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ARABIAN HORSE WORLD

L E G E N D.

L I F E .

L U X U R Y.

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Khallaghan A

Khing Of Diamonds

KhohinoorMW

Aur Kinda Party

Khole Haan

Aur U Kruzn Forabruzn

Proudly owned by the Pitassi Family AWPA, Scottsdale Signature & Breeders Sweepstakes Nominated Sire STANDING AT BECKER STABLES 530.477.5588 • SCID & CA Clear

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PIERCE PHOTO

STIRGILL PHOTO

OCTOBER 2019

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ON THE COVER:

Gazal Al Shaqab (Anaza El Farid x

Kajora) see story on page 41.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY APRIL VISEL

GENERAL:

34

Twisted Tales: Maah Daah Hey, the Mini-Tevis Ride

There’s a saying, “Man plans and God laughs.” In Darice’s case it seems it’s “Woman plans and horses snicker!” by Darice Whyte

38

East Coast Egyptian Classic

by Lisa Cifrese

41

Cover story: Gazal Al Shaqab,

The Once and Future King

History continues to unfold around Gazal Al Shaqab. He is the horse that flies without wings, conquers without a sword. He is the once and future king. Long may he reign, by Betty Finke

58

Stud Book Research, Volume 90

Computer research by Douglas Tatelman, introduction by Denise Hearst

68

Wit and Wisdom From Our Early

Breeders: Marianne and

Richard Hatfield. Marianne and

Dick started their lives together in June 1951. Their Arabian horse interest was obvious even then. A few months later, they gave each other Bint Treyf (Alyf x Treyf by *Nasik), bred by Kellogg Arabian Ranch, who continued to play an important role in the Hatfield family life, by Mary Jane Parkinson

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A refers to placement within the

Trainer and Breeder Almanac

beginning on page 72

TRAINER & BREEDER ALMANAC:

1A

Almanac Introduction/Index of Trainers and Breeders

Selecting the right trainer for your horse is crucial. The successful partnership between owner and trainer is a long-term endeavor with many similarities to a happy marriage.

2A

Trainer/Breeder Profiles

12A

WC Ciao Bella

WC Ciao Bella, Italian for “Hello Beautiful,” was a fitting name for the mare Holly Dillin calls “the Most Nationally-Titled Halter Mare in North American History,” by Holly Dillin

17A

You Be the Judge

by Cindy Reich

20A

From the Artist: Alfred de Dreux

22A

Arabian Ambassador

AM Shahrazad, brings her

Arabian flair to open cutting competitions.

(C O N T I N U E D

O N

PAG E

6 )

WH Justice x Om El Shadiva, by Sanadik El Shaklan

For breeding information contact Janina Merz at 805.490.6810 | www.OmElArab.com

OSBORN PHOTO

REID PHOTO

OCTOBER 2019

TABLE OF CONTENTS

(C O N T I N U E D

F R O M

PAG E

4 )

AROUND THE WORLD:

98

The Fairytale Castle and Arabian Horses

The elegant Domaine de

Chantilly was the setting for

the 2019 AHO World Cup

and AHO Breeders’

Championship,

by Caroline Reid

106

2019 Polish Nationals

and the Pride of

Poland Auction

It was bittersweet to return

to Janów Podlaski for this

year’s Pride of Poland

Festival after a break of

three years which has seen

such sweeping changes in

the political scene of the

country and, of course, the

studs, by Deirdre Hyde

FROM THE WORLD

AHW: Archive,

57

Collection, Record Keeping, Documentation

Record Keeper

19A

UPCOMING FEATURES

Egyptian Arabians in

40

November/December

Upcoming Issues

127

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ENDURANCE & RACING:

24

2019 Tevis Cup

The drama of the Tevis, as

expressed by Gwen Hall: “The

six miles from Lower Quarry to

the finish line I got motion

sickness riding in the dark. I

thought I would fall out of the

saddle. But Dakar worked to

stay under me; he is so

amazing! We walked at least

four of the last six miles in, all

because of my vertigo. I was

astonished to find out we still

placed eighth!” Read more

stories of sheer grit in our Tevis

coverage, by Genie Stewart-

Spears

114

RoseBrook Tops Texas

Arabian Races at Retama

by Steve Andersen

116

HH Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan

Al Nahyan Cup

by Steve Andersen

DEPARTMENTS

8

Online Exclusives

10

What in the World: A Golden Moment

After years of documenting others in the arena, Suzanne Sturgill takes a spin in the Golden Oldies class.

118

Stud Farm Diaries:

Tips for a Stress-free Horse

by Cindy Reich

121

Arab Year

126

Map & Index

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arabianhorseworld.com

ONLINE EXCLUSIVES

OCTOBER 2019

PHOTO OF

THE MONTH

Heirs Noble Love (Afires Heir

x Noble Aphrodite by IXL Noble

Express) 2009 mare,

ridden by Joel Kiesner, owned

and bred by Karlton Jackson,

Fayetteville, Georgia.

www.kiesnertraining.com.

PHOTO BY SCHATZBERG/VESTY.

Q U O TE

O F

TH E

M O N TH :

I like to come in humble and see how the day unfolds because it’s Tevis and you never know what can happen. You can have the best horse that has a bad day, or steady-eddy who trips and falls. You just never know. I think it’s important to ride your own ride no matter what, that includes riding your horse to the best of its ability and not more. That’s how I have always ridden Monk. I know he gives me all he has and I listen to that.

LINDSAY FISHER, “2019 TEVIS CUP,” PAGE 24.

OUT OF THIS WORLD: FEBRUARY 1984

1983 U.S. NATIONALS SOLID GOLD

“One of the highlights of the

show was the spectacular

performance of Scarlet Lace in

winning the Park class. In

perfect balance and form, this

million-dollar mare proved her

worth for owner George Huck

of Olympia Farms by becoming

the first mare to win the

‘Triple Crown,’ having already won Formal Driving and Combination National

Championships. Scarlet Lace showed ‘em how to do it right.”

READ MORE BY GLADYS BROWN EDWARDS AND SEE THE PHOTOS AT

www.arabianhorseworld.com/US-nationals-83

2019 YOUTH NATIONALS

Check out the photo gallery

and results listing at:

www.arabianhorseworld.

com/2019-youth-nationals.

//

WANT MORE OF THE WORLD?

Keep your finger on the pulse of Arabian Horse World

and take full advantage of all that our website has to

offer. With daily updates and exclusive online content,

a calendar of Arabian horse events around the world

searchable by country, date, and type of event, there

is always something new to read or explore…

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ARAB YEAR ONLINE

Searchable by country, date, and name of show, our online Arab Year is a wonderful resource. Check it out at arabianhorseworld.com/events. Email kathy@ arabianhorseworld.com to add your event to our Arab Year in print and online.

//

ARABIAN HORSE WORLD

PUBLISHER

Denise P. Hearst

EDITOR

Mary Jane Parkinson

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Betty Finke

SENIOR SALES ASSOCIATE

Wendy Flynn

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Jeffrey Wintersteen Cindy Reich

SALES/MARKETING CONSULTANTS

Gary Dearth Francesca Aragno

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION

Carol Kelsey-Frilot, Senior Designer Michael Junge Annie Gallagher Wilson Sani Ricasata

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Kathy LaChaine

CIRCULATION/ACCOUNTING MANAGER

Rhonda Hall

COMPUTER SYSTEMS

Douglas Tatelman

STAFF WRITERS

Steve Andersen Genie Stewart-Spears

AHW MEDIA GROUP, LLC

PRESIDENT

Jeffrey M. Sloan

Copyright © 2019 by AHW Media Group, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproductions of contents, either whole or in part, not permitted without written consent of publisher. Address all advertising and subscription related queries to:

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www.arabianhorseworld.com E-mail should be sent to info@arabianhorseworld.com. Arabian Horse World reserves the right to edit all written materials submitted for publication. Printed in the USA.

