that fit onto
your screen. For example, if your computer screen can show 15 records, the record counter
decreases by 15 when you exit the Unreported Records screen.
In this manner, the Unreported Records helps by showing the faults and operations records that
occurred since the last time SCADA downloaded or you viewed the Unreported Records. The
Fault Summary, Fault Record, Operations Summary and Operations Record do not identify which
records were reported and which remain in the Unreported Records.

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7 Records ABB Power Control Device

Figure 7-7. Unreported Fault Records Window


7 Records

Figure 7-8. Unreported Operations Records Window

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6 Records

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ABB Power Control Device 8 Communication

8 Communication
8.1 PCD Communication Environment
The PCD is equipped with an RS-232 port on the front panel for local communications. A serial
cable with a null modem adapter is required for connection to a PC. The communication cable
must have a Male DB-9 connector on the PCD end and a female DB-9 connector on the PC end.
The front port was previously an optical connection requiring an optical probe. The enhanced
front panel (now standard on all ANSI units) replaces the optical connection with a standard RS-
232 connection. The local port is used with AFSuite configuration software for data access and
set up.
In addition, the PCD has a separate communications path to the processor on the rear panel that is
completely isolated from the front panel port. The front panel port can be used while the unit is
connected on SCADA via the rear port. This connection takes the form of one of 4 possible
methods.
1. COM2a Module. This module has one isolated RS-232, one isolated RS-485 and one fiber
optic port.
2. COM3 Module. This connection has one isolated RS-232 and one isolated RS-485 port. Has

8 COMMUNICATION
bridge feature from RS-232 to Fiber
3. COM4 Module. This module has one isolated RS-232, one isolated RS-485 and one fiber
optic port. Superceded by Com2a.
4. COM5 Module. This module is used only for the Loop Control Option. The module has 3
ports, two isolated RS-232 ports and one isolated RS-485 port. One of the RS-232 ports is
not available for communications. It is, instead, used for diagnostic and firmware upgrade
purposes on the COM5 card – Loop Control processor.
5. CPU Module. This module has one non-isolated RS-232 port that is not intended for remote
communication, unless the user provides other means of isolation. The CPU Module is
automatically disabled when a communication module is installed in slot E. The CPU port
is used for upgrading firmware on the main processor.
The PCD supports various protocols. The command message structure and substructures for
these protocols are available upon request. Contact the nearest ABB sales office or ABB at its
Lake Mary, FL technical support office and request the “Protocol Document” for the unit type
(PCD and the specific protocol of interest). The following protocols are available in the PCD
relay:
• Modbus® ASCII or RTU
• DNP 3.0
• IEC 60870-5-101

8.2 PCD Communications Settings


Using the front panel HMI the user can change the communication settings for the PCD. When
you are changing settings on the PCD via the HMI, the communication ports are blocked from
changing settings but data can still be read. Table 8-1 shows the basic communications settings

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8 Communication ABB Power Control Device

for the PCD. These unit address, baud rate, frame settings are general for all protocols.
Parameters 1-25 and Mode Parameters 1-8 are for DNP protocol only.

Table 8-1. Communication Settings


HMI Abbreviation Description
Unit Address Unit Address (default is 0001)
This setting is the data-communications address of the PCD. The value is a
decimal value in the range of from 1 to 65,535. The corresponding
hexidecimal value is shown in brackets [0001 – FFFF]. This address applies
to the Rear Panel port only. The Front Panel port, used for local
communication, has a fixed address of 000.
FP Baud Front Panel Configuration (default is 9600, N, 8,1)
FP Frame Two values are specified for digital communication through the front panel
data port. The baud rate: 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 (default) baud; and
the frame pattern: NONE-8-1 (default), NONE-8-2. These must match the
communications settings of the computer (or other digital device)
communicating with the PCD.
RP Baud Rear Panel Configuration (default is 9600, N, 8, 1)
RP Frame Two values are specified for digital communication through the front panel
data port. The baud rate: 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, or 19200 baud; and
the frame pattern: , NONE-8-1, EVEN-8-1, ODD-8-1, NONE-8-2, . These
must match the communications settings of the computer (or other digital
device) communicating with the PCD.
®
RP Protocol Rear Panel Protocol (default is Modbus ASCII)
This setting specifies which communications protocol to use for data
8 COMMUNICATION

communication through the rear data port that is communicating with the
®
computer connected to the PCD. The available choices are: ASCII Modbus
®
(default), RTU Modbus , DNP 3.0, and IEC 60870-5-101 (optional)
RTS/CTS Delay (only RTS/CTS hardware handshaking
available through CPU When enabled, the user can set a value for 0-3000 ms for pre CTS Tx Delay,
port when no COM and 0-3000 ms for pre-CTS delay and 0-3000 ms for Post Tx Delay.
module is present
Parameter 1 – 25 Rear Port Parameter 1 – 25 (see DNP Protocol Document for defaults)
This settings affect data communication using the DNP 3.0 protocol. Contact
ABB Inc. for more information. The PCD has a special mode which allows
Modbus command interpretation while set in DNP protocol. See below for
more information on Parameter 24, Protocol Autodetect.
Mode Par 1-8: Rear Port Parameter Mode 1 – 8 (see DNP Protocol Document for defaults)
This settings affect data communication using the DNP 3.0 protocol. Contact
ABB Inc. for more information.

The PCD rear port is typically used for connection to SCADA and the RP Protocol must be set to
the appropriate DNP or Modbus®. Modbus® protocol is the default. The PCD has a feature
called “Protocol Autodetect” which allows the control to communicate using DNP 3.0 protocol,
while monitoring the communication for Modbus® commands. If a Modbus® request is detected
(from AFSuite, WinPCD, or other Modbus® source) the control will recognize, and respond to the
query in Modbus®. After the response, the port switches back to DNP protocol. This is an
especially useful feature for interrogating historical records or changing setting on control. Note
that DNP communication must cease for the duration of the Modbus® communication. Enabling
Parameter 24 in Communication settings activates the autodetect feature. It is set to “disabled” in
default settings. .

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ABB Power Control Device 8 Communication

8.3 Communications Port Descriptions


8.3.1 RS-232 Communication Port
The RS-232 communication port is available on all Communication modules. It consists of a 9-
pin D-shell connector and provides point-to-point communication.
The RS-232 standard supports one driver and receiver over a distance of 50 feet. However, RS-
232 will also support an external modem or a radio transmitter remote from the substation
increasing the communication distance to approximately 3.5 miles in favorable terrain.

Table 8-2. RS-232 Port Pin Connections


Pin Description Number
2 Receive Data - Relay receives data through this pin
3 Transmit Data - Relay transmits data through this pin
5 Signal Ground
7 Request To Send
8 Clear To Send

8.3.2 RS-485 Communication Port

8 COMMUNICATION
The RS-485 communication port is available on all communication modules except the CPU
module. The RS-485 connector is located in the green Phoenix terminal connector. The RS-485
standard defines the properties of the electrical signal of the electronic bus interface that handles
this communication. RS-485 differs from the RS-232C standard found on most devices. RS-485
has the advantage that makes it well suited for substation applications in a ring network where a
maximum of 32 devices may be connected at a maximum distance of communication wire length
is 4,000 feet / 1,219 m.
COM3, COM4 and COM5 modules have three jumpers that are essential to the RS-485 ring
network operating properly. The first jumper is J5; this jumper establishes a terminating resistor
for the network. The purpose of the terminating resistor is to match the impedance of the line
between the transmitter and the receiver (see Table 8-3).

