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Key Stage 1 BrightSparks Concert

October 2019

Zog

© Orange Eyes Ltd. 2018.

Teachers’ Resource Pack


Autumn 2019
London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources
Unauthorised copying of any part of this
teachers’ pack is strictly prohibited

The copyright of the project pack text is held by:

• Polly Ives © 2019


• London Philharmonic Orchestra © 2019

Story and images of Zog are used by kind permission of Julia Donaldson, Axel Scheffler,
Scholastic and Magic Light Productions.

‘The Breathing Song’ song lyrics and melody copyright © Julia Donaldson 2016
‘The Breathing Song’ is taken from A Treasury of Songs by Julia Donaldson, illustrated by Axel
Scheffler (Macmillan Children’s Books 2016)

‘The Flying Doctors’ song lyrics and melody copyright © Julia Donaldson 2010, based on
Zog by Julia Donaldson, illustrated by Axel Scheffler (Alison Green Books, an imprint of
Scholastic) and featured in Zog Book and CD edition.
Zog is licensed by Magic Light Pictures Ltd. Film stills from Zog © Orange Eyes Ltd. 2018

Any other copyrights are held by their respective owners.

This pack was produced by:

London Philharmonic Orchestra


Education and Community Department
89 Albert Embankment
London SE1 7TP

LPO BrightSparks concerts in 2019/20 are generously supported by Candide Trust, Dunard
Fund, Mr & Mrs Philip Kan, Gill and Julian Simmonds and the Rivers Foundation.

This pack and all learning audio resources


are available on
lpo.org.uk/creativeclassroomsconnect

London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources


Contents

Introduction 4

The London Philharmonic Orchestra 5

The Orchestra 6

The Music 7

Audience participation songs 10

Classroom activities 13

Further songs 19

Thank you 20

The Breathing Song lyrics 21

The Flying Doctors lyrics 22

Sheet music 23

London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources


Introduction
This pack is designed to help you and your class prepare for the London Philharmonic
Orchestra’s KS1 BrightSparks concert at Royal Festival Hall on Wednesday 30 October 2019.
It also provides classroom activities based on the concert repertoire and the musical story.
This year our concert is all about Zog, the keen but accident-prone young dragon from Julia
Donaldson and Axel Scheffler’s book. In the concert, we will find out all about Zog, and also
meet all the sections of the Orchestra, possibly earning some golden stars along the way!

The concert will begin with the Orchestra performing Elgar’s ‘The Wild Bears’ from the Wand
of Youth Suite No. 2. Through this music, we will start to meet the sections and instruments
of the Orchestra.

The audience will then sing two songs, written by Julia Donaldson, with the Orchestra;
these are ‘The Breathing Song’ and ‘The Flying Doctors’. We recommend that you take the
time to learn and teach the songs so that your students can benefit most from the concert
experience. Lyrics and sheet music can be found at the back of this pack. You can also listen
to our audio by going to lpo.org.uk/creativeclassroomsconnect.

The Orchestra will then perform Ravel’s ‘Empress of the Pagodas’ from Mother Goose Suite,
through which we meet more instruments in the Orchestra and hear how they sound.

There will then be a screening of the 2018 Magic light Pictures animation of Julia Donaldson
and illustrator Axel Scheffler’s Zog, with music by René Aubry, arranged by Terry Davies,
performed by the Orchestra.

Finally we will all stand to sing our ‘The Flying Doctors’ song one last time.

Meet the presenter


Polly Ives enjoys a varied career as a concert presenter
and narrator, workshop leader, trainer and cellist. Polly
has presented many of the LPO BrightSparks concerts
for Key Stage 1 and has led workshops for Under 5s
with the LPO. She is Resident Animateur with Music in
the Round, based in Sheffield, and in 2017 she set up
her own concert series for babies and toddlers called
Concerteenies.

She has worked with CBeebies, Wigmore Hall,


Royal Opera House, Southbank Sinfonia, European
Brandenburg Ensemble, Beatrix Potter Attraction and
has coached the National Children’s Orchestra and the City of Sheffield Youth Orchestra. She
has adjudicated at music festivals, and performed live on BBC Radio 3’s In Tune.

4 London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources


The London Philharmonic Orchestra
One of the finest orchestras on the international stage, the London Philharmonic Orchestra
balances a long and distinguished history with its reputation as one of the UK’s most
forward-looking ensembles. It was founded in 1932 by Sir Thomas Beecham, and since then
has been headed by many great names in the conducting world.

The Orchestra regularly record for film – amongst many soundtracks they have recorded are:
• The Lord of the Rings Trilogy
• The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
• Thor: The Dark World

The London Philharmonic Orchestra has been performing at Southbank Centre’s Royal
Festival Hall since it opened in 1951, becoming Resident Orchestra in 1992. It also has
residencies in Brighton and Eastbourne, and performs around the UK and the world.

The LPO Education and Community department maintains an energetic programme for
young people and families. Our BrightSparks schools’ concert series provides orchestral
experiences for students from Key Stage 1 all the way up to A Level, providing analysis of
set works at Key Stages 4 and 5. FUNharmonics family days provide interactive concerts and
music-making experiences for the whole family at Royal Festival Hall. Other projects work
with SEN schools, and with young people in the LPO Soundworks creative ensemble, with
accompanying online space The Studio. In primary schools, the Creative Classrooms project
works intensively with KS2 teachers to build confidence in leading music in school, while
parallel online space Creative Classrooms Connect hosts resources for KS2 teachers beyond
the live project. The department also caters for emerging talent – the LPO Young Composers
and Foyle Future Firsts schemes look to support young players and composers at the start of
their careers, while the LPO Junior Artists scheme supports talented musicians from under-
represented backgrounds.

