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Cisco TelePresence Pre-sales

Account Manager Training

Student Guide
Version 4.0
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Course Overview
This course has been designed to help generate a deeper awareness of Cisco TelePresence,
and provide the sales force knowledge they need to be conversant with their customers at a
business, technology and a solution level, including the technical knowledge required to speak
intelligently about the technology, and ensure successful customer engagements by
educating the sales force and the ATPs on the technical requirements for Cisco TelePresence
(i.e. room and network requirements) and procedural guidelines for taking a customer from sale
through to implementation.

Target Audience
This course is designed in the English language.

It is intended as the TelePresence pre-sales training to be provided to the Cisco sales and
system engineering personnel.

Course Prerequisite
The prerequisite for this course with
be QuickStart for Cisco TelePresence.
This 2.5-hour online offering creates
helps to create initial awareness
around the Cisco TelePresence
solution for:

„ Solution Overview:
Provides a high-level
background of Cisco
TelePresence including
understanding the
concepts of Cisco
TelePresence, product /
solution offerings and
roadmap

„ Value Proposition: Arms the field, giving them the ability to analyze and understand
customers’ problems, how those problems affect overall business, and how Cisco
TelePresence solves those problems.

„ Vertical Markets: Enables learners to profiles potential buyer and segment targets,
including functional titles of key decision makers and tactics to address concerns of
those customers in purchasing positions.

„ Go-to-Market Strategy: Clearly defines the field and channel go-to-market strategy
that establishes roles and responsibilities, routes to market and sales strategies
associated with the field and channels sales team.

„ Technical Background: Gives learners technical information that includes specific


details of product or service function, uses, life, and linkages with other systems or
products.

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights Reserved, Cisco Confidential iii
„ Competitive Positioning: Highlights characteristics of the Cisco Empowered
Branch solutions that differentiate it in the market and how the pricing, message,
and model compare with competitor’s offerings.

„ Service Offerings: Describes key service offerings that are critical to successful
implementation of products and technologies to accelerate product absorption
and/or ensure ongoing effectiveness of implementation.

„ Solution Pricing: Gives product pricing information linked to strategies for justifying
the product’s cost as well as bundled pricing.

„ Customer Wins: Arms learners with proof points and success stories to
demonstrate the value of a Cisco TelePresence solution. This module contains
generalized information on customer feedback as well as direct account customer
testimonials, as well as includes sales success stories and best practices.

QuickStart for Cisco TelePresence Enrollment

To enroll into the QuickStart for Cisco TelePresence online course offering, go to URL:

ƒ CEC Access:
http://glms.cisco.com/ems?ssp=/index/index.saba&siteName=ems&UrlId
=131327

ƒ PEC Access:
http://cisco.partnerelearning.com/pec/Direct.asp?URL=20202321479395.1893

For additional enrollment information, contact Tony Anderson at toanders@cisco.com.

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Module 01: Welcome
– Cisco
TelePresence
PreSales ILT for
Account Managers

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Agenda
Welcome

Sales Process review & CxO Relevancy

Break – 15 minutes

Business Case for TelePresence

The Discovery Process

Lunch – 75 minutes

Creating a Customer Proposal

Order Assurance

Competitive Landscape

Break – 15 minutes

TelePresence Technology and Design Overview

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Learner Skill and Knowledge

Prerequisite
ƒ Cisco TelePresence
PreSales QuickStart
Training
Recommended
Training
ƒ QuickStart for Cisco
Unified
Communications

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Introduce Yourself

ƒ Name
ƒ Company
ƒ Experience Selling Cisco TelePresence
ƒ Honest thoughts on Cisco TelePresence

15 Minutes
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Class Format

ƒ Learners will be divided into teams working together to


accomplish class based activities.
ƒ Activities will focus on idea sharing through exchanging
customer comments and feedback.

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Discussion: What Makes TelePresence a


Valued Enterprise Solution?

ƒ Share examples
ƒ Identify messages to which potential customers respond
ƒ Build a picture of what could be
ƒ Give examples of innovations that are standards today

20 Minutes
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Cisco TelePresence Channel Contacts

US Ted Demeris tdemeris@cisco.com

US Joel Cochran jocochra cisco.com

CN Rebecca Leach releach@cisco.com

Europe Janis Bergquist jbergqui@cisco.com

Emerging Rui Teixeira rteixeir@cisco.com

APAC Shankar Subramanian shanksub@cisco.com

Japan Yoko Tsunekawa ytsuneka@cisco.com

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 1-7

CTS Extended Team

Name Role When to Contact

Nancy Zehring WW Channels Cisco TelePresence


Channel responsibility for
WW Channels
Sam Fahed WW Channels Partner enablement
responsibility for WW
Channels
Jeff Hayes CA Cisco TelePresence CA
responsibility

Amy Rogers TSBU Cisco TelePresence order


assurance responsibility

Erica Schroeder Corporate Marketing Cisco TelePresence


Marketing Lead: Case
studies, customer
references
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Resources

Worldwide ATP Website:


http://cisco.partnerelearning.com/pec/Direct.asp?URL
=2016172456585.1564
Sales or Demo questions:
ask-telepresence-sales@cisco.com
Technical questions:
ask-telepresence-technical@cisco.com
General questions:
ask-telepresence@cisco.com

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Module 02: Cisco
TelePresence
Sales Process

“Being here is being there”

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Agenda

ƒ Review the Cisco TelePresence value proposition and sales


process
ƒ Discuss CxO Relevancy

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Awards for Cisco TelePresence

“#25 Most innovative Companies”


Long known for its M&A chops, Cisco's innovation reputation is gaining
ground as it looks to grow in areas beyond networking equipment. For
instance, its Emerging Markets Technology Group has dreamed up
“Telepresence,” a high-definition, high-cost videoconferencing system that
puts other such systems to shame.

“Best of 2006” “Innovation Award”


One of Only 20 Products Selected Only Six Selected from 100 Entries
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Cisco TelePresence Vision
Go Anywhere the Network Goes

Work Live
Cisco TelePresence Meeting TeleMedicine
Virtual Specialist (Branch) Family Visits
Virtual Administrator Virtual Dining
The
Network
As the
Virtual Box Seat Platform
Remote Classrooms

Play Learn
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Cisco TelePresence
What It Is Today—The Cisco TelePresence Meeting

It’s all about the Experience


ƒ Every participant at table ... life size
ƒ Eye contact, audio from person speaking
ƒ Speak normal voice level
ƒ No perceivable latency

Simplicity
ƒ Technology invisible to the user
ƒ One touch calling - As easy as placing a phone call

Network as the Platform


ƒ Cisco TelePresence leverages the Network as the Platform along
with Cisco Unified Communications to deliver Unique, In Person
Experiences

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Changing the Business Landscape with


TelePresence

TelePresence will change


business process execution:

Decreased Travel Expense – Immediate cost benefits can be gained


from a simple analysis of the hard and soft costs of travel
Enhance business productivity – improved productivity and
engagement with subject matter experts
Process Transformation – Improve reach and visibility for business
decision making and customer access enables greater business agility.
Business Continuity – TelePresence can help maintain business
continuity in the face of pandemic threats, national disaster and times of
increased travel restrictions
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Customer Segment 1 Profile
ƒ Segment 1 Profile:
•Global Enterprise Companies
•Vertical-specific: Financial services, Manufacturing,
Pharmaceutical, Retail, SP (as Enterprises)
• Quantifiable Attributes:
•WW customer base
•Distributed theaters of operations – split headquarters, 100+
offices
•Large scale investment in network, $1M+ investment in Unified
Communications
•Available bandwidth, Willing to add bandwidth

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Territory Planning: Profiling Accounts


Profile Focus Verticals

Identify potential customers: Segment


Government
$200M revenues
ƒ Does the customer have high
Financial Services
IPC bookings? Geographic Global
Distribution, Energy
ƒ Does the customer have high
Multi-site
bandwidth sites? Large Pharmaceuticals/
Enterprise Healthcare
Distributed
Prepare and plan: Teams Insurance
ƒ Use available intelligence to Large/Key
Manufacturing/
Operational Commercial
identify key business initiatives Resiliency High Tech

Map out a strategy. Central Retail


Service
Decision-Making Higher Ed
Provider
Media/Entertainment
C-Level Execs

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Sales Process: Pre-Order process

CxO intro, Value


proposition
Demo,
Establish CxO / Executive
Sales
Track CxO approval
Engage
Account
Prequalify Qualification
Territory Planning

Refined Proposal &


location, and Room
Bus. Case
Applications

room, + Assessment
Tie into

network (step 3)
(step 1 & 2)
Close Initial
systems &
services order
Handling
Objections IT Manager
Qualify Initial User
Applications
End User
(CxO included)

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CxO Relevancy

Objectives:
ƒ Establish the Cisco TelePresence vision
at the CxO level
ƒ Align with strategic business initiatives
ƒ Close for a demo

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Executive - Care Abouts

Board Members

Executive
Management

What They Care About


CEO
• Reducing the number • Reducing travel costs
of travel days • Building relationships
• Reducing the time with the right people at
Managing Partner away from office & the right time
family • Lower stress levels
• Improved health • Increased productivity

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Finance - Care Abouts

Accounting

Financial Manager

What They Care About


CFO
• Reducing travel • Improved
costs communications with
• Lowering risk and investors & analysts
Controller liabilities • Compliance with
• Staying within municipal travel
budget limits & reduction mandates
predictable budgets • Increased productivity
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Human Resources - Care Abouts

Training

Director of
Training

What They Care About


V.P.
Human Resources • Reduce time to • Reduce time to train
recruitment & new hires
expenses • Lower expenses for
Director of • Improve quality of on-going training
Human Capital new hires • Manage issues of
• Creating a ‘green’ disagreement more
work place quickly & amicably
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Operations - Care Abouts

Plant Manager

Director of
Operations

What They Care About


COO
• Reduce recruitment • Reduce time to train
time new hires
• Improve quality of • Lower expenses for
V.P. of new hires on-going training
Supply Chain
• Reduce recruitment • Manage issues of
expenses disagreement more
quickly & amicably
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Marketing - Care Abouts

Marketing
Manager

Director of
Corporate
Communication

What They Care About


CMO
• Improve customer • Ability to offer
satisfaction ratings ‘platinum’ amenities to
• Increase productivity preferred customers
V.P. of with artists & • Demonstrate to
Public Relations vendors customers & the press
• Increasing customer their organization’s
touches technology savvy

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Sales - Care Abouts

Sales
Manager

Director of
Product or Service
Business Unit

What They Care About


CSO
• Develop more & • Reduce travel time &
better quality turn into selling time
presentations and • Reduce days out of
V.P. Sales demonstrations field for training
& Marketing • Ability to respond • Ability to offer
‘on-demand’ to ‘platinum’ amenities to
customers preferred customers

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Activity

Learners will break into teams to discuss the following:


1. Questions from CxO’s: For “Top of Mind for CxO’s”, collaborate with
team members to identify the answers to CxO; questions that you feel
have the most effectiveness.
2. Questions for CxO’s: For “Top Questions to Ask”, role play
possible/past CxO answers. Then brainstorm on follow-up statements
to address possible concerns.
Groups will present their findings and defend their answers.
1. Groups will present their answers. Answers will be addressed for their
effectiveness.

15 Minutes
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Cisco TelePresence Demo


Objectives:
ƒ Ensure the experience!
ƒ Cover key demo components:
– Purpose built solution
– Overview of the solution functions
– Engineer the Ah-ha! moment
ƒ Explore key business applications:
– Identify one or two applications
– Select first two sites to support the application

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Q&A

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Module 03: The
Business Case
For Cisco
TelePresence

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Agenda
ƒ Business benefits
ƒ Economic impact on Cisco operations
ƒ Business-use scenarios, vertical-market impact

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Transforming In-Person Interactions


Reed’s Law:
Today Future
New The utility of a network for
Business multipoint communication
Number of Interactions

Models
evolves exponentially with
the number of participants.
Productivity

In-Person TelePresence
Interactions Interactions

Source: Cisco IBSG, 2006

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Areas of Value for Cisco TelePresence
Travel Employee New Business Business
Reduction Productivity Models Continuity

Reduced travel for Reduced travel Sales: increased Effective crisis


internal and “downtime” customer contact; management
external meetings reduced sales cycle
Increased “in- Emergency
Reallocate travel person” interactions Marketing: accelerated executive
to critical customer content development meetings
meetings Improved access
to busy executives Product Development: Improved
Positive reduced development communication
environmental Ready access cycle and
impact, reduced to SMEs decision making
emissions Manufacturing:
Enhanced improved supply-chain
Facilitates work-life communication and integration
integration, decision making
workplace flexibility Professional Services:
Increased face time more consulting time
with customers
HR: reduced hiring
cycle resulting from
remote job interviews

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The Impact of Cisco TelePresence on Key


Financial Drivers
REVENUE OPERATING EXPENSES RISK

Travel Expenses Reduce business


New Product Reduce time-to- travel expenses Business ƒ Effective crisis
Revenue market for new Continuity management
products and
services ƒ Improve
Time savings for communication
Executive and executives, with global
Lead Expand lead Employee knowledge
workers, and offices, R&D
Generation generation Productivity
SMEs centers, etc.
through increased
customer contact ƒ Reduce risk of
Avoid internal critical
Internal Project project delays, downtime, asset
Sales Pipeline Improve sales Costs reduce project impairment
cycle time
pipeline
conversion rate
Reduce vendor Compliance with ƒ Meet
Vendor and and supply-chain Environmental environmental
Supplier Costs costs with third- Regulations
party emissions-
Sales force Improve time to collaboration compliance
Productivity productivity for standards
new sales hires Reduce support
costs through ƒ Improve
Support Costs
global shared overall
service centers environmental
Remote job inter- care
views compress
Hiring Costs hiring cycle, reduce
cost of turnover

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Top 5 Value Drivers


of TelePresence for Cisco
Travel Employee New Business Business
Reduction Productivity Models Continuity

1. Reduce 2. Cut travel-related 3. Increase


noncritical travel downtime sales-closure rates
4. Reduce
sales-cycle time
5. Improve service
effectiveness of
technical-assistance
engineers

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Cisco TelePresence Will Deliver
Significant Financial Benefits for Cisco
Cisco TelePresence
$33M Investment
(110 Rooms)

Travel-Expense
$42M Reduction
(5.5% Travel Substitution)

$29M $93M $49M $21M


Executive & Improved Sales-cycle CA Services Additional Benefits
employee
productivity
+ salesrate
success + reduction + cost
avoidance ($192M)
(2% reduction)
(2% increase)

Source: Cisco IBSG, 2006 $201M Cisco-wide


Cisco Sales
* Data is based on present TOTAL*
value of free cash flows over CA
a three-year period.

