Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 184
IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events Tables de Cotation de l’IAAF pour les Epreuves Combinées

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events

Tables de Cotation de l’IAAF pour les Epreuves Combinées

EDITION 2001

(REPRINT 2016)

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events --------------- Tables de Cotation de l'IAAF pour les Epreuves
IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events --------------- Tables de Cotation de l'IAAF pour les Epreuves
IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events --------------- Tables de Cotation de l'IAAF pour les Epreuves

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events

---------------

Tables de Cotation de l'IAAF pour les Epreuves Combinées

2001 Edition

Reprinted edition - June 2016

IAAF COUNCIL / LE CONSEIL DE L’IAAF PRESIDENT Sebastian COE (GBR) SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Sergey

IAAF COUNCIL / LE CONSEIL DE L’IAAF

PRESIDENT Sebastian COE (GBR)

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Sergey BUBKA (UKR)

VICE PRESIDENTS Dahlan AL HAMAD (QAT) Hamad KALKABA MALBOUM (CMR) Alberto JUANTORENA DANGER (CUB)

TREASURER José Maria ODRIOZOLA (ESP)

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS Roberto GESTA DE MELO (BRA), South America* Nawal EL MOUTAWAKEL (MAR) Abby HOFFMAN (CAN) Anna RICCARDI (ITA) Pauline DAVIS-THOMPSON (BAH) Geoff GARDNER (NFI), Oceania* Sylvia BARLAG (NED) Ahmad AL KAMALI (UAE) Frank FREDERICKS (NAM) Bernard AMSALEM (FRA) Zhaocai DU (CHN) Victor LOPEZ (PUR), NACAC* Stephanie HIGHTOWER (USA) Hiroshi YOKOKAWA (JPN) Antti PIHLAKOSKI (FIN) Mikhail BUTOV (RUS) Adille SUMARIWALLA (IND) Nawaf AL SAUD (KSA) Svein Arne HANSEN (NOR), Europe* David OKEYO (KEN), Africa* Karim IBRAHIM (MAS), Asia*

*Area Group Representatives

CONTENTS / TABLE DES MATIERES

 

English

French

President’s Message / Message du Président

4

25

A Brief History / Un Bref Historique

5

26

The Evolution of the Scoring Tables / Evolution des Tables de Cotation

9

31

IAAF Rule 200 - Outdoor / Règle 200 de l’IAAF - Plein Air

17

40

IAAF Rule 222 - Indoor / Règle 222 de l’IAAF - Salle

19

42

How to Use the Tables / Comment utiliser les Tables

20

43

How to score / Comment noter

20

43

Formulae / Formules

22

45

OUTDOOR SCORING TABLES / TABLES DE COTATION EN PLEIN AIR DECATHLON MEN / HOMMES

Engl/Fr

100

metres / 100 mètres & Manual timing / Chronométrage manuel

48

Long Jump / Saut en Longueur

 

52

Shot Put / Lancer du Poids

55

High Jump / Saut en Hauteur

61

400

metres / 400 mètres & Manual timing / Chronométrage manuel

62

110

metres Hurdles / 110 mètres Haies & Manual timing / Chronométrage manuel

69

Discus Throw / Lancer du Disque

 

75

Pole Vault / Saut à la Perche

81

Javelin Throw / Lancer du Javelot

84

 

1500

metres / 1500 mètres

90

PENTATHLON MEN / HOMMES

 

200

metres / 200 mètres & Manual timing / Chronométrage manuel

96

HEPTATHLON WOMEN / FEMMES 100m Hurdles/ 100 mètres Haies & Manual timing/Chronométrage manuel

 

104

High Jump / Saut en Hauteur

110

Shot Put / Lancer du Poids

111

200

metres / 200 mètres & Manual timing/Chronométrage manuel

117

Long Jump / Saut en Longueur

 

124

Javelin Throw / Lancer du Javelot

127

800

metres / 800 mètres

133

DECATHLON WOMEN / FEMMES

 

100

metres / 100 mètres & Manual timing/Chronométrage manuel

139

400

metres / 400 mètres & Manual timing/Chronométrage manuel

143

Discus Throw / Lancer du Disque

 

150

Pole Vault / Saut à la Perche

156

 