The LPO is proud to be a member of the South Riverside Music Partnership (SRMP) which
comprises the LPO, Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, and the Music Education
Hub leads of Lambeth, Lewisham, Southwark and Royal Greenwich.

Website: lpo.org.uk Twitter: LPOrchestra


Facebook: londonphilharmonicorchestra Instagram: londonphilharmonicorchestra

London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources 5


The Orchestra
An orchestra is a large group of musicians and their instruments. It is divided into different
sections:

Woodwind: flutes, oboes, clarinets, bassoons

Brass: French horns, trumpets, trombones, tuba

Percussion: timpani (large kettle drums) and other types of drums, xylophone,
glockenspiel, shakers, triangles and lots more

Strings: violins, violas, cellos, double basses

Other: harp, piano


There are also some other instruments in our concert to look out for:
Piccolo: the little sibling of the flute, which is smaller and plays higher notes
Celeste: it looks like a small piano and makes a twinkly noise that sounds like a music box
Mandolin: looks and sounds a little like a twangy ukulele!
Tin whistle: also known as a penny whistle, associated with lots of folk music
Northumbrian pipes: a small member of the bagpipe family, associated with folk music

6 London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources


The Music
In this concert, you will hear music inspired by wild creatures, especially dragons! You’ll hear
music performed by the London Philharmonic Orchestra on their own, you’ll sing two songs
with the Orchestra, and watch a full screening of Zog, with live orchestral soundtrack.

Zog
Our concert features the soundtrack of the animated film version of Zog. You’re going to hear
the full orchestral score. The film was produced by Magic Light Pictures in 2018, featuring the
voices of Sir Lenny Henry, Kit Harington, Rob Brydon and Tracey Ullman and is based on the
book by much-loved author Julia Donaldson and illustrator Axel Scheffler.

The film is available to buy on DVD or watch online, and the book,
published by Scholastic, is available to buy, including in the shop at
Royal Festival Hall. We recommend that you explore the book with your
children before the concert day if possible.

Summary of the story


Zog is an imaginative story about a little dragon and his classmates, in training at Madam
Dragon’s School.

In Year One, they learn how to fly.


In Year Two, they learn how to roar.

©2010 & TM Julia Donaldson/Axel Scheffler. Licensed by Magic Light Pictures Ltd. © Orange Eyes Ltd. 2018.
In Year Three, they learn how to blow fire.
In Year Four, they learn how to capture a princess.
In Year Five, they learn how to fight.

Poor, accident-prone Zog isn’t particularly good


at mastering his new skills despite lots of practice, and keeps finding himself in bother. He
crashes into a tree, his throat grows hoarse and his wing tip catches alight! But, luckily, a
young princess called Pearl is always on hand to nurse him with plasters, sore-throat sweets
or stretchy bandages. She even volunteers to be captured so Zog can finally win his golden
star.

But when a knight, Sir Gadabout the Great, arrives to save her, she declares that she really
wants to be a doctor and not a princess. Together they form the Flying Doctors, with Zog as
their flying ambulance.

In the concert, we will watch the film all the way through. Please ask your pupils to keep
watching the Orchestra as well as the film during the screening. Polly will encourage the
audience not to clap during the end credits of the film and to listen to the orchestra until the
very end of the music.

London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources 7


Edward Elgar (1857–1934): ‘The Wild Bears’ from
Wand of Youth Suite No. 2 (published 1908)
The concert begins with this piece, giving a bold and exciting
introduction to the Orchestra. The title of the piece suggests young
wild bear cubs running about and playing, though for our concert
you could imagine the young dragons at Madam Dragon’s school,
flying and playing together, and maybe causing a bit of mischief.

Fast and characterful melodies pass from the string section to the
woodwind instruments, and then the brass section (see page 6 for
an introduction to these instruments). Rhythmic, driving and loud
percussion instruments all add to the drama! Listen out for the
‘slidey’ sound in the middle – what action could this depict?

Elgar is one of the most well-known English composers, and it is


very likely you have heard some of his music before, such as the
Pomp and Circumstance Marches or the Enigma Variations. Elgar
composed a lot of the music for the Wand of Youth Suite when he
was a boy, for a play that his family were putting on. He wrote down
the tunes in a notebook, and 40 years later arranged them into a big
orchestral piece.

Maurice Ravel (1875–1937): ‘Empress of the Pagodas’ from


Mother Goose Suite (1911)
Ravel originally wrote this suite of five movements for piano
duet in 1910, but he then arranged a version for orchestra in
1911 and later that year expanded it into a ballet. Ravel loved
to write music for children and created magical fantasy worlds
through his sound world. Two of the other movements in this
suite are inspired by fairy tales: ‘Sleeping Beauty’ and ‘Tom
Thumb’.

‘Empress of the Pagodas’, like Zog, tells a story about a princess


and a dragon. There are three sections; in the first, the princess’s
theme is played on the piccolo, flute, oboe and then a xylophone
with hard sticks. The string instruments make an eerie and
shimmery sound by playing with their bow high up on their
fingerboard.

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The harp plays harmonics (a technique that creates a high, ghostly sounding note) and
glissandi (‘slides’ – where the player runs their finger across the strings to create a fast scale).
Please note, your children do not need to know these musical terms, but if you hear these
effects when you listen to the piece you may like to use them to describe these sounds.

We then hear the French horns and the tam-tam (a large metal gong) announcing the arrival
of the dragon. There is a low and moody melody on the clarinet and the celeste. This section
of the piece is slower and has a different mood from the Princess section.

The piece uses a pentatonic scale (a scale of just five notes, commonly heard in music from
Southeast Asia). Ravel wrote that he was hugely inspired by the Javanese Gamelan ensemble
that he experienced at the Paris Exhibition of 1889 when he was 14 years old.