//

WHAT IN THE WORLD

A GOLDEN MOMENT

by Suzanne Sturgill

Suzanne Sturgill and ANGELS ENVEE (Fadi Al Shaqab x Dorian Aurelia), in the East Coast Egyptian Classic.

haven’t shown a horse I since I was a teenager and I have never shown an Arabian horse. As a

new breeder of a beautiful filly, I wanted so much to show her ATH, but knew I couldn’t run. I have never been able to run — flunked many a gym class because of it. So when I saw the ‘Golden Oldies Class — 50 and Over’ which had limited running, offered at the

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East Coast Egyptian Classic Show, I knew I was going, and that I was taking my Angel in! Everyone else in the class ran with their horses before me! I planned on a light jog and let her prance about with her non-stop tail. I was the last to go in, I looked at my partners who asked if I wanted a little shake shake, I nodded, let’s go for it! And did a big trot around the arena! In all the fun of

Suzanne Sturgill and ANGELS ENVEE with co-owners David Conner and Miller Pinson.

trotting off with mom for the first time ever, she gave a cute buck just before we got to the judge. My ankles didn’t freak out and we made it! I can be bad about stepping out of my comfort zones, but this has been my year for stepping out. I never liked to sing in public unless I knew the song perfectly inside and out, I didn’t like to take on a job unless I knew I could deliver the best. So I had lots to worry about showing my filly myself with only two halter lessons

and feeling very awkward with my hands (thus no whip to confuse me more), worried that my ankle will rollover if I run, or wondering will she respond and do a good stand up for me. Friends came to the show to cheer us on … “everyone’s watching Suzanne, the photographer!” YIKES!! This was big for me!! But the moment I took the lead, ALL THAT WENT AWAY!

I didn’t trip or fall down, and she showed like a champ for me!

I remember watching the video

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afterwards, and realizing while

I was in the ring with the girl of my dreams, it was just the two of us! It was surreal, and it didn’t matter if I was doing it perfectly. We were having fun and doing the best we could for both being newbies. I never heard the crowd cheering that

I heard in the video. Nor did I

it didn’t matter

if I was doing

it perfectly. We

were having fun

and doing the

best we could.

realize right away that we were the last ones called out for awards, which meant that we won the class! Guess I was on cloud nine just to be having fun with my horse. Many thanks to the Egyptian Classic Show for this class for folks who ‘have been around a little longer.’ You helped us find the confidence and joy of showing our horses. I want to do it again!

//

ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY

CEA Comfortably Numb

2018 AWPA H/A Futurity Champion 2018 H/A Maturity Champion

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10

YEARS

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Corrective Customized Supplement

Athena

md

(Truest x Anastasiaa

by ATA Bey Starr)

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Competing in

the Arabian Yearling Fillies Championship

with Austin Colangelo at U.S. Nationals

Proudly owned by ISRA Arabians Kris & Ashley Glover www.israarabians.com

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TRAVIS TRAINING CENTER, INC.

Payson, Utah 801-376-3820 travis@travistrainingcenter.com www.travistrainingcenter.com

 

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(JA Urbino x MM La Preciosa)

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((Fadi Al Shaqqab x Bey Monet TRJ)

 
 

2018 bay colt

 

Purebred Yearling Sweepstakes Colt to be shown by Kim Morgan Region 8 Reserve Champion Yearling Sweepstakes Colt

 

Proudly owned by Linda and Larry, Abston Arabian Farm, Lucas, TX

 

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(Ambre x Fancyana)

2002 Half-Arabian grey gelding

Half-Arabian Gelding Stock/Hunter Type open and AOTH to be shown by Kim Morgan and Kassie Crissman 2018 U.S. National & Youth National Reserve Champion

Proudly owned by the Crissman family, Baton Rouge, LA

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2017 Half-Arabian bay gelding

 

Half-Arabian 2-year-old Gelding to be shown by Kim Morgan 2018 U.S .National Reserve Champion Yearling Sweepstakes Gelding 2019 Region 9 Champion Half-Arabian Gelding AOTH

 

Proudly owned by Dione and Tom Hanke, Ponca City, OK

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ARABIAN HORSE WORLD is a proud sponsor of AERC

“This year’s Tevis was an incredible experience and probably the most fun and amazing race of my life.”

T eviscup 100-mile Endurance Race

¤‚⁄·

OSBORN PHOTO

story by Genie Stewart-Spears photos by Lynne Glazer, Ron Osborn, and Bill Gore

T he 64th Western States 100-Mile Trail Ride, aka

Tevis Cup or simply Tevis, started 184

competitors at 5:15 a.m. on August 17. The trail

begins at Robie Equestrian Park, near Truckee, California, and takes riders over, around and down many mountains, along narrow trails, in and out of canyons, through rivers, and across bridges in the infamous Sierra Nevada Mountains. It is a challenge for riders and their horses to reach the finish line in Auburn, California, within 24 hours. The competition is just as much, if not more, against the elements as each other. The predawn start is staggered into two groups, or pens as they are called, with the more competitive, faster horses in the first pen. “It allows us to put the faster horses up front because there’s little opportunity to pass in the first 12 miles,” says Ride Director Chuck Stalley.

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Since it is based on the horse, not the rider, this means, for example, veteran competitor Heather Reynolds was in the second pen even though she is a highly competitive rider. But being in the second pen didn’t slow her down. Husband and wife endurance riders and trainers, Jeremy and Heather, were both competing. Heather has completed seven times with three wins and two Haggin Cups (best condition); Jeremy has had six completions (all in top ten) with three wins and two Haggin Cups. Heather, who has over 22,000 career miles, was riding ASuddenGift MHF (Sudden Mischief [By Golly] x AER Wiqueen [*Wiking]). Jeremy has over 14,000 miles and was riding RTR Rimfires Etta (RTR Rimfire x PS Sierra Sage) owned by Dublin Hart. But it was Californian Karen Donley and Royal Patron (Monarch AH [*Wiking] x Pink Beaches), the 2016 Tevis Cup

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OSBORN PHOTOOSBORN

PHOTO

At 9:27 pm, after 100 miles of rugged trail, Sanoma Blakeley, right, on RA Ares Bay (Must Bey Dreamin x RBS Aalani Mist) edged Jeremy Reynolds on RTR Rimfires Etta (RTR Rimfire x PS Sierra Sage) at the finish line of the Western States 100-Mile Trail Ride. Blakeley’s course time was 14 hours 12 minutes, and one second later for Reynolds.

Top right and bottom: Tevis Cup winner, 18-year-old Sanoma Blakeley, said, “I am just so proud to have been able to ride this amazing athlete, RA Ares Bay, aka Goober, and that he finished so strongly and finally got his moment to shine. He has a hundred percent career completion rate, including four Tevis finishes, a 16th, 5th, and 3rd place, and this year he brought it home with the win. Thanks for everybody who supported us, all the volunteers, everyone who made this ride possible and everybody who sent us positive comments!”

Jeremy Reynolds, top left, riding RTR Rimfires Etta (RTR Rimfire x PS Sierra Sage).“I thought I had a really good chance of winning,” said Jeremy, who conceded to second place after a six-mile battle against Sanoma Blakeley. “For the first 10 miles, the mare, owned by Dublin Hart, wasn’t trotting like I thought she should. At that point, I thought we only had a wing and a prayer to top ten. I continued with my normal game plan, running (on foot) in the canyons. Then she pretty much turned it on after Foresthill when we were 45 minutes behind the frontrunners. We started picking some of the riders off. “Then those last six miles Sanoma and I switched the lead back and forth three or four times. My horse didn’t have much left and so when Sanoma asked for trail again, I stayed with her just in case we might have a run off. I got up to the hip of her horse at the finish line but she definitely had the better horse that day.”

winners, who took the lead at about 28 miles. Donley was closely challenged by a pack of riders, including siblings Barrak and Sanoma Blakeley, along with Gwen Hall and Lindsay Fisher, to name a few. Donley, on her 17-year-old mare, said later, “We had a great day. I train all year for this ride and to ride the trail at a certain pace. I knew she could repeat her performance of 2016. Given a few changes to the course, we were slightly ahead of pace.”