1500

metres / 1500 mètres

158

INDOOR SCORING TABLES / TABLES DE COTATION EN SALLE HEPTATHLON MEN / HOMMES

 

60

metres / 60 mètres & Manual timing / Chronométrage manuel

164

1000

metres / 1000 mètres

167

60

metres Hurdles / 60 mètres Haies & Manual timing / Chronométrage manuel

172

PENTATHLON WOMEN / FEMMES

 

60

metres Hurdles / 60 mètres Haies & Manual timing / Chronométrage manuel

176

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

3

President’s Message I warmly welcome this reprinted edition of the IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined

President’s Message

I warmly welcome this reprinted edition of the IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events.

Scoring tables which have a history in Athletics dating back even further than the IAAF’s own creation in 1912 are an invaluable reference tool for all those who work in and closely follow our sport.

Based upon mathematical principles they have been regularly adapted over the course of a century and more to meet the demands of our constantly changing sport, taking into account mankind’s physical and athletic development.

As far as possible these tables ensure that the specialist in one event cannot overcome performances in the other events. As such the best individual event performances in combined events can score roughly the same number of points.

While these tables can never be a definitive measurement of the level of performance considering the differing opinions among the sports statisticians concerning their basis and method of construction, they do allow us to consistently rank combined events athletes in competition.

Sebastian Coe

IAAF President

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

4

A BRIEF HISTORY OF COMBINED EVENTS COMPETITIONS

MEN'S PENTATHLON AND DECATHLON

Men's combined events competitions have a very ancient tradition. A Pentathlon (consisting of long jump, discus throw, javelin throw, 192m sprint and wrestling) was introduced into the Classical Greek Olympic Games from about 700 BC. After the end of the ancient Olympic Games in 390 AD, there was a very long gap.

The next reports of combined events competitions, come from the middle of the 19th century in England. For example, the Much Wenlock Olympics in 1851 included a Pentathlon with high jump, long jump, putting the 36lb shot, 880 yards and climbing a 55 foot rope. There are also reports from Germany about the same time of combined events including pole vault, a stone throw and long jump.

Modern combined events competitions, as we now know them, probably started in America about 1880, scoring being carried out using a table prepared for the American Athletic Union. At first the Decathlon (the All Round event as it was then called) included 100 yards, shot put, high jump, 880 yards walk, 16lb hammer throw, pole vault, 120 yards hurdles 56lb weight throw, long jump and 1 mile run. The whole event was completed in a day! It proved so popular that the organisers of the 3rd Olympic Games in St. Louis in 1904 arranged for a Decathlon to take place in conjunction with the Games, though not as an official event.

Similar experiments with Pentathlons and Decathlons were coming to the fore about this time throughout Scandinavia and in Germany. At the interim Olympic Games in Athens in 1906, Greece made an attempt to revive the classical Pentathlon with a standing long jump, ancient style discus throw, javelin throw, 192m sprint and wrestling, but combined events, for track and field only, had now progressed too far. The Decathlon, with its good balance of track, jumping and throwing events requiring both explosive and endurance qualities, was developing irresistibly.

By 1910 Sweden, who were to stage the 5th Olympic Games in Stockholm in 1912, had decided to include a Pentathlon (long jump, javelin throw, 200m, discus throw and 1500m) as well as a two-day Decathlon (100m, long jump, shot put, high jump, 400m, 110m hurdles, discus throw, pole vault, javelin and 1500m). In fact, the Decathlon had to be extended to three days owing to the large number of entries, with the discus and 110m hurdles transposed. However, the original sequence of events was confirmed at the 1914 IAAF Congress and has remained unchanged to this day.

The Pentathlon has also remained unchanged except for a change in the scoring

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

5

method in 1928. Until then, the scoring was based on the addition of the place number in each event; the lowest total winning. From 1928, the same tables and scoring system as for the Decathlon have been used: hence the inclusion of the 200m in the 1984 tables. After 1924, the Pentathlon was dropped from the Olympic Games, since the inclusion of two men's combined events was considered excessive. Nevertheless, the Pentathlon continues as an official IAAF event, in particular for one day meetings, in club competitions and as a team event.