Artwork by KS2 pupil from St Aidan’s Primary School inspired by


‘Empress of the Pagodas’

London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources 9


Audience participation songs
In the concert, we will sing two songs with the Orchestra,
written by Julia Donaldson and especially arranged for the
LPO. The words of both songs will be projected on a big screen
during the concert, so you don’t need to know the words off
by heart, but learning them thoroughly beforehand will mean
you get the most out of the amazing experience of singing
with the London Philharmonic Orchestra. Music and song
words can be found at the back of this pack.

‘The Breathing Song’ is taken from A Treasury of Songs


by Julia Donaldson and illustrated by Axel Scheffler,
first published 2016 by Macmillan Children’s Books (an
imprint of Pan Macmillan). This book is widely available
to buy if you wish, and comes with an audio CD. The
version in our concert has been arranged by Matthew Forbes. We will
sing this once to warm up our voices before singing ‘The Flying Doctors’ song. You can
join in with the words or just do the sound effects, whatever works best for your children.

‘The Flying Doctors’ is written by Julia Donaldson


and arranged for the LPO by Iain Farrington. It features in
the Zog Book and CD edition, published by Alison Green
Books (an imprint of Scholastic). The song tells the story
of Zog, the Princess and the Knight as the crew of flying
medics that they form at the very end of the Zog story.
Zog © Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler, 2010 (Alison Green Books, an imprint of Scholastic)
A Treasury of Songs © Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler 2016 - Macmillan Children’s Books

We appreciate that some of the words in the song may


be a challenge for younger children in the audience,
so we encourage teachers to use their judgement
regarding the best way to learn it. In the concert,
the audience will be encouraged to sing during the
choruses (though they may sing in the verses if they
wish). The chorus has the same music and mostly the
same words throughout, but each time it repeats,
the third line has different words – so for younger
children, teachers could suggest that they sing lines one, two and
four of each chorus instead.

Audio tracks to help you learn ‘The Breathing Song’ and


‘The Flying Doctors’ can be found online at
lpo.org.uk/creativeclassroomsconnect

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Warming up for ‘The Breathing Song’
Spending five minutes doing simple and fun warm-up activities will help to make singing an
enjoyable and creative experience and will encourage your class to sing out loud and proud.

• Ask the children to copy you making different facial expressions, aiming to wake up
the eyes, forehead, cheeks, mouth and tongue. You may like to include faces from
the Zog book, e.g. excited face, grumpy face, surprised face, breathing fire face,
sore throat face, roaring face. Encourage the children to respond without spoken
explanations, to encourage good listening, looking and responding. You could then
ask a child to be the leader/conductor and everyone to copy their facial expressions.

• Next, get your voices warmed up by making some sounds inspired by the dragons
flying e.g. flying fast and free, soar, swoop, loop the loop, zig-zag and crash! You can
use your hand movements to demonstrate the sounds going higher and lower, faster
and slower.

• Ask the children to copy you making the sounds from The Breathing Song e.g. sniff,
gasp, pant, sneeze, puff, sigh, yawn and most importantly – snore!

• Remind children to make their eyes sparkle and smile when singing and it will
automatically improve the quality of the sound!

Taking it further
We have created a wealth of resources all about singing on Creative Classrooms
Connect lpo.org.uk/creativeclassroomsconnect

Take a look at parts 1 and 2 of Let’s Sing, for all the warm-up activities, games and
songs you’ll ever need! You can also find other classroom activities (aimed at Key
Stage 2, but many could be adapted for younger learners).
© Orange Eyes Ltd. 2018.

London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources 11


‘The Flying Doctors’
In the concert, we will be joined by singer, Rosie Adediran, who will sing the verses of this
song, introducing the characters in the story. Polly will lead the audience, joining in with the
choruses. You can find all of the song lyrics and sheet music at the back of this pack.

This song is great at supporting lyric learning and experimenting musically with rhyming
words and phonic sounds. Here are some tips on how to teach this song to your children.

• Lead a simple ‘call and response’ activity, asking the children to copy you saying some
of the words in the song, for example:
• Teacher: ‘pl pl plaster’ Children: ‘pl pl plaster’
• Teacher: ‘d d disaster’ Children: ‘d d disaster’

• Ask the children to copy you in saying rhyming pairs rhythmically. You could use:
• plasters and disasters
• injections and infections
• question and indigestion
• lotions and potions

• Next, you could develop these two activities by singing the words above using two
notes, do and mi, or C and E for example. You could also clap a pulse or ask a child to
keep a steady beat on a drum.

• To learn the song, say the words, then introduce the melody, using a combination of
your solo singing and the recorded audio tracks.

• To develop further, experiment with the dynamics (loud or quiet), timbre (style/tone
quality e.g. growl-like or flute-like) and texture (solo or group singing). Discuss the
mood of the song. What singing voice style could we use to give the song meaning
and character?

• Ask the children to create their own actions to help make the lyrics more memorable
and personal.

• Record or film the children singing and listen or watch back, asking the children to
suggest improvements to their performance.

• Singing the songs in a variety of spaces or ways encourages children to listen to


themselves better. Get your class to sing with their eyes closed, whilst covering their
ears, whilst standing in a line, or whilst lying on the floor in a circle.

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Classroom activities
You may like to explore these further suggestions for activities to get the children more
familiar with the story’s themes and characters, as well as getting creative, inspired by the
music from the concert.

Links to literacy
1. You could develop your own raps, chants or songs, using the rhythm and rhyme in the
book. This activity uses the following line from the book: ‘Now that you’ve been shown,
you can practise on your own’.