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Gabriela Blakeley, who was unable to start this year, talked about her Oregon family’s ride plans. “We had really high hopes for Barrak and Sanoma’s horses. They were planning on riding together and competitively. At 55 miles Sanoma’s horse was stronger than Barrak’s so she decided to leave him and go on alone. Wasch’s horse was inexperienced and had never done a race longer than 50 miles so he was just trying to finish this year.” Eighteen-year-old Sanoma, who has 3,555 career miles since 2008, was

PHOTO GLAZER PHOTOOSBORN

riding RA Ares Bey (Must Bey Dreamin x RBS Aalani Mist). Her brother, 20-year-old Barrak, with 4,275 miles since 2007, was on OMR Quicksan (OMR John Henry [RD Five Star] x Sansational Lady [Sanskrit]). (Last year, Wasch rode RA Ares Bey to third place and Barrak rode OMR Quicksan to fifth place.) This year Wasch, with 5,690 miles since 2004, was on up and coming Skywalker SF (*Sir Fames HBV x Pskyla). With 3,040 career miles, Gwen Hall, riding Sizedoesntmatter (Line Dancer

“Ogee was capable of winning the ride,” stated Haley Moquin who completed in third place on Ogee (Okba x Gollys GiGi [By Golly]) in 14 hours 21 minutes. “But,” she admitted, “my lack of experience on the Tevis Trail would be a big factor in whether or not that was possible. “Ogee was being a powerhouse through the canyons,” continued Moquin, who calls Texas home. “She naturally trots at 11 mph and is always asking to go faster. She was a beast as we cantered on ledges and up the hills alongside Jeremy, Heather, Sanoma, and Richard. Those last 15 miles seemed like the fastest pace in the entire race. Everyone was flying down the trails. I never have to ask her to go faster or check her so that she doesn’t go too fast. This made for an easy hundred!” And, Moquin added, “I am forever grateful to the Lemmons family for providing me with a horse that was more than ready and being there with me every step of the race. They made my first hundred-miler one to remember and treated me as a part of their own family. I can’t thank them enough for this experience. I am officially hooked on Tevis and hope to be there in 2020!”

[Burning Sand] x Contemporary You [*Wiking]), better known as Dakar, says, “We started our training for this year’s Tevis last winter and felt we could go for a shot at the win this year.” Hall, from Colorado, and Dakar finished in fourth place in 2014 and second place in 2015. She and Dakar had 2,150 miles together coming into this event and make a formable team. There are a number of places along the course where horses are viewed by veterinarians, besides the two vet checks with one-hour mandatory holds, either as they

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trotted by or at a Gate & Go checkpoint. A Gate & Go is where they are briefly examined, trotted out in-hand and their pulse checked before they can continue down the trail if they pass the exam. Red Star, at 28 miles, is the first Gate & Go. Karen Donley was leading by two minutes at that point. Robinson Flat, 36 miles into the course, is the first vet check with an hour hold. Donley was first in and out of this vet check too. However, Gwen Hall was only one minute behind Donley. The young Blakeleys were only four minutes

GLAZER PHOTO

GLAZER PHOTO

Richard George and his Anglo-Arabian MF Amir Al Rasool (Akdar Brins x May Go North) completed in fourth place with a ride time of 14 hours 22 minutes. George and his horse shared 500 career miles coming into this ride.

behind and the Reynoldses were nearly 30 minutes behind. Gwen Hall said, “I rode much of the first half of the ride with Karen Donley. She is a wonderful lady, and her mare and Dakar seemed to get along well. Let me tell you, that lady can fly on foot running down the canyons!” At Last Chance, the 50-mile- point Gate & Go, Donley, Hall and the two young Blakeleys arrived at the same time. But, again, Donley’s horse vetted through quickly, getting a two-minute lead over Hall. Barrak and Sanoma took eight minutes longer getting through the vet check. Lindsay Fisher and Monk, an unregistered Arabian gelding, along with three

other riders, leaped out ahead of the Blakeleys. This was Californian Lindsay Fisher, D.V.M., and Monk’s fifth Tevis, always having finished in the top ten. Fisher has completed a total of seven times and six of those were in the top ten. Although Christopher Martin owns Monk, Fisher and Monk have about 1,500

career miles together, including seven 100-miler rides. “I just tried to cruise along easy, wanting to Top Ten. I was riding fourth place, nice and steady, at about 75 miles, when six horses riding together passed me. I went from fourth to tenth in 30 seconds! That’s nuts!” she said in disbelief. After the treacherous canyons is

“I am so happy that Goobs is a sure- footed horse, knowing where the trail was because we were booking it in the dark.”

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In 14 hours 39 minutes, Suzanne Huff and her homebred SD Expressa (Expressive LP x Barbarella FF [*Barbaados]) finished in fifth place. “Prior to Francisco’s,” she said, “the ‘pack’ (of frontrunners) was even larger – there were eight in the pack. For me the California Loop was crazy

scary as I didn’t like going faster than a trot along those ledge trails. But when whatever horse was in front of me took off, Sessa would also. Since she is more competitive than I am, I didn’t have much say in the matter. I knew, though, once it got dark I would be able to slow her down. I had no idea where we were leaving Lower Quarry because it

was dark and with a big group there would Top Ten so was very happy.”

but I knew I

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GLAZER PHOTO

Although Gwen Hall, left, and Karen Donley appear to be on a casual trail ride in this photo, they both had high hopes of winning the Tevis Cup. Donley completed in sixth place and Hall finished in eighth place. Hall, who’s been competing since 2011, now has three Tevis completions in 2nd, 4th and this year 8th place, on Sizedoesntmatter (Line Dancer [Burning Sand] x Contemporary You [*Wiking]), better known as Dakar. “The start this year was a little nerve wracking for me,” she shared. “Because the ride was postponed a month due to snowpack, we started in the dark. Usually there is twilight at the start, enough to see. With the dark and dust, plus 180-plus amped up horses and riders, I went out a little faster than I planned for safety concerns. Dakar was strong and didn’t miss a step. The sunrise was very welcome, and I was a bit surprised to find us out front. But we were hitting our time goals and so I didn’t worry. “The six miles from Lower Quarry to the finish line I got motion sickness riding in the dark. The moon hadn’t come up yet and under the tree canopy it was very dark. No roller coasters for this gal!” she laughed. “So, at three miles out on the twisty single track heading up to the finish line, I started vomiting. A lot. I thought I would fall out of the saddle. But Dakar worked to stay under me; he is so amazing! We walked at least four of the last six miles in, all because of my vertigo. I was astonished to find out we still placed eighth!”

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another Gate & Go. At that check, Deadwood, 55 miles into the course, Gwen Hall had taken the lead by one minute over Lindsay Fisher. The three Blakeleys, followed by Karen Donley arrived at the checkpoint. Horses had to meet a 64 heart rate before continuing. Donley and Hall were out on the same minute. Meanwhile, Heather and Jeremy Reynolds were still lagging behind by about 25 minutes. Foresthill vet check, at 68 miles, is the second and last one-hour mandatory hold after passing the veterinary exam. It is a busy place. Residents and sightseers mingle with crews, and riders calculate and recalculate their goals. Karen Donley was first to arrive, followed by Lindsay Fisher and Haley Moquin seven minutes later. Twenty-year-old Haley Moquin, not mentioned earlier, had been in the top ten mix. From Texas, this young lady was riding smart on a 15-year-old mare Ogee (*Okba x Gollys GiGi [By Golly]). This was Haley’s first hundred- mile competition. Ogee, owned by Erin Lemmons, also of Texas, had one previous hundred-miler that she won and earned the Best Condition Award. Gwen Hall and Dakar had slipped back 30 minutes behind the leader along with Suzanne Huff and Nicki Meuten. Jeremy and Heather Reynolds had moved up to eighth and ninth place. Suzanne Huff has completed the Tevis in 1996 (16th place), 2000 (8th place), 2007 (3rd place) and 2017 (26th place). Huff, from Nevada, has accumulated 21,000 career miles. This year she was riding SD Expressa (Expressive LP x Barbarella FF [*Barbaados]) “This was Sessa’s first Tevis and ninth one-day 100-mile finish. I bred, raised, trained, and have competed both her and my 2017 26th-place finisher SD SzZaphira (Gardjan x Rawena),” she said. “My goal,” she continued, “was to get across the river before dark and to Top Ten. It’s this mare’s type of ride — mountains, technical, with lots of downhill. She has excellent recoveries.

GLAZER PHOTO

But I, along with two other riders, made an error after Robinson Flat at a three-way intersection with a big pine tree blocking the view of one single ribbon way down the trail. We lost 20-30 minutes regaining the route and this dropped me down to 14th place at that time.” Donley was first out of Foresthill with a 10-minute lead over Sanoma Blakely and 13 minutes ahead of Haley Moquin. Suzanne Huff was in sixth place. Virginian Nicki Meuten and Jeremy Reynolds left Foresthill with Huff. Heather Reynolds was out three minutes later, and Richard George, on his third try to complete the course, was also in the top ten. George, who lives in the Tevis area, was riding his Anglo-Arabian, MF Amir Al Rasool (Akdar Brins x May Go North). George and his horse shared 500 career miles coming into this ride. Nicki Meuten, who had completed the ride in 2007, was riding FYF Dutch (LS Zane Grey x Lateef Zeda). “Dutch was on his game,” said Meuten, a veterinarian from Virginia, about her homebred 15-year-old gelding. “When he was a young colt, I told told my husband Don I want to keep this one – let’s not sell him. It was a

“I don’t start a ride with a plan on how I will try to finish. I ride the horse I am on and make decisions as I go, depending on the day my horse is having,” stated Nicki Meuten, D.V.M., who completed in seventh place on FYF Dutch (LS Zane Grey x Lateef Zeda). “We started in pen 1, maybe 50th or so going out and were 30ish at Robinson Flat. Dutch was strong and sensible, and we kept moving up. At Foresthill we were going out with the frontrunners. I wanted to stay strong, but knew I did not know the trail well enough to risk racing once it got dark. All light was gone when I left Lower Quarry. With just six miles to go, I backed off and rode to make it in safely.”