Table 8-3. RS-485 Port


Pin Jumper Description
G - RS-485 Common/VDC Return
- - RS-485 Minus
+ - RS-485 Positive
- J4 RS-485 Fail-Safe Pull-up
- J5 RS-485 Termination
- J6 RS-485 Fail-Safe Pull-down

Whenever a RS-485 network is idle, all PCD are in receiving mode, there are no active
transmitters on the network. Without a transmitter driving the network, the state of the line is
unknown. To maintain the proper idle voltage state, bias resistors must be applied to force the
data lines to the idle condition. Bias resistors are nothing more than a pullup resistor on the data
J4 line and a pulldown resistor (to ground) on the data J6 line. The goal is to generate enough dc

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8 Communication ABB Power Control Device

bias current in the RS-485 network to maintain a minimum voltage level between the J4 and J6
data lines.
A shielded three conductor twisted cable should be used to connect the RS-485 ring network.
The shield should be grounded at the PCD to prevent induced interference from circulating
ground currents. Connect the PCD ground terminal directly to the equipment ground bus. Secure
ground connections directly to the equipment ground bus and do not daisy chain them from one
device ground to the next. Do not position signal cabling parallel to power conductors. Power
conductors are defined as any cable or conductor carrying currents greater than 20 amperes.
Make certain the polarity (+) and (-) is correct when connecting the RS-485 terminals on each
device. Cables should be isolated from sources of electrical noise.

8.3.3 Fiber Optic Port


The Fiber optic port is available on the Com 2a and Com 4 modules. These ports have ST type
connectors, which can accommodate a variety of fiber sizes. Typically, Single Mode fiber is
recommended, and supports up to 15 kilometers. communication port is available on all
communication modules except the CPU module. The RS-485 connector is located in the green
Phoenix terminal connector. The RS-485 standard defines the properties of the electrical signal
of the electronic bus interface that handles this communication. RS-485 differs from the RS-
232C standard found on most devices. RS-485 has the advantage that makes it well suited for
substation applications in a ring network where a maximum of 32 devices may be connected at a
maximum distance of communication wire length is 4,000 feet / 1,219 m.

8.4 Communication Module Descriptions


8 COMMUNICATION

There are 5 different options for rear port communications, all supporting the communications
settings listed above. Each of the available modules provides hardware solutions for different
needs. Reference Table 8-4 for a summary of each modules hardware features.

Table 8-4. Communication Module Feature Sets


Feature CPU (direct) COM 2a COM 3 COM 4 COM 5
RS-232 port (9 pin) Y Y Y Y Y
RS-485 port N Y Y Y Y
Fiber Port (ST N Y N Y N
connectors)
Bridge feature from N N Y Y N
RS-232 to RS-485
Software RTS/CTS N N Y Y N
handshaking, settable
using by jumpers on
board
Hardware controlled Y N N N N
RTS/CTS handshaking
with settable timers
Isolated ports N Y Y Y Y

8.4.2 CPU Direct


The RS-232 port on the CPU is only active when there is no communication module installed.
This port is typically used for firmware upgrades. However, it can be used for external
communication to SCADA or for programming the control. This port also has actual RTS/CTS
lines from the processor that can provide RS-232 RTS/CTS hardware handshaking. This can
provide data flow control that may be needed when interfacing with radio receiver/transmitters.

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ABB Power Control Device 8 Communication

There are two time settings for the CPUs RTS/CTS handshaking, the CTS Tx Delay timer and the
Post TX delay.
The CPUs hardware RTS/CTS handshaking feature is only available when there is no
communication installed, and operates as follows. When a query is received from the master, the
PCD will compose its response. With the RTS CTS Delay timer feature enabled, the PCD will
first raise its RTS line, and wait until the CTS line is high from the master. If the CTS line never
goes high, at the end of the CTS Tx delay it will proceed to send the response regardless of the
CTS status. If there is a Post Tx Delay setting programmed, the PCD will keep the RTS line
high for that amount of time after the transmission of the response. This feature is useful for
certain types of radio communication.

8.4.3 Type 2a Communication Module Description


The Type 2a module has three communication ports, one RS-232, one RS-485, and one fiber
optic port. The ports on this module are all optically isolated. All communication to the Com2a
must be radial and there is no bridge feature.
It is important to note that the Com 2a module only communicates one port at a time and the
jumper must be set in the appropriate position. The module is shipped in the RS-232 position
from the factory. If RS-485 is desired, move the jumper to the opposing pins. If fiber optic
communication is desired, remove the jumper or place it on one pin for future access.

Figure 8-1. Type 2a Communications Module

8 COMMUNICATION
8.4.4 Type 3 and Type 4 Communication Module Description
The Type 3 and 4 communication modules provide software based RS-232 RTS/CTS
handshaking to assist with data flow control that may be needed when interfacing with radio
receiver/transmitters. The RTS/CTS feature may be selected by the placement of jumper H302.
If this is set to ignore CTS, the RTS jumper is also ignored. Jumper H202 selects the time in
milliseconds that RTS remains asserted past the end of data transmission. This feature is used to
eliminate squelch problems associated with radio transmission and reception. The module will
transmit data on all ports at once, but can only receive on one port at one time. When data is
received then that data is retransmitted over all ports except for the port where the data was
received. All data is handled this way by this module.

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8 Communication ABB Power Control Device

8.4.4.1 Communication Bridge Feature


Type 3 and Type 4 Communication modules include a communication bridge between the RS
232, the RS-485. When these modules are installed, several PCDs, or other devices, may be
networked together using a multi-dropped RS-485 scheme (Type 3 or Type 4). One option is to
connect to the COM3 or COM4 module to the master, and connect additional units to the RS-485
port in “daisy chain” fashion. Another method is to connect the PCDs RS-485 ports in daisy
chain, including an RS-485 port directly on the RTU. As previously described, the Type 3 and
Type 4 Communication modules have the unique ability to retransmit or echo messages on all
ports simultaneously with the restriction that only one port can be assigned to receive.

Figure 8-2. Type 4 Communications Module Jumper Locations


8 COMMUNICATION

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ABB Power Control Device 8 Communication

Figure 8-3. Typical Application – Type 3 or 4 Comm. Module RS-485 & RS-232

RS-485
RS-232

Radio Radio

RS-232

RS-485 RS-485

Radio tower

RS-485 RS-485

Workstation

RS-485

8 COMMUNICATION
8.4.4.2 Enabling RTS/CTS Control
If your communications application requires RTS/CTS control, as in some radio applications, this
can be enabled on the Com Type 3 and 4 Communications Module. To enable these features
remove the module from the housing and locate a jumper labeled CTS (H302). Install the jumper
across the two pins to disable RTS/CTS control, remove the jumper to enable RTS/CTS control.

Table 8-5. Comm. Module Type 3 and Type 4 RTS/CTS Control, Jumper H302 Settings
Jumper Position RTS/CTS Control
OFF Disabled
ON Enabled

The time in milliseconds jumper H202 selects that RTS remains asserted past the end of data
transmission. This feature is used to eliminate squelch problems associated with radio
transmission and reception. Delays can be programmed from 0 to 50 milliseconds, refer to the
following table for selection of desired delay times.

Table 8-6. Comm. Module Type 3 and Type 4 RTS Drop Delay Time, Jumper H202 Settings
Jumper Position Jumper Position RTS Drop Delay Time
OFF OFF 0 ms
OFF ON 10 ms
ON OFF 20 ms
ON ON 50 ms

Note: If RTS/CTS is enabled and no CTS are applied, then message transmission for all
remaining ports is disabled.

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8 Communication ABB Power Control Device

8.4.4.3 Fiber Optic Mode Control


The Type 4 communication module provides a selection for looped or star (radial) fiber
connection per the jumper indicated in Table 8-7. Looped mode, however, is no longer
supported. Certain SCADA systems may support loop fiber connections, but in general, ABB
recommends star mode only, detailed below.