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Cisco TelePresence Deployment


New Business Model Delivers Strategic Value

Improving Sales Reducing Sales Travel Savings Executive & Employee Cost Avoidance
Success Rate Cycle Productivity Gains In Services
+ $93 Million + $49 Million - $42 Million + $29 Million $21 Million
2% Increase 2% Decrease 5% Decrease

Investment - $33 Million

$201M 19% equipment


20% Internal Resources
23% outside services & room
readiness (install , support &
new/re-configure room)
4% logistics/shipping
34% Circuits/WAN Upgrade
Changing the way we (global Cisco Offices)
Work, Live, Play & Learn

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Cisco on Cisco TelePresence Overview


85 Cisco TelePresence 9,023 TelePresence 1,214 Meetings
in major cities meetings scheduled avoided travel
globally to date. by using Cisco
ƒ US/Canada: 37 CTS ƒ 2,732 meeting with TelePresence
3000, 22 CTS 1000 customers to saving Cisco
ƒ APAC/Japan: 12 discuss Cisco ~$9.30M to date
CTS 3000, 2 CTS Technology over
1000 TelePresence
ƒ Europe: 7 CTS 3000, ƒ 188 with deal ID
5 CTS 1000
Overall average Change the way
utilization is 44% we Work, Live,
(~ 53% in the past 4 Play & Learn
weeks and target is
40% based on 10
hours a day)

Target: 110 by July


2007
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A New Channel for Employee, Partner,
and Customer Interaction
Situations Ideally Suited for Cisco TelePresence

Little or no substitute for decision maker


Concentrated Expertise
or expert (e.g., CxO or SME).

Short Timeframe to Act Decision or action is very time-sensitive.

Decision or action has large impact to


High-Value Decision organization, customers, or shareholders.
Information to be shared is complex,
Complex Information to Share
multifunctional, quantitative, or qualitative.
Nonverbal communication is important to the
Context Is Important decision or relationship. Situation may involve
uncertainty or ambiguity.
Meeting participants are geographically distributed
Distributed Participants and costly to assemble in person.
Meeting participants include diverse ethnicities,
Multicultural Participants national cultures, and/or languages.

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Cisco TelePresence in Healthcare


ƒ Provides new access model for healthcare and
a new market for retailers, healthcare providers,
and service providers
ƒ Enables remote, doctor-to-patient, and doctor-
to-doctor consultations
ƒ Enables tele-health capabilities in the
enterprise, commercial, and home markets
ƒ Makes experts available to patients visiting
in-store healthcare clinics
ƒ Facilitates in-store consultations with
remote pharmacologists or specialists
(e.g. allergist)
ƒ Delivers specialized classes conducted by
remote experts

Source: Cisco IBSG, 2006

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Cisco TelePresence in Financial Services


ƒ New markets/new geographies ─ immediate
scaling of financial institution “footprint”
ƒ Retail banking ─ customized customer
interactions on products and services—expert
in every branch
ƒ Commercial banking ─ create on-demand
products for corporate treasurers, tax/finance
groups
ƒ Private banking ─ access to expertise on
taxes, estate planning, complex financial
products,
asset management
ƒ M&A and IPO underwriting ─ multipoint
conferencing with distributed parties—lawyers,
syndicate banks, corporate clients
ƒ Sales & trading ─ real-time, interactive, “in-
person” collaboration among trading desks,
enabling better execution across geographies

Source: Cisco IBSG, 2006


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Activity: Market Segment Business Case

Learners will break into teams to brainstorm on proving


the business case for the following sectors:

Endpoint 1 Endpoint 2
Manufacturing Retail

Public Sector Service Providers

Groups will present their findings and defend their


answers.

25 Minutes
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Cisco TelePresence in Retail & CPG

ƒ In-store, lifelike access to experts on home


improvement, pharmaceuticals, electronics,
and other products/services
ƒ Retail product design, development:
communications between design centers
and merchandising executives
ƒ Real-time retail product sourcing
ƒ Retail/supplier business reviews
ƒ TelePresence hosting services at
hotels/airports/conference centers
ƒ A new model for conducting customer focus
groups
ƒ Collaboration with advertising firms

Source: Cisco IBSG, 2006

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Cisco TelePresence in Public Sector


ƒ State and country agencies ─ Coordination of
multistate or multicountry agencies and
associations
ƒ Emergency operations ─ Emergency response,
particularly mobile command centers
ƒ Education ─ linking scarce teaching specialists to
remote schools
ƒ Virtual town halls ─ extend reach of elected
officials to constituents
ƒ Justice system ─ video arraignments, depositions
ƒ Police ─ virtual concierge in stations to improve
customer service
ƒ Intelligence centers ─ observe nonverbal
communication during intelligence-gathering
sessions
ƒ Military ─ direct communications among allied
forces

Source: Cisco IBSG, 2006

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Cisco TelePresence in Manufacturing
ƒ Energy & oil
– Links platforms offshore and in remote
areas with experts onshore
– Connects remote workers with other
colleagues, improving employee
satisfaction
ƒ Auto & industrial systems
– Use as part of collaborative R&D
(most car manufacturers have dispersed
design centers)
– Helps industrial systems companies
provide advanced service and support
ƒ All manufacturing
– Links senior executive decision makers
in global operations

Source: Cisco IBSG, 2006

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Cisco TelePresence for Service Providers

ƒ Enables SPs to create new revenue


streams by offering innovative services to
enterprise, small/medium-sized business,
and consumer markets
ƒ Improves customer intimacy─SPs can
increase “in-person” interactions with
large corporate accounts
ƒ Increases internal productivity─allows
large service providers to link their
regional operations

Source: Cisco IBSG, 2006

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Q&A

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Module 4:
The Discovery Phase

Denise Lage
Business Development Mgr.-TSBU

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Module Highlights

ƒ The Discovery Phase


ƒ Navigating through a Multi-Theatre Opportunity

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The Discovery Phase


ƒ Now that your customer has said they are
interested…what do you do next?
ƒ Discuss the following with your customer:
9What are their current business issues?
9What problems are they experiencing as a result of
those business issues?
9Let’s introduce some additional problems that they may
or may not be experiencing?
•i.e. Time to train new employees, disparate offices, time to bring
products to market
9What’s the potential impact if they do nothing?

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© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 4-1


The Discovery Phase
9Do they have an overall Video Strategy? If so, you’ll
need to better understand their expectations.
9What solutions are they considering?
9What about Unified Communications?
•Do they have a Cisco Communications Manager today?
•Do they have plans to migrate to IPT?
9Does your customer require Managed Services?

9Which locations will you deploy TelePresence?

US&C FE © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 4

Pre-Qualification Discussion
“Identifying if your customer is ready to deploy
TelePresence”

ƒ Do you have rooms that meet the physical dimensions?


ƒ In the identified rooms, approximately what percentage
of the room has glass walls or windows?
ƒ Are there any non-Cisco switches in the LAN at the
proposed Cisco TelePresence locations?
ƒ Are there any non-Cisco routers in the WAN path
between the proposed Cisco TelePresence locations?
ƒ Is the Customer willing to remediate the room to make
it CTS qualified?

US&C FE © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 5

What is a Multi-Theatre Engagement?


ƒ When a customer wants to purchase Cisco
TelePresence Endpoints that are being installed in
multiple Cisco theatres (i.e. US/CN; Europe; Emerging;
Japan and Asia Pacific)
ƒ So far over 50% of all purchases and higher for active
proposals

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© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 4-2


Cisco Multi-Theatre Definitions

ƒ Primary ATP
Customer selects - Primary ATP has
headquarters relationship with customer
ƒ Secondary ATP
Secondary ATP fulfills in country room
logistics in agreement with Primary ATP
ƒ TelePresence ATP 2 Tier Model
Allowing the Primary partner to source
product through a Secondary ATP
ƒ Value Added Tax (VAT)
An indirect tax that is levied on goods or
services rather then individuals (paid by
consumers in the form of higher prices)

US&C FE © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 7

What does this mean from the customer


perspective?

ƒ Customer may want to issue a single Purchase Order


for all endpoints, installation and support.
ƒ Customer may want to issue local purchase orders in
country to recover VAT and taxes.
ƒ Customer may want a lead ATP partner to act as the
single point of contact for the entire Cisco
TelePresence deployment & project management
ƒ Customer may want to bundle network and SLA’s with
the purchase order for a single point of contact

ƒ Customer may want …….

US&C FE © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 8

Multi-theater Deals…Before Proposal:


ƒ Talk to your customer ….. before you give a
proposal you need to establish
Where are the endpoints going to be located?
What are the local logistics in each country? Do
you know if there are customs duties, local taxes
and VAT’s?
Does the customer want to issue a single PO?
Multiple PO’s?
Is the customer willing to pay international uplifts
for single PO deployments?
Is the customer willing to work with in country
ATP partners?

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More questions…Before Proposal
Does the customer want global project
management?
Are the rooms established and have they been
checked for readiness? Is there local country
power requirements?
Does the customer want a managed service?
Is the customer purchasing Cisco PDI services –
if so, as a single SOW engagement form Cisco or
on an endpoint by endpoint basis
For Essential Operate Services – single
consolidated purchase or per endpoint?

US&C FE © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 10

Why is VAT important to the customer?


Financial Implications
ƒ Value Added Tax (VAT)
Unlike a retail sales tax, VAT is charged & collected at each
stage of the production process - not only on the final sale.
VAT is refundable to end customer w/invoice from in-country
supplier
Most countries outside of the U.S. require VAT - Rates vary
from 5-25%
Overall cost to one customer on TelePresence Product can be
significant and warrants working with a local ATP

ƒ Know the implications per endpoint - make sure you


talk with your customer about how they expect “YOU”
to handle

US&C FE © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 11

Options for Multi-Theatre Engagements


Single PO From Customer
ƒ Primary ATP
–Works with customer on proposal including international
endpoints. Global project management, international uplifts,
services, taxes (including customs tax and duties) and
logistics should be considered in the proposal
–Takes single customer PO
–Issues PO to Cisco for endpoints within authorized theatre
–Issues PO to Secondary ATP partner in theatre of endpoint
installation. Secondary partner places order with Cisco

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Example Multi-Theatre Engagements
Single PO From Customer

US
Customer

US US
Account Channel
Team Team

Japan Europe Europe Japan


Account Account Channel
Channel Team
Team Team Team

Primary
ATP
US

Secondary Secondary
ATP ATP
Japan Europe

US&C FE © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 13

Options for Multi-Theatre Engagements


Multiple PO From Customer
ƒ Primary ATP
–Works with customer on proposal including international
endpoints. Global project management, services, taxes &
logistics should be considered in the proposal
–Takes customer PO for local endpoints + services, global
project management,& global services. Primary ATP places
order with Cisco
ƒ Secondary ATP
–Takes customer PO in theatre of endpoint installation for
endpoint + local services. Secondary partner places order
with Cisco

US&C FE © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 14

Example Multi-Theatre Engagements


Multiple PO From Customer

US
3 Site Deal

US US
Account Channel
Team Team

Europe Brazil Europe Emerging


Account Account Channel
Channel Team
Team Team Team

Secondary Primary Secondary


ATP ATP ATP
Europe US Brazil

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© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 4-5


In Summary
ƒ Get actively engaged early with any TelePresence
opportunity
ƒ ASK your customer about how they want to procure
Cisco TelePresence and international logistics
ƒ If a DSA is involved make sure it has been approved
internationally by all Cisco teams
ƒ Get the channel teams involved and let them help
with international partner connections
ƒ Be very specific when asking a Secondary ATP to
work on a customer opportunity
ƒ As a Secondary ATP understand the dynamics of
the opportunity and ask questions

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© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 4-6


Module 05:
Cisco TelePresence
Customer Proposal

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 4-1

Customer Proposal Considerations

All Cisco TelePresence customer proposals


should consider the following seven main
items:
1.Cisco TelePresence Systems (Required)
2.Cisco TelePresence Application Solutions (Optional)
3.Cisco Unified Communications Manager (Required)
4.Cisco TelePresence Peripherals (Optional)
5.Professional Services (Required)
6.Managed Services (Optional)
7.Support Services (Required)
– Cisco Essential Operate Services for CTS products

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 4-2

Cisco TelePresence Systems

CTS-3000

CTS-1000
How many endpoints in the first order?
-CTS3000, CTS1000 or mix
Countries of endpoint installation?
Is bandwidth available?
-Who is the carrier for each location?
-MPLS, Point-to-Point, etc.?
Is this a multi theatre opportunity?
-Pricing considerations in other countries?
© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 4-3

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 5-1


Cisco TelePresence Application Solutions
ƒ CTS-MAN 1.0 – Cisco TelePresence Manager
ƒ CTS-CTMS-1.0 – Cisco TelePresence Multi-switch
ƒ CUCT – Cisco Unified Conferencing for
TelePresence

Is there a need for scheduling integration?