“Although Dutch eats meagerly, spooks and stumbles a lot — not a good thing for a Tevis mount — he was almost perfect.”

good decision; he is now at 3,700 miles and 11 for 12 in 100s. We hauled him from Virginia to California for this ride. There were no issues with horse, trailer, or truck for 3,000 miles! Dutch and his trailer buddy did terrific over our five-day trip with a three-day hold over in Ft Collins. “On race day I had to ask Dutch to slow down all day. He wanted to go faster, but we were traveling as fast as I wanted to over those trails! Dutch is not a great eater and does not take care of himself, but still I could not believe it when he turned his nose up at the gorgeous California alfalfa hay. And he did not like the mash that was prepared for him. He wanted to eat but not what was being offered. Then we found plain old grass hay at about mile 50 — he dove into it,” she laughed.

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“Although Dutch eats meagerly, spooks and stumbles a lot — not a good thing for a Tevis mount — he was almost perfect. I say sorry to Heather (Reynolds) as Dutch did try to bite her good horse at a water tub. Other than that poor citizenship grade, he was a gentleman.” With 15 miles to go out of Francisco’s Gate & Go, Karen

Donley was still in the lead. Seven riders were within 16 minutes behind her. Donley said, “I had a ten-minute lead out of Francisco.

I planned to keep a steady pace to the finish line. But about three miles before Lower Quarry, a

group of six riders zipped past me.

I had no intention of racing

after them.” The six riders who passed Donley at about 91 miles were Sanoma Blakeley, Heather and Jeremy Reynolds, Richard George, Haley Moquin and Suzanne Huff. Six miles from the finish line was the last on-trail vet check at Lower Quarry. It is a Gate & Go where the horses must meet the 64-pulse rate before they can continue. Jeremy Reynolds said, “It was a really crazy pace there towards the finish. We flew in a big group, cantering most of the way, and then caught and passed Karen at

GLAZER PHOTO

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Finishing in 15 hours 13 minutes in 9th place was Lindsay Fisher, top left, and Monk (unregistered Arabian). Fisher says, “I like to come in humble and see how the day unfolds because it’s Tevis and you never know what can happen. You can have the best horse that has a bad day, or steady-eddy who trips and falls. You just never know. I think it’s important to ride your own ride no matter what, and that includes riding your horse to the best of its ability and not more. That’s how I have always ridden Monk. I know he gives me all he has and I listen to that.” Lindsay Fisher and Monk went on to earn the coveted Haggin Cup, top right. It is similar to earning Best Condition but much more. Chuck Stalley, Ride Director explained, “The Cup Committee observes the horses and riders throughout the event and (among other things) certifies the sportsmanship of the top ten finishing riders. If the Cup Committee finds no violations or concerns, those horses are eligible to show for this award. The Haggin Cup selection then falls to the veterinary team to determine the winner. Completion time and weight carried are not considered in the selection. This is unlike AERC best condition formulas commonly used in endurance events.”

the river crossing (88 miles). Then Heather and I and Sanoma took off at a hand gallop and left the group. The three of us arrived together at Lower Quarry.” George and Moquin arrived two minutes later and Donley and Huff were seven minutes behind. Anticipation and adrenalin had to be high for everyone as the ride could be won or lost at the checkpoint. Sanoma Blakeley was first to pulse down and leave, and wasted no time heading for the finish line. Two minutes later, Jeremy Reynolds went in hot pursuit. The next five riders went out five to nine minutes later. It was dark and the trail was narrow and dangerous in places. Jeremy Reynolds recalled, “I went out fast to the bridge and then across Highway 49, where there is a very technical, rocky section where trotting is the fastest you dare go. From the bridge, I was 45 seconds behind Sanoma and hammered along until I caught and passed her. We switched the lead back and forth three or four times. My horse didn’t have much left and so when Sanoma asked for trail again, I stayed with her just in case we might have a run off. I got up to the hip of her horse at the finish line but she definitely had the better horse that day,” declared Reynolds. Sanoma and Goober, as she calls RA Ares Bay, crossed the finish line with a course time of 14 hours 12 minutes. Jeremy and Rimfires completed on the same minute but mere seconds after. Victorious, Sanoma said, “This year’s Tevis was an incredible experience and probably the most fun and amazing race of my life. Goobs was so strong all day! He and I have always had a bond. I rode him on his first two

Sanoma Blakeley was first to pulse down and leave, and wasted no time heading for the finish line. Two minutes later, Jeremy Reynolds went in hot pursuit. The next five riders went out five to nine minutes later. It was dark and the trail was narrow and dangerous in places.

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100s and won multiple 50s and best conditions on him a few years ago. I knew I could have a chance at winning Tevis with him when my dad offered me to ride him. But I am not a huge fan of all the drop-offs at Tevis, so I was very hesitant at first. “But when race day came, he was a beast and felt absolutely amazing! Not much seemed to faze him, and when we came into Last Chance and Deadwood he pulsed in at 48 bpm. I have never ridden a horse that was so strong. After 90 miles I felt as though we had done maybe 20! The race to the finish with Jeremy Reynolds was pretty insane and I am so happy that Goobs is a sure-footed horse, knowing where the trail was because we were booking it in the dark. It came down to a sprint for the finish and Goobs gave me his whole heart. He won Tevis by a horse length,” Blakeley said. Nine minutes later, in third place, was college student Haley Moquin on Ogee. Amazingly, this was Haley’s first 100-mile event! “I left Lower Quarry in fourth place. With six miles to go, I really thought I was going to finish fourth. It is very difficult to make up time with so few miles. About two miles from the finish line, I caught up to Richard George. He was walking his horse up a hill. The trail was wide, I asked to pass, and on Ogee and I went.” Richard George completed one minute later in fourth place, and 17 minutes later Suzanne Huff, Heather Reynolds, and Karen Donley walked their horses across the finish line. Unfortunately, Heather’s horse was pulled at the final vet check because her mount trotted out lame. “It was a shoeing malfunction,” explained the disappointed but stoic Heather. About the ride, Huff says, “The California Loop was

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Rounding off the top ten finishers was Suzanne Hayes on her Anglo-Arabian Greenbriar Al Jabal (WW Sun Dancer x Go Tiger Go [Thoroughbred]), better known as Atlas. Their course time was 15 hours 14 minutes. Atlas, with Suzanne aboard, has finished the Tevis four times and Hayes has nine finishes, including the four on Atlas. “My plan for Tevis this year was as usual, go for a finish first, then do the best we can on that particular day,” explained Hayes. “Did I have any doubts of a finish? I think you always have that nasty thought in the back of your mind, but I am normally a very positive person so that’s what I focus my thoughts and energy on! “Already this year Atlas did the Fort Howes 100 (fourth place), five weeks later the Big Horn 100 (third place), then five weeks later, this Tevis Ride (10th place). He is an extremely good 100-mile horse so that’s what we’ve focused on,” she said with pride.