• Stand in a circle

• Demonstrate the words to children by saying them in a rhythmic way, encouraging


the children to join in. Then develop this into a simple melody. Here is an example:

• When this tune is secure, demonstrate some simple body percussion while you sing,
and encourage the children to copy you. Start with simple actions e.g. clapping/knee
pats and progress to more tricky and creative actions e.g. finger clicks/rub tummy/
pat head/the floss. You could change the actions while still singing the tune, or leave
gaps between each singing of the tune to just practise your new “skill”. If leaving
gaps, it is a good idea to keep a steady beat on e.g. a small drum, to keep everyone
together.

• Next, ask a child to teach the other children a new solo skill (e.g. a dance move or
body percussion rhythm) and all the children copy and practise their own versions
until they are all experts!

• Next, try singing a version of the song with some instruments (tuned/untuned/
homemade percussion). One person demonstrates an instrument, and then gives it
to someone else to practise and they continue to play their instrument while you sing
the song again. Add more instruments playing different rhythms and timbres.

This simple song focuses on practising a new skill and sharing our talents. It is also a great
example of adding more actions and instruments and creating a thicker texture of sound. It
is great at encouraging good listening, quick responses and developing children’s own ideas.

London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources 13


2. Word art – look at the descriptive words in the story (e.g. gleaming, fearsome, champion,
alight, flapping, stretching, wildly, happy, prancing, twisty) and create your own versions
so they look like their definitions. Will the word be spiky or smooth? Would the word be
large or small? Curly or simple? What colours would you use? How would you say or sing
the word? What sound or instrument would represent it?

3. Ask the children to imagine that they are Madam Dragon and to plan a lesson to show
what they want their pupils to learn. This could link to other elements of the story or to
what your class is learning about, for example:
• ‘Today we are learning how to make a healthy breakfast for Princess Pearl’
• ‘Today we are learning how to care for a horse’
• ‘Today we are learning how to play the recorder’

Write a five step plan, instructing Zog and his friends on the key things required to learn
successfully.

4. Ask children to imagine they are Madam Dragon, writing a school report for Zog, or one
of the other dragons in her school. You could create a school report template, inviting
children to write the name of the dragon at the top, draw a picture of him/her, and
include information about what that dragon is good at, and what skills he/she should
work on. Make sure to sign the report in a grand, Madam Dragon-esque squiggly
signature!

5. After the concert day, ask the children to write a diary entry about their trip to hear the
London Philharmonic Orchestra.

© Orange Eyes Ltd. 2018.

14 London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources


Soundscapes

• Create some sounds for the different skills the dragons learn:
• flying sounds
• roaring sounds
• blowing fire sounds
• fighting sounds

• If you have any percussion instruments, discuss which sounds would be good for
each skill (e.g. a xylophone for flying, a thunder drum for roaring, an ocean drum for
blowing fire, claves and cymbals for fighting music).

• Could you make your own instruments or sound makers to sound and look like each
skill?

• Discuss why each instrument is good for those skills – what is it made of? How is it
played? What does it look like?

• Then ask, how the sounds should be played – loudly or quietly, long or short sounds,
as a solo or a group?

• Split into groups with each group making sounds for just one of the dragon skills and
experiment with the different groups of instruments.

• Challenge each group to create a short scene of music to represent their skill. Each
child must play something, but not everyone needs to play all the time.

• Could you sequence your sounds into a longer piece and intersperse the music with
children narrating some of the story?

London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources 15


Getting creative with the characters

• In this book, as well as the main characters, there are lots of other animals in the
fields and the woods. Make a character list and discuss, or write a description, of the
features and characteristics of each of them (e.g. describe how they each look, what
they are wearing and how they move or behave).

• Explore some vocal sounds and body percussion for each of the characters and what
they are doing (the sound of a horse’s hooves, worms wriggling in the mud, a squirrel
running up a tree, a unicorn hiding in the tree).

• Add some percussion or homemade instrument sounds for each character (e.g. “the
brave knight is wearing metal armour and riding a strong horse. We could play loud,
galloping music on the coconut shells and saucepan and metal spoons”).

• You could print and laminate picture cards and use them to direct or ‘conduct’ the
children making the different sounds (without giving spoken instructions).

• If the other background characters (e.g. the unicorn, heron, frog, lizard) could talk,
what would they say? Encourage the children to sing their ideas, perhaps using a
simple Do/Mi or C and E motif, experimenting with their voice styles to explore the
characterisation.

• You could extend this further with drawing and writing about the characters.
You could make masks, characters on lollipop sticks to role-play and re-enact the
characters’ conversations and songs.

Body shapes
Explore some yoga moves inspired by the images in the book:

• Listen to some calm recorded music (perhaps ‘Clair de Lune’ from Suite bergamasque
by Debussy or calm classical Indian raga).

• First, take some deep breaths.

• Then, make sure you warm up – look online for how to do this safely and
appropriately with your children. You can find more information at:
• www.namastekid.com (paid subscription)
• www.getset4pe.co.uk (some free resources)

16 London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources


• Hold some yoga poses incorporating some of the elements in the story, e.g. a tree
pose, mountain, dragon, horse, eagle, flower and butterfly.

• Can the children suggest new poses or actions for elements from the story, e.g. a
castle, snow, the mountains?

Explore the musical instruments

• Research the musical instruments that will be in the concert (see map of the
orchestra on page 6). Discuss the key characteristics of the groups or ‘families’ of
instruments (woodwind, brass, string, percussion). What do they sound like? How do
you play them? Which instruments play the highest sounds? Can you make your own
versions of these instruments using materials in your class (perhaps shoe-boxes and
elastic bands, bottles with different amounts of water, cutlery etc.). Can you invent
your own instrument?

• Make some ‘What am I?’ Riddle Cards. On the front, write ‘I am made of wood. I am
very large. I make very low sounds. What am I?’ And under the flap write, ‘I am a
double bass’. You could make other riddles for characters in the book e.g. scarecrow,
unicorn etc.