WOMEN'S PENTATHLON AND HEPTATHLON

In contrast to the men, the pioneers of women's athletics had to labour against a great mass of prejudice. These basic difficulties were increased by problems in the international organisation of athletics. The USSR, which was one of the strongest nations in women's athletics, and especially combined events competitions, was not a member of the IAAF until after the 1939-45 World War. Even more serious, the IOC refused to admit women to the Olympic Games from the very beginning.

Towards the end of the first World War, a French woman, Mme Alice Milliat, established a national women's federation. After an unsuccessful appeal to the IOC in 1919 to include women's athletics in the Olympic Games, she set up a rival organisation, the Fédération Sportive Féminine Internationale (FSFI) in 1921. Whereas the IOC naturally saw it as a threat, the IAAF set up a committee on women's athletics in 1922. This led, finally, to a joint committee with the FSFI in 1926 to control women's athletics worldwide.

The FSFI organised Women's World Championships, similar to the Olympic Games, in 1922, 1926, 1930 and 1934. This did not endear women's sports to the IOC but, after considerable pressure from the IAAF, the first women's athletics events (admittedly only 5) were added to the Olympic Games in 1928 in Amsterdam. There were six women's events in 1932 in Los Angeles, but again only 5 in 1936 in Berlin. It must be admitted that women's athletics never really took off in the Olympic Games until 1948.

The IAAF amended its constitution in 1924 to include women's athletics and, in 1926, as noted above, established a joint women's athletics committee with the FSFI. In 1928, various women's athletic world records were accepted by the joint committee and recorded in the IAAF handbook. The IAAF became increasingly frustrated by the joint committee and finally decided, in 1936, to take over the exclusive control of women's athletics world-wide. Special rules for women were included in the 1937 handbook (but without any event rules or list of events), and the women's Pentathlon was included in the list of events qualifying for world records. At the Congress in Paris in 1938, a Pentathlon world record, set in 1934, was officially accepted.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

6

At the IAAF Congress in Oslo in 1946, two special commissions were set up, one to prepare new rules for women's athletics, including the Pentathlon, and the other to study all questions of scoring tables both for women as well as men. At the 1948 Congress in London, the USSR finally became a Member, although they had competed in the 1946 European Championships. The women's commission called for the urgent preparation of official scoring tables to replace a number of different national scoring tables. Details of the further development of the women's scoring tables are given in the next section. With the introduction of the new women's scoring tables in 1954, the IAAF had established a structure for international Pentathlon competition, but it was not until 1964 that the IOC allowed the event to be included in the Olympic Games.

Meanwhile, as the battles for women's international athletics raged, long- established national federations, set up their own rules and scoring tables for women's combined events competitions. One of the effects of this was a whole range of different events, almost always Pentathlons, as shown by the following table:

COMPETITION DAYS

 

ORDER OF EVENTS

 

Pentathlon

Pentathlon 80mH 100mH SP JT DT HJ LJ 60m 100m 200m 800m

80mH 100mH SP

JT

DT

HJ

LJ

60m 100m 200m 800m

1924/27

2

42

 

31

5

1927/30

2

42

3

1

5

1928/40

2

24

 

3

1

5

1928/49

2

15

 

42

3

1949/60

2

4

1

25

 

3

1961/68

2

1

2

34

 

5

1969/70

2

1

2

34

 

5

1971/76

1 or 2

1

2

34

 

5

1977/80

1 or 2

1

2

34

 

5

Octathlon: (One form only listed here)

 

1946/77

2

5

6

427

3

1

8

Nonathlon:

1970/80

2

1

6

823

7

5

4

9

Heptathlon:

1981/82

2

1

26

 

35

 

4

7

1983

2

1

36

 

25

 

4

7

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

7

As will be seen from this table, even after the IAAF had assumed complete control of women's athletics, there continued to be frequent changes in the events included in the Pentathlon, and in the order of the events. This arose partly from the fact that no consensus had been established before 1936 and, at least in part,

from the impossibility of establishing a balanced test of skill and endurance over

5 events. This was shown up in the late 1960s and early 1970s in various

countries, with trials of women's combined events competitions having 6, 7, 8 and

9 events. Finally, in 1981, the IAAF established the Heptathlon as the official combined events competition for women. Women now have a reasonably balanced competition which has now risen to the same standards as the men's Decathlon.