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crazy scary as I didn’t like going faster than a trot along those ledge trails, but when whatever horse was in front of me took off, Sessa would also. I didn’t have much say in the matter. I had no idea where we were leaving Quarry

because it was dark and with a big group there

knew I would Top Ten so was very happy.” Donley, who finished in sixth place on the same minute as Huff said, “Knowing I would not win, I slowed down some,” says Donley after she was passed before Lower Quarry. “At Lower Quarry, my mare got all As for her vet score. We have seven for seven completions on the Tevis Trail!” Nicki Meuten and Dutch crossed the finish line with a ride time of 14 hours 51 minutes in 7th place. Gwen Hall and Dakar were next with 15 hours 5 minutes course time. Ninth place was Lindsay Fisher and Monk in 15 hours 13 minutes. And topping off the Top Ten was Suzanne Hayes, who has top tenned this ride eight times out of nine starts, completed in 15 hours 14 minutes on her Anglo-Arabian, Greenbriar Al Jabal (WW Sundancer x Go Tiger Go). Hayes, a veteran competitor from Montana, has over 24,000 miles. She said, “The ride this year was very competitive and fast. And as for Atlas (nickname for her horse) having only has 3,000 miles, it is because I have figured out over the years that less is more and to save your horse for the important rides. Plus, I happen to be blessed with another extremely talented Anglo-Arabian and two young Al-Marah horses that have started their endurance careers. “What about Tevis that keeps you coming back, you ask? Good question!” she said. “There’s just something about it that keeps calling me back; plus, it’s one of the last, at least in the West, big deal rides left.”

but I

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Seventy-five-year-old Kathie Perry is one of the founding members of the American Endurance Ride Conference and has completed the Tevis Cup 24 times! “In 1972, a small group of endurance riders, mainly from Auburn, felt we needed some sort of uniformity to this fast growing sport and to offer more protection to the horse, thus the American Endurance Ride Conference was formed. By sanctioning only rides that met its criteria, the conference offered a central clearinghouse for ride dates, ride results, and a very simple point system. The record keeping became an important part of the conference along with the educational programs and establishing veterinarian guidelines,” she explained. Perry’s first Tevis was in 1975. This year she completed in 20 hours, 33rd place, on Cowbboy (HR Aflame x Isabel Star [RD Five Star]). When asked what makes a good Tevis horse she said, “I like Arabians and I like them to be well balanced, with good feet, shorter in the back and a good hip with a sound mind.” And when asked what draws her back every year to the Tevis she stated, “It is the Super Bowl of endurance rides and who wouldn’t want to compete in the Super every year! I come for the journey and the beauty of the trail, the experience it reveals, the challenging mountains, river crossing, rocks, bogs, canyons, extreme heat and the darkness. It is all wonderful!”

Earning the Haggin Cup, judged on the horse’s condition during and after the ride, as well as the rider’s sportsmanship, is a sought- after honor. “The final judging of the horses is done at 10 a.m. on Sunday morning, five hours after the final hour to finish,” explained Chuck Stalley. “The Cup Committee observes the horses and riders throughout the event and (among other things) certifies the sportsmanship of the top ten

finishing riders. If the Cup Committee finds no violations or concerns, those horses are eligible to show for this award. The Haggin Cup selection then falls to the veterinary team to determine the winner. Completion time and weight carried are not considered in the selection. This is unlike AERC best condition formulas commonly used in endurance events. This year the honor went to Monk, ridden by Lindsay Fisher. “Monk didn’t have that extra go

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Ninety-eight of the 184 starters completed this year. It was an unusually high completion rate due to several factors.“We had a very competitive field of riders up front this year,” stated Ride Director Chuck Stalley. “And we took out about a mile section at Pucker Point, the trail along the edge of a bluff, due to looseness of the ground resulting from a fire a few years ago as well as cows in that area contributing to the erosion. The re-route trail was on a two- track trail, which was faster, and that made the ride maybe 20-25 minutes faster. “In addition,” he added, “the weather was clear and dry, no wind, maybe 90-93 degrees in the canyons that is typically 100 degrees other years. We also moved the ride from July 20th to August 17th because the snow wouldn’t melt by July 20th,” he stated. “The snow melted off the trail at the top of Squaw Valley 10 days before the race. With this later date, we had a half hour less of light but that is a half hour more of cooler temperature. All these factors that made the ride faster this year.”

that he normally does,” said Lindsay about their day on the trail. “I’d say he was having a bad day, but in the end, we had our best outcome to date!” The final rider crossed the finish line with a course time of 21 hours 47 minutes. Interestingly, 41 riders completed in the last 45 minutes time frame! That wrapped up another great event at 5:02 a.m. (5:15 a.m. was the cutoff time to complete) on August 18 with 98 successfully completing.

GORE PHOTO

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Suzanne Solis, left, and Angie McGhee, bottom right, hauled Suzanne’s horse from Georgia to California to ride the Tevis Trail. Solis rode Thor (unregistered Arabian) and Angie was on Khorvet (TC Kharpe Diem x Jamahra). Angie said her goal was first to start, second to get a photo at Cougar Rock, and third to earn the Tevis belt buckle. She and Suzanne accomplished the goals! They both completed, in 89th and 90th place, with a course time of 21 hours 38 minutes.

2019 Tevis Top Ten Finishers

1.

Sanoma Blakeley

RA Ares Bey (Must Bey Dreamin x RBS Aalani Mist)

14:12

2.

Jeremy Renolds

RTR Rimfires Etta (RTR Rimfire x PS Sierra Sage)

14:12:01

3.

Haley Moquin

Ogee (*Okba x Gollys Gigi)

14:21

4.

Richard George

MF Amir Al Rasool (Akdar Brins x May Go North)

14:22

5.

Suzanne Huff

SD Expressa (Expressive LP x Barbarella FF)

14:39

6.

Karen Donley

Royal Patron (Monarch AH x Pink Beaches)

14:39

7.

Nicki Meuten

FYF Dutch (LS Zane Grey x Lateef Zeda)

14:51

8.

Gwen Hall

Sizedoesntmatter (Line Dancer x Contemporary You)

15:05

9.

Lindsay Fisher

Monk (unregistered Arabian)

15:13

10.

Suzanne Hayes

Greenbriar Al Jabal (WW Sun Dancer x Go Tiger Go [TB])

15:14

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TWISTED TALES

MAAH DAAH HEY – THE MINI TEVIS RIDE

Story and photographs by Darice Whyte

believe the I saying is “Man plans and God laughs.” Well, in

About 10 days before the Maah Daah ride date, three of us decided we would go to North Dakota for the ride. We had been to the ride in the fall of 2017, however the ride location had moved. Wonderful news! That meant a new area for us to see. Suddenly three became five, and

my case, it seems it’s “Woman plans and horses snicker!” Dianne and I made plans to once again try the 50-mile endurance ride at Fort Howes with Tia and Serenade. Last year, we made it to 40

miles, but the heat did us in. The next plan was Dianne would do the 50-mile ride at Big Horn with Tia while Wendy and I

would ride Bolt and Serenade in the 100. Slowly, one by one, our horses came up with very different plans. Some little injuries and some not so much so. Driving long

distances with horses that aren’t sound isn’t the most brilliant plan. Without Wendy riding in the 100 there was no way I was riding 100 miles on my

own. I was only going because Wendy convinced me we should and she had promised to open all the gates on the trail. She’s 20 years younger than I am, and I’m a short senior on a tall horse! While I can get on from the ground, I’m nowhere nearly as fast as she is. Now what? Well, when plans dissolve it’s time to stand up and shout, “Plot twist,” and make new plans.

This is an amazing site for a ride. I am so lucky that people put on rides in these areas so I can go check them out.

two trailers and four horses were making the journey southwest. At last minute, we decided we would leave on Thursday evening rather than early Friday morning. The temperatures were predicted to be quite high, so

if we could get four hours out of the way during the cooler nighttime that

I WAS ONLY GOING BECAUSE WENDY CONVINCED ME WE SHOULD AND SHE HAD PROMISED TO OPEN ALL THE GATES ON THE TRAIL.

seemed to be a good idea. Just before supper Wendy, Wendy’s 11-year old-son Ethen, and I headed off to my sister’s place to spend the night.

While getting some of the driving out of the way was a good plan, me staying up until 2 AM visiting with my sister and brother-in-law probably wasn’t! We did manage to solve all the world’s problems, however morning came a wee bit early. We headed out, and as we drove along, I began to feel not so wonderful. At first I thought I had self- inflicted flu. However, as the day went on and I began feeling substantially more green, I wondered if I had

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The land is definitely not flat like at home! We went up and down these buttes all day.