• In the concert, we will encourage the audience not to clap during the end credits of
the film and to listen to the orchestra until the very end of the music. Polly will ask
the children to watch, listen and choose their favourite instrument during this section
so it would be great to encourage your children to do this.

London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources 17


Inspired by Ravel’s ‘Empress of the Pagodas’

• Listen to the first section of this piece and imagine the princess walking, dancing and
taking a bow. Can the children dance or create movements inspired by the music,
perhaps using colourful scarves or ribbons? Move the scarves up and down, side to
side, diagonally, make different shapes (circles, triangles, squares), blow them so they
fly in the air, swish in the air, scrunch in your hand and throw and catch etc.).

• Create your own Dancing Princess music, inspired by the pentatonic scale (a scale of
just five notes, commonly heard in music from Southeast Asia). If you have a piano
or keyboard, demonstrate the sound of this scale by playing just the black notes, or
otherwise the notes C D F G A on chime bars or similar. Using just these five notes
you can improvise simple but evocative tunes.

• In the middle section of the piece, we meet the dragon. Listen to this and then ask
children to describe what they imagine the dragon looks like. What is it doing? How
does it move? What words can they use to describe the dragon music? Could they
make a dragon train and move in response to the music?

• Create your own Dragon music using percussion and homemade instruments,
making sure this has a contrasting mood to the Princess music.

• Now, put your Princess and Dragon music into a structure. Ravel puts his music
in this order:
• Princess music – Dragon music – Princess music

• You might want to do the same as Ravel, or ask your children what order they would
like the different sections to come in. Maybe they would like the Dragon music to
enter before the Princess music?

• Make a storyboard or a comic strip telling your own story of the princess and the
dragon which you could also use as a musical score for your class piece.

Drawing by KS2 pupil


from The Meads
Primary School inspired
by ‘Empress of the
Pagodas’

18 London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources


Further songs
The songs below are some more Zog-inspired pieces that you might want to try with your
class if you have more time.

What shall we learn at school today? (Inspired by: What shall we do on a rainy day?)

Verse 2: Let’s all learn how to fly... in Year One


Verse 3: Let’s all learn how to roar... in Year Two
Verse 4: Let’s all learn how to blow... in Year Three
Verse 5: Let’s all learn how to capture a princess... in Year Four
Verse 6: Let’s all learn how to fight... in Year Five

• After each verse, discuss each different dragon skill, and ask your children to think
about the style the next verse should be in (e.g. loud or soft, short or long notes, fast
or slow)

What’s inside the doctor’s bag? (Tune: Have you seen the Muffin Man?)

• Make your own doctor’s bag, either using toy


medical equipment or laminated pictures (e.g.
plasters, throat sweets, stethoscope, bandage,
thermometer).

• Pass the bag around the circle while singing the


song and when the music stops, that child takes
out an item and discusses what it is and what it
is used for. What other equipment might the
doctor need?

London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources 19


Thank you
We hope this pack will give you some suggestions to support KS1 provision in your
school. For further ideas, don’t forget that the LPO’s BrightSparks series of schools
concerts runs annually at Royal Festival Hall, with specific concerts for both KS1 and
KS2 and associated teacher INSET sessions.

You can find out more at www.lpo.org.uk/education

Please feel free to get in touch at any time about our work here at the LPO, or if you’d
like any future guidance for musical work in the classroom. We’d love to hear from
you about your school’s future musical activities!

Get in touch with us by email at education@lpo.org.uk

© Orange Eyes Ltd. 2018.

20 London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources


The Breathing Song
When you see a flower, do you sniff? When your birthday comes, do you puff?
When you see a flower, do you sniff? When your birthday comes, do you puff?
If it is a rose, Maybe you can blow
a lovely smell goes up your nose, the candles out in just one go
When you sniff, When you puff,
When you sniff. When you puff.

When you’re feeling sad, do you sigh?


When you’re feeling sad, do you sigh?
When you climb a hill, do you pant? No one wants to play,
When you climb a hill, do you pant? and it’s a cold and rainy day,
When you’re at the top, So you sigh,
I bet you’re really glad to stop, So you sigh.
And you pant,
And you pant.

When you’re feeling tired, do you yawn?


When you’re feeling tired, do you yawn?
You grumbled when they said
that it was nearly time for bed,
When you get a shock, do you gasp? But you yawn,
When you get a shock, do you gasp? Yes, you yawn.
Somebody says “Boo!”
or there’s a spider on your shoe,
So you gasp,
So you gasp. When you’re fast asleep, do you snore?
When you’re fast asleep, do you snore?
Have you got a snore
so loud it wakes them up next door,
When you have a cold, do you sneeze? When you snore,
When you have a cold, do you sneeze? When you snore?
Nothing you can do can stop it;
Here it comes – a-choo!
Yes, you sneeze,
Yes, you sneeze.

THE BREATHING SONG is taken from A Treasury of Songs by Julia Donaldson, illustrated by Axel Scheffler
London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources 21
A Treasury of Songs © Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler 2016 - Macmillan Children’s Books
The Flying Doctors
At the concert our singer Rosie will perform the verses by herself and the audience will join Polly to sing all of the choruses,
which we’ve highlighted for you below in pink. The chorus has the same music throughout, but each time it repeats, the
third line has different words – so for younger children, teachers could suggest that they just sing lines one, two and four of
each chorus.

Doctors, we’re flying doctors


And we’re ready to fly to you
We have plasters to conquer all disasters
So just call the flying doctor crew.

Meet our princess


I’ve put away my crown and my silly frilly dress
And now I travel here and there,
Taking people’s pulses and giving them my care. I’m with the…

Doctors, we’re flying doctors


And we’re ready to fly to you
Our injections will ward off all infections
So just call the flying doctor crew.