DECATHLON

The trend in the late 1990s was to study a further step of the combined events for Women and maybe the introduce a Decathlon for Women in the third millennium.

In order to achieve this goal, the IAAF Technical Committee together with the Women's Committee decided in the year 2000 to create a Working Group consisting of several experts in that field. Athletes, coaches, meeting organisers and member federations have been consulted with the aim of studying the need of this new event.

Based on their research and experience, the members of the Working Group and the Technical Committee recommended to add the women's decathlon in addition to the heptathlon. This proposal was supported by the IAAF Council in March and voted by the Congress in August 2001.

Although it was envisaged to keep Men's and Women's decathlon identical, problems would appear when these two events should be organised at the same stadium at the same time. It was therefore proposed to keep the men's order of running events and inverse the order of field events between the two days.

No deadline has been fixed yet for the introduction of Women's Decathlon into the World Championships programme.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

8

THE EVOLUTION OF THE SCORING TABLES

In order to understand the evolution of the scoring tables, it is helpful to have some idea of the different types of tables which have been involved. Fortunately, there are only three main types: linear, progressive and regressive. With a linear table, the increase in points scored for a unit increase in performance is the same from the bottom of the table to the top. In visual terms, the graph is a straight line. With a progressive table, the increase in points scored for a unit increase in performance gets larger as the performance improves. In visual terms, the graph is a rising curve, concave side upwards. In a regressive table, the increase in points scored for a unit of performance gets smaller as the performance improves. In visual terms, the graph is a rising curve, concave side downwards.

Early Men's Scoring Tables

All the early tables were linear, probably because they are easier to construct. In graphical terms, it is only necessary to decide two points on the graph - the top (national/world records etc) and the bottom (the time for walking the distance/an average of junior performances etc) and then draw a straight line through them. The most prominent of these early men's tables were:

Date

Country

Type of Table

At the Top of the Table

Comments

 

Points

Reference

Scored

Point

1884

USA

Linear

1000

World Records

1901

Denmark

Linear

1000

National Records

Revised 1910

1902

Sweden

Linear

1000

National Records

The Malmö Tables

1909

Finland

Linear

100

National Records

1911

Germany

Linear

1000

World Records

For the 1912 Olympic Games

From 1911 onwards, the main interest for all international men's combined events competitions lies in the series of tables prepared initially for the Olympic Games and later for the IAAF. National federations and individual persons, however, continued to prepare new sets of tables some of which were eventually adopted by the IAAF. Others, such as the "Portuguese Tables" of 1949/1954/1962, acquired an excellent world reputation and some others served to develop the art and science of scoring tables.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

9

1912 Olympic Scoring Tables

Having, in 1910, decided to include the Decathlon in the Olympic Games of 1912, the Swedish Organising Committee set about preparing a new set of tables for international competition. The initial work, which began in February 1911, was based on the linear principle but there were many difficulties in achieving an acceptable set of tables. In May 1912, a progressive formula was briefly examined but time did not permit these ideas to be properly developed. In June 1912, the

Organising Committee was forced to revert, with some amendments, to their original proposals for a set of linear tables which were used for the Decathlon in the 1912 Olympic Games and where a valid 1908 Olympic Record had a value of

1000 points.

One feature of the 1912 tables (and also the 1920 tables) was the use of fractional points scores. The experts developing these tables found it necessary to extend the tables to more than two places of decimals in order that every possible performance in each event should have a unique score. For example, the javelin table looked like this:

Distance m

50.50

50.51

50.52

50.53

50.54

Points Score

880.925

881.200

881.475

881.750

882.025

The dislike by ordinary athletes and coaches of such a complex scoring system is clear when reading reports of discussions.

"1920" Olympic Scoring Tables

With Europe pre-occupied with the first World War, America, in 1915, adjusted the

1912 tables by altering the 1000 points scores to correspond with the Olympic

Records as they existed following the 1912 Games. These tables were formally

accepted by IAAF in 1921 and were used in the Olympic Games in 1920, 1924,

1928 and 1932, and even during the first European Championships in 1934.