-Does the customer desire integration with Microsoft Exchange
for Calendar & scheduling?
Is there a desire for manageability of TelePresence endpoints
Is there a requirement for point to point and/or multi-point
TelePresence Meetings
-Does the customer plan on integrating with Legacy VC systems
in the future or will this just be a TelePresence Virtual Meeting
Environment?
-Does the customer currently use Cisco Unified MeetingPlace &
desire to integrate Cisco TelePresence with MeetingPlace?

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 4-4

Cisco Unified Communications


Manager
ƒ Cisco Unified Communications Manager 5.0(4)a (min.)
ƒ Cisco Unified Communications Manager Server (MCS)
ƒ Cisco Unified Communications Manager Device License Units
ƒ Cisco ISR Voice Gateways

Is this a Cisco Unified Communications customer?


-How many servers are currently in CUCM cluster?
-Is customer running minimum of CUCM 5.0(4)a in Cluster?
-What version of MCS servers currently make up existing
cluster? (i.e. 3rd Party brand, Cisco Branded HP or IBM MCS)
Does customer currently have enough DLUs in cluster available to
support TelePresence endpoints
-11 DLUs per CTS endpoint regardless of type (3000 & 1000)
If the customer is using 3rd Party PBX, do they require integration
& PSTN access from the TelePresence endpoints to leverage
single Dialplan?
© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 4-5

Cisco TelePresence Peripherals

ƒAuto Collaborate
–WolfVision Document Camera

Is the customer interested in the WolfVision Document


Camera?
Is the partner a WolfVision partner – if not is an
arrangement in place with a WolfVision partner for
procurement and installation.
In-ceiling installation is required for the document camera.
Is the customer willing to pull electricity in the ceiling?

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 4-6

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 5-2


Professional Services
ƒ Room Readiness Assessment (RRA)
ƒ Plan, Design, Implement (NRA)
ƒ Installation
ƒ Project Management
Is this a first CTS customer opportunity?
-If yes, include Cisco Advanced Services
Are multiple theatres/countries involved?
-If yes, include country logistics and taxes
Are multiple ATP’s going to be engaged?
Are rooms available and ready for CTS installation?
Are Cisco TelePresence Peripherals involved (i.e.
Document Camera)?
Is Multipoint part of project scope?
© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 4-7

Managed Services

ƒCisco Select Operate Services

Does the customer have existing video equipment that is


covered under a managed service?
Is there an expectation that Cisco TelePresence will be
supported under a managed service?
Is there a “Concierge” component to the customer
expectations?
Is there a requirement above the Cisco Select Operate
Service offering?
© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 4-8

Support Services
ƒCisco Essential Operate Services
– Cisco TelePresence Endpoint Services
– Cisco TelePresence Manager Services
– Cisco Unified Communications Manager Services

Does the customer have an existing Operate service


contract?
Does the customer want to extend this contract to cover
the Cisco TelePresence Operate service?

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 4-9

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 5-3


Summary
1.Required components:
–Cisco TelePresence Systems
–Cisco Unified Communications Manager
–Professional Services
–Support Services - Cisco Essential Operate Services for CTS products

2.Optional Considerations:
–Cisco TelePresence Software Solutions
–Cisco TelePresence Peripherals
–Managed Services

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 4-10

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 4-11

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 5-4


Module 06:
Cisco TelePresence Order
Assurance Program

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 6-1

TelePresence Order Assurance Program


Purpose
ƒ Ensure Customer Readiness
ƒ Prevent CAP cases
ƒ Control Logistics

Who manages the Order Assurance Program?


ƒTelePresence Systems Business Unit
ƒAlias: tsbu-orderassurance@cisco.com
Does every TelePresence product go through this process?
ƒYes, all products in Cisco TelePresence Systems (CTS) family go through the
Order Assurance process
ƒSpecific caveats exist based on Endpoint type and multipoint products
How does this process affect Customer Satisfaction?
ƒPerforming extensive network and room assessments uncovers any remediation
needs BEFORE the product is shipped
ƒBy controlling the timing of when product is shipped, we give our customers time to
prepare to receive the product

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 6-2

Three Stages of Order Assurance


1.Pre-Qualification Review
ƒRoom and network preliminary assessments
ƒUncovers remediation issues
ƒPerformed by Account Team and/or ATP
2.Readiness Assessment
ƒRoom and network actual measurements
ƒValidates that initial remediation has been done and secures
confidence for successful experience
ƒPerformed by ATP (with Cisco AS on first deal)
3.CTX Certification
ƒCisco TelePresence Experience Certification (CTX)
ƒPerformed by Cisco TSBU Engineers

ƒImportant:
ƒCTS-1000 does not require RRA and will not have CTX performed

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 6-3

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 6-1


Pre-Qualification Review

Purpose
ƒ Uncover remediation needs early allowing the
customer time to respond

Room Specifics:
ƒDo the dimensions meet minimum requirements?
ƒIs there independent HVAC systems in the room?
ƒIs there sufficient 20Amp power in the room?
ƒHow will any issues be remediated?
Network Specifics:
ƒDoes the path between the sites meet the minimum BW, Latency and Jitter
requirements?
ƒIs the path infrastructure based on Cisco product?
ƒDoes the infrastructure require upgrades to support TelePresence?
Logistic Specifics:
ƒDoes the customer have ample storage and staging space to unpack and inventory
shipment?
ƒDoes customer have sufficient access along path between receiving dock and
TelePresence room?
ƒAre there special security considerations that must be met for delivery?

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 6-4

CTS-3000 Shipping Pallets

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 6-5

CTS-1000 Shipping Pallets

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 6-6

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 6-2


Readiness Assessments
Purpose
ƒ Validation of remediation resulting from
Pre-Qualification Stage

Room Readiness Assessment (RRA)


ƒDo the luminescence readings fall within the min/max thresholds?
ƒDoes the audible feedback test result in acceptable thresholds?
ƒIs there sufficient power in the room for the endpoint type?
ƒHow will any issues be remediated?

Network Path Assessment (NPA)


ƒDoes the end-to-end path test prove sufficient BW, Latency, and Jitter thresholds?
ƒIs the network ready to be configured for QoS queues?
ƒIs the Cisco Unified Communications infrastructure ready for TelePresence
integration?
ƒHas the test uncovered any significant unanticipated anomalies?

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 6-7

CTX Certification
Purpose
ƒ Validation of Cisco TelePresence Experience Quality

The Quality Test


ƒDo the luminescence readings fall within the min/max thresholds?
ƒDoes the audible feedback test result in acceptable thresholds?
ƒDoes the end-to-end call result in crisp video and audio?
ƒAre calls easily initiated and ended?
ƒDo the rooms show continuity on color, ambiance, and table alignment?

What happens if a room doesn’t pass CTX?


ƒFurther remediation will be required
ƒCTX will be performed again after remediation

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 6-8

Cisco TelePresence Order Assurance


What Who Purpose
Pre-Qualification Cisco Acct Team Determines readiness of customer room
In-Depth and/or ATP and network. Results supply customer data
to support remediation requirements.

Order Submitted By Approved ATP


Room Readiness Approved ATP Detailed light and sound meter test.
Assessment (RRA) (w/CA on first order) Used to validate that remediation has
been done as a result of prequal.

Network Path Approved ATP Detailed network path assessment.


Assessment (NPA) (w/CA on first order) Used to validate that remediation has
been done as a result of prequal
NPH Released

Professional Services Approved ATP Complete installation of room and


network equipment;
Customer Acceptance

CTS-3000 Only
CTX Certification Cisco TSBU Final validation of Cisco TelePresence
Experience Quality

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 6-9

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 6-3


Order Assurance Best Practices

ƒ Complete the prequalification documents BEFORE booking order!


– Helps develop remediation plan that may result in significant up-
charges for customer
– Deployment site addresses are critical to provide Premium Operate
Services
– Solidifies the scope of the entire deal and its complexities
ƒ Order product with separate ship sets. This allows the product to be
released as the customer room passes.
ƒ Order Cisco AS Services on a separate order from product.
ƒ Teach customer the multi-theater ordering practice used at Cisco.
– Issue separate POs per site that is outside Theater of order.
ƒ Contact tsbu-orderassurance@cisco.com with any questions about this
process.

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 6-10

Q&A

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 6-11

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 6-12

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 6-4


Module 07:
Competitive
Landscape

“Every seat is First Class"

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-1

Outline

ƒ Cisco Competitive Differentiators


ƒ Polycom
ƒ HP Halo
ƒ Tandberg
ƒ Teliris

Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 2

Cisco TelePresence
Competitive Differentiators Summary

Experience Reliability
„ Spatial Audio „ Cisco Brand
„ Always Life-size „ Network Engineering Expertise
„ Simplicity Quality
„ One Virtual Meeting Room „ Audio Quality
„ True HD @ 1080P
Multipoint
„ Cost per Segment Integration
„ Life-size „ Network as a platform
„ Capacity „ Ease of UC Integration
„ Centralized Implementation „ Ease of Implementation
„ Simplicity „ Time to Install
„ Scalability & B2B

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-3

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-1


Outline

Cisco Competitive Differentiators


Polycom RPX
HP Halo
Tandberg
Teliris

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-4

Polycom RPX 408

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-5

Polycom RPX 400 Series/Destiny


Conferencing/MedPresence

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-6

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-2


Key Features /1

ƒ Screen
– 16’x42” high-resolution screens with four rear projectors.
– Large, integrated, contoured, and almost seamless video walls
– Response: Rear Projection does not provide vivid pictures
ƒ The modular “room-within-a-room” solution
– No permits & relocatable.
– Response: Higher construction cost. Unnatural feeling.
Whereas CTS is also easily relocatable.
ƒ RPX suites are compatible with legacy Polycom’s standards-
based VSX 8000 codec platform.
ƒ Polycom customers can connect to Destiny (2nd largest installed
base after Teliris).

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-7

Key Features /2

ƒ Can seat 28 participants in an effective classroom setting (for


universities and corporate training).
– Response: Looses eye contact in larger rooms. Theatre layout
is not meant for executive meetings. Unnatural setting ruins
the meeting experience
ƒ The only large-capacity classroom solution on the market.
ƒ Ability to project whiteboarding, VHS or DVDs.
ƒ Includes the RPX Video Network Operations Centers (VNOC)
– Concierge-level service
– Call management
– Remote monitoring
– Response: No Automated meeting scheduling.

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-8

Weaknesses
ƒ Lack of a HD codec solution:
– HD version recent announced in Jan 2007 without details
– Grainy effect due to smoothing out the lack of details
ƒ Eye contact problems in the larger 400 series.
ƒ Audience closest to the center has much better approximation of
eye contact than the left and right of screen.
ƒ Lower audio quality @ 22 kHz
ƒ No Automated meeting scheduling.
ƒ Polycom’s channel to market for RPX remains under construction,
particularly in Europe.
ƒ High room-in-room construction cost

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-9

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-3


Polycom RPX: Strategy & Tactics
Polycom’s GTM strategy for RPX is likely to focus on:
ƒ RPX’s adherence to industry standards
ƒ Interoperability
ƒ Legacy video conferencing system
ƒ Protect current investment
ƒ RPX’s ability to participate in multipoint meetings using industry-
standard video bridges
ƒ Polycom’s strength in the conferencing and collaboration channels
ƒ Full range of meeting solutions covering 4 to 28 participants
ƒ Multi-purpose room provides better usability

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-10

Competitive Response
Effective Meeting from True TelePresence Experience
ƒ Polycom’s grainy images? Cisco offers true HD quality
ƒ Cisco’s spatial audio sounds like being in the same room
ƒ No technology to learn. As simple as using Cisco IP Phone
ƒ Polycom’s foreign feeling? Cisco’s solution feels like being present
in the same conventional meeting room
Integration to Cisco
ƒ Easy Unified Communication integration
ƒ Top network preparation, planning and support
ƒ Lower room cost
ƒ Scalability & flexible B2B
Cisco Multipoint – 36 segments @ life size
© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-11

Outline

Cisco Competitive Differentiators


Polycom
HP Halo
Tandberg
Teliris

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-12

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-4


Competitors can also Help Validate the
Market Space

HP Halo has already sold over 50 units

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-13

Key Features /1

ƒ Halo Video Exchange Network (HVEN)


High-bandwidth, Full-duplex
No-perceived delay connection experience between HP Halo studios.
Remote diagnostics, calibration, ongoing service and repair
24x7 concierge service
ƒ Halo is a turnkey HP managed service
– requires dedicated stand-alone fiber network.
ƒ Response:
– Requires new connections to a shared network
– Security concern
– Unable to scale
– Cisco knows it all when it comes to networking

Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 14

Key Features /2
ƒ Enhanced multipoint capabilities
Enable three or four-point connections
Between HP Halo studios around the globe.
Response: One of Halo’s weakness (see next slide)
ƒ The connection of up to four studios
Only a few clicks of the mouse
Almost instantly brings a global team to the same table to work
eye-to-eye in real-time to accelerate decision-making and project
development.
Response: 1 – 2 min to launch a call
ƒ Data Collaboration
Easily share documents and data
Play full motion video (w/o audio)
Mounted above the displays.
Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 15

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-5


Weaknesses
ƒ Requires dedicated, proprietary network (HVEN)
ƒ Can’t integrate to existing network or manage internally
ƒ Privacy and security concerns
ƒ Limits expansion into Executive Homes (if ever possible)
ƒ Video Quality
ƒ Captured only at 480i then upscale to 720p (not HD)
ƒ Not life-size, comes with smaller screen
ƒ High bandwidth consumption
ƒ 45Mbs network link required for low quality video
ƒ Requires building permits to create facility
ƒ Lack of flexibility in designs
ƒ Non-MCU based Multipoint without “TelePresence experience”
ƒ Zoomed out more and looses eye contact
ƒ Limited to 16 participants
ƒ Require fully meshed implementation with extra bandwidth consumption
ƒ Requires upgrade
ƒ 1 – 2 min to setup each call (consider time wasted in a multipoint call)
© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-16

HP Halo: Strategy & Tactics


ƒHP is currently selling direct
ƒTargeting the highest level executives at the largest companies.
ƒThe messaging strategy
ƒ Experience
ƒ Productivity gain
ƒ Travel avoidance
ƒThe focus
ƒ Away from the technology
ƒ Away from videoconferencing
ƒHalo represents a systems integration business.
ƒHP – Tandberg Alliance
ƒ Tandberg to join HVEN
ƒ Possible interoperability integration

Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 17

Competitive Response

ƒ HP’s message strategy


Not life-size no HD?
HP Halo might only be comparable to high end videoconferencing.
Cisco’s delivers true first class TelePresence experience
ƒ HP’s focus
Cisco has unmatched simplicity
ƒ Overall
HVEN is a costly implementation with lack of security and scalability.
Cisco provides easy integration to unified communication solution.
Cisco’s vision is productivity gain from simplicity and effective
communications which HP Halo is lack of.

Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 18

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-6


Outline

Cisco Competitive Differentiators


Polycom
HP Halo
Tandberg
Teliris

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-19

Tandberg Experia

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-20

Strengths

ƒ Seems to be more flexible in utilizing existing room


environments
ƒ Supports encryption
ƒ Uses existing network
ƒ Wireless touch-panel control
ƒ One touch dialing
ƒ Response: Not only those, Cisco provides many more
strengths including high quality HD experience and a
thorough Unified Communication solution.

Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 21

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-7


Weaknesses

ƒ Only 720p, not life-size Æ Not TelePresence


ƒ Not an end-to-end solution, with any monitoring or
SLA commitments
ƒ Not an immersive environment
They will make compromises in the room environment for “good
enough” solution which they call “adaptive” not “immersive”.

ƒ Non-MCU based Multipoint solution


Requires fully meshed setup with high bandwidth consumption at
all sites
Not able to scale as the TelePresence network grows
Limited to 4 sites

Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 22

Tandberg Experia: Strategy & Tactics

ƒ Provides a comprehensive visual collaboration product line


stretching across a broad range of price points.
ƒ Develops solutions based on a single hardware and software
platform.
ƒ Maintains strict adherence to standards (H.323, SIP, etc).
ƒ Maintains interoperability throughout the product line.
ƒ Provides innovative, “Tandberg-only” and “Tandberg-first” features.
ƒ Provides additional value when used in Tandberg-centric
environments that include the company’s border controller,
extensive management system, streaming solutions, etc.
ƒ Joined HVEN, possible integration/interoperability and B2B with
Halo customers

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-23

Competitive Response

ƒ Experience
TelePresence is a first class application
Cisco is a First Class solution, like its all other solutions

ƒ Multipoint
Cisco provides life-size multipoint experience up to 36
screens in the same meeting. Another first class from Cisco.

Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 24

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-8


Outline

Cisco Competitive Differentiators


Polycom
HP Halo
Tandberg
Teliris

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-25

Teliris VirtuaLive 360

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-26

Key Features

ƒ Integration of existing H.323/H.264 Video Conferencing Systems.


ƒ The VirtuaLive™ Presentation System allows meeting
participants to bring a presentation on their laptop and plug it into
a cable provided in the conference room table and display a
presentation in all locations.
ƒ Teliris solutions use a network transport facility known as InfiNET.
ƒ Allows scheduled, adhoc and support desk lunched calls.
ƒ Cost-effective add-on solution to existing meeting rooms like
Cisco
ƒ MPEG based video and audio encoding
ƒ Data Collaboration supports up to 1600x1200 and others including DVD
ƒ Remote system monitoring and diagnostics plus live operator on-screen
support

© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential ─ Do Not Distribute 7-27

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-9


Strengths

ƒ Exceptional ease of use


ƒ Integration flexibility
ƒ High quality, full-duplex audio
ƒ High quality video images with tight lip-sync
ƒ Extremely low latency/delay
ƒ Strong eye contact
ƒ Carrier-grade reliability
ƒ Response: Cisco TelePresence is all of above

Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 28

Weaknesses

ƒ Complex user interface


ƒ Company not capable of global support and service
ƒ Will not scale to B2B
ƒ Simple network management
ƒ Complex AV integration – not designed as a
complete system
ƒ A newly established small company with too
diverse focus

Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 29

Teliris VirtuaLive: Strategy & Tactics


ƒ Flexibility
Allows high degree of customer flexibility.
Almost everything within the system can be modified by request.
ƒ Reliability
The company’s VNOC’s proactively monitors the system closely.
ƒ Innovation
Teliris has proven willingness to shun the norm in order to reach the
next level.
ƒ Customer hand-holding
Aggressive customer training/management program
Ensures the customers enjoy the best possible ROI.
ƒ Cost effectiveness
Teliris declares to be both “technically and fiscally deployable”.

Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 30

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-10


Competitive Response
ƒ Cisco Unified Communication
Using Cisco network as the platform.
Easy integration to Cisco Unified Communication solution
Cisco’s solid networking expertise ensure the platform is well
maintained in every aspect.
Cisco’s UC provides scalability and easy B2B integration
ƒ Cisco Support
HTTS – 24x7 High Touch responsive expert level support
AS – Expert level training/planning/provisioning/auditing
ƒ Cisco Brand

Presentation_ID © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 31

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 7-11


Cisco TelePresence
Solution Technical Overview

TSBU Technical Marketing


May, 2007

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 1

Agenda
9 Introduction (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Multipoint (15min)
ƒ Cisco Unified Communications Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Business 2 Business Connectivity (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Virtual Agent (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Interoperability Strategy (5min)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 2

Cisco TelePresence
Icon Overview

Cisco TelePresence Cisco Unified Cisco TelePresence Cisco Cisco TelePresence


System Codec Communications Manager Catalyst Multipoint Switch
(CTS) Manager (CTS-Manager) Switch (CTMS)
(CUCM)

Cisco TelePresence
System 1000 Cisco TelePresence
(CTS-1000) System 3000
(CTS-3000)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 3

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-1


Cisco TelePresence
A Key Part of Cisco’s Vision for Video Convergence

Video Telephony Cisco TelePresence

• Unified • Network as the


Communications Video Convergence Platform

Digital Media Physical Security


Management

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 4

Cisco TelePresence
Redefining How People Communicate

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 5

Cisco TelePresence
Redefining How People Communicate

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 6

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-2


A New and Innovative Philosophy
The Cisco TelePresence Meeting
Cisco TelePresence Cisco Built from
Why TelePresence? Design Principles the Ground Up!
ƒ More than 60% of ƒ Experience the meeting, ƒ It’s all about the Experience
communication is non- not the technology
ƒ 25 Patents: Video, Audio,
verbal
ƒ Life size, high-definition, Network Integration, User
ƒ Existing collaborative eye contact, discern body Experience
technologies don’t language
ƒ Innovative, fully integrated
adequately replace a
ƒ Natural, multi-channel, system – leverage Unified
face-to-face meeting
full-duplex, spatial audio Communications and the
experience
Network as the Platform

Displays Microphones Environmentals

Camera Codec Furniture

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 7

Cisco TelePresence
A Complete End-to-End Solution

TelePresence • Group and Executive


Cisco TelePresence Solution

• Auto Collaborate Peripherals


Systems • Integrated voice and data

• Multipoint Switching
Multipoint • Unified Conferencing
Collaboration • MeetingPlace / Webex
integration

• Cisco TelePresence
Management & System Manager
Scheduling • Unified Operations Manager
• Remote Operate Services

• Cisco TelePresence B2B


Network as Connectivity
the Platform • Quality of Service SBC
• NAT / Firewall Traversal

• Room and Network


Cisco TelePresence Readiness assessments
eXperience • Planning and design services
• CTX Verification

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 8

Agenda
ƒ Introduction (5min)
9 Cisco TelePresence System (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Multipoint (15min)
ƒ Cisco Unified Communications Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Business 2 Business Connectivity (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Virtual Agent (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Interoperability Strategy (5min)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 9

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-3


Cisco TelePresence
CTS-3000

ƒ 12 participants at the
virtual table
ƒ Native 1080p cameras
and 65” plasma displays
ƒ Wideband microphones
and speakers
ƒ Cisco Unified IP Phone
7970G
ƒ Auto-Collaborate
ƒ Audio Add-In

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 10

Cisco TelePresence
CTS-1000

ƒ 4 participants at the
virtual table
ƒ Native 1080p camera
and 65” plasma display
ƒ Wideband microphone
and speaker
ƒ Cisco Unified IP Phone
7970G
ƒ Auto Collaborate
ƒ Audio Add-In

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 11

Cisco TelePresence
Codec
• Runs embedded Linux on compact flash
• Leverages Cisco Unified Communications
Manager
• Built on open standards
• CDP and 802.1Q for VLAN
assignment
• 802.1p and DSCP for QoS
• HTTP configuration and firmware
downloads
• SSH, HTTPs, and SNMPv2/3 for
administration
• SIP signaling
• Video: H.264 @ 1080p or 720p
• Audio: AAC-LD and G.711
• XML for making/terminating
scheduled and ad hoc calls
• Auto Collaboration for data sharing
• Audio Add-In for audio only participants
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 12

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-4


Cisco TelePresence
Video

ƒ Cameras
Native 1080p resolution
Small form factor
Clustered design for
enhanced eye contact
Purpose built by Cisco –
managed by the CTS codec
ƒ Displays
65” Plasma technology
Native 1080p resolution
Life size - two people per screen
Purpose built by Cisco –
managed by the CTS codec

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 13

Cisco TelePresence
Audio

ƒ Microphones
Discrete audio by table segment
Multi-channel spatial audio with
echo cancellation
AAC-LD audio codec
G.711 for audio add-in
4 audio channels per system
Cell phone (GSM/GRPS) static
elimination
ƒ Speakers
Designed to properly reproduce
human speech
Mounted under each 65” plasma
display to provide the feeling that
the sound is emanating from the
person speaking (spatiality)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 14

Cisco TelePresence
User Interface
ƒ Cisco Unified IP Phone 7970G
provided as part of system
ƒ Provides the user interface
to the CTS – touch screen

XML

ƒ Features:
Ad hoc (manual) calls
System speed dials
“One Button to Push” call launch
for scheduled meetings
Conference/Join used to
add audio participants to a
TelePresence meeting
(a.k.a. Audio Add-In)
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 15

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-5


Cisco TelePresence
Audio Add-in

Audio Add-in
ƒ Audio add-in allows any CTS
endpoint to add an audio only
participant or audio bridge into a
TelePresence meeting
ƒ Envoked using Conf/Join softkey
on 7970G IP Phone
ƒ Uses 4th (auxiliary) audio channel
using G.711 codec

or

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 16

Cisco TelePresence
Auto Collaborate

Auto Collaborate
ƒ Auto Collaborate enables you to
share graphics from a laptop or
objects via a document camera
ƒ No configuration (Plug and Play)
ƒ Images automatically displayed
for all sites in the meeting
ƒ Last device activated takes control
ƒ Uses 4th (auxiliary) video channel
– H.264 video codec
– Resolution 1024x768 @ 60Hz
– 5 frames per second

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 17

Cisco TelePresence
Auto Collaborate
ƒ Inputs
Laptop connected via VGA cable
(provided)
WolfVision Document Camera
(optional)
VZ-C12 Ceiling Mounted (CTS-3000)
VZ-9Plus Desktop (CTS-1000)

ƒ Outputs
HD Projector mounted under table
(provided with CTS-3000 and fully
managed by CTS codec)
LCD display for CTS-1000 (optional)
NEC LCD1770NX (17-inch)
NEC LCD2070NX (20-inch)
NEC LCD4010BK (40-inch)

CTS-3000 CTS-1000
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 18

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-6


Cisco TelePresence
Administrative Interface

ƒ Web based (HTTPs) or


CLI based (SSH)
administration
ƒ System configuration
ƒ Real time call and
network statistics
ƒ Real time status of
system peripherals
ƒ System logs
ƒ SNMP v3 support

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 19

Cisco TelePresence
Configuration and Upgrades

ƒ CTS endpoints are


configured and administered
through CUCM
ƒ CTS endpoints receive their
configuration and firmware
updates automatically from
CUCM
ƒ System speed dials
provisioned via CUCM
ƒ From CUCM’s view CTS is just
like any other (SIP) phone

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 20

Cisco TelePresence
Resolution and Motion Handling

Part of CUCM
Administration
for each CTS

ƒ CTS codec supports 1080p and 720p


ƒ Three motion handling settings within each resolution:
Good, Better, Best
ƒ Flexibility for deploying systems in sites with bandwidth
constraints
ƒ Codec automatically steps down from Best Motion to
Good Motion when network congestion occurs