This is our knight.


I used to ride a charger and loved to pick a fight,
But now the helmet’s off my head.
I’d rather wear this nice, twisty stethoscope instead. I’ve joined the…

Doctors, we’re flying doctors


And we’re ready to fly to you

Zog © Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler, 2010 (Alison Green Books, an imprint of Scholastic)
There’s no question, we’ll cure your indigestion,
So just call the flying doctor crew.

‘The Flying Doctors’ song lyrics and melody copyright © Julia Donaldson 2010
Here is our dragon
I’m big enough to fit both the doctors and their bag on.
They can count on trusty Zog
To carry them in safety through rain and snow and fog. I’ve joined the…

Doctors, we’re flying doctors


And we’re ready to fly to you
We have lotions and extra powerful potions
So just call the flying doctor crew.

Doctors, we’re flying doctors and we’re ready to fly to you


If you’re wheezing or if you keep on sneezing,
If you’re teething or having trouble breathing,
If you’re itching or if you can’t stop twitching,
If you’re measly or mouldy, colicky or coldy,
If you’ve got bronchitis, mumps or tonsillitis,
If you need some ear drops, don’t shed any teardrops.
Call the flying doctor crew!

22 London Philharmonic Orchestra KS1 BrightSparks 2019 Resources


Breathing Song
Piano version
Julia Donaldson
Jauntily arr.
M.
Forbes
2018
q. =108 A
# 12
Voice &#8 ∑ ∑ œ #œ
j
œ j nœ
j
œ œ™ œ
1.When you see a flower do you
2.When you climb a hill do you
3.When you get a shock do you
4.When you have a cold do you
5.When your birth - day comes do you

Jauntily ˙™
q. =108
œj
A
# 12 œ #œ œœ j œ œ nœ j
& # 8 œœ œJ œ œœœ J n#œœ J nœœœœ ™™™™ Œ ™ Œ™ j
œœ ‰ ‰ Œ™ œœ ‰ ‰
œ œ
Piano œ™ œ ™™ œ™ œ ™ œ™
? ## 12 œ
{ 8 œ™ ˙™
˙™ ˙™ ˙™
˙™
4
# j < ¿™ > Y™ j <¿™ > Y™
Voice &# œ ‰ ‰ j j j œ ‰ ‰
œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ œ
sniff? SNIFF When you see a flower do you sniff? SNIFF
pant? PANT, PANT When you climb a hill do you pant? PANT, PANT
gasp? GASP When you get a shock do you gasp? GASP
sneeze? A - CHOO! When you have a cold do you sneeze? A - CHOO!
puff? PUFF When your birth -day comes do you puff? PUFF

˙™ n ˙ ™™
# Ϊ j j
œ Œ™ j ‰ ‰ Œ™ j
nœ ˙
&# œœ ‰ ‰ œœ ™™ # œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œ
n œœ
Pno.
œ
? ## j œ ‰ ‰ œj ‰ ‰
{ j ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ ˙™ œ™ œ™ #œ ™ œ™ J
œ ˙™

7 B
## j j j j
Voice & œ #œj œ j j œ œ œ œ œ œ™ œ œ
œ œ œ nœ
If it is a rose, a love - ly smell goes up your nose when you
When you're at the top I bet you're rea - lly glad to stop and you
Some - bo - dy says "Boo!" or there's a spi - der on your shoe so you
No - thing you can do can stop it, here it comes "A - choo!" yes you
May - be you can blow the can - dles out in just one go when you

B
# j
& # Ϊ j
œœ ‰ ‰ Œ™ j
œœ ‰ ‰ Œ™ œœ ‰ ‰ ##˙˙˙˙ ™™™™
œ œ œ
Pno.
? ## ˙™
{ ˙™ ˙™ ˙™
2
9 Repeat verses 1-5
## j < ¿ ™> ¿™ j‰ ‰ < ¿ ™> Y™ ™™ œ j j
Voice & œ‰ ‰ œ œj œ #œ œ œj œ™ œ nœ
sniff, SNIFF when you sniff. SNIFF 6.When you're fee-ling sad, do you
pant, PANT, PANT and you pant. PANT, PANT
gasp, GASP so you gasp. GASP
sneeze A - CHOO! yes you sneeze. A - CHOO!
puff, PUFF when you puff. PUFF
˙™ ˙˙ ™™™ ˙˙˙˙ ™™™™
# Œ™ j ™ Œ™ j j
œ ™™ ˙˙ ™
&# j
œœ ‰ ‰ Œ n œœ ‰ ‰ œœ ‰ ‰
Pno.
œ nœ œ
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{ œ™ Œ™ ˙™ j ‰ ‰ œj ‰ ‰ ˙ ™ & ™™ ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™™
˙™ œ
12
# Y™ Y™
Voice & # œj ‰ ‰ Œ ™ j j j œj ‰ ‰ Œ ™
œ œ œ œ œ™ œ œ
sigh? SIGH When you're fee - ling sad, do you sigh? SIGH
˙™ ˙˙ ™™™ ˙˙ ™™™ ˙˙ ™™™
## ˙˙˙ ™™™ ˙˙ ™ ™
˙˙˙˙™™™ ˙˙ ™™
˙˙™™ ˙˙ ™ ˙˙ ™
&
Pno.
# ˙˙™™ ˙˙™™ ?
{
& # ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™™
15
# j œj œ œj œ œj œ ™ œ œj œj ‰ ‰ Œ ™ ¿ ™ j ‰ ‰ Œ™ Y™
Voice & # œ #œj œ j j
œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ
No -one wants to play and it's a cold and rai -ny day, so you sigh SIGH so you sigh, SIGH
˙˙ ™™™
# ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™™™ #˙˙˙ ™™™ ˙˙ ™™ nn˙˙˙ ™™™™ ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™
& # œœ ™™ œ™ ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™ #˙ ™ ˙˙™™ n˙ ˙˙™™
Pno.
œ™ ˙™ ˙˙™™
? ## ˙ ™ ˙™ #˙ ™ w™
˙™ ˙™
{ C
˙™ ˙™ ˙™ #˙ ™ w™
D Slower
19
# bbb ™™ œ #œj œ
Voice &# ∑ ∑ j œ ™ œ nœj
œ
7.When you're fee - ling tired do you
8.When you're fast as - leep do you