Developments in the Theory of Scoring Tables

From 1920, three concepts became prominent in the theory and development of scoring tables. These have, in varying degrees, influenced all subsequent tables.

1) The fact that each unit of improvement in an athlete's performance gets increasingly harder as the athlete approaches his ultimate. This can be expressed statistically as follows: the probability of any athlete achieving or exceeding a given performance rapidly gets less as the performance rises towards the record. The score for a performance can be derived as the inverse of that probability. The resulting scoring table is progressive but, applied simply, this leads to an exceedingly progressive scoring table, and the main challenge has been to control this excess.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

10

2) The need to be able to compare the performance of an athlete in one event with that of another in a different event or, indeed, in a different individual sport.

3) The wish to have a really "scientific" basis for any scoring system. With the growing research into human physiology and sports science, it seemed possible that a basis could be found in physiological parameters, such as heart beat, breathing rate, oxygen uptake or oxygen depletion and so on.

The interplay of these and other interests in the development of the scoring tables over the past 65 years is a fascinating study.

1934 IAAF Scoring Tables

At the end of the 1920's the Finnish Federation set to work on a new set of national scoring tables. An early decision was made to drop all fractional points, the score in each event to range from 0 to 1150 points. The aim of the new tables was that a performance in any event should score the same as an equally good performance in any other event. To this end, seven standard performances in each event (labelled A-G) were selected by experienced judgement. All the performances scoring 1000 points would only be reached rarely by combined events athletes. All the G performances would be reached occasionally by leading boys. The range of performances in each event between A and G was subdivided into 20 equal steps. The number of steps between the standard performance was divided A, 1, B, 3, C, 3, D, 3, E, 3, F, 7, G, and a progressive curve was employed such that the slope of A was twice that of G. The whole scheme clearly works directly for field events, but not track events using time as the performance figure. However, if the times are converted into average speeds for the race, these can be used equally as well as distances in developing a scoring table. The new scoring tables were calculated by J. Ohls from Finland in 1931. These tables were progressive and corresponded to the formula P = f (eM), where P means the points, e is the base of natural logarithms and M corresponds to the performances. The tables were calculated for sprint events up to the hundredths and the performance were evaluated only by full points. A zero point value was allotted to average performances of pupils and the 1000 point value was near the then world records. The tables were calculated up to 1150 points

The new scoring table was such a success when introduced in 1932 in Finland that it was adopted by the IAAF at its next Congress in 1934. The main difference consisted in the progressive character of the Finnish evaluation as against the linear evaluation of decathlons at the Olympic Games in 1936 and at the European Championships in 1938, 1946 and 1950.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

11

1950/52 IAAF Scoring Tables

 

The improvement of the athletic performances after the war called for further changes of the tables which were made by Gösta Holmér and Axel Jörbeck from Sweden.

A

Scoring Tables Commission was appointed at the 1946 IAAF Congress. During

the next 2 years, proposals were received from a number of members for a revision

of

the existing 1934 tables or for new tables. A working party was established from

Finland and Sweden to carry out what in effect amounted to a re-appraisal of the

1934 tables. All the tables were to remain progressive, with the top score for each table at 1500 points and with the key equivalent performance scoring 1300 points. The basic principles remained very much the same but with a serious attempt to base every key performance on facts rather than on experienced judgement. For example, the key 1300 points performances for all running events were taken from

a

Performance Curve. This was drawn up by plotting the average speed for all the

existing world records against the distance of the race. The smooth line through these points was the performance curve.

It

must be admitted that all the key performances at the bottom of the tables and

the key performances for the field events were still very much on an experienced judgement basis. One change which seems very curious today is that the progressive nature of all the tables was increased, in some cases very considerably. The new scoring tables were presented to the 1950 Congress where

there were a number of criticisms of the non-decathlon events. These were revised

in

the next 2 years and the whole set of tables accepted by the 1952 Congress.