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 21

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-7


Cisco TelePresence System
Network Connectivity
ƒ Phone and Primary Codec both reside on the Voice VLAN
ƒ Primary Codec passes CDP and 802.1Q/p between the phone
and network.
ƒ Switch sees two CDP Neighbors. QoS trust is extended through
the codec to the phone
7970 Codec Switch

CDP CDP
802.1Q/p 802.1Q/p

POE
A/C

Example:
Console(config)#interface Gigabit 0/16
Console(config-if)#switchport mode access
ƒ Phone and cameras receive Console(config-if)#switchport access vlan 261
Power over Ethernet Console(config-if)#switchport voice vlan 262
(802.3af) from codec Console(config-if)#spanning-tree portfast
Console(config-if)#mls qos trust {dscp | cos}

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 22

Cisco TelePresence
CTS Network Protocol Interaction
Cisco 7970G TelePresence Access-Edge Cisco
Primary Cisco Unified TelePresence
IP Phone Switch CallManager
Codec Manager
LAN /
WAN

802.3af
CDP CDP
CDP
DHCP
DHCP
TFTP
HTTP on port 6970
SIP
Shared Line

SIP

XML XML

No 802.1Q VLAN tag


Tagged with 802.1Q ID of Voice VLAN

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 23

Cisco TelePresence
CTS Media Path

Primary Cisco Unified Primary


7970 Codec CallManager Codec 7970

XML “DIAL”
SIP “INVITE” SIP “INVITE”
XML “RING”

XML “ANSWER”
SIP “200 OK”
SIP “200 OK”

RTP Media
(audio + video)

Signaling Note: Signaling has been simplified for the purpose of this slide.
There are many other XML and SIP messages which are not shown.
Media

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 24

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-8


Cisco TelePresence
CTS-3000 Connectivity
LAN/WAN
Gig Ethernet
Ethernet + PoE
Camera Video
Display Video
Speaker Audio
Microphone Audio

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 25

Cisco TelePresence
CTS-1000 Connectivity
LAN/WAN
Gig Ethernet
Ethernet + PoE
Camera Video
Display Video
Speaker Audio
Microphone Audio

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 26

Cisco TelePresence
Primary Codec Connections

Document Camera In

Line in DVI In (from laptop)


(from laptop)
(CTS-3000)
or LCD Out (CTS-1000)

Auxiliary Microphone and Speaker not enabled in


current release (for future use)
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 27

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-9


Cisco TelePresence
Video Flow CTS-3000
CTS 1 CTS 2

Video
RTP Connection

ƒ Max 4 Video Streams


Center, Left and Right Camera = 3 Video streams
Data Video = 1 Video stream
ƒ Each Camera stream is sent to the corresponding Display
ƒ Data Video stream is sent to the Projector HDMI Output
ƒ All Video Streams share 1 common RTP Connection
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 28

Cisco TelePresence
Audio Flow CTS-3000
CTS 1 (In) CTS 2 (Out)

Audio
RTP Connection

ƒ Max 4 AAC-LD Audio Streams


ƒ Center, Left and Right microphone = 3 streams
ƒ Line in and Audio Add-in = 1 stream
ƒ System audio sent to corresponding speaker
ƒ Line In Split and Played out all speakers
ƒ All Audio Streams share 1 common RTP Connection
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 29

Cisco TelePresence
Video Flow CTS-1000

CTS 1 CTS 2

Video
RTP Connection

ƒ Max 2 Video Streams


Center Camera = 1 Video streams
Data Video = 1 Video stream
ƒ Camera stream is sent to the Display
ƒ Data Video stream is sent to the LCD HDMI Outlet
ƒ Both Video streams share 1 common RTP Connection
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 30

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-10


Cisco TelePresence
Audio Flow CTS-1000
CTS 1 (In) CTS 2 (Out)

Audio
RTP Connection

ƒ Max 4 AAC-LD Audio Streams


ƒ Center microphone = 1 stream
ƒ Line In and Audio Add-in = 1 stream
ƒ System and Line In Audio mixed and played out single
CTS-1000 speaker
ƒ All Audio Streams share 1 common RTP Connection
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 31

Cisco TelePresence
CTS-3000 to CTS-1000

CTS-3000 CTS-1000
R R
C
C
L
L LC
R
C
LR

ƒ CTS-1000 appears on center display of CTS-3000


ƒ CTS-3000 transmits active segment to CTS-1000
ƒ Video is switched based on active speaker/segment
ƒ CTS-1000 hears all segments of CTS-3000 (CTS-3000
transmits all four audio channels to CTS-1000)
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 32

Cisco TelePresence
Audio Flow CTS-3000 to CTS-1000
CTS 3000 CTS 1000
(In) (Out)

Audio
RTP Connection

ƒ Max 4 mixed audio streams


ƒ Mixed audio played out single CTS-1000 speaker
ƒ All Audio Streams share 1 common RTP Connection

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 33

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-11


Agenda
ƒ Introduction (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System (15min)
9 Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Multipoint (15min)
ƒ Cisco Unified Communications Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Business 2 Business Connectivity (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Virtual Agent (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Interoperability Strategy (5min)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 34

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


Introduction

ƒ Cisco TelePresence requires a dedicated, enclosed space


Proper dimensions
Wall, ceiling, flooring materials
Color, texture and continuity
Lighting
Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Systems are designed to be installed in
existing conference rooms with no construction permits required
ƒ Cisco Account Team will assist the customer in selecting and pre-
qualifying the rooms they wish to install TelePresence in
ƒ Cisco TelePresence-Certified Advanced Technology Partners
(ATPs) will perform a detailed Room Readiness Assessment
(RRA) prior to installation to ensure that the room meets the
required specifications and to establish base-line lighting and
acoustic measurements

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 35

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


Room Dimensions: CTS-3000 (Metric)

6.1m
Room Dimensions: 76.2mm

Minimum:
4.57m x 6.1m x 2.44m 5.48m

Recommended:
5.8m x 6.7m x 3.05m 3.07m
4.57m
Maximum:
7.01m x 9.45m x 3.66m
Table provided as
integrated part of 1.52m

system ”

Recommended Door Acceptable door and window locations


Chairs provided by location Network and power receptacle locations

customer

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 36

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-12


Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements
Room Dimensions: CTS-3000 (Standard)

20'
Room Dimensions: 3"

Minimum:
15’ x 20’ x 8’ 18'

Recommended:
19’ x 22’ x 9’ 10.07'
15'
Maximum:
23’ x 31’ x 10’
Table provided as
integrated part of 5'

system ”

Recommended Door Acceptable door and window locations


Chairs provided by location Network and power receptacle locations

customer

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 37

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


Room Dimensions: CTS-1000 (Metric)
2.44m
Room Dimensions: .22m
Minimum: 1.549m

4.27m x 2.44m x 2.44m


Recommended:
4.88m x 3.66m x 3.05m
Maximum: 2.6m
6.1m x 6.1m x 3.66m
1.22 x 1.83m 4.27m
Table provided by customer
1.22m x 1.83m x 78cm
Rectangular shaped
Low-gloss finish 1.52m

Chairs provided by customer


Acceptable Door and Window location
Network and Power Receptacle location

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 38

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


Room Dimensions: CTS-1000 (Standard)
8’
Room Dimensions: 9”
Minimum: 5’1”

14’ x 8’ x 8’
Recommended:
16’ x 12’ x 9’
Maximum: 8.5
20’ x 20’ x 10’
1.22 x 1.83m 14’
Table provided by customer
4’ x 6’ x 30”
Rectangular shaped
Low-gloss finish 5’

Chairs provided by customer


Acceptable Door and Window location
Network and Power Receptacle location

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 39

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-13


Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements
Door and Window Location

•Windows need to be
treated to control
lighting and acoustical
properties
•Doors and windows
should preferably be
located out of camera
view while providing
convenient access to
the room for
participants ”

Recommended Door Acceptable door and window locations


location Network and power receptacle locations

• No wall should be
more than 20% glass
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 40

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


Wall, Door and Floor Materials

ƒ What type of materials are the walls, doors and floor


made of?
• Drywall is acceptable with acoustic
ceilings of 8’ – 10’ (2.44 - 3.05m)
height
• Cinder block, Glass, Brick and alike
walls may need treatment
• Is the floor carpeted? Marble, Wood,
Tile, and alike hard surface flooring
may need treatment
• Plenum flooring and other raised
flooring require special consideration
• IIC Rating of 60 or better

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 41

Cisco TelePresence
Acoustics

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 42

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-14


Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements
Acoustics – Room Isolation

ƒ Rooms should be isolated from other environments and


not allow more than 20-30dB of sound transmit through
walls. 40-60 STC and IIC recommended
• Walls
Sound Transmission Class (STC)
Drywall, Cinderblock, Brick, Glass,
other?
Do walls extend to structural deck?
Insulation between rooms?
• Floor and Ceiling
Impact Insulation Class (IIC) HVAC noise should not be
greater than 42dB at diffuser.
Multi-floor construction? 36dB and lower recommended
Raised or Plenum floors?
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 43

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


Acoustics - Sound Quality & Reverberation
ƒ Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC) Absorption of sound
ƒ Reverberation should not exceed 500 milliseconds and is
ideal at 150 – 300ms across all frequencies (125Hz-4kHz)
• Walls
Painted Drywall & Fabric Panels
recommended. Wood, brick, block or
similar may required remediation
• Floors
Carpet is highly recommended
Marble, wood, & tile are highly
sound reflective
• Ceiling
Acoustic tiles with high sound
absorption rating highly recommended
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 44

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


Ceiling Materials

• What type of ceiling tiles are


used?
• Without tiles the ceiling is too
sound reflective causing high NRC = .65 NRC = .65
reverberation!
• Acoustical tiles with
.70+ NRC rating preferred
• Noise Floor 36dB NRC = .65
A-Weighted NRC = .60

• Noise Floor 56dB


C-Weighted
• HVAC Diffuser NC30
NRC = .70 NRC = .90
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 45

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-15


Cisco TelePresence
Illumination

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 46

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


Light Sources and Fixtures

ƒ Proper lighting is critical to the experience!

• 300-400 lux of well


dispersed, ambient light
throughout the room
• Fluorescent bulbs,
indirect fixtures, highly
recommended
• Electronic ballasts
required!

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 47

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


Light Sources and Fixtures

ƒ Proper lighting is critical to the experience!

• There are lighting


options. If ceiling
height is 9’ or greater,
pendant lights are best
solution for even
coverage
• Bulb temperature must
be:
• 4000-4100 Kelvin
• 82 CRI

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 48

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-16


Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements
Light Sources and Fixtures

• What type of light fixtures Recommended


are in the room?
• 300-400 Lux of well dispersed
ambient light.
• Indirect fluorescents and
fixtures highly recommended
• Electronic ballasts required!
• Pendant style fixtures centered
Not Recommended
over the table or indirect
recessed panels evenly
dispersed are recommended
• Bulb temperature
• 4000/4100 Kelvin
•Note other sources of light
• 82 CRI (i.e. windows, skylights, etc.)
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 49

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


Light Sources and Fixtures

ƒ If windows exist, are there curtains or blinds to block


out natural light from the room?

• Curtains should completely


block out all light
• Windows into hallways or
other rooms may cause
distractions to the
experience
(i.e. people peering in
through the windows)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 50

Cisco TelePresence
Continuity

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 51

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-17


Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements
Visible Wall Space – Continuity
• Customer should paint walls to provide optimal flesh tone depiction.
Cisco will provide a palette of approved colors to choose.
• The back wall (behind participants) should be clear of busy patterns
and provide a surface that is similar in all locations

• Remediation is not covered


in the cost of the CTS
Endpoint or Services
• Cisco may provide a
Reference Sale list of
Vendors for common
solutions

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 52

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


Visible Wall Space – Continuity

ƒ What objects are located on / in front of the back wall?

Certain items can help add


a dimension of depth
(e.g. adornments on the
walls, plants in the corner
of the room)

Other items can be


distracting and take away
from the overall experience
(e.g. windows, reflective
surfaces such as dry-erase
boards)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 53

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


Visible Wall Space – Continuity
Recommended colors. Please contact Cisco for additional
recommendations
Benjamin Moore Colors*

Huntington Classic Fairmont Peach


Cork Brandy
Beige Caramel Gold

* Color accuracy varies based on monitor and printer settings

Exterior Window Treatments Interior Window Treatments

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 54

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-18


Cisco TelePresence
Facilities

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 55

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


HVAC
ƒ HVAC Supply and Return locations are critical!
ƒ A separate climate zone is recommended for each room
• Return registers must be
placed above the
monitors to effectively
displace hot air
• Supply registers must be
placed behind the
participants, not directly
above them
• Total Heat Output
CTS 3000 = 20,478 BTU/hr.
CTS 1000 = 6,210 BTU/hr.

HVAC noise should not be


greater than 42dB at diffuser Return Supply
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 56

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


Power Requirements CTS 3000
ƒ Appropriate number of dedicated power circuits must
be located on the wall behind the equipment
Standard Required Power
120volts – 4 dedicated 20Amp circuits
240volts – 4 dedicated 10Amp circuits

Recommended, optional 5th


receptacle to control lighting façade:
- Switched at wall near door for convenience
- Inline with current ceiling lights

Current lighting circuit must support additional:


120V - 3Amps
240V - 1.5Amps

Please note that some commercial lighting requires 277V.