C U D Slower
bn˙˙ ™™
∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏

## œœ #œœ œœ j œ œ œ nœ œ™ j
& œ J œ œœ J n#œœ J nœœœœ ™™™™ œ™ bb˙˙˙ ™™™ b
b b ™™ Œ ™ j
œœ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ œœœ ‰ ‰
œ
Pno. œ™ œ ™™ œ™ œ™ U
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{ Ϫ
nœ ™ b˙ ™
b˙™
˙™
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3
22
b j Y™ j ‰ ‰ Œ™ ¿™ Œ j
Voice &b b œ ‰ ‰ Œ™ j j j œ < #œ >
œ œ œ œ œ™ œ œ
yawn? YAWN When you're fee - ling tired do you yawn? YAWN You
snore? SNORE When you're fast as - leep do you snore? SNORE

˙™ b˙™
b j œj j ‰ ‰ Œ ™ bœj ˙ ™
&b b Œ™ œœ ‰ ‰ Œ™
œœ ™™ n œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œ
bœœ
Pno.
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? bb j ‰ ‰ œj ‰ ‰ ˙™ œ™ #œ ™ œ ™ œ ‰ ‰ œj ‰ ‰
{ b œ
E
œ™ J ˙™
25
b j j j j
Voice & b b œ #œ œ j œ œj nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ™
J
œ œ
œ
grum - bled when they said that it was near - ly time for bed, but you
Have you got a snore so loud it wakes them up next door when you

E
j j
b
&b b Ϊ
j
œœ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ œœ ‰ ‰ Œ™ œœ ‰ ‰ #n˙˙˙˙ ™™™™
œ œ œ
Pno.
? bb
{ b ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ ˙™

27 1.
b j ¿™ Y™
Voice &b b œ ‰ ‰ Œ™ œ j œj ‰ ‰ Œ ™ ∑
œ
yawn; YAWN yes you yawn. YAWN
snore? SNORE when you snore. SNORE
˙™ 1.
b j j œj œœ #œœ œœ nœ
&b b Œ™ œœ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ nœœj ‰ ‰ Œ ™ œœ ‰ ‰ œ J œ œœœ œJnnœœœ J
œ bœ œ J
Pno.
Ϫ Ϫ
? bb œœœ ™™™ œ™ œ™
{
30
b Œ™ ˙™
˙™ œ
j ‰ ‰ œj ‰ ‰ ˙™ œ™

b ™™
Voice &b b ∑ ∑ ∑

˙™
œj w ™™™
∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏

b ™
& b b bœœœœ ™™™ Œ™ ™™ œœœ #œœJ œœ œ œœœ ™™™
œœ
œ
œ
œ
w
w
w™
J
2
Pno.
Ϫ Ϫ Ϫ
? bb Ϫ Ϫ 2

{ b ˙™
˙™
™™ œ™
œ
œ
w
w
w™
™™
The Flying Doctors Song
Julia Donaldson
arr. Iain Farrington

### 4
Lively (q = c.132)

Voice & 4 ∑ ∑ œ œ ‰ œj œ nœ

{
Doc - tors! We're fly-ing

### 4
Lively (q = c.132)
‰ j
& 4 œ
œœ œœ œ œ nœ œœœœ˙ œœ œ œœ n# œœœ œœœ œ œ
œ
? ## 44 œ œ œ œJ #nœœœ œœœ
# œœœ œœœ œœœ ‰
Piano f

œ j
J œœœ œ œ œ œ
œ

###
4

& œ œ Œ #œ nœ œj œ j
œ #œ œ ˙ œ œ

{
doc - tors, and we're rea - dy to fly to you. We have

###
&
# œœ œ œœ n# œœœ œœœ œ œ œ # œœ œ œ œ # œœ nnœœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
? ###
œ œ œ nœ ˙
œ œ œ ˙ ˙

###
œ™ œ œ œ œ
7

& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ

{
plas - ters to con-quer all di - sas - ters, so just call the fly-ing doc - tor

### ‰
& j‰ j ‰ j œ
œœ œœ œœœ œœœ œ œ œ # œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ
œ œ œ œ œ œ
? ###
˙ œ nœ œ œ ˙
˙ #œ ˙
2

###
10

& ˙ Ó Œ ‰ j
˙ œ œ ˙ œ

{
crew! Meet our prin - cess. I've

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ
### ? œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ
? ### j ˙
œ™ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ˙ ˙
###
13

& œ
œœœ œ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ œœ œœœœ œ

{
œ œ ™™
œ œœœ ™™™
put a-way my crown and my sil - ly fril-ly dress, and now I tra - vel here and there,

? ### œœ ™™ J œ J œ œœ™™ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
J
J &

? ###
˙ ˙ ˙
˙ ˙ ˙
###
16

& ∑
#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{
ta-king peo-ple's pul - ses and giv- ing them my care. I'm with the

###
& œœ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ # œ
œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ # œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ
? ### œ œ œœ œ ˙ ˙
œ œœ ˙ ˙