Table 8-7. Comm. Module Type 4 Fiber Optic Mode Control, Jumper H303 Settings
Jumper Poaition Mode
OFF Radial
ON Looped

8.4.4.4 Star Mode


This mode of operation should be considered the default mode for most installations. Also, this is
the proper configuration mode for applications where the PCD is acting as a communication
bridge.
ABB recommends Dymec® fiber optic star devices to assure compatibility. Available are a 4
device and an 8 device star, S# OS5HRT-L-5M and S# OS9HRT-L-9M respectively. These S#’S
are for 24 & 48 VDC operation. 90-250 VAC/VDC models are also available. Figure 8-4
illustrates the 8 point star. The connection to the master is through fiber, requiring that either the
RTU have a fiber connection or the user supply a Dymec® RS-232 to fiber converter, S# 5844
(style number will vary depending on voltage requirement).
8 COMMUNICATION

Figure 8-4. Typical Application - Type 2a or 4 Communication Module Radial Mode

RxD

TxD
SCADA

RxD RxD

TxD TxD

TxD TxD
RxD RxD
RxD TxD
RxD TxD TxD RxD

TxD RxD RxD TxD


Dymec 8 Star
RxD TxD TxD
RxD

TxD RxD

RxD TxD

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ABB Power Control Device 8 Communication

Figure 8-5. Typical Application - Analog Cellular Network


Cellular
network

RS-232 RS-232

Analog Analog Analog


or network or WinPCD
Cellular Cellular
PCD2000 Modem Modem

8.4.5 COM Type 5 Communication Module Description


The COM Type 5 module provides two isolated RS-232 serial ports at the DB-9S connectors
designated RP and RP2. An RS-485 transceiver parallels the RS-232 transceiver on port RP, and
the RS-485 positive, negative and ground signals are available at an adjacent Phoenix connector.
Port RP2 is reserved for future use.
When the COM Type 5 module is plugged into a PCD, the CPU module’s RS 232 connector is
disabled and the RP port is enabled as the communication port for the CPU module. Thus, either
the RS-232 front port on the PCD or the COM Type 5 RP port (or RS-485 port) can be used for
communication with the CPU module, though not simultaneously.
There are two LEDs (TxD and RxD) associated with the RP port. These LEDs light to indicate

8 COMMUNICATION
serial communication on either the RS-232 or the RS-485 port. The RS 232 or RS-485 port is
enabled by setting jumper J3 on the COM Type 5 circuit board.

8.4.5.1 COM Type 5 Module Jumper Settings


The COM Type 5 module provides several user-configurable jumpers and switches. Each is
labeled on the component side of the printed circuit board in white ink. The jumpers consist of
two or more gold pins extending approximately 0.25 inch above the printed circuit board. Shunt
blocks (provided) are used to short adjacent pins together for setting the options.
Figure shows the COM Type 5 module circuit board layout. Refer to for a listing of COM Type 5
module jumper settings.
Note: Some items with J or JP designations are connectors instead of jumpers and are discussed
elsewhere in this manual.

Table 8-8. Communication Module Type 5 Jumper Settings


Jumper Function Jumper Position
J1 Do not use. For manufacturing use only. NA
J2 Do not use. For manufacturing use only. NA
J3 Selects RP serial port communication protocol (RS-232 RS-485 short pin 2 to pin 1
or RS-485) by shorting the appropriate pins. RS-232 short pin 2 to pin 3
Note: The J3 designator is next to pin 1.
J6 Reserved for future use. NA
JP2 Reserved for future use. NA
JP3 Do not use. For manufacturing use only.
JP4 This jumper connects the RS-232 DTR signal (RP Install a shunt block to short
connector pin 4) to DSR (RP connector pin 6). These pins
RS-232 signals are otherwise unconnected.

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8 Communication ABB Power Control Device

JP5 Determines the RS-232 function supported at the RP pin 2 to pin 1 (reserved for
DB-9 connector pin 7. Short the middle pin to an future use)
adjacent pin: pin 2 to pin 3 Connects RP
Pin 1 is adjacent to the RP DB-9 connector connector pin 8 (CTS) to RP
connector pin 7 (RTS)
JP6 Install a shunt block only if no connection is made to the Install shunt block to short pins
RS-485 connector.
JP7 RS-485 terminator. Install a shunt block if there are Install shunt block to short pins
only two RS-485 nodes or if this recloser is at either
end of a multidrop RS-485 chain.
JP8 Install a shunt block on JP6 only if no connection is Install shunt block to short pins
made to the J4 RS-485 connector.
JP9 Do not use. For manufacturing use only. NA
JP10 Do not use. For manufacturing use only. NA
JP11 Connects the COM Type 5 module logic ground to the Install shunt block to short pins
PCDs chassis ground if a shunt block is installed. Use
of JP11 is usually not necessary.
S1 Reserved

8.5 Modem Application


8 COMMUNICATION

8.5.1 External Modem


There are several different options for modem communication. To assure successful
communication, ABB recommends using like modems at the master and device. Laptop modems
do not always communicate properly with some types of modems. ABB has verified successful
communication using a few different modems, including the following:
Note: When using modems, ABB recommends the use of phone line surge protection. One such
surge protector is the Sixnet® S# SP-TELCO-1. Ground as required by the surge protector
manufacturer instructions, and verify that the protector is connected properly (line and
phone side, with the phone side being connected to the PCD).
• Sixnet® SixTrak modem, which is an industrial rated modem with self-dial capabilities. The
self-dial capability, paired with the PCDs programmable logic capability, allows the PCD to
respond within a minute to an event. This response may take the form of dialing back to
SCADA on Modbus®, dialing back to SCADA and automatically sending unsolicited data to
the master, or, the Sixtrack modem can be set to dial a pager. The SixNet® modem model #
VT-MODEM-2 operates on voltages from 10-30 VDC, but units with a higher DC operating
voltage are available.
• Telenetics® Modem. Industrial grade modem. The Telenetics modem S#’s MIU14.4 operates
on 48-240 VAC or VDC, though other operating voltages are available.
• US Robotics®, 56K Fax/Modem: Compatible, but not industrial rated. Therefore is
recommended when located in a substation house. This modem has an AC adapter and is
configured with dip switches. The following configurations for Send and Receive are
suggested:
Send Modem Dip-Switch Configuration:
Data Terminal Ready Override

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ABB Power Control Device 8 Communication

Numeric result Codes


Display result codes
No echo, Offline commands
Auto answer off
Carrier detect override
Load factory defaults
Smart mode
Receive Modem Dip-Switch Configuration:
Data Terminal Ready Override
Numeric result Codes
Suppress result codes
No echo, Offline commands
Auto answer on first ring
Carrier detect override
Load factory defaults
Dumb mode

8 COMMUNICATION
8.5.2 Using a Modem
When using an external modem connected to your PCD or PC, a telephone system may require
you to do more than enter a telephone number in the AFSuite program’s Modem dialog box. For
example, you may first be expected to dial “9” for an outside line at your office. If so, preface the
telephone number you want to dial with the characters “9W”, as in this string: 9W19195554567.
In this example, the “9” gives you the outside line, and the “W” instructs the modem to wait for a
second dial tone before continuing to dial. The following table lists the dial modifiers and their
definitions recognized by most modems.
ABB recommends a surge suppressor device to help prevent damage to the modem upon a
lightning event. Telco S# xxx is a recommended brand.