 

Summary Table

 

Points

100m

LJ

SP

HJ

400m

110mH

DT

PV

JT

1500m

1000 P

10.77

758.5

16.00

196.5

48.15

14.35

51.20

442

70.40

3:55.0

 

0 P

16.1

334

3.51

85

71.6

21.4

11.25

193

15.48

5:49.3

The Early Scoring Tables for Women

 

is necessary at this point to go back to the beginning of the women's scoring tables since, after the men's 1950/52 tables, the development of the IAAF scoring tables follows the same path for both men and women. Scoring systems were developed independently in Germany and the USSR in the 1920s, being used extensively for their national pentathlon championships. The German "100-points" tables published by the DSfL (Deutsche Sportbehörde fur Leichtathletik) were based on the progressive principle and were used internationally e.g. at the 1934 Women's World Games in London. In the mid to late 1930s, the French Federation arranged for the preparation of a set of scoring tables for women's events. The tables are very curious, in graphical terms a progressive "curve" from a series of straight lines

It

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

12

with abrupt angles between them. Presumably they were put together by practical rather than mathematically minded people. Despite the fact that the introduction of these tables states that they were intended for domestic competition only, their use internationally was recommended by the IAAF in 1948.

1954 IAAF Women's Scoring Tables

These tables introduced a very important era in the development of the IAAF scoring tables. They were:-

1)

The first fully developed set of women's tables available for international competition;

2)

The first set of tables prepared under the guidance of Axel Jörbeck, a Member of the IAAF Technical Committee, who was to dominate IAAF work on scoring tables for the next 25 years;

3)

The first set of IAAF tables using principles proposed by an Austrian, Dr. Karl Ulbrich who published a comprehensive study of the point evaluation of athletic performances on the basis of which L. Miettinen, Axel Jörbeck and Tage Ericson prepared the first IAAF tables for combined events for women.

The most remarkable aspect of the 1954 scoring tables is that in a very few years, Jörbeck was able to assemble sufficient data on women's athletics; study all the

literature and available proposals for the preparation of scoring tables and select

a system based on Ulbrich's theories. He then applied them with great judgement

and moderation, so that these tables lasted, with a small adjustment in 1971, for 30 years.

The Ulbrich principles on which the new scoring tables were based are really very simple. Using the available statistical data, it is necessary to determine two performances which will score zero points and say 1000 points. For track events it is then necessary to convert the race times to velocities and these are used to construct a linear table based on velocity. The velocity scale in this table is then converted back to race time to give the final scoring table. As used by Jörbeck, it proves to be a very moderately progressive table which experience proves to be ideal.

For field events, the problem is much more difficult. Ulbrich supposed that the basic

property imparted by the athlete to his body in a jump or to the implement in a throw,

is velocity. Since the distance an implement (or the body) will fly is proportional to

the square of the initial velocity, it is only necessary to substitute the square root of each performance for the velocity in the same scheme for a calculation which is mathematically sound. This gives a scoring table which is moderately regressive.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

13

It

is the difference between the tables for track events which are moderately

progressive and those for field events which are moderately regressive, which is the basic weakness of Ulbrich type tables. It arises from the false assumption that

what the athlete imparts to an implement is velocity, whereas, in fact, it is kinetic energy, which is proportional to the square of the velocity. It is a measure of Jörbeck's skill and moderation in the preparation of the IAAF tables that this weakness has lain dormant for so many years. In later years, however, the ranges

of

performances became so wide in modern combined events competition that the

difference between the tables for track and field events became very apparent.

The new Jörbeck/Ulbrich women's scoring tables were accepted by the Bern Congress in 1954, with great relief.

1962 IAAF Men's Scoring Tables

 

In the latter years of the 1950s the disadvantages of the strongly progressive 1950/52 men's tables became increasingly apparent. A working party under Axel Jörbeck therefore undertook the preparation of a new set of tables using exactly the same principles as for the women's 1954 tables. The tables were calculated from the statistical data available at that time on the basis of Dr. K. Ulbrich's equations from 1950.

A

specific equation led to a progressive evaluation of the performances achieved

by runners.

 

Another equation led to a regressive dependence of points on the results of technical events.

These were accepted by Congress in 1962 and effectively remained in force until

1984.