###
‰ œj œ nœ œ
19

& œ œ œ Œ #œ nœ œj œ j
œ #œ œ

{
doc - tors! the fly-ing doc - tors, and we're rea -dy to fly to

###
& œœ œ œœ n# œœœ œœœ œ œ œ # œœ œ œœ n# œœœ œœœ œ œ œ # œœ œ œ œ # œœ nnœœ
? ###
œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ
œ œ œ œ œ ˙
3

###
22

& œ œ œ
˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{
you. Our in - jec - tions will ward off all in - fec - tions, so just

###
& œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œœ œœ
j ‰
œœœ
j
œœœ œ œ œ # œœ œœ œ œ œ
œ œ
? ###
˙ ˙ œ nœ œ œ
˙ ˙ #œ
###
& œ™ œ œ œ
25

˙ Ó
œ œ ˙ œ œ

{
call the fly-ing doc - tor crew! This is our

### œœ œ œ œ œ
& ‰ j œ œ ? œ œ œ
œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ
œ œ œ œ
? ### j ˙
Ϫ
˙ œ œ œ œ œ ˙
˙
###
28

& Œ ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{
œ œ ™™
œ œœœ ™™™
knight. I used to ride a char - ger and loved to pick a fight, but now the

œ œ œ œ™
œ™ œ œœ™™
œ œ œ œ
? ### œ œ J œ J J
J
? ###
˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙
˙
###
31

& œ Ó Œ ‰ œj
œ œœœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{
hel - met's off my head. I'd ra-ther wear this nice twist-y

œ
? ### œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ
œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ # œ
œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ
? ### œœ œœ œœ œ
˙ œ ˙
˙ ˙
4

### ‰ œj œ nœ œ œ
34

Œ #œ nœ
& #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{
ste-tho-scope in- stead. I've joined the doc- tors, the fly-ing doc- tors, and we're

###
& œ œ œ œ
# œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œœn# œœ œœ œ œ œ # œœ œ œœn# œœ œœ œ œ œ
? ### ˙
˙ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ
### j
37

& œ œ j œ
œ #œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{
rea -dy to fly to you. There's no ques - tion we'll cure your in - di -

###
œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œœ
& j ‰ j
# œœ œ œ œ # œœ nnœœ œ
œœ
œ
œœœ œœœ
? ###
œ nœ ˙ ˙
˙ ˙ ˙
###
œ™ œ œ œ œ
40

& œ œ œ œ œ ˙ Ó
œ

{
-ges - tion, so just call the fly-ing doc - tor crew!

###
& œ ‰ j œ œ ?
œ œ
œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ
? ### j
œ nœ œ œ
Ϫ
˙ œ œ œ œ œ
#œ ˙
###
43

Œ ‰ j
œ œ™
& ˙ j œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{
œ œ ™™
Here is our dra- gon. I'm big e-nough to fit both the

? ### œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ ™™
œ
J œ œ
J
? ###
˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙
5

###
46

& œ œ Ó Œ ‰ œj
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ œ

{
œœ ™™™
doc-tors and their bag on. They can count on tru - sty Zog. To

? ### œ œ œœ™™ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
J & œ
J œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ
? ### œ œ œ
˙ ˙ ˙ œ œœ œ œ
˙
###
49

& #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ

{
car - ry them in safe - ty through rain and snow and fog. I've joined the

###
& # œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ # œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ
? ### ˙ ˙
˙ ˙

###
‰ œj œ nœ œ
51

& œ œ œ Œ #œ nœ œj œ j
œ #œ œ

{
doc - tors! the fly-ing doc - tors, and we're rea -dy to fly to

###
& œœ œ œœ n# œœœ œœœ œ œ œ # œœ œ œœ n# œœœ œœœ œ œ œ # œœ œ œ œ # œœ nnœœ
? ###
œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ
œ œ œ œ œ ˙
###
54

& ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ

{
you. We have lo - tions and ex -tra pow-er-ful po - tions, so just

###
œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œœ
& j‰ j
œœ œœœ œœœ œ œ œ # œœ œœ œ œ œ
œ œ
? ###
˙ ˙ œ nœ œ œ
˙ ˙ #œ
6

### nnnbb ‰ œj œ #œ
& œ™ œ œ œ
57

˙ Ó œ œ
œ œ

{
call the fly-ing doc - tor crew! Doc - tors! we're fly-ing

### ‰ nnnbb
& œœ œœ j œ b œ œœ œœbnœœœ œœœ œ œ
œ œ œœ œ œ n œ
œ œ œ nœœ œ œ œ
? ### j nnnbb œ œ œ
nœ œ œ nœ œ
˙ ˙ œ™ œ œ
b
60

& b nœ œ Œ œ #œ nœj œ œj œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ

{
doc- tors, and we're rea-dy to fly to you. If you're wheez-ing or if you keep on

b j j
& b nœœ œœbnœœœ œœœ œ œ nœœ œ œ# œœ nbœœ œ œœ œ œ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœœ œœœ
œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ
? bb œ œ œ #œ n˙ ˙
œ œ œ ˙ n˙ ˙
b
64

&b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

{
sneez - ing, If you're teeth - ing or hav-ing trou-ble breath - ing, If you're

b j j
& b œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœœ œœœ œ œ œ n œœ œœ œ œ œ
œ nœ œ œ œ œ
? bb œ œ
bœ œ œ ˙ bœ œ œ
nœ ˙ nœ
b
67

&b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ

{
itch - ing or if you can't stoptwitch - ing, If you're meas - ly or mould - y,

b j j j j
& b ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœœ œ œ
œœœ œ œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ
œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œœ
? bb
˙ œ bœ œ œ ˙
˙ nœ ˙
7
# nnnn
b nn## ## œ™ œ œ
70

& b œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ œ œ n

{
co-lick-y or cold - y. If you've got bron-chi - tis, mumps or ton-si - li - tis.

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