Table 8-9. Modem Dialing Modifiers


Dial Modifier Description
0 - 9 - #ABCD Specifies the letters, numbers and symbols a modem uses when dialing.
T Instructs the modem to dial using the Tone method.
P Instructs the modem to dial using the Pulse method.
, Pauses before continuing the dial string. The length of this pause is programmed
into your modem; usually, it is 1 or 2 seconds. For longer pauses, enter multiple
commas or reprogram your modem.
W Waits for another dial tone.
@ Waits for silent answer from those modems that do not offer a tone when they
answer.
! Issues a hook flash, which is equivalent to pressing and quickly releasing the switch
hook on your phone as you would to answer a call waiting.
R Places your call in reverse mode (originates your call in answer mode), to call an
originate-only modem. This character must be the last one in the dial string before
the carriage return.

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8 Communication ABB Power Control Device

Table 8-9. Modem Dialing Modifiers


Dial Modifier Description
; Returns the modem to the command state.
S=n Dial the telephone number n stored in your modem. (Consult the modem’s
documentation where to store this number.)
8 COMMUNICATION

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ABB Power Control Device 8 Communication

8 COMMUNICATION

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8 COMMUNICATION 8 Communication ABB Power Control Device

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ABB Power Control Device 9 Accessory Programs

9 Accessory Programs
9.1 Oscillographic Analysis Tool
Waveform analysis is performed by a separate ABB software application Oscillographic Analysis
Tool (OAT) software program enhances the fault analysis capabilities of the PCD. OAT displays
the waveform data captured by these units. Besides all analog waveforms, this program shows
digital input/output, pickup and fault information.
The analog waveforms are displayed simultaneously in individual windows. Each window
contains a trigger indicator, a left cursor and a right cursor. Move either cursor to any position
within the window for each waveform. When moving the cursor in one window, it moves in the
other windows as well. Each waveform window can be resized to enhance viewing and can be
deleted individually. The time location of the left and right cursors and the difference in time
between the cursors are provided in the Main Display window. Other information in the Main
Display window includes the filename from which the waveform records were extracted; the date,
time and trigger position of the sample taken at the control; the unit ID number; and the catalog
number.
OAT allows the ability to overlay an individual analog waveform onto any other analog
waveform, for example, overlay VA onto IA to examine the phase relationship. Alternatively,
scale all current waveforms with respect to the largest amplitude within that group. This is called
the Actual Scale and is the default setting. However, you can also scale waveforms with respect
to the largest amplitude encountered for that waveform only, which is called the Normalized
Scale. The Normalized Scale accentuates noise and other characteristics of the waveform. A
zoom feature allows you to position the left and right cursors within the waveform and then
zoom-in to closely examine that section of the waveform.

9.1.1 System Requirements and Installation


OAT requires a PC running Microsoft® Windows™. In addition, it is recommended that the

9 ACCESSORY PROGRAMS
screen resolution be set to 1024 x 768 pixels to allow viewing of all OAT windows.
To install OAT, follow these simple steps:
1. Start Windows.
2. Place the CD-ROM in your disk drive.
3. If the PC does not have, autorun built in then click on Start then click on Run.
4. In the Run, screen click on Browse.
5. Select the drive containing the CD.
6. Select and click on and copy the files name PWRVIEW.EXE and TEST.CAP from the 3.5"
disk to the directory you created. The test file is used to explain the operation of the
Oscillographic Display and Analysis software.
7. Set up the executable application in the Program Manager window:
a) Go to the Main window in the Program Manager window.
b) Double-click on “Windows Setup.”
c) The Windows Setup window appears. Select “Set Up Application” under the Options
menu.

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9 Accessory Programs ABB Power Control Device

d) Another window appears. Select “Ask you to specify an application,” and click on
“OK.”
e) Enter the application path and filename (e.g., C:ourdir/pwrview.exe), and click on “OK.”
The icon should appear in the Applications window of the Program Manager.

9.1.2 Using OAT


OAT is a menu-driven program. A parent window contains windows for the analog waveforms
and for digital information.
To open a file, do the following:
1. Double-click on the icon in the Desktop.
2. Click on Continue at the prompt.
3. Under the File menu, select Load Graph Data File.
4. The Open window appears. OAT files are listed as *.cap files, including the test.cap file.
Click on the file you want and select OK, or double-click on the filename.
The file loads and the individual analog waveform windows appear.

9.1.3 Analog Display Windows


The analog waveform windows appear within the Main Display window. The Main Display
window appears to the right of the analog waveforms and lists the file name, date and time the
data was captured at the control, and locations of the trigger point and the left and right cursors.
The left cursor is at the far left side of each analog waveform window, and the right cursor is at
the far right side. You can drag the cursors by moving the mouse cursor close to the left or right
cursors. Hold down the left mouse button while dragging the left or right cursor to the desired
position. Release the mouse button. After you move the left or right cursor, the time value for
that cursor changes in the parent window. In addition, the cursor position in all the other analog
waveform windows mirrors your cursor movement. The trigger cursor cannot be moved.
To resize an analog waveform window, move the mouse to the border on that window. A double-
headed arrow appears when the mouse is properly positioned. Hold down the left mouse button
and drag the window border to the desired position. Release the mouse button. Each analog
9 ACCESSORY PROGRAMS

waveform window can be deleted. Simply click on the Delete button in the window. That
waveform window disappears, and the other waveform windows shift to take up the empty space.

9.1.4 Menu Commands


Each menu on the Oscillographic Analysis Tool parent window has specific features.

9.1.4.1 Hardcopy Menu


Under the Hardcopy menu is the command Print Graph. When you want to print a copy of the
window(s) you are viewing, select this command.

9.1.4.2 Assign Colors Menu


Use this menu to assign colors to the analog waveforms. This is especially helpful when you
overlay two waveforms. When you select Analog Trace, a list of the analog traces appears.

9.1.4.3 Trace Overlay Menu


Use the Trace Overlay menu to overlay any analog waveform on any other analog waveform.
This way you can directly compare the two. From the Trace Overlay menu, choose Select From
Existing Traces. You can also use this menu to remove overlays.

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ABB Power Control Device 9 Accessory Programs

After selecting from the Trace Overlay menu, a window appears that requests you to enter a base
trace and an overlay trace. Enter each trace and select “Enter.” The overlay trace appears in the
window of the base trace. Enter other traces as you desire, and select “Done” when you are
finished.
Note: Only one waveform may be overlaid onto any base trace.

9.1.4.4 Scale Traces Menu


You can scale analog waveforms to an Actual Scale or a Normalized Scale. Actual Scale shows
an analog waveform in relation to the other six waveforms. When you choose Normalized Scale,
the waveform is scaled with respect to the largest amplitude for that waveform only. In other
words, the peaks expand to fit that individual window. From the Scale Traces menu, select
Actual Scale or Normalized Scale. The program launches in Actual Scale.

9.1.4.5 Select Status Trace Menu


You can present digital input/output, pickup and fault information in a window by using the
Select Status Trace menu. Follow these steps to display digital information.
1. Select the digital information you want under the menu.
2. A window appears with a list of the different parameters measured. Double click on the
parameters you want. As you double click on a parameter, a digital line appears in the
graph window.
3. When you have selected all the parameters you want, click on Done.

9.1.4.6 Zoom Menu


Zooming in allows you to enlarge a selected portion of the analog waveform. To do this, set the
left and right cursors to the desired range. Then select “Zoom In” from the “Zoom” menu.
The portion you selected enlarges. Use “Zoom Out” to return to the original size.

9.1.5 Math Button


At the top of the Main Display window is a button marked “Math.” Press this button to perform
math functions associated with the analog waveforms.

