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Physical and Chemical Properties and Changes:

Table of Contents
1: Table of Contents
2-3: Student Sample
4-6: Teaching Tips and Discussion Tips
7-8: Teacher Answer Key
9-10, 11-12, 13-14: Different Student Versions
15: Exit Ticket
16: Teacher Answer Key for Exit Ticket
17: Terms of Use

© Bethany Lau
Tips for using Doodle Diagrams as Guided Notes
The thing that most students struggle with in middle school and high school, in every class, is how to
take notes. So often, they are lost without some sort of model. Many teachers expect them to
have a blank notebook page, watch a Powerpoint, listen to the teacher lecture, somehow know
what is important enough to write down, and physically write while trying to listen. This is mentally
exhausting and so often students struggle all year, year after year, doing the same thing. A
friend of mine used to call this teaching style: “Death by Powerpoint”. Students benefit by taking
notes, by physically writing, but there has to be a balance and there has to be a model for them to
follow.

I have found in the past that the best way to help students take notes is to give them a notes
packet for each unit with headers and a list of topics I’m going to cover in class: basically a space
where they can put their notes on the page. Every year, I have improved my notes packets and
class discussions to better help my students learn without being overwhelmed while taking notes.
I’m creating these doodle diagrams so that students have pictures to help them really visualize
each concept in their notes.

What I find helps students the most when I am helping them to learn content together in a class
discussion format:

* I decide which note format would be best for my students. I have pages with more or less text,
so I can customize it for each student or class depending on their ability to take notes and how
much time I want to spend. Some students/classes really like to draw their own pictures; some
don’t!

* I print and copy a packet of the unit’s doodle diagrams and have them stapled before I give
them to my students. Students are much less likely to lose a packet and they are more likely to get
the notes when they are absent from a friend, because they see that it’s blank in their packet!

* Give them a model to follow! Write as you go, with them on an ELMO projector, so they can see
what you’re writing, what you’re highlighting, how you want them to take notes and process the
information.

* Use Powerpoint minimally. I do use my computer projector to show pictures or short video clips
or other multimedia that I find online to supplement the guided notes. I use very little text on the
screen.

* As I go through the lesson, I never just fill in the blank on the doodle diagram. I ask questions
continually. I ask students what they think are the characteristics of life, what they think will
happen next in this diagram, what they think is the best way to summarize this video clip they just
saw on transcription or translation. And we fill it in together.

* I encourage students to doodle! These pages are designed to have places where students can
fill in borders, fill in letters, color in pictures, and make their own doodles in the white space.
Research shows that students who do this remember more of the material! Processing the
material with the artistic side of their brain can aid in memory. So encourage them to use colored
© Bethany Lau

pencils, pens, whatever they would like on their page in the time you working through the page with
them.
Teacher Tips for Physical/Chemical Properties:

I use this page to introduce students to physical properties and chemical properties,
before we get into element types and the periodic table (where they will learn more
about groups of elements with similar properties).

* I recommend using this * Physical properties are properties that can Name: _________
page with students to help be measured or observed without changing
them take down notes the chemical structure of the sample.

Properties
about the properties but * Intensive properties are physical properties
nothing replaces that do not change with the amount of

Physical
demonstrations! There matter in a sample.
are a bunch of great
Examples of intensive properties:
videos on the web that * Density - the ratio of mass to volume; a
you can use to explain measurement of how tightly packed
properties like molecules are in a sample.
* Color, hardness, and brittleness
conductivity and ductility. * Temperature, boiling and melting points
* Electrical conductivity
* Chemical properties are * Specific heat - amount of heat a substance
absorbs to raise the sample one degree Kelvin * Extensive properties are physical
often a little harder for * Irradiance - amount of light given off of a properties that change with the
students to understand. sample per unit area of that sample’s surface amount of matter in the sample.
Because the properties * Ductility - material’s ability to be stretched
are often measured into a wire Examples of extensive properties:
* Fluidity - the ability of a substance to flow mass, volume
during or after a chemical easily
reaction, they aren’t
* Chemical properties are properties
apparent just by looking at that can be observed or measured
a sample. Again, I during or right after a chemical
recommend doing a web reaction.
search and select some Pr * Chemical properties cannot be
appropriate videos that l examined without reacting the sample
in some way and observing what
a

you can use to happens during the reaction.