PDU shipped with CTS 3000 supports 120V – 240V.
Additional power management may be required to this receptacle.
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 57

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-19


Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements
Power Distribution Per Circuit CTS 3000
Required Circuits Circuit 1 2 3 4
Displays 1 1 1
x4
Codecs 1 1 1
Lighting 1 2 2
Projector 1
CTS PDU
Table Legs 6

Optional 5th receptacle supporting 3 Amps w/ ceiling lights


Circuit 1 2 3 4 5
Displays 1 1 1
Codecs 1 1 1
Lighting 5
Projector 1
Table legs 6
CTS PDU
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 58

Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements


Ethernet Connectivity Requirements

ƒ Appropriate number of dedicated Gigabit Ethernet jacks


must be located on the wall behind the equipment

• CTS-3000 requires seven Gigabit


Ethernet ports (RJ-45 UTP)
• 1 for Primary codec
• 6 for participants
• CTS-1000 requires 3 Gigabit
Ethernet ports (RJ-45 UTP)
• 1 for Primary codec
• 2 for participants • Ethernet switch should be located
outside of the room (i.e. in the
appropriate IDF closet)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 59

Agenda
ƒ Introduction (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements (15min)
9 Cisco TelePresence System Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Multipoint (15min)
ƒ Cisco Unified Communications Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Business 2 Business Connectivity (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Virtual Agent (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Interoperability Strategy (5min)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 60

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-20


Cisco TelePresence Manager Simple
to Use
Scheduling and Management Simplicity

Automated Call Launch


“One Button to Push” Concierge
Services

Lotus Unified
Domino CallManager
Room Scheduling
Enterprise Groupware
Microsoft
Exchange
CTM
Multipoint
Cisco Scheduling
TelePresence
Manager

Unified
Operations
User Manager Reporting Billing
Experience Administration

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 61

Cisco TelePresence Manager


Introduction
ƒ Similar in design to Cisco Unified CallManager 5.0:
Runs on Cisco MCS–7800 Series Media Convergence Servers
Runs Cisco Linux Voice OS platform. Installed via Platform Configuration
DVD or comes pre-installed from factory
CLI interface accessible via SSH or local keyboard/monitor/console ports
Web-based (HTTPs) interface for administration and monitoring
SNMP v3 and CDP support for managing the server
ƒ System Requirements:
– Cisco MCS-7835-H1/H2 Server
– Customer provided Microsoft
Active Directory 2000 or 2003
and Microsoft Exchange 2003
– Cisco Unified CallManager 5.1
or greater
– Easy to deploy and configure:
• no intrusive Active Directory or
Exchange schema extensions
• No client-side Outlook plugins
to install

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 62

Cisco TelePresence Manager


Protocol Interaction
Active Directory
ƒ CTM “discovers” meeting
rooms by interrogating Cisco
Unified CallManager via Exchange
AXL/SOAP LDAP
ƒ CTM “discovers” Exchange
mailboxes by interrogating
Active Directory via LDAP, then Cisco Unified Cisco
CallManager TelePresence
logs into Exchange using Manager
WebDAV
Lotus Domino/Notes support in
future release
AXL/SOAP WebDAV
ƒ CTM monitors mailboxes for
each room and accepts or
rejects meeting requests AXL/SOAP
Codec
ƒ CTM pushes meeting
schedules to the Codec using
XML
ƒ Codec pushes meeting
schedules to the Cisco Unified
IP Phone 7970G
ƒ One button to push call launch
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 63

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-21


Cisco TelePresence System
Site to Site Meeting Example

7970 Codec CCM CTM Exchange User

CTM discovers
and monitors
endpoints in CTM discovers
CCM via rooms in LDAP
AXL/SOAP and and logs into
JTAPI Exchange
mailboxes via
WEBDAV
User schedules
CTM pushes CTM reads meeting in
XML content to event in mailbox Outlook
Primary Codec
Primary Codec (via WEBDAV)
pushes XML
content to Phone
in room
CTM Sends
User now has a Meeting confirmation
“single button to To User
push” to join the
meeting

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 64

Cisco TelePresence
Multipoint Meeting Example

7970 Codec CTMS CTS-Manager Exchange User

Checks for available


CTMS resources and
geographical location
User schedules
meeting in
CTS-Man. reads
event in mailbox Outlook
CTS-Man. sends
Meeting Details to
CTMS

CTS-Man. Sends
meeting confirmation
to User
CTS-Man. pushes
Primary Codec XML content to
pushes XML primary Codec
content to Phone
in room

User now has a


“Single Button to
Push” to join the
meeting

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 65

Cisco TelePresence
Multipoint Geographical Selection

1
Multipoint meeting requested:
San Jose, Seattle, Dallas, and
New York
San Jose
System selection GMT - 8
2 SJ: GMT -8
SE: GMT -8 CTS-Manager ?
DA: GMT -6
NY: GMT -5 OK
Av. GMT -6.75
Dallas
CTMS closest to GMT - 6
mean GMT is selected
3 Check for available
resources

4 Meeting scheduled New York


successfully GMT - 5

Note: If no resources are available in Dallas the next closest CTMS is


selected (San Jose)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 66

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-22


Agenda
ƒ Introduction (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System Manager (15min)
9 Cisco TelePresence Multipoint (15min)
ƒ Cisco Unified Communications Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Business 2 Business Connectivity (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Virtual Agent (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Interoperability Strategy (5min)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 67

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


Introduction

ƒ Native 1080p
Video Switching
ƒ Extremely
low-latency New York Los Angeles London
ƒ Site and segment-
based switching
modes
ƒ Groupware-based
scheduling of
multipoint meetings
ƒ Integrated with
Cisco TelePresence
Manager
ƒ Call launch automated Toronto
with “one button to
push”
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 68

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


Platforms

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint Switch (CTMS)


ƒ Software based Solution
ƒ Integrated and Managed by CTS-Manager
ƒ TelePresence Support Only
ƒ Very Low Latency <20ms

Cisco Unified Conferencing for TelePresence (CUCT)


ƒ Hardware based solution
ƒ Extension of current Unified Video Conferencing and
MeetingPlace offerings
ƒ Support for multiple video formats
ƒ Low Latency <50ms

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 69

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-23


Cisco TelePresence Multipoint
CTMS System Features

• Designed for Cisco TelePresence


• Integrated with Cisco TelePresence Manager
• Scheduled and non-scheduled meeting support
• Site and Segment Switching
• Supports up to 36 table segments (12 CTS-
3000’s or 36 CTS-1000’s)
• 1080p & 720p Video and Audio Switching
• QoS (DSCP marking)
• Flow Control (video switch instructs endpoints
not to send video for inactive segments)
• System Requirements
• CTS version 1.1.1
• CTS-Manager 1.1

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 70

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


CTMS Components

ƒ CTMS
Cisco TelePresence Multipoint Switch
– Video and Audio Switching (CTMS)
– Non-Scheduled Meeting Man.
ƒ CTS-Manager
–Meeting Scheduling
– “One Button to Push” Dialing
– Resource and Location
Management
– Scheduled Meeting Man. •
– Required for Scheduled
meetings Cisco TelePresence Manager
(CTS-Manager)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 71

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


CUCT System Features

• Hardware based Appliance


• Scheduled meeting support
• Voice Activated Switching
• Site and Segment Switching
• Supports up to 36 table segments (12 CTS-
3000’s or 36 CTS-1000’s)
• Video switching 1080p, 720p & 480p
• Auto Cascading
• QoS (DSCP marking)
• System Requirements
• CTS version 1.1.1
• CTS-Manager 1.2

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 72

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-24


Cisco TelePresence Multipoint
CUCT Components
Multipoint Control Unit
ƒ MCU (MCU)
– Video and Audio switching
– Non-Scheduled Meeting
Man.
ƒ CUCT
–Meeting Scheduling Cisco Unified Conferencing for
– Resource and Location TelePresence (CUCT)
Management
– Meeting Management
– Required Component
ƒ CTS-Manager
–“One Button to Push” Dialing
Cisco TelePresence Manager
(CTS-Manager)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 73

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


Site Switching CTS-3000

Previously Active
Active Site
site

Video from the entire


active site is displayed
to all other sites, and table Active site views last active sites
position is always maintained video

Site becomes
active site

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 74

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


Segment Switching CTS-3000
Site 1 Site 2

Segments switched independently. Previously active segment


Active segments video is displayed remains displayed for the
in its respective position on all active segment
CTS-3000’s in the conference
Site 3

Segment goes
active

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 75

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-25


Cisco TelePresence Multipoint
Deployment Considerations

ƒ Bandwidth required to support multipoint


ƒ Physical placement of multipoint devices
Centralized
Distributed

ƒ Latency consideration
ƒ Loss & Jitter considerations
ƒ What meeting types will be supported

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 76

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


Bandwidth Considerations

60Mbps

CTMS

Tok
yo
15Mbps

QoS-Enabled
WAN

15Mbps 15Mbps
J ose 45Mbps 15Mbps
New
San York

ƒ Each CTS dials into the


Cisco TelePresence
Multipoint System Lon
don
* Bandwidth examples based on 1080p

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 77

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


Flow Control (CTMS Only)

No Flow Control:
2.5Mbps per table segment (avg.)
Meeting begins
9 –- all CTS
table Systems
segments
Transmit video andMbps
22.5 audiototal segments
Active bandwidth
Audio Only
Stop sending video
identified
CTS - 1 R R Left, right & center
C
C
L
L Video and Audio

R R
C Active Site
CTS - 2 C
L
L Video and Audio
With Flow Control:
R R 2.5Mbps per table segment (avg.)
C Active Site 6 – table segments
C
CTS - 3 15.2 Mbps total bandwidth
L
L

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 78

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-26


Cisco TelePresence Multipoint
Latency Considerations

10ms

CTMS

Tok
yo
53ms

QoS-Enabled
WAN

31ms
J ose 85ms
New
San York

ƒ Remember to calculate ƒ Worst case latency


end-to-end, including Tokyo to London is
CTMS induced latency Lon
don 148ms
* Latency numbers based on Cisco’s
internal Network and may differ for customers
based on service provider network paths used
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 79

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


Physical Location

Centralized
ƒ Small deployments with less Jose
San
than six CTS endpoints New
York

ƒ Centralize the multipoint


n
device to minimize latency Lo ndo

Distributed
ƒ Large dispersed deployments
York
New
ƒ Regionally deploy Multipoint San
J ose
devices Paris

ƒ CTS-Manager or CUCT
required for geographical m g yo
erda Ko n Tok
meeting placement Amst Hon
g

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 80

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


Latency Example (Centralized)

<20ms
31ms
Recommended
New Deployment
Jose York
San
37ms

don
Lon

ƒ Multipoint services Located in New York


ƒ Latency 87ms between San Jose and London
ƒ Multipoint services centrally located between San Jose and
London
ƒ Recommended Centralized Deployment

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 81

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-27


Cisco TelePresence Multipoint
Latency Example (Centralized)

<20ms 31ms
New
Jose York
San Not a
85ms Recommended
Deployment

don
Lon

ƒ Multipoint services not centrally located adding an


additional 48ms latency
ƒ 135ms for the same meeting with multipoint services
located in San Jose
ƒ Not a recommended deployment

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 82

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


Latency Example (Distributed)

<20ms

Correct Meeting
San Placement
York 84ms J ose
New
74ms
54ms

Paris

g yo
m Ko n Tok
erda Hon
g
Amst

ƒ 177ms latency between Honk Kong and Paris


ƒ Multipoint devices are regionalized to manage latency
ƒ CTS-Manager or CUCT server provide the ability to manage
meeting placement

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 83

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


Latency Example (Distributed)

<20ms
31ms

San
York J ose
New Incorrect
84ms 97ms Meeting
104ms Placement

Paris

g yo
m Ko n Tok
erda Hon
g
Amst

ƒ 220ms for the same meeting if multipoint services in


New York are used
ƒ 220ms is outside the end-to-end latency target for a
multipoint meeting
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 84

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-28


Cisco TelePresence Multipoint
Meeting Types Supported

ƒ Non-Scheduled
– CTMS only

ƒ Scheduled
– Requires CTS-Manager for CTMS
– CUCM

ƒ Mixed Non-Scheduled and Scheduled


– CTMS only

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 85

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


Non-Scheduled Meetings

ƒ Only Supported with CTMS


ƒ Non-Scheduled “only” meetings recommended in
Centralized deployment only
ƒ Not recommended for Distributed deployment
ƒ No “One Button to Push” dialing
ƒ No multipoint resource management (first come first
server)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 86

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


Scheduled Meetings

ƒ Supported by CTMS and CUCT


ƒ Scheduled only meeting environment supported in both
centralized and distributed deployments
ƒ CTS-Manager required for CTMS deployments
ƒ Multipoint resource management
ƒ “One Button to Push” dialing

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 87

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-29


Cisco TelePresence Multipoint
Mixed Mode (Non-Scheduled and Scheduled)

ƒ Only supported with CTMS


ƒ Mixed meeting environment supported for both
Centralized and Distributed deployments
ƒ Resource management for scheduled meetings only
ƒ Recommendation for large environments is to deploy
separate Scheduled and Non-Scheduled resources
ƒ “One Button to Push” available for Scheduled Meetings

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 88

Cisco TelePresence Multipoint


Multipoint Summary

ƒ Choose the appropriate platform for your environment


ƒ Analyze the placement of multipoint device(s) based on
– Bandwidth
– Latency

ƒ Provision the appropriate bandwidth to sites supporting


multipoint
ƒ Choose the meeting types supported in your network

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 89

Agenda
ƒ Introduction (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Multipoint (15min)
9 Cisco Unified Communications Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Business 2 Business Connectivity (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Virtual Agent (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Interoperability Strategy (5min)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 90

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-30


Cisco TelePresence
Cisco Unified Communications Manager (CUCM)