9 ACCESSORY PROGRAMS
9.1.6 Spectral Analysis
The Spectral Analysis Tool window appears when you click on the Math button. By using this
tool, you can create a spectrum window for a selected region of waveform data.
Follow these steps to perform a spectral analysis:
1. Click on the Math button at the top of the Main Display window.
2. The Spectral Analysis Tool window appears.
3. Select the waveform you want by scrolling up or down in the “Wave Form” box. Double-
click on the desired waveform. An extended cursor appears in place of the left cursor in the
window of the selected waveform. (The default is the uppermost waveform.)
4. Select the desired sample interval by scrolling up or down in the “Sample Interval” box.
Double-click on the interval you want. The extended cursor in the waveform window
changes size accordingly. (Default = 32 or one cycle for a, 50-Hz wave form.)
5. Move the extended cursor over the section of the waveform on which you want to perform
the spectral analysis. Do this by clicking on the left vertical of the cursor and dragging in
the waveform window.

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9 Accessory Programs ABB Power Control Device

6. Click on the FFT (Fast Fourier Transformer) button in the Spectral Analysis Tool window.
The Spectral Analysis Display window appears with the generated spectrum. The harmonic
content as a percentage of the fundamentals (to or 60 Hz) appears in the Spectral Analysis
Tool window for the harmonics (2nd to the 11th).
7. As you wish, move the cursor within the Spectral Analysis Display window by clicking the
left mouse button in the region you want. The cursor snaps to that position, and the
frequency appears in the “Frequency” box of the Spectral Analysis Tool window.
8. Double-click on the upper left corner of the Spectral Analysis Display window to close it,
or click on “Done” in the Spectral Analysis Tool window to remove the Spectral Analysis
Display and Spectral Analysis Tool windows.

9.2 User-Defined Time Overcurrent Curves


An external PC-based program, CurveGen, can be used to create custom time-overcurrent curves
for the PCD. With CurveGen, you can program time-overcurrent curves other than the ones
provided in the PCD.
The standard curve entered into the PCD has the following form:
 A   14n − 5 
Trip Time =  P
+ B ×  
M −C   9 
 I 
where M =  INPUT 
 I PICKUP 
and IPICKUP is the PCD setting.
Coefficients A, B, C and P are defined by the user; and n is the time dial setting for a particular
protection element that is using the curve.
To define the curve, you must define the coefficients in this equation. There are two ways to do
this:
1. Enter the coefficients by hand: With the CurveGen program you can define all four
coefficients by hand. This is designed for users who do not want curves based on already
9 ACCESSORY PROGRAMS

established functions, but instead are ready to define curves through mathematical
manipulation.
2. Determine the coefficients via curve fitting: Define a series of time versus current points
and fit them to the standard equation listed above.
For the second method, you use the CurveGen program to enter the series of time versus current
points from an already defined curve. CurveGen then fits the four coefficients to these points.
There are two ways to enter these points into the CurveGen program:
1. Enter all sampled points by hand.
2. File entry: CurveGen can also read files with points defined in them.
The ability to remove, sort, plot, edit and view points gives you total power over the curve to be
generated.
Once all the points are entered, CurveGen fits a curve using the standard equation. After A, p, C
and B have been determined, you can plot the curve against the points given as well as determine
the overall error of the curve versus the plotted points.
After all four coefficients have been determined; you can generate a linear approximation of the
curve. Maximum error criteria must be satisfied before CurveGen can determine the coefficients

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ABB Power Control Device 9 Accessory Programs

needed for the PCD. Errors and warnings indicate whether the error criteria can be met or if the
number of entries in the curve table is above the maximum value allowed.
When the curve tables have been defined by CurveGen, download them into the PCD. When you
want to use a user-defined curve, select “Transmit Programmable Curve Data” from the
Programmable Curves drop-down menu in AFSuite.

9.2.1 Using CurveGen


Click on the CurveGen 1.0 icon to run the CurveGen application.
From the Curve Data Worksheet the user has two options for entering the curve coefficients:
• Manually enter the coefficients
• Enter time/current points on the curve and let CurveGen calculate the coefficients

9.2.1.1 Manually Entering Coefficients


• If desired, the user may enter a description in the Description field.
• Under Standard, select ANSI or IEC.
• Under Data Entry Method, select Manually Enter Coefficients.
• The user can now enter the known coefficients A, B, C and p.
• Under Curve Series, select Default. Time Dial 1 through 10 will appear on the screen for
ANSI or 0.05 to 1 for IEC. Any combination of valid time dials can be used.
• Select Apply. CurveGen will display the graph. Under the Graph menu at the top of the
screen the graph format can be changed and the graph can be printed for a clearer view.
• If you are satisfied with the results, select Save As under File and type in a filename with a
*.CRV extension. This file will be used for transmitting to the PCD.
• The user also has the ability to save the worksheet. Select Save Worksheet As then save as a
[filename.wrk].

9.2.1.2 Compute Coefficients


• If desired, the user may enter a description in the Description field. Under Standard, select
ANSI or IEC.
• Under Data Entry Method, select Compute Coefficients.

9 ACCESSORY PROGRAMS
• Choose the Compute Coefficients tab. Using the mouse, place the cursor in Row 1, Column
1 (Current M).
• Type in the multiple tap current, M then press the TAB key and type in the corresponding
time. Press the TAB key again to enter a second point. Continue until a minimum of 5 data
points are entered or 100-max. Please note that for ANSI or IEC type curves, the points you
enter are equivalent to a time dial of 1.0.
• After all points have been entered click on Solve. The computed coefficients will appear on
the screen. To see these points on a graph, click on the [Apply] button.
• Choose the Relay Data tab and notice that the coefficients previously calculated appear under
Coefficients. Under Curve Series, select default. Time dial 1 through 10 should appear on the
screen for ANSI and 0.05 to 1 for IEC. Any combination of valid time dials can be used.
• Select Apply. CurveGen will display the graph. Under the Graph menu at the top of the
screen the graph format can be changed and the graph can be printed for a clearer view.
• If you are satisfied with the results, select Save As under File and type in a filename with a
[*.CRV] extension. This file will be used for transmitting to the PCD.
• The user also has the ability to save the worksheet. Select Save Worksheet As then save as a
[filename.wrk].

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10 ACCEPT. TEST, & MAINT

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ABB Power Control Device 10 Acceptance, Testing, and Maintenance

10 Acceptance, Testing and Maintenance


10.1 Precautions
Take the following precautions when using the PCD:
1. Connect the current and voltage transformers for proper phase rotation and polarity to
ensure correct measurement of kilowatts and kiloVARs, and for the proper operation of the
46, 67P and 67N protection elements.
2. Incorrect wiring may result in damage to the PCD and the recloser and/or electrical
hardware connected to the recloser. Be sure the wiring on the PCD and the recloser agrees
with the electrical connection diagram before energizing.
3. Apply only the rated control voltage as marked on the PCD nameplate.
4. High-potential tests not recommended. If a control wire insulation test is required, only
perform a DC high-potential test. Surge capacitors installed in the unit do not allow AC
high-potential testing.
5. Follow test procedures to verify proper operation. To avoid personal shock, use caution
when working with energized equipment. Only competent personnel familiar with good
safety practices should service these devices.
6. When the self-checking function detects a system failure, the protective elements are
disabled and the alarm contacts activate. Replace the unit as soon as possible.

WARNING: Terminals on the back of PCD may be energized with dangerous voltage
levels. Use extreme care.

CAUTION: Do not insert hands or other foreign objects into the case for removal of
PCD modules while energized.