Ethen, his mother Wendy, Shannon and Elizabeth getting supper ready. The site had a lot of trees, which helped with the heat.

picked up something else. When I turned down ice cream, I knew something was definitely amiss. As I was somewhat motion sick, it was safer for Wendy to drive so I tried to have a nap. When I woke up I did feel somewhat better, however I was not feeling 100%. We finally reached our destination, found our

friends, and got the horses settled in their corrals. Despite the long drive, all of our horses vetted in well and we were ready for the 50-mile ride. Wendy and I had discussed riding the 30-mile distance instead of the 50 as the temperature was to be rather brutal. I thought we should just do the 50. Well, Saturday

morning when I woke up and was still feeling green, I really wondered about my decision. It

was hot as expected and ever so humid! The sun was beating down on us, and I’m not sure who was sweatier — me or Serenade! As we went along, I was somewhat dizzy and nauseated. At one point, I looked down and saw riders below us and just about fell off my horse. After that I didn’t look down much. Heights don’t bother me, but it seemed my eyes had become ping pong balls. I thought I might have to end my ride sooner than expected. The big cattle trough looked hugely inviting. The day grew warmer, and our flatland horses

continued to march up and down the hills like troopers. We maintained a minimum pace, but we kept moving. We knew we were probably in about last place, but we came to ride not to win. Then suddenly at about mile 25, my dizziness and

nausea lifted! I felt almost perky, and I was halfway done. I was back in this thing. Last year, Serenade had trouble pulsing down in the high heat and hills. This time she was pulsing down just fine and seemed to be handling the heat, humidity, and hills very well. Yay! Progress. There were a lot of gates to be dealt with, and Wendy was quick to jump off Bolt to get them. At one of them she

accidentally lost his reins. Well the schmuck decided to head down the trail solo. I started after

him casually so he wouldn’t head for the hills, but then he started to canter! Well Serenade, not to be outdone, was in hot pursuit. I have NO idea how I managed to snag his reins. I felt like an outrider at the racetrack! Somehow I got up on Serenade’s neck and got two fingers around his reins to pull him back. I was sure he was a goner, and I thought I would end up checking out how well the air bags worked on my Hit Air vest. Phew! Crisis averted. At the next gate I jumped off to get the gate to give Wendy a break. Of course, trying to remount required further tightening of my girth and someone holding a

I WAS SURE HE WAS A GONER, AND I THOUGHT I WOULD END UP CHECKING OUT HOW WELL THE AIR BAGS WORKED ON MY HIT AIR VEST.

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Ok, so definitely not a horse, BUT my horse wanted NO part of this guy.

stirrup leather so I could clamber back onto my horse. (Note to self: get a shorter horse.) After that episode, when I said I would get the gate, I was told I was too slow. Sad but true. On our way out and our way back we had to cross the Little Missouri River. On the way out the horses were reluctant to enter the water, I think mostly due to the current. We don’t have any rivers close by that we can safely practice going in and out of, so this was something new. And evidently highly suspicious! Wendy ended up leading Bolt through the water, and the other horses followed. Heading home, I asked Serenade to step into the water, and this time there was absolutely no hesitation. The fact that she seemed to want to lie down in it was a concern! As we were headed across, Bolt was suddenly into water that was significantly deeper than what I was experiencing. Apparently, there was a bit of a drop off, and he found the spot. Luckily, no harm was done, and we carried on. Wendy was now a bit soggier than she had planned on. When we arrived back at camp, we had completed 40 of the 50 miles. Unfortunately, Ethen appeared to have a touch of sun stroke, and he was out. Elizabeth, one of our fellow Canadians, had a bit of an accident while trotting out her horse so she was out. Bolt and Serenade vetted in just fine, so we were going to continue. However time was growing tight, and we didn’t have time to dilly dally. We headed out for our final loop, and Anne Perkins, from Montana, joined us with her Arabian gelding, ES Jameel. We tried to be as fast as we could while not exhausting our horses. We trudged up the hills and trotted on the level and downhills. When we made

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Anne Perkins with her gelding ES JAMEEL (HU-Shakeel x GC Breaza). He looked so fresh at the end of the 50 miles, and won the award for Best Conditioned and High Vet Score. What an athlete he is!

the turn to head in, the horses seemed to find a spring in their step. While our horses were keen to chase Jameel, he looked like he was on his first loop not his last! He looked absolutely amazing. We finally crossed the finish line approximately 20 minutes under the allotted 12 hours. Although both of our horses were tired, they vetted through well, and we received our completion. The ride was a huge ask of them, and we were very proud of their efforts. It’s so difficult to train for hot weather when you haven’t any. Hills are always a challenge to find, but they seemed to handle them reasonably well. Anne presented Jameel for Best Conditioned, and he won the award along with High Vet Score. Anne was thrilled, and the awards were well deserved. While I didn’t see the other horses who were presented, Jameel looked like he could have sailed around and done the full course all over with minimal effort. I can definitely say this ride was significantly tougher than the one we did in 2017! There were more hills to climb, a river to cross, along with high heat and humidity. This route was like a mini Tevis experience, and while the drop-offs aren’t as dramatic, they definitely are impressive! But of course, I’ll be back! With even more friends, because who doesn’t like having a posse?

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Make your other horses jealous:

Experience Endurance Riding!

Tara MacLeod and Zorros Ironhorse at the Duck Mountain Derby Endurance 50-mile ride. Photo © Darice Whyte.

Free info packet! AERC.org/InfoRequest

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EAST COAST EGYPTIAN CLASSIC

AUGUST 3, 2019 · VIRGINIA HORSE CENTER · LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA

By Lisa Cifrese

The magnificence of the Blue Ridge Mountains served as the backdrop for the inaugural East Coast Egyptian Classic held at the Virginia Horse Center in Lexington, Virginia. Show Chair, Cricket Gates, President of The Pennsylvania Arabian Horse Association, and Kimberly Dickinson, Show Manager of the East Coast Arabian Horse Championships, successfully reintegrated the Egyptian influence back into this grand horse show. In establishing this “show within a show,” Cricket’s focus was clear — to provide a fun and inviting venue highlighting the Egyptian influence to the Arabian community at large. As Cricket exclaimed,“ The more inclusive we are in the industry, the better for all.” And by all measures, it appears that the East Coast Egyptian

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Classic did just that, and did so beautifully. Twenty- six halter classes held in Wiley Arena showcased straight Egyptian, Egyptian Heritage (having one straight Egyptian parent), and World Class (having one straight Egyptian in the last four generations of the pedigree) Arabian horses. Spectators enjoyed breakfast in the grandstands — provided by our generous sponsors. Long-time Egyptian Arabian supporter Scott Brumfield of Greencastle, Pennsylvania, served as judge, and did so with grace and professionalism. And although the number of horses presented was not large, the quality was quite good, and the mood of the horses, handlers, and spectators was jovial. Clearly, a great time was had by all!

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A highlight of the East Coast Egyptian Classic was the last of the day — the Golden Oldies class. Amateurs, age 50 and over presented, and trotting was made optional. Famous photographer Suzanne Sturgill, showing Angels Envee for the Angels Envee Partnership, made her 40-year comeback. Appearing in the ring with limited chance to practice, Suzanne totally enjoyed the experience and won the class with her filly Angels Envee. According to Suzanne, the experience “was quite surreal, actually, a little different than showing Morgans and Quarter horses of years past.” (See Suzanne’s story beginning on page 10 of this issue.) Looking to 2020, Show Chair Gates believes that this show will continue to grow, and plans to include some performance classes as well. Watch for the East Coast Egyptian Classic to become a premiere showcase for the straight Egyptian, Egyptian Heritage, and World Class Arabian horses. Join us, August 1, 2020, in beautiful Lexington, Virginia.

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TOP LEFT: Grand Champion Straight Egyptian Mare/Stallion DAENERYS (Burak Ben-Eden EA

x Good Faith), owned by Gail E. Ahrens, Chadds

Ford, Pennsylvania.

TOP RIGHT: Grand Champion Egyptian Heritage Mare/Stallion LANA DEL REY (Exxalt x LF Starstruk), owned by Javan Schaller, Scottsdale, Arizona.

BOTTOM LEFT: Grand Champion World Class Mare/ Stallion JABEL AL SHAHANIA (Versace

x Material Girl VF), owned and shown by

Jacquelyn Sharpe, Boone, North Carolina.

BOTTOM RIGHT: Grand Champion Yearling Colt/Filly XX INSIGNIA (Exxalt x Lavinia AF), owned by Sandra K. Smith, Pine Hill, Alabama.

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Egy tian

ArabianS

IN OUR NOVEMBER/DECEMBER ISSUE:

Egyptian Event Coverage and The Pyramid Society Yearbook

BREEDERS CALL US TODAY TO SHARE YOUR STORY 805.771.2300 · sales@arabianhorseworld.com

www.ArabianHorseWorld.com

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G a z a l

G a z a l

T h e

On c e

B Y

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B E T T Y

F u t u r e

F I N K E

K i n g

T o anyone who loves Arabian horses, the words

“Al Shaqab” conjure up visions of equine excellence, of

almost impossibly beautiful horses being awarded the

highest honors.The name, however, is far older than that. It signifies the

site where Qatar fought and won its final battle for independence

against the Ottoman Empire, and it is, indeed, on this very site that the

now world-famous stud farm was first established in 1992.