ƒ CUCM Release 5.1(1) or later required


ƒ CUCM view a CTS just like a
Cisco Unified SIP IP Phone
– Automated configuration and firmware
distribution
– Advanced call routing and
Call Admission Control (CAC)
– Management, Call Detail Recording (CDR)

ƒ CTS-Manager integrates with CUCM


via AXL/SOAP and CTI/QBE providing
– Device and call status

ƒ Cisco TelePresence Multipoint integrates


with CUCM via SIP trunk
ƒ Cisco Unified SIP IP Phone 7970G providing:
– Simple user interface “It’s as easy as making a phone call”

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 91

Cisco TelePresence
CUCM – CTS Communication

Cisco Cisco TelePresence


Unified System
CallManager
Cisco Unified
IP Phone 7970G

Gig Ethernet
Ethernet + POE
SIP

ƒ CUCM sees primary codec as a SIP endpoint


ƒ Secondary codecs are invisible to the network and to CUCM
ƒ Cisco Unified IP Phone 7970 runs SIP (not SCCP)
ƒ Primary codec and IP Phone share a line appearance

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 92

Cisco TelePresence
CUCM Integration – Multipoint Configuration
Multipoint
Device

ƒ Cisco TelePresence Multipoint communicates with


CUCM via a SIP Trunk
CUCM Configuration: CTMS Configuration:
–Configure a UDP-only SIP Trunk –Configure Access Number
Security Profile – CTMS 1.0 only range to match CUCM Route
supports UDP Pattern
–Configure a SIP Trunk –Configure IP addresses of all
CUCM servers
–Configure a Route Pattern

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 93

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-31


Cisco TelePresence
Cisco TelePresence Manager

ƒ CTS-Manager communicates with CUCM via


AXL/SOAP and JTAPI

CUCM Configuration: CTS-Manager Configuration:


ƒCreate an Application User with ƒConfigure the IP address of the
the following privileges CUCM node that runs the AXL Web
–AXL API Access and CTI Manager services
–CTI Monitoring –Must be the same node
–Serviceability Access
–Standard CCM Admin Access
–Associate CTS devices
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 94

Cisco TelePresence
CUCM Cluster Requirements and Recommendations

Requirements:
ƒ Cisco TelePresence requires CUCM version 5.1.1 or later
ƒ Cisco TelePresence has unique bandwidth and QoS requirements –
but CUCM cannot differentiate between a TelePresence call and a
regular Video Telephony call (to CUCM they’re both “video calls”)
ƒ All CTS systems must be registered to the same CUCM cluster
because CTS-Manager can only integrate with a single CUCM cluster

Conditions: Recommendation:
9CUCM
× CUCM 5.1(1)
5.1(1) or
or later?
later? ƒUse existing
Deploy
ƒƒPick CUCM
oneaofseparate
your CUCM cluster
CUCM
clusters
clusterand
for TelePresence
use it for all
× No other
9No other Video
Video Telephony
Telephony
TelePresence systems globally
apps
apps
deployed?
deployed?
×More
× Morethan
9More thanone
than oneCUCM
one CUCMcluster?
CUCM cluster?
cluster?

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 95

Cisco TelePresence
Case Study Example - Cisco Internal Deployment

PSTN EMEA Cluster


San Jose
TelePresence Cluster

IP
GK

H.323 Gatekeeper
San Jose
Production Cluster APAC Cluster

ƒ Over a dozen clusters deployed around the globe with thousands of Video
Telephony endpoints. H.323 Gatekeeper between clusters
ƒ Decision was to deploy a new cluster in San Jose and all TelePresence systems
globally register back to it
ƒ H.323 Inter-Cluster Trunk from TelePresence cluster to Gatekeeper provides
global reachability to any other IP Phone and to Meetingplace for Audio Add-In
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 96

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-32


Agenda
ƒ Introduction (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Multipoint (15min)
ƒ Cisco Unified Communications Manager (15min)
9 Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Business 2 Business Connectivity (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Virtual Agent (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Interoperability Strategy (5min)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 97

Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements


Introduction

ƒ This presentation is designed to clearly and succinctly articulate the


bandwidth, SLA, QoS requirements and Switch/Router platform
recommendations for Cisco TelePresence
Kept short and to the point. More exhaustive explanations of each topic covered
are available upon request
Engage Cisco Advanced Services and/or TSBU Technical Marketing for design
assistance
ƒ The guidance provided herein is designed for use by:
Customers and Service Providers when architecting and provisioning the
network for Cisco TelePresence
Cisco Account Teams and ATP Partners when performing Cisco TelePresence
Pre-Qualification Questionnaire
Cisco Advanced Services and ATP Partners when performing detailed Network
Path Assessments (NPAs)
ƒ The information contained in this presentation is subject to change without
notice. Information provided is accurate to the best of our knowledge and
takes a conservative approach in order to protect our customers. Cisco
offers no warranty or guarantee as to the accuracy of the information

Cisco Confidential. Non-Disclosure Agreeement (NDA) Required

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 98

TelePresence Loss Service Level Requirement


Why is TelePresence So Sensitive to Packet Loss?
Cisco TelePresence Codecs use 1080p30 Resolution
1920 lines of Vertical Resolution (Widescreen Aspect Ratio is 16:9)
1080 lines of Horizontal Resolution

1080 x 1920 lines =

2,073,600 pixels per frame

x 3 colors per pixel

x 1 Byte (8 bits) per color

x 30 frames per second

= 1,492,992,000 bps

or 1.5 Gbps Uncompressed

Cisco TelePresence Codecs transmit 3-5 Mbps per 1080p screen,


which represents over 99% compression.
Therefore packet loss is proportionally magnified in overall video quality.
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 99

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-33


Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements
Traffic Characteristics Summary

ƒ One-Way, End-to-End Service Level Targets


Latency ≤ 150 ms TelePresence
Jitter ≤ 10 ms Traffic Profile
Loss ≤ 0.05%
ƒ Max Bandwidth per Second

bytes
CTS-1000 = 5.5 Mbps (at 1080p)
CTS-3000 = 14.6 Mbps (at 1080p) 33ms frame intervals
CTMS = 198 Mbps (5.5 Mbps * 36 sites) • 30 frames/sec
ƒ Average Packet Size / Packets per Second • Variable bit rate
Average 1100 bytes / packet • Large packet sizes
CTS-1000 @ 5.5 Mbps = average 655 pps • High packets/sec
CTS-3000 @ 14.6 Mbps = average 1,740 pps • See notes section
for details

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 100

Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements


Bandwidth Details – Max Bandwidth (per second)

Average bandwidth utilization is much less. See notes section for details
Resolution 1080p 1080p 1080p 720p 720p 720p
Motion Handling Best Better Good Best Better Good
Video per Screen (kbps) 4000 3500 3000 3000 2000 1000
Audio per Microphone (kbps) 64 64 64 64 64 64
Auto Collaborate video
500 500 500 500 500 500
channel (kbps)

Audio Add-In channel (kbps) 64 64 64 64 64 64

CTS-1000
4,756* 4,256* 3,756* 3,756* 2,756* 1,756*
Total Audio and Video (kbps)
CTS-3000
12,756 11,256 9,756 9,756 6,756 3,756
Total Audio and Video (kbps)

CTS-1000 total bandwidth


5.4 Mbps* 4.8 Mbps* 4.3 Mbps* 4.3 Mbps* 3.2 Mbps* 2 Mbps*
(Including layer 3- 4 overhead)

CTS-3000 total bandwidth


14.6 Mbps 12.8 Mbps 11.1 Mbps 11.1 Mbps 7.7 Mbps 4.3 Mbps
(Including layer 3 – 4 overhead)

• When a CTS-1000 calls a CTS-3000 the CTS-1000 will transmit 128 kbps of audio but receive 256 kbps

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 101

Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements


Bandwidth Details – Burst Provisioning

1 Obtain burst parameter


using the following formula:
B = R(T) 2 Recommended burst parameters:
CTS-1000
Where: R = 5.5Mbps, T = 200ms, B = 144179 bytes
R = Rate (Bytes ⁄Seconds) CTS-3000
T = Time (Seconds) R = 14.6Mbps, T = 200ms, B = 382730 bytes
Recommend using 200ms for T
CTMS
B = Burst (Bytes) R = 198Mbps, T = 200ms, B = 5190451 bytes
maximum load of 36 CTS-1000 rooms. To calculate
See notes section for long-hand bandwidth required for less rooms, use 5.5 x the
explanation of formula number or segments (1 segment per CTS-1000,
3 segments per CTS-3000)

3 Example uses:
Policing: police bps [burst-max] conform-action action exceed-action action
police 14600000 382730 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop
Shaping: shape [average | peak] mean-rate [[burst-size] [excess-burst-size]]
shape 14600000 3061840 ! This command expresses burst-size in bits, not bytes
Queuing: priority {bandwidth-kbps | percent percentage} [burst]
priority 14600000 382730
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 102

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-34


Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements
Where Does Latency, Jitter and Loss Occur?

Service
CE PE Provider PE CE

Campus CE-PE PE-PE PE-CE Campus

Serialization, Policing, Serialization,


Queuing,
Queuing, Shaping Queuing, Queuing, Queuing,
Shaping Shaping
Shaping Propagation

ƒ In the Campus, the primary concern is packet loss


ƒ On the CE-PE links, the primary concern is jitter caused by queuing,
serialization and shaping
ƒ From PE-PE, the primary concern is latency (caused by distance) and
packet loss (caused by policing)
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 103

Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements


How is Latency, Jitter and Loss Measured?

Latency 95ms Latency 90ms

Jitter 6ms Jitter 9ms

Loss .04% Loss .01%

ƒ Delay, jitter and loss are measured:


End-to-end (codec ethernet port to codec ethernet port)
Uni-directionally (each codec independently measures
incoming RTP traffic)
ƒ End-to-end budgets are carefully engineered to provide global
coverage without negatively impacting the experience
A portion of the budget is allocated to the service provider (demarc to
demarc – including CE-PE links) and the remainder is allocated to the
Enterprise
See slides 8-10 for detailed breakdown of each

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 104

Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements


One Way Latency Targets and Thresholds
Target Warning Message 2nd Warning Message

End to End ≤ 150 ms > 200 ms > 400 ms

Service Provider ≤ 120 ms > 160 ms > 320 ms

Recommended SLA

ƒ 80/20 split between Service Provider and Enterprise


80% allocated to the SP is from demarc to demarc - including the CE-PE link
20% allocated to the Enterprise
ƒ Service Provider should engineer their network to the Targets, but the Service
Level Agreements (SLAs) should be based on the first threshold
ƒ Threshold behavior:
> 200 ms
A warning message is displayed “Experiencing network delay”
> 400 ms
2nd warning message is displayed “Experiencing severe network delay”

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 105

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Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements
One Way Jitter Targets and Thresholds
Target Warning Message Call Terminated

End to End ≤ 10 ms > 20 ms > 40 ms

Service Provider ≤ 5 ms > 10 ms > 20 ms

Recommended SLA

ƒ 50/50 split between Service Provider and Enterprise


50% allocated to the SP is from demarc to demarc - including the CE-PE link
50% allocated to the Enterprise
ƒ Service Provider should engineer their network to the Targets, but the Service
Level Agreements (SLAs) should be based on the first threshold
ƒ Threshold behavior:
> 20 ms
A warning message is displayed “Experiencing network congestion”
> 40 ms
Step 1: System will lower motion handling from Best to Good
Step 2: If condition persists the call will be disconnected and an error message
will be displayed “Call could not proceed due to excessive network
congestion”
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 106

Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements


One Way Loss Targets and Thresholds
Target Warning Message Call Terminated

End to End ≤ .05 % > .1 % > .2 %

Service Provider ≤ .025 % > .05 % > .1 %

Recommended SLA
ƒ 50/50 split between Service Provider and Enterprise
50% allocated to the SP is from demarc to demarc – including the CE-PE link
50% allocated to the Enterprise
ƒ Service Provider should engineer their network to the Targets, but the Service
Level Agreements (SLAs) should be based on the first threshold
ƒ Threshold behavior:
> .1%
A warning message is displayed “Experiencing network congestion”
> .2%
Step 1: System will lower motion handling from Best to Good
Step 2: If condition persists the call will be disconnected and an error message
will be displayed “Call could not proceed due to excessive network
congestion”
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 107

Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements


Ethernet Switch / Line Card Recommendations
ƒ Switches / Line Cards ƒ Catalyst 6500 ƒ Catalyst 4500
must have enough per- √ WS-X6816-GBIC √ WS-X4548-GB-RJ45V
port memory buffers to √ WS-X6748-SFP * √ WS-X4448-GB-RJ45V
handle the sub-second √ WS-X6748-GE-TX *
byte/packet rates √ WS-X6724-SFP * 9 Catalyst 4948
√ WS-X6708-10G-3CXL *
ƒ Catalyst 6500 line cards √ WS-X6708-10G-3C * ƒ Catalyst 3750 / 3750-E
must offer (per port): √ WS-X6704-10GE *
√ WS-C3750G
400KB or greater transmit √ WS-X6516A-GBIC
√ WS-C3750-E
(TX) memory per port for √ WS-X6516A-GBIC
point-to-point meetings √ WS-X6516-GBIC √ Stacked configurations
√ WS-X6516-GE-TX × Non-Gig models
1Mb or greater transmit
(TX) memory per port for √ WS-X6502-10GE *
ƒ Catalyst 3560 / 3560-E
multipoint meetings √ WS-X6501-10GEX4 *
√ WS-X6416-GE-MT √ WS-C3560G
Priority Queuing √ WS-X6416-GBIC √ WS-C3560G-E
ƒ All Ethernet ports in the √ WS-X6408A-GBIC × Non-Gig models
path should be > 1 Gbps √ WS-X6316-GE-TX
√ WS-X6148A-GE-45F *
ƒ Any switch model / line √ WS-X6148A-GE-TX *
card not explicitly listed × All other line cards
here is implicitly not Detailed platform-specific
recommended * Recommended for test results and guidance
multipoint available upon request