10.2 Handling Electrostatic Susceptible Devices (ESD)


The electronic circuitry on PCD modules is susceptible to damage from electrostatic discharge.
When handling a module, observe the following guidelines.
• Keep modules in the static-shielding bag until you are ready to install them. Save the bag for
future use.
• Before opening a bag containing electronic circuitry, touch it to a grounded surface to
equalize charges.
• Always wear a grounded wrist strap when handling modules. In the field, connect the wrist
strap to a non-painted grounded component within the enclosure.
10 ACCEPT. TEST, & MAINT

• When working with modules, use a static dissipating work surface (static mat) connected to
the same ground as the wrist strap.
• Do not touch circuitry. Handle printed circuit board modules by the edges or by the
mounting bracket.
• Avoid partial connection of semiconductors. Verify that all auxiliary devices connected to
the modules use proper grounding before energizing.

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10 Acceptance, Testing, and Maintenance ABB Power Control Device

10.3 Acceptance Testing


The purpose of this section is to provide the user with the necessary information on receipt of the
unit, initial power-up, verify settings, initial test, initial tripping and reclose in a new PCD. It
answers most of the frequently asked questions by users who are not familiar with the device.
Recommendation for all initial tests performed is done according to the factory default
procedures in this instruction booklet before attempting to test with operational settings.

10.3.1 Receipt of the PCD


When you receive the PCD, examine it carefully for shipping damage. If any damage or loss is
evident, file a claim with the shipping agent and promptly notify the nearest ABB sales office.

10.3.2 Initial Power-up


Before installing the PCD, use the following procedures:
• Power up the PCD. A slight relay clicking sound should be heard; pressing the down arrow
key illuminates the LCD display. The following LED should illuminate Green: G-Normal
(Self-check). The following LEDs should illuminate Red: Close LED.
• The Clear (C) pushbutton operates like the [Esc] key on a PC to get back to the previous
screen or by continued pressing return to the Meter screen.
• The Enter [↵] pushbutton provides access to the various menus in the PCD it also operates
like the Enter [↵] key on a PC to gain access to a menu item or confirm a setting change.
• The Up and Down arrow pushbuttons provide scrolling through the various menu items and
change the characters for entering the Password.
• The Right and Left arrow pushbuttons provide moving the cursor from one position to the
next for entering the Password and for changing the settings within the unit.

10.3.3 Changing the Password


To verify and test the PCD use the correct Password otherwise there is no access to the PCD.
This feature prevents unauthorized users from access to change metering, settings, operations,
and test menus in the PCD. Table 10-1 identifies which menu items require a Password and
which menu items do not require a Password.
The “Relay” password allows access to all functions presented by the PCD and AFSuite. The
“Test” password allows access only to Operation and Test menus. It is very important that when
a Relay Password is set, an Operation Password is also set. Otherwise, the default password (four
spaces) will allow operation of the breaker using AFSuite or other Modbus Protocol commands.
ABB recommends setting both a Relay and Test password and maintaining it in a safe place.
10 ACCEPT. TEST, & MAINT

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ABB Power Control Device 10 Acceptance, Testing, and Maintenance

Table 10-1. When Password is Required


Password Required – R= Relay Password, T= Password Not Required
Test Password
Change Primary Settings – R View Load
Change Alt1 Settings – R View Demand
Change Alt2 Settings – R View Min/Max Demand
Change Counter Settings – R Show Primary Settings
Change Alarm Settings – R Show Alt1 Settings
Change Clock Settings – R Show Alt2 Settings
Change Communication Settings – R Show Configuration Settings
Change Oscillographic Capture Settings - R Show Alarm Settings
Change Power Quality Settings - R Show Clock
Trip Breaker – R or T Show Communications
Close Breaker – R or T View Power Quality Records
Force Physical Input – R or T View Fault Summary
Force Physical Output – R or T View Fault Record
Set/Clear ULO – R or T View Operations Record
Force Logical Input – R or T View Operations Summary
Test Output Contacts – R or T Perform Self Test
Function Test Mode – R or T Test Contact Inputs
Fault Test Mode – R or T Battery Test Mode

The factory preset Password for PCD is four underscore characters.


To set a new Password, write down a 4-digit alphanumeric password that is easy to remember.
1. Press Enter [↵] to go to the Main Menu.
2. Using the Down arrow key scroll to Settings and press Enter [↵].
3. This opens the Setting Menu, scroll down to Change Settings press Enter [↵].
4. Scroll down to Configuration press Enter [↵], at the Enter Password prompt, press Enter [↵]
again for the second time. This is the Change Configuration Setting menu.
5. Scroll down to Relay Password, press Enter [↵].
6. This is the Change Password screen. The cursor is at the first digit position. Use the Up or
Down arrow pushbuttons to change the first digit position (ranging from _ to Z). Then use
the Right arrow pushbutton to move to the second digit position and again use the Up and
Down arrow pushbuttons to change this digit. Continue the same process for the third and
fourth digit.
10 ACCEPT. TEST, & MAINT

7. When input of the 4-digits for the Password are complete press Enter [↵].
8. A new Verify Screen appears with a prompt to Input Password Again. Input the New
Password and press Enter [↵]. A new screen stating Password Verified appears.
9. Press Clear (C) pushbutton. A screen prompt asks to Save Configuration press Enter [↵].
10. Verify the New Relay Password by following the same procedure to change the Test
Password.

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10 Acceptance, Testing, and Maintenance ABB Power Control Device

11. Write both the Relay and Test Passwords down and keep them in a secure place. If you
forget the password, contact ABB Inc.

10.3.4 Verify Settings


1. Using the arrow keys, got to the Main menu, scroll to Setting, press Enter [↵], scroll to Unit
Information, press Enter [↵].
2. Record the PCD serial number and CPU ROM for future reference. Use the Catalog
Number Interpretation Key (see 0) to verify the options that apply to the serial number are
as ordered.
3. Press Clear [C] to return to the Settings menu, scroll to Show Settings, press Enter [↵].
Check default settings for Primary, Alternate 1 or Alternate 2 Settings against the tables
supplied in this instruction booklet.
4. If changes to the default settings are necessary, press Clear [C] twice to return to the Main
menu. Scroll to Settings and press Enter [↵], in the Settings menu scroll to Change
Settings, and press Enter [↵]. In the Change Settings menu, scroll to Primary, Alternate 1
or Alternate 2 Settings and press Enter [↵]. Program the appropriate settings using the
arrow keys.
5. After checking the default settings, press Clear [C] twice to return to the Main menu. Scroll
to Settings and press Enter [↵], in the Settings menu, scroll to Change Settings and press
Enter [↵]. In the Change Settings menu, scroll to Clock Settings and press Enter [↵]. Set
the unit clock using the arrow keys.
6. Press Enter [↵] to enter the correct time and return to the Change Configuration Settings
menu, press Clear [C] twice to return to the Main menu.

10.3.5 Initial Test


Enable the following protection elements 50P, 51P, 50N and 51N in Primary Settings for the
PCD. Set the time overcurrent element 51P for pick-up at 600 amperes and the time overcurrent
element 51N at 300 amperes. Enable the instantaneous elements (50P-1/N-1) for pick-up at 2
times (51P/N setting) or 1200 amperes and 600 amperes respectively. The time overcurrent curve
set to Extremely Inverse with a time dial setting of 5.0. When tested at 1200 amperes (2 times
51P setting) or 600 amperes (2 times 51N setting) the PCD should trip the 51P and the 51N
element in approximately 16 seconds. Refer to Figure 10-1 on page 229 of this instruction book
for test connections and procedure.

CAUTION: Do not apply 600 or 1200 amperes into the PCD. These settings are primary
settings for PCD from a 600:1 ct embedded in the recloser. Therefore, actual current
applied to PCD is either 1 amp or 2 amp for PCD to read 600 and 1200 amperes,
respectively.