There is a certain poetic symmetry in basing a breeding center for

the former war horses of the Bedouins on the site of a historic battle,

and even more in its being the birthplace of a stallion who literally

conquered the world.As in the legend of the creation of the Arabian

horse, in which God, having shaped the Horse from the South Wind,

told him to “fly without wings and conquer without a sword,” this

particular hero needed neither an army, nor any weapons.

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Gazal Al Shaqab and trainer Michael Byatt in Aachen 2017.

No one who was there that evening in

September 2017 will forget the moment the majestic

dark bay stallion entered the ring with Michael Byatt.

It was one of the most thrilling and moving moments

in the long history of an event not lacking in

highlights. After all, what can be more thrilling

than seeing a living legend in person?

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2017 Salon du Cheval Platinum World Champion Stallion Gazal Al Shaqab,pictured with

(from left to right): Sheikh Joaan bin Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani,Sheikh Hamad bin Ali Al

Thani,breeding and show manager at Al Shaqab,and Michael Byatt.

No other horse is linked as

inexorably to the rapid rise and

enduring success of Al Shaqab as

Gazal. He was one of the first foals

born there. He was the first horse with

the Al Shaqab suffix to be named

World Champion – the first of many,

most of them his descendants. It was

Gazal who first made Al Shaqab a

household name in the industry. Now

in his twenty-fifth year, he is without

doubt the most influential living

Arabian sire in the world.Among

the select horses honored with the

“Lifetime Award” at the All Nations Cup in Aachen, he is

the first one who was able to collect his award in person.

No one who was there that evening in September 2017 will

forget the moment the majestic dark bay stallion entered

the ring with Michael Byatt. It was one of the most thrilling

and moving moments in the long history of an event not

lacking in highlights.After all, what can be more thrilling

than seeing a living legend in person?

It is rare for a new breeding program to produce a

horse of this caliber so early. More often, beginning breeders

have to wait for years for the birth of their superstar, if they

even manage to get one.There is no fail-safe recipe. But, as

experienced breeders will tell you: it all begins with getting

the right mares.

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The right mare in this case was Gazal’s dam, Kajora.A

U.S. National Champion mare, she carried over 75% of the

best proven Polish bloodlines, with close crosses to such

greats as Naborr, Exelsjor, and Pietuszok, the remainder

composed of Crabbet/Old English foundation lines with

another dash of Polish through Witez II. She was a proven

broodmare, having already produced four daughters

and two sons. Not too surprisingly, all her foals up to that

point had been sired by Polish or Russian stallions. But

when she came to Qatar in 1994, she was in foal to

Anaza El Farid, a straight Egyptian stallion who

was double Morafic, a grandson of Ansata Ibn

Halima, and from the celebrated Dahman

Shahwan family of Ali Pasha Sherif.

Impeccable breeding for an

Egyptian stallion, certainly,

but, in terms of Kajora’s

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Gazal’s dam, U.S. National Champion Mare Kajora (Kaborr x Edjora by Exelsjor).

pedigree, a complete outcross.

“It was time to do something very

creative,” says Sheikh Hamad bin

Ali Al Thani, Breeding and Show

Manager of Al Shaqab.

Outcross breeding is always a bit

of a gamble, more unpredictable

than staying within the same gene

pool. But it has been proven over

and over again that outstanding

results can be achieved by thinking

outside the box and not doing the

obvious thing. More than once,

outcrosses have resulted in sires that

became game-changers.You have

to be willing to take a risk.A bit of

luck doesn’t hurt, either.“I disagree

LEFT: As a yearling Gazal Al Shaqab won the junior champion title at the 1996 Qatar International Championships.

RIGHT: Egyptian Event Champion Junior Male Gazal Al Shaqab at two years old, pictured with Eileen Verdieck and Sheikh Hamad bin Ali Al Thani.

when people say there is no such

thing as luck in business,” comments

Michael Byatt, one of the people

involved both in acquiring Kajora

and determining this breeding.

“I was fortunate enough to be in

the right place at the right time with

the right person, and then all these

stars aligned to create these horses.

We may never see such a family

again our lifetimes.” Because when

all these factors came together,

the result changed the world of

Arabian breeding.

When Kajora foaled a bay colt

on May 15, 1995, it was immediately

clear that this little guy was special.

Gazal’s show career began early, when he won the

Junior title at the 1996 Qatar International Championships

as a yearling. He then traveled to the U.S., where he

was shown by Eileen Verdieck.While he won the Region

16 yearling colt championship, his first visit to the U.S.

Nationals did not exactly set the world on fire. His major

achievement as a junior competitor was winning the

Junior Male Champion title at the Egyptian Event as a

two-year-old.

“He was a beautiful youngster,” remembers Michael

Byatt, who later showed him to his greatest victories and

stood him at stud for many years.“He had this huge eye,

he was super balanced. But he definitely got prettier with

age. He had that real deep jowl always.As his head dried

out, it didn’t look as big as it did when he was a baby.

Everything tied together much nicer as he got older. He

was a beautiful, super high-quality youngster for sure.”

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2001 World Champion Stallion Gazal Al Shaqab, left, and his son, Marwan Al Shaqab (x Little Liza

Fame) World Champion Junior Male.

Gazal returned to the ring in 1999 as a four-year-

old stallion to win the senior championship at both the

Qatar International and the Middle East International

Show.That same year, he bred his first mares.Among

them was another high-caliber U.S. import, the Fame VF

daughter Little Liza Fame, who in 2000 produced a

bay colt that was named Marwan Al Shaqab.

At this point, Gazal could have retired and

let Marwan do the rest, because his fame

would have been assured even if he

had never sired another foal.

But that’s not the way

the story goes. In 2001,

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father and son took a trip to Paris, where

they were named World Champion

Stallion and World Champion Junior

Male, respectively. It was the first time in

history that a sire and son combination

pulled off a double victory in the

same year.

And the world took notice, including

the directors of the Polish state studs.

In fact, Dr. Marek Trela, for many years

director of Janow Podlaski and engineer

of the state stud’s greatest triumphs

in modern times, had crossed paths

with the emerging dynasty before

that. Earlier the same year, he had

encountered the yearling Marwan

while judging a show in Qatar. He

had placed Marwan above the then

reigning World Junior Champion, and

afterwards asked who his sire was.

And so the seed was sown.

What do you do if you like a

horse and want to get something

like him? You can try to get the

horse, of course – or, even better, you

get his sire. Instead of returning to

Qatar after Paris, Gazal traveled to

Poland and spent the next two years

covering mares at Janow Podlaski

and Michalow.

In those days, it was still a very

exclusive honor for a stallion to be

leased by the Polish state studs.Those

stallions were most often pure Polish

themselves, selected with the express

intent to recover Polish bloodlines

that had been lost at home. Only

a select few other stallions were

allowed to introduce new blood,

and they were used sparingly, such

as Sanadik El Shaklan and the

straight Egyptian Laheeb. Gazal Al

Shaqab was the first outside stallion

to be used to the same extent as

only Probat and Monogramm had

Pianissima

(Gazal Al

Shaqab x

Pianosa)

U.S. National

Champion

Mare, Polish

National

Supreme

Champion

and European

Triple Crown

winner.

been used in modern times.The fact that he had a high

percentage of Polish breeding himself may explain the

faith the directors had in him as a breeding horse.

Their faith was justified. Like Probat and Monogramm,

Gazal Al Shaqab shaped and defined an entire

generation of Polish breeding.Where in the 1980s the

Probat daughters had won acclaim in the international

showrings, and followed in the 1990s by the Monogramm

daughters, the early twenty-first century belonged to the

daughters of Gazal. No less than three of them became

World Champion Mares, including the most universally

beloved mare of the twenty-first century: Pianissima.

From Gazal’s first Polish foal crop in 2003, this exquisite

bay beauty began her conquest of the international

showrings as a yearling, moving from Supreme Polish

National Champion to take the European Triple Crown.

She was unbeaten during her career, which took her to

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Gazal Al Shaqab.

the U.S., where she was U.S. National Champion

Mare and Scottsdale Champion Mare in 2006,

and back to Europe where she repeated

her Triple Crown in 2008 as a mature

mare. Her final win was the World

Platinum Champion Mare

Title at Paris in 2013.