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© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-36


Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements
Router Platform Recommendations
Detailed recommendations are pending. The following
information is preliminary and subject to change

ƒ Ethernet port(s) connecting router to LAN should be > 1 Gbps


ƒ Shaping should be avoided due to high probability that it will introduce unwanted
jitter
If shaping is required, proceed with caution until more concrete data is available and test
prior to deployment. Behavior varies across different router platforms and IOS versions
× 2600 / 3700 Series platforms
Not recommended due to Gigabit Ethernet requirement and requirement for DS-3 or higher
WAN interface speeds (see slides 13-15)
? 2800 / 3800 Series platforms
Questionable due to requirement for DS-3 or higher WAN interface speeds
(see slides 13-15)
Proceed with caution until more concrete data is available
9 7200 Series platform
VXR chassis recommended
Older-generation NPEs questionable. Proceed with caution until more concrete data is
available, or use latest-generation NPEs to be safe
9 7300, 7600, 12000 Series platforms

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 109

Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements


WAN Interface Types Recommendations

ƒ Avoid bundled interfaces (e.g. MLPPP, IMA)


Fragmentation and Reassembly causes jitter and high CPU on
router

ƒ Fractional DS-3 or higher recommended


T-1 / E-1 circuits are not a viable option

ƒ Metro Ethernet recommended as alternative to leased


circuits where available
ƒ Broadband (e.g. DSL, Cable) not recommended
Shared bandwidth
Asynchronous upstream/downstream speeds
No QoS guarantees

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 110

Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements


WAN Bandwidth Recommendations
ƒ Converged networks are recommended for maximum Return on
Investment
Benefit from increased bandwidth for data applications when
TelePresence is not using the bandwidth, allowing customers to
leverage bandwidth upgrades made for TelePresence to roll out
new/additional applications
Following best-practice QoS recommendations (see slide 25), no more
than 33% of the link should be allocated to TelePresence
CTS-1000 = 5.5 Mbps. Minimum circuit speed = 16 Mbps
CTS-3000 = 14.6 Mbps. Minimum circuit speed = 45 Mbps

ƒ Overlay (dedicated) networks are also supported


33% rule does not apply in this case. Reserve 2% of the link for routing
protocol and management traffic overhead. Round up to the nearest
whole Mbps to be safe
CTS-1000 = 5.5 Mbps. + 2% = 5.6 Mbps (round up to 6 Mbps) + burst
CTS-3000 = 14.6 Mbps. + 2% = 14.9 Mbps (round up to 15 Mbps) + burst
Burst recommendations provided on slide 5
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Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements
WAN Circuit Provider Recommendations

ƒ To ensure customer success, Cisco has created the


Cisco Certified TelePresence Connection (CTC) program for
Service Providers
http://wwwin.cisco.com/sp/segments/wireline/managed/emerging_telepresence.shtml

ƒ For various business reasons, customers may want to use a


provider who is not a member of the above program
If the customer is simply acquiring circuits for an enterprise-managed
WAN then the customer is free to use any provider they choose
If the customer is obtaining an advanced end-to-end service, such as a
managed service, hosted service, B2B service, etc. then Cisco
recommends using a provider from the CTC program
If the customer still prefers to use a provider not part of the CTC
program, then Cisco must work with the provider to ensure that the
service they are offering meets the required SLA parameters and
that the network is engineered to accommodate the bandwidth and
burst requirements. These situations will be accommodated on a
case-by-case basis. Account teams should proceed with caution
and engage Cisco Advanced Services and/or TSBU Technical
Marketing for assistance before quoting the solution to the
customer

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 112

Agenda
ƒ Introduction (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Multipoint (15min)
ƒ Cisco Unified Communications Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements (15min)
9 Cisco TelePresence Business 2 Business Connectivity (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Virtual Agent (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Interoperability Strategy (5min)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 113

Cisco TelePresence Secure Business to


Business

ƒ Industry’s first Public “Switched”


TelePresence Network solution
ƒ Technology Solution that has been
created by both Cisco and our Service
Provider Partners
ƒ Enables TelePresence meetings with
customers, suppliers, and partners
ƒ Maintains simplicity features such as
one button to push call launch
ƒ Secure, reliable connections across
diverse, existing enterprise and
service provider networks

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 114

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-38


Transform Your Business Interactions

Partners Customers

HQ
Suppliers

Vendors

Solution Elements
Cisco’s Ability to Deliver • Secure Connect to Different Networks
• IP Network expertise end-to-end • Privacy Maintained: FW/NAT Traversal
• Global Service Provider Partnering • Encrypted Signaling and Media
• Endpoint and Network Management
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 115

Cisco TelePresence
Business to Business Connectivity

Cisco Powered Network


Service Providers
SBC SBC

SBC

Customer Site

ƒ Seamless, secure, scalable connectivity


NAT/Firewall traversal
Signaling and Media encryption
Global reachability – partners, customers,
vendors
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 116

Cisco TelePresence Secure Business to


Business Overview
The complete solution includes the following components:
ƒ TelePresence technology
TSBU: Cisco TelePresence System with endpoint security: authentication, encrypted
media, encrypted signaling
TSBU: Cisco TelePresence Manager for directory & and “one button” scheduling services
ƒ Enterprise network
IPCBU: Cisco Unified Communications Manager v.5.1 or greater
DSSTG: Enterprise network security: firewall/NAT traversal
ATG: Cisco Multiservice IP-to-IP Gateway for inter-worked, policed, external call routing
NMTG, CROS: Network management tools for network pre-assessment, provisioning,
monitoring, fault detection, and troubleshooting
ƒ Service provider network
TSBU, NSITE, CMO: Cisco TelePresence Inter-Business network with high bandwidth and
QoS
SRBU: Cisco Session Border Controller for interworked, policed, intercompany call routing
NMTG, CROS: Network management tools for monitoring, fault detection, and
troubleshooting
SRBU, SP Tools: Billing and mediation capabilities

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 117

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-39


Cisco TelePresence Secure Business to
Business Roadmap

Pt. to Pt., One provider, Pt. to Multi-Pt., One provider, Peering multi- provider,
multi-company multi-company multi-company
Q4 CY2007 Q1 CY2008 Q3 CY2008

• TelePresence Enhanced • Multi-provider bilateral


Security & Mangeability • Multipoint (in Enterprise) peering
Authentication • Multipoint (in SP) • Universal Directory &
Encrypted Media Scheduling Service
Encrypted Signaling • MP Integration with • Multi-cluster scheduling
CTS Traps & MIBs Outlook/Exchange for one-button
Voice Activated Switching call launch
One Button to Push • Collaboration tools
• Unified IP Communications • Virtual Agent Integration with
Contact Center Express
• Enterprise Network
• Enterprise Network Enhanced
Firewall / NAT Traversal
Security
TelePresence NM tools

• SP MPLS VPN Network • SP IMS Network with


• SP IP NGN Network Presence Policing

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 118

Agenda
ƒ Introduction (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Multipoint (15min)
ƒ Cisco Unified Communications Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Business 2 Business Connectivity (15min)
9 Cisco TelePresence Virtual Agent (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Interoperability Strategy (5min)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 119

Cisco TelePresence Virtual Agent


Connecting Customers With Experts
ƒ Combines CTS 1000 and Cisco Unified Contact Center
Express
ƒ Connects virtual agents to callers via the skills-based
routing, integrated queuing of Cisco Unified Contact
Center Express
ƒ Creates an intimate experience for the customer with
life-size, high-definition video images and CD quality
audio
- Agent and customer appear life-size on video
displays
ƒ Delivers high impact, face-to-face customer service
from any location
ƒ New applications, Vertical Markets
Finance: Branch office experts
Retail: High-end electronics sales
Healthcare: Remote consultation, interpretive
services
Administration: Three lobby ambassadors can
manage 10 buildings
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 120

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-40


Agenda
ƒ Introduction (5min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Room Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence System Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Multipoint (15min)
ƒ Cisco Unified Communications Manager (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Network Requirements (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Business 2 Business Connectivity (15min)
ƒ Cisco TelePresence Virtual Agent (5min)
9 Cisco TelePresence Interoperability Strategy (5min)

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 121

Industry Trends Towards Interop


ƒ Polycom purchases Destiny conferencing – creating interoperability
between Polycom TelePresence and Polycom Videoconferencing
systems
ƒ Tandberg and HP Halo announce interoperability between Halo
TelePresence suites and Tandberg Videoconferencing systems
ƒ HP upgrades the Halo TelePresence equipment from proprietary
MPEG to H.264 standards with the codec supplier Haivision
ƒ Tandberg announces “experia” TelePresence product line providing
interoperability with standard Videoconferencing systems
ƒ Teliris claims backwards compatibility with standard H.323 and
H.320 Videoconferencing systems

Interoperability

VTC TelePresence
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 122

Cisco TelePresence
Interoperability – Messages

ƒ Cisco TelePresence is based on open standards like


SIP, H.264 and ITU-T common audio algorithms
ƒ Cisco’s will provide multipoint interoperability via the
Cisco Unified Videoconferencing 3500 Series MCUs
ƒ Cisco will provide native interoperability between Cisco
TelePresence and competitive TelePresence endpoints
using SIP and 720p/480p standards
ƒ Cisco will offer a Competitive Trade-In Program
This allows customers another tactical approach to interop and
provides generous trade-in for your legacy VTC equip
Program details at
http://wwwin.cisco.com/emtg/tsbu/selling_resources/

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 123

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Cisco TelePresence
Interoperability – Strategy

ƒ A comprehensive, multi-phase strategy


Interop between Cisco CTS-1000 and CTS-3000
Phase 0

Audio-only interop between Cisco TelePresence and standard-


definition Videoconferencing / Video Telephony endpoints

TelePresence multipoint switching, with audio-only interop


Phase I

standard-definition Videoconferencing / Video Telephony


endpoints
Phase III Phase II

Integrated multipoint combining high-definition and standard-


definition endpoints in the same meeting

Native interop between Cisco TelePresence endpoints and


competitive TelePresence endpoints

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 124

Cisco TelePresence
Interoperability – Phase 0

CTS-3000 CTS-1000
R R
C
C
L
L LC
R
C
LR

High-Definition TelePresence
Available Q1CY07
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 125

Cisco TelePresence
Interoperability – Phase 0

London
Generic H.323, H.320
or SIP Videoconferencing

Cisco Unified
MeetingPlace H.323, SIP or SCCP
Video Telephony

New York
Desktop Video TelePhony
e.g. CUVA, CUPC

High-Definition TelePresence
Standard-Definition Videoconferencing Available Q1CY07
Audio-Only
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 126

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-42


Cisco TelePresence
Interoperability – Phase I

London
Generic H.323, H.320
or SIP Videoconferencing

Tokyo Cisco TelePresence Cisco Unified


Multipoint Switch MeetingPlace H.323, SIP or SCCP
Video Telephony

New York
Desktop Video TelePhony
e.g. CUVA, CUPC

High-Definition TelePresence
Standard-Definition Videoconferencing Available Q2CY07
Audio-Only
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 127

Cisco TelePresence
Interoperability – Phase II

London
Generic H.323, H.320
or SIP Videoconferencing

Tokyo Cisco TelePresence Cisco Unified


Multipoint Switch MeetingPlace H.323, SIP or SCCP
Video Telephony

New York
Desktop Video TelePhony
e.g. CUVA, CUPC

High-Definition TelePresence
Standard-Definition Videoconferencing Available Q4CY07
Audio-Only
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 128

Cisco TelePresence
Interoperability – Phase II

London
Generic H.323, H.320
or SIP Videoconferencing

Tokyo Cisco TelePresence Cisco Unified


Multipoint Switch MeetingPlace H.323, SIP or SCCP
Video Telephony

New York
Desktop Video TelePhony
e.g. CUVA, CUPC

High-Definition TelePresence
Standard-Definition Videoconferencing Available Q4CY07
Audio-Only
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 129

© 2007, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 8-43


Cisco TelePresence
Interoperability via Cisco Unified MeetingPlace

H.323 CTS 1000


Video Conferencing •Life Like & Size
•1080p
•One button to push
•Spatial Audio

MS Exchange
CTS Manager

Cisco Unified
MeetingPlace

CallManager 5.1

•Legacy H.323
•Standard definition
video & audio

CTS 3000 CTS 3000

Available Q4CY07
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 130

Cisco TelePresence
Interoperability – Phase III

CTS-1000 Competitor
TelePresence

CTS-3000 Competitor
TelePresence

High-Definition TelePresence
Standard-Definition Videoconferencing Available CY08
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 131

Cisco TelePresence
Interoperability – Key Takeaways

ƒ Cisco TelePresence is based on industry standards such as SIP,


1080p, 720p, H.264, AAC/LD.
ƒ Cisco will provide interoperability with standard videoconferencing
systems via the Cisco Unified Videoconferencing 3500 series
ƒ Cisco will offer a competitive Trade-in Program to assist customers with
the transitions to the immersive visual communications
ƒ Cisco’s TelePresence is the world’s only 1080p native resolution
immersive experience offering:
√ 65” displays to deliver life size images
√ Standards based (H.264, 1080p, 720p video, SIP, AAC-LD)
√ “One button to push scheduling” and call launch
√ Fully integrated with Cisco Unified Communications

© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 132

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