10.3.6 Initial Tripping and Reclose


The 51P element for PCD has the factory default set to Enabled. In addition, the 79-1 Open Time
10 ACCEPT. TEST, & MAINT

Interval default setting is Lockout. When the PCD initiates a trip signal via 51P to the VR-3S or
OVR, this element allows for the first tripping reclose sequence 79-1 to proceed to Lockout. This
precautionary setting ensures that the PCD has at least one protection setting Enabled before
installation.

10.3.7 Recloser
Only the recloser elements Enabled, or set to Lockout activate the PCD during the respective
recloser cycle. For example: if the 79-1 Mode Select: 51P is Enabled. Then the 51P element
initiates a trip signal to the VR-3S or OVR to operate. With the 79-1 Open Time Interval set to

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ABB Power Control Device 10 Acceptance, Testing, and Maintenance

Lockout, then the PCD, will Lockout after the 51P operation. The same conditions hold true for
79-2, 79-3 and 79-4. The exception is 79-5 Open Time Interval this setting is always set by
factory default to Lockout.

10.4 High-Potential Tests


AC high-potential tests are not recommended. If a control wire insulation test is required,
completely withdraw the PCD from the cabinet or panel and perform only a DC high-potential
test. Refer to page Table A2-1 on page 319 for Dielectric values.

10.5 System Verification Tests


PCD continuous monitoring of a self-check output contact performs routine hardware tests to
verify that the PCD is functioning properly. Run these tests via the HMI or via the
communications port and AFSuite.
1. Confirm pass/fail status of each Self-Check element by using the Test Menu.
2. Confirm continuity of current and voltage through each input sensor by using the Meter
Menu.
3. Confirm continuity through each optically isolated contact input for both the opened and
closed condition by using the Test Menu.
4. Verify operation of each output contact by using the Test Menu.
5. Confirm that all PCD settings are correct by using the Show Settings Menu.
6. Check the Fault and Operation Records for proper sequential operation.

10.6 Testing the PCD


PCD functions depend on the state of the recloser monitored through its 52B contact. If it is not
possible to use test equipment to simulate a recloser operation, place the PCD in the Functional
Test Mode. This mode allows testing of the pre-programmed overcurrent elements and recloser
sequences without simulation of the 52B contact. If PCD is not placed in Functional Test Mode
or the 52B contact is not connected to PCD during testing, PCD will immediately go into Breaker
Failure and Lockout on the first trip.
The PCD stays in the Functional Test Mode for fifteen minutes or until cleared whichever occurs
first. While PCD is in the Test Mode the fault, all sequences are written only to the Operations
Record.
The tests procedures confirm PCD protection and metering accuracy. Test only the elements that
will be enabled when the PCD is placed into service. Testing the enabled functions ensures that
the PCD settings are correct for the desired application. Check and verify the Fault and
Operations Records after each test to confirm proper sequential operation of the PCD logic.
10 ACCEPT. TEST, & MAINT

The following test procedures are written from the perspective of using AFSuite and a Doble®
F6150 Power System Simulator for generation of 3-phase voltage and current.

WARNING: Follow all safety procedures of the test equipment being used whenever
testing PCD.

Table 10-2 and Table 10-3 show the factory default settings on which the tests are based.

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10 Acceptance, Testing, and Maintenance ABB Power Control Device

Table 10-2. Configuration Settings for Test Procedures


PCD Element Test Setting
Trip Mode 3 Phase
VT Ratio 100
VT Connection 120 wye
Positive Sequence Reactance/Mile 0.678
Positive Sequence Resistance/Mile 0.486
Zero Sequence Reactance/Mile 3.013
Zero Sequence Resistance/Mile 0.772
Line Length (Miles) 10
Breaker Failure Open
Trip Failure Time (cycles) 18
Close Failure Time (cycles) 18
Close Delay Time (cycles) 0
Curve Set ANSI
Phase Rotation ABC
Protection Mode Fund
Reset Mode Instant
Alt1 Setting Disable
Alt2 Setting Disable
Cold Load Time Mode Seconds
79V Time Mode Seconds
Voltage Display Vln
Frequency 60Hz
Zone Sequence Disable
Target Mode Last
Remote Edit Enable
WHr Display KWHr
LCD Light Timer
ID PCD
Demand Minutes 15
LCD contrast 50
Relay Password [ _ _ _ _ ] 4 underscore
Test Password [ _ _ _ _ ] 4 underscore
10 ACCEPT. TEST, & MAINT

END OF CONFIG

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ABB Power Control Device 10 Acceptance, Testing, and Maintenance

Table 10-3. Primary Settings for Test Procedures


PCD Element Test Setting
51P Curve Extremely Inverse
51P Pickup Amps 600
51P Time Dial 6.0
51P Minimum Response 0.00
51P Time Adder 0.00
50P-1 Curve Standard
50P-1 PickupX 2.0
50P-1 Curve Block Disable
50P-2 Disable
50P-2 PickupX 3.00
50P-2 Time Delay 0.10
50P-2 Curve Block Disable
50P-3 Disable
50P-3 PickupX 4.0
50P-3 Time Delay 0.10
46 Curve Extremely Inverse
46 Pickup Amps 600
46 Time Dial 1.00
46 Minimum Response 0.00
46 Time Adder 0.00
51N Curve Extremely Inverse
51N Pickup Amps 300
51N Time Dial 6.00
51N Minimum Response 0.00
51N Time Adder 0.00
50N-1 Curve Standard
50N-1 PickupX 2.0
50N-1 Curve Block Disable
50N-2 Enable
50N-2 PickupX 3.0
50N-2 Time Delay 0.10
50N-2 Curve Block Disable
10 ACCEPT. TEST, & MAINT

50N-3 Enable
50N-3 PickupX 4.0
50N-3 Time Delay 0.10
67P Enable
67P Curve Extremely Inverse
67P Pickup Amps 300

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10 Acceptance, Testing, and Maintenance ABB Power Control Device

Table 10-3. Primary Settings for Test Procedures


PCD Element Test Setting
67P Time Dial 1.00
67P Minimum Response 0.00
67P Time Adder 0.00
67P Torque Angle 270
67N Enable
67N Negative Sequence
67N Extremely Inverse
67N Pickup Amps 150
67N Time Dial 1.00
67N Minimum Response 0.00
67N Time Adder 0.00
67N Torque Angle 90
79 Reset Time 10
79C Disable
79-1 Functions
79-1 Open Time Lock
79 Cutout Time Disable
79V Select Disable
Cold Load Time Disable
2-Ph 50P Disable
81 Select 81-1
81S-1 Pickup Frequency (Hz) 59.30
81S-1 Time Delay (sec) 0.2
81R-1 Pickup Frequency (Hz) 59.90
81R-1 Time Delay (sec) 1.0
81V Voltage Block (sec. volts) 70
27 Select Disable
59 Select Disable
32P Select Disable
32N Select Disable
END OF SETTINGS
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ABB Power Control Device 10 Acceptance, Testing, and Maintenance

10.7 Functional Test Mode (Password Protected)


The Functional Test Mode is accessed from the HMI in the Test > Func. Test Mode menu item.
Use the Functional Test Mode to test programmed overcurrent functions and the reclose sequence
(upon removal of test current) without the need for a recloser, by simulating operation of the 52a
and 52b contact inputs. The PCD stays in Functional Test Mode for fifteen minutes after the last
keypress, or until you exit from the test mode. While in Test mode if a not connected to a
recloser, the 52a will appear in the logical outputs as always energized and the 52b always de-
energized.

Note: If connected to a recloser in functional test mode, the recloser will operate if the
user opens or closes the control.