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Her ethereal beauty inspired a whole

generation of breeders across the

globe. Perhaps she was too exquisite

for this world, because she died far

too young; but her legacy continues

and her beauty continues to inspire

even now, years after she is gone.

From the same dam line at Janow

came Pinga, foaled in 2004, who was

named World Champion Mare in 2012,

as well as winning numerous other

titles. But the one that stands out as a

broodmare is Michalow’s Emandoria,

also foaled in 2004, out of Emanda.

Like Pianissima, she was a World

Champion both as a junior and as a

senior, and achieved the Triple Crown

in 2013. In addition, she has excelled

as a broodmare both for Michalow

and for several lessees, most notably

Jadem Arabians in Belgium.There she

produced Emerald J, by QR Marc,

doubtlessly QR Marc’s best son to date

and a multiple champion himself. Being

by a Marwan son, Emerald J of course

carries two crosses to Gazal, and he

is proving an excellent sire with mares

from a broad spectrum of bloodlines,

siring champions throughout the world.

TOP: Polish National Champion Mare

and World Champion Mare Pinga

(Gazal Al Shaqab x Pilar).

MIDDLE: Junior and Senior World

Champion and U.S. National

Champion Junior Mare Emandoria

(Gazal Al Shaqab x Emanda).

BOTTOM: Multi-champion Emerald J

(QR Marc x Emandoria).

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TOP: Gazal Al Shaqab.

MIDDLE LEFT: Etnologia (Gazal Al Shaqab x Etalanta).

MIDDLE RIGHT: Ekspulsja

(Gazal Al Shaqab x Elandra).

BOTTOM: Norma (Gazal Al Shaqab

x Nina).

Poland wisely retained their

three world champion mares, only

sending them out on lease; but

many of Gazal’s 2003 and 2004

Polish daughters were exported

across the world, becoming

treasured broodmares and/or show

champions wherever they went.

Among them are Halsdon Arabians’

Etnologia and Ekspulsja and Al

Muawd Stud’s Norma, to name just

a few.All in all, Gazal ranks as one

of the most significant stallions ever

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used in Poland.

Marwan Al Shaqab.

There again, you might say that his fame would

have been be assured if he had only been used

for those two years in Poland. But in the meantime,

his oldest son Marwan had been busily building

his own dynasty and emerging as Gazal’s heir

apparent. In the years to come, it would be chiefly

Marwan’s offspring that stood in the limelight. By

today, Marwan has sired more World Champions

than any other stallion before or since. Listing all the

achievements of all his offspring would fill a book,

but to name just a few:

AT LEFT FROM TOP TO BOTTOM:

Marajj 2004 (Marwan Al Shaqab x RGA Khouress), from Marwan’s first foal crop,World Champion, multiple international champion and sire of champions

Marquis CAHR 2004 (Marwan Al Shaqab x Rohara Magnifica),World Champion

FA El Shawan 2005 (Marwan Al Shaqab x Foxbriar Shakita), sire of the exotic FA El Rasheem, who is now siring a string of winners for Dubai Arabian Stud

Baanderos 2005 (Marwan Al Shaqab x HB Bessolea), twice All Nations Cup and World Champion

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TOP ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT:

QR Marc 2005 (Marwan Al Shaqab x Swete Dreams),World Champion,

All Nations Cup Champion, and at this time, the leading sire among

Marwan’s sons, and sire of Emerald J

Abha Qatar 2007 (Marwan Al Shaqab x ZT Ludjkalba), European,

All Nations Cup, and two-time World Champion

Kahil Al Shaqab 2008 (Marwan Al Shaqab x OFW Mishaahl), twice

World Champion, also leased to the Polish state studs and sire of

national and international champions

BOTTOM ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT:

All in all,

Gazal ranks as

EKS Alihandro 2010 (Marwan Al Shaqab x OFW Psylhouette),

two-time World Champion,three-time All Nations Cup

one of the most

Champion,(unbeaten in the showring),champion sire

Hariry Al Shaqab 2010 (Marwan Al Shaqab x White

Silkk),World Champion,three-time U.S.National

Champion,three-time Scottsdale Champion

Wadee Al Shaqab 2010 (Marwan Al Shaqab x OFW Mishaahl),two-time

significant stallions

ever used in

Poland.

World Champion,multi-International

Champion

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As can be seen from the years of birth,

Marwan was building his own international

dynasty at the same time that his sire Gazal

was producing the next generation of Polish

broodmares and world champions, the two

strands running parallel to each other and

eventually merging to create such outstanding

horses as Emerald J.

These stallions listed are far from being all

of Marwan’s successful sons, just those with the

highest profile. But there are also his daughters,

which include:

AT RIGHT FROM TOP TO BOTTOM:

Abha Myra 2003 (Marwan Al Shaqab x ZT Ludjkalba), dam of World Champion Fadi Al Shaqab

Abha Palma 2006 (Marwan Al Shaqab x Abha Ghazali),World Champion, dam of three-time U.S. National Champion Polidoro FC

Rihab Al Nasser 2007 (Marwan Al Shaqab x Remal Al Nasser),All Nations Cup Gold Champion and dam of champions

AJ Sawahi 2010 (Marwan Al Shaqab x Siberia SA), World Champion

Even these very brief and select lists of sons

and daughters show that Marwan’s successful get

come from mares of widely differing backgrounds,

and are equally successful in the showring and as

breeding horses.

The same is also true of Gazal himself.While

Marwan Al Shaqab and the Polish offspring

would be quite enough to mark him as the

founder of a great dynasty, they are far from

the only ones.While it is true that no other Gazal

son has been used as extensively as Marwan,

and been so successful in the show ring himself,

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there are others that have to be mentioned,

and their success is all the more remarkable

since they had far fewer offspring. Stival 2006

(out of Paloma de Jamaal), himself Supreme

Champion at Las Vegas, stands out as the sire

of U.S. National Champion Trussardi, foaled

in 2009 out of Precious As Gold, and double

U.S. National Champion and twice Las Vegas

Gold Champion Barzan Al Shahania, foaled

in 2010 out of NW Siena Psyche. Gazwan Al

Nasser, foaled in 2008 out of Ftoon Al Shaqab,

was leased to the largest Arabian farm in

Germany, the Ismer Stud, where he sired several

outstanding premium broodmares as well as

the premium stallion Mouammar. Lawrence El

Gazal, foaled in 2008 out of Lara El Ludjin, sired

international winners at La Movida Arabians in

Austria and was also leased to Poland, though

not used to the same extent as his sire. It is

interesting to note in this context that while

the Polish state studs never used Marwan Al

Shaqab (though some private breeders in

Poland did), they did lease his son Kahil Al

Shaqab, again with great results.

As for Gazal Al Shaqab’s daughters, the

most successful ones were indeed those from

Poland, but again that is not the whole story.

For example, one of his first daughters, Falha

TOP: Supreme Champion Stallion Stival (Gazal Al Shaqab x Paloma de Jamaal).

MIDDLE: The stallion Gazwan Al Nasser (Gazal Al

Shaqab x Ftoon Al Shaqab).

BOTTOM: Sire of international winners Lawrence El

Gazal (Gazal Al Shaqab x Lara El Ludjin).

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Al Shaqab (foaled in 2000 out of PR

Padrons Jewel), is the dam of the

stallion Mountassar Al Zobair (by

Khidar), who was sold to Bahrain and

is doing very well at international

shows as this time. Swedish-bred

Magora, foaled in 2003 out of

Margotka, was a major international

winner during her show career.

“The dominant feature of his

greatest offspring is this quality about

them,” muses Michael Byatt.“There is

this depth of quality, from the size of

the eyes, the quality of skin and coat,

to the expression, to the way they

conduct themselves

supremely

intelligent, very trainable.When he

produces those things, which I think

are Gazal’s most amazing traits, they

ooze self-confidence.When all of

those things come through, his foals

are so extraordinary.” So extraordinary,

indeed, that they changed the world.

To the question of what Gazal

is like as an individual, Michael

replies: “Gazal is the most supremely

intelligent, most intuitive, self-aware,

and knowing horse that I’ve ever

been around. He knew by the clock

where to be.At 8:30 AM he wanted

out of his stall.At 4:30 PM he wanted

back in, and he was very capable of

transmitting his desires.

“And seasonally, he was always in one place at

noon, another place at three, and you could absolutely

tell time by what he did. He knew how he was going to