emic

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demonstrate some
Examples:
chemical properties.
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* Toxicity - ability to damage living


tissue
Ch

* Flammability - ability to burn


* Heat of combustion - amount of
s

energy released when burned


© Bethany Lau
© Bethany Lau
Teacher Tips for Physical/Chemical Changes:

Students will learn about physical and chemical changes with this page. I find it important
for students to see a lot of different examples of physical changes, so they do not get
confused between the two types.

Physical
Please note that in this * Physical changes are changes that take
Steam (Gas)
example, I chose to show (H2O) place to the form of a substance but do
a physical change and a changes not change the molecular structure of the
sample.
chemical change for the
same substance: water! Examples of physical changes:
* Cutting a solid sample in half
The goal is for students to * Sanding a rough sample into a smooth
sample
see that state changes * Changing the temperature of a sample
like vaporization are * Freezing a liquid sample into a solid
physical changes and do sample
Liquid Water * Boiling a liquid sample to form a gaseous
NOT change the chemical (H2O) sample.
structure of the * Changing the shape of a sample

chemical
substance (in this case * Chemical changes are chemical
water). The molecules in reactions that change the molecular Liquid Water

* After a chemical change, the substance changes


structure of the sample. (H2O)
the gas are the same as
the molecules in the liquid - becomes an entirely different substance Hydrogen gas (H2)
just with more energy and (or a mixture of substances). Atoms are
rearranged. Oxygen gas (O2)
freer to move!
* Some chemical changes are reversible
but many are irreversible.
But chemical changes (like
electrolysis of water)
* When a chemical change
does change the chemical happens, there is often evidence.
structure. In this diagram, Examples of evidence of a
students can see that chemical change taking place:
oxygen and hydrogen gas * Color changes
* Odor is produced
are produced during * Light energy or heat
electrolysis and the energy is given off Electrolysis of water is the decomposition of
molecules are different! * Gas is produced water, caused by electric current. This is a
* Precipitate (a new solid) is chemical change.
formed
I recommend either 2 H2O(l) O2(g) + 2 H2(g)
performing the © Bethany Lau

demonstration in class or
using a video to show
students electrolysis, so
they can see the whole
© Bethany Lau

process in motion.
* Physical properties are properties that can Name: _________
be measured or observed without changing
the chemical structure of the sample.

Properties
* Intensive properties are physical properties
that do not change with the amount of

Physical
matter in a sample.

Examples of intensive properties:


* Density - the ratio of mass to volume; a
measurement of how tightly packed
molecules are in a sample.
* Color, hardness, and brittleness
* Temperature, boiling and melting points
* Electrical conductivity
* Specific heat - amount of heat a substance
absorbs to raise the sample one degree Kelvin * Extensive properties are physical
* Irradiance - amount of light given off of a properties that change with the
sample per unit area of that sample’s surface amount of matter in the sample.
* Ductility - material’s ability to be stretched
into a wire Examples of extensive properties:
* Fluidity - the ability of a substance to flow mass, volume
easily
* Chemical properties are properties
that can be observed or measured
during or right after a chemical
reaction.
Pr * Chemical properties cannot be
l examined without reacting the sample
in some way and observing what
a

happens during the reaction.


emic

pe

Examples:
rtie

* Toxicity - ability to damage living


tissue
h

* Flammability - ability to burn


C

* Heat of combustion - amount of


s

energy released when burned


© Bethany Lau
Steam (Gas)
(H2O) Physical * Physical changes are changes that take
place to the form of a substance but do
changes not change the molecular structure of the
sample.

Examples of physical changes:


* Cutting a solid sample in half
* Sanding a rough sample into a smooth
sample
* Changing the temperature of a sample
* Freezing a liquid sample into a solid
sample
Liquid Water * Boiling a liquid sample to form a gaseous
(H2O) sample.
* Changing the shape of a sample

chemical
* Chemical changes are chemical
reactions that change the molecular Liquid Water

* After a chemical change, the substance changes


structure of the sample. (H2O)

becomes an entirely different substance Hydrogen gas (H2)


(or a mixture of substances). Atoms are
rearranged. Oxygen gas (O2)
* Some chemical changes are reversible
but many are irreversible.