10.8 Fault Test Mode (Password Protected)


This function has been enhanced in version 2.82 of the firmware. The Fault Test Mode allows
the user to test the unit with pre-set simulated fault current, in order to verify protective curve
timing and breaker operation. This provides the ability to do timing tests without the need for a
current injector or test device.
To execute the Fault Test Mode:
• From the HMI go to the Test > Fault Test Mode
• Press “C” to continue to the test
• Set the Psim (Phase Simulation current) and Nsim (Neutral Simulation current) as desired by
using the up, down, right and left keys. These values are in multiples of the 51P and 51N
pickup value.
• When complete, press “E” to execute the test. The PCD will sequence through its
programmed shots, and stop at the lockout step.
The simulated fault current is logged in the Fault Records and Fault Summary. The simulated
current, relay time, clear time and tripping elements are logged. The breaker operates for this
test, and while the breaker counter is incremented, the KSI (fault duty accumulator) is not
increased by the test.

Note: If connected to a recloser in functional test mode, the recloser will trip and
reclose per the programmed sequence and fault current level.

10.9 Verify Self-Checking Test Via HMI


Follow these steps to verify the pass/fail status of each self-check element on the PCD:
1. Connect the proper control power to the unit. Wait for initialization to be complete.
10 ACCEPT. TEST, & MAINT

2. The green STATUS LED should be lit.


3. From the HMI, press [Enter] to get the Main Menu.
4. Scroll down to TEST and press [Enter].
5. The first choice is Self Test, press [Enter]. All elements under the Self Test; Power,
Memory, and DSP should each display PASS.
6. Press [C] three times to return to the normal display.

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10 Acceptance, Testing, and Maintenance ABB Power Control Device

10.10 Metering Test


Apply 3-phase voltages and currents as shown in Figure 10-1 of 0.4A to A, B and C-Phase and
the Neutral.
Test Current Test Voltage
IA = 0.4 A ∠0° VA = 120.0 V ∠0°
IB = 0.4 A ∠240° VB = 120.0 V ∠240°
IC = 0.4 A ∠120° VC = 120.0 V ∠120°
IN = 0.0 A ∠0° VN = 0.0 V ∠0°
Use AFSuite and from Metering click on Load Values to display a similar type screen.
Current Voltage Power
IA = 240 A ∠0° kVA-N = 12.0 V ∠0° kW-A = 2880
IB = 240 A ∠240° kVB-N = 12.0 V ∠240° KW-B = 2880
IC = 240 A ∠120° kVC-N = 12.0 V ∠120° kW-C = 2880
IN = 0.0 kW-3P = 8640
I0 = 0 kV1 = 12.00 ∠0° kVAR-A = 0
I1 = 240 ∠0° kV2 = 0 ∠0° kVAR-B = 0
I2 = 0 ∠0° kVAR-C = 0
Freq = 60.00 kVAR-3P = 0
PF = 0.99 Leading
10 ACCEPT. TEST, & MAINT

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ABB Power Control Device 10 Acceptance, Testing, and Maintenance

Figure 10-1. Typical Test Circuit

Control +
Power
AC or DC -
PCD2000
IA
+
-
IB
+
3- Phase -
Current IC +
-
+
IN
-

VA
VB
3-Phase
VC
Voltage
VN

10.11 51P — Phase Time Overcurrent


Follow these steps to check the time overcurrent (51P) element for both the minimum pickup
current and timing.
1. Connect the PCD as shown in Figure 10-1.
2. Verify that the 51P element is the only element set per Table 10-3.
3. Apply 0.1A of balanced three-phase current from the test set to phases A, B and C per
settings from Section 10.6.
4. Gradually increase the current until the PICKUP LED just lights. This should be within
±3% of 600A on the PCD. This confirms the accuracy of the 51P setting.
5. Decrease the input current from the test set to 0.1A or turn off the test set. Reset targets, if
10 ACCEPT. TEST, & MAINT

necessary, by pressing the [C] Clear push button twice.


6. Apply 2.0A of balanced three-phase current from the test set to phases A, B and C the
PICKUP LED will light. After 20 seconds, the PCD will initiate a trip.
7. This value should be within ±3% of 20 seconds for the ANSI Extremely Inverse curve at
Time Dial 6.0 on the PCD. This confirms the timing accuracy of the 51P setting.
8. Decrease the input current from the test set to 0.1A or turn off the test set. Reset targets, if
necessary, by pressing the [C] Clear push button twice.

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10 Acceptance, Testing, and Maintenance ABB Power Control Device

10.11.1 50P-1 — Instantaneous Overcurrent


Follow these steps to check the instantaneous time overcurrent (50P-1) element for both the
minimum pickup current and timing.
1. Connect the PCD connected as shown in Figure 10-1.
2. Verify the 51P and 50P-1 are the only elements Enabled and set per Table 10-3.
3. Apply 0.1A of balanced three-phase current to phases A, B and C per settings from Section
10.6.
4. Increase A, B, & C-phase current from 0.1A to 2.0A until the PICKUP LED lights and the
recloser trips open. This should be within ±7% of 1200A on the PCD. This confirms the
accuracy of the 50P-1 setting.
5. Decrease the input current to 0.1A or turn off the test set. Reset targets, if necessary, by
pressing the [C] Clear push button twice.

10.11.2 50P-2 — Instantaneous Overcurrent


Follow these steps to check the instantaneous time overcurrent (50P-2) element for both the
minimum pickup current and timing.
1. Connect the PCD connected as shown in Figure 10-1.
2. Verify the 51P and 50P-2 are the only elements Enabled and set per Table 10-3.
3. Apply 0.1A of balanced three-phase current to phases A, B and C per settings from Section
10.6.
4. Increase A, B, & C-phase current from 0.1A to 3.0A until the PICKUP LED lights and the
recloser trips open. This should be within ±7% of 1800A on the PCD. This confirms the
accuracy of the 50P-2 setting.
5. Decrease the input current to 0.1A or turn off the test set. Reset targets, if necessary, by
pressing the [C] Clear push button twice.

10.11.3 50P-3 — Instantaneous Overcurrent


Follow these steps to check the instantaneous time overcurrent (50P-3) element for both the
minimum pickup current and timing.
1. Connect the PCD connected as shown in Figure 10-1.
2. Verify the 51P and 50P-3 are the only elements Enabled and set per Table 10-3.
3. Apply 0.1A of balanced three-phase current to phases A, B and C per settings from Section
10.6.
4. Increase A, B, & C-phase current from 0.1A to 4.0A until the PICKUP LED lights and the
recloser trips open. This should be within ±7% of 2400A on the PCD. This confirms the
accuracy of the 50P-3 setting.
5. Decrease the input current to 0.1A or turn off the test set. Reset targets, if necessary, by
10 ACCEPT. TEST, & MAINT

pressing the [C] Clear push button twice.

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ABB Power Control Device 10 Acceptance, Testing, and Maintenance

10.12 51N — Neutral Time Overcurrent


Follow these steps to check the instantaneous neutral time overcurrent (51N) element for both the
minimum pickup current and timing.
1. Connect the PCD connected as shown in Figure 10-1.
2. Verify the 51P and 51N are the only elements Enabled and set per Table 10-3.
3. Apply 0.1A of balanced three-phase current to phases A, B and C per settings from Section
10.6.
4. Gradually increase A-phase current from 0.1A to 0.6A until the PICKUP LED just lights.
This should be within ±3% of 300A on the PCD. This confirms the accuracy of the 51N
setting.
5. Decrease the input current to 0.1A or turn off the test set. Reset targets, if necessary, by
pressing the [C] Clear push button twice.

10.12.1 50N-1 — Neutral Instantaneous Overcurrent


Follow these steps to check the instantaneous neutral time overcurrent (50N-1) element for both
the minimum pickup current and timing.
1. Connect the PCD connected as shown in Figure 10-1.
2. Verify the 51P, 51N and 50N-1 are the o