* When a chemical change


happens, there is often evidence.
Examples of evidence of a
chemical change taking place:
* Color changes
* Odor is produced
* Light energy or heat
energy is given off Electrolysis of water is the decomposition of
* Gas is produced water, caused by electric current. This is a
* Precipitate (a new solid) is chemical change.
formed
2 H2O(l) O2(g) + 2 H2(g)
© Bethany Lau
* Physical properties are properties that can Name: _________
be measured or observed without changing
the of the sample.

Properties
* properties are physical
properties that do not change with the

Physical
amount of matter in a sample.

Examples of properties:
* - the ratio of mass to
volume; a measurement of how tightly
packed molecules are in a sample.
*
* , points
*
* - amount of heat a
substance absorbs to raise the sample one * properties are
degree Kelvin physical properties that change with
* - amount of light given off of a the amount of matter in the sample.
sample per unit area of that sample’s surface
* - material’s ability to be Examples of
stretched into a wire properties: mass, volume
* - the ability of a substance
to flow easily
* Chemical properties are properties
that can be observed or measured
during or right after a
.
Pr * Chemical properties cannot be
l examined without reacting the sample
in some way and observing what
a

happens during the reaction.


emic

pe

Examples:
rtie

* - ability to damage
living tissue
h

* - ability to burn
C

* - amount
s

of energy released when burned


© Bethany Lau
Steam (Gas)
(H2O) Physical * Physical changes are changes that take
place to the form of a substance but do
changes not change the
sample.
of the

Examples of physical changes:


*
*
*
*

*
Liquid Water
(H2O) *

chemical
* Chemical changes are chemical
reactions that change the Liquid Water

* After a chemical change, the substance changes


of the sample. (H2O)

becomes an entirely different Hydrogen gas (H2)


(or a mixture of substances).
are rearranged. Oxygen gas (O2)
* Some chemical changes are reversible
but many are .

* When a chemical change


happens, there is often evidence.
Examples of evidence of a
taking place:
*
*
*
* Electrolysis of water is the
* of water, caused by electric current. This is a
chemical change.
2 H2O(l) O2(g) + 2 H2(g)
© Bethany Lau
Name: _________

Properties
Physical

Pr
l
a

o
emic

pe
rtie
Ch

© Bethany Lau
Steam (Gas)
(H2O) Physical
changes

Liquid Water
(H2O)

chemical Liquid Water


changes
(H2O)

Hydrogen gas (H2)


Oxygen gas (O2)

2 H2O(l) O2(g) + 2 H2(g)


© Bethany Lau
Name: _________

Properties
Physical

Pr
l
a

o
emic

pe
rtie
Ch

© Bethany Lau
Physical
changes

chemical
changes

© Bethany Lau
Name: __________________ Physical and Chemical Name: __________________ Physical and Chemical
During a chemical change, what can change that During a chemical change, what can change that
cannot change during a physical change? cannot change during a physical change?

Name: __________________ Physical and Chemical Name: __________________ Physical and Chemical
During a chemical change, what can change that During a chemical change, what can change that
cannot change during a physical change? cannot change during a physical change?
Answer Key
Name: __________________ Physical and Chemical

During a chemical change, what can change that


cannot change during a physical change?

During a chemical change, the rearrangement of


the atoms in the substance changes! Atoms are
not rearranged during a physical change.

Teacher Instructions:

I recommend using an “exit ticket” for the last 3-5


minutes of class. Pass them out, ask your students
to fill them out, and then go over the answer right
then and there after they switch with their partner
to correct. I recommend having the “partner
switch” be different every day (Behind you, in front
of you, to the left/right etc). That way you can give
them a participation grade by just checking them off
in your gradebook (I’m sure you don’t have time to
grade 100+ of these a day...) It’s a great way to get
a quick formative assessment of how they
understood the lesson.

© Bethany Lau
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