 
 

Summary Table

 

Points

 

100m

LJ

SP

HJ

400m

110mH

DT

PV

JT

1500m

1000 P

10,2

790

18,75 217

46,00

13,70

57,50

478

81,00

3:40,2

 

0

P

15,7

359

4,70

113

78,10

32,0

12,81

149

14,02

6:39,7

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

14

Amendments to the Women's 1954 and the men's 1962 Tables

For the men's tables, the only change was the introduction of tables for races timed by photo-finish. For the women's tables, it was necessary to adjust some of them in 1971 to take account of the rapid improvements in performance which had been made in the 1950s and 1960s. Other adjustments were necessary to take account of the changes in the pentathlon events and finally the change to the heptathlon. In addition, of course, there was the introduction of tables for races timed by photo-finish.

The Background to the 1984 Men's and Women's Tables

In the latter part of the 1970's, pressure began to mount for a revision of both the men's and women's scoring tables. This really arose for two reasons. First, all previous sets of IAAF scoring tables were intended to carry out two functions: to provide a scoring system for combined events competitions and to provide a method of comparing performances by different athletes in different events. Secondly, following the basic physics of the Ulbrich principles, all the tables for track events were progressive, whereas all the tables for field events were regressive.

The effect of the dual use for the tables is that the scores for individual event world records should be approximately equal. The best single event performances in world record class combined events are bound to be less good, and to a widely different degree, owing to the differences between a single event performance and the same performance set in the pressure of a combined events competition. As a result, the best scores set in each individual event will vary widely. Technically, this does not matter at all if the differences in the scores between different athletes in one event are roughly proportional to the differences in their performances, but the emotional effect on the athletes could be very severe. Why try very hard when the maximum scores are so low?

The effect of the regressive scoring tables in the field events has become important, as the range of performances in combined events has widened with the great improvement in the top class performances. There comes a point with a regressive scoring table when it does not seem worth while trying any harder in that event, with a diminishing yield in points for each improvement in performance.

The IAAF Technical Committee Working Group (Robert Blanchet, Carl-Gustav Tollemar, Viktor Trkal and Etienne Wante) under the leadership of Emmanuel Rose, Technical Committee Chairman, met in Prague on March 2 and 3, 1983 with observers from FRG, GDR, USA and several statisticians. Nine points were accepted as basic principles for a new set of tables:

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

15

1. The new set of tables should be used for combined events only.

2. Results in various events should, as far as possible, yield about the same number of points if the results are comparable as to quality and difficulty.

3. The new tables should be either:

a) a modification of the existing ones

b) a straight line in all events

c) slightly progressive tables in all events.

4. It must be possible to use the scoring tables for beginners, juniors and top athletes as well.

5. There will be a special scoring table for men and another table for women.

6. All the new versions of the scoring tables should be based on the statistical data for the combined events by paying due regard to the statistical data for performances by single event athletes.

7. The new tables should be applicable now and for the future.

8. It is desirable without creating other problems, that the total scores using the new tables for the top world class athletes should remain approximately the

same. That is about 8500 points for the decathlon and about 6500 points for the heptathlon.

9. As far as possible the new tables must insure that a specialist in one event cannot overcome performances in the other events.

Fulfilling all these conditions was not easy. Particularly N° 8 required that any change in points in one event should be reflected in all the other events. The 3 c) possibility was chosen for the tables construction, i.e. slightly progressive tables in all events.

Since the 1984 Scoring Tables apply only to combined events competitions, the best individual event performances in combined events can score roughly the same number of points. With the abandonment of the Ulbrich principles, the disadvantages of the regressive scoring tables for field events has been avoided.

These tables are still valid but with the modifications regarding the long throws and the addition of the indoor scoring tables and the new events for women's decathlon.

Historical research made with the help of Mr Viktor Trkal (CZE)

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

16

RULE 200

Combined Events Competitions

U18 Boys, U20 and Senior Men (Pentathlon and Decathlon)

1. The Pentathlon consists of five events which shall be held on one day in the following order: Long Jump; Javelin Throw; 200m; Discus Throw; and 1500m.

2. The U18 Boys’ and the Men’s Decathlon consists of ten events which shall be held on two consecutive days in the following order:

First day:

100m; Long Jump; Shot Put; High Jump; 400m.

Second day:

110m Hurdles; Discus Throw; Pole Vault; Javelin Throw;

1500m.

U20 and Senior Women (Heptathlon and Decathlon)

3. The Heptathlon consists of seven events, which shall be held on two consecutive days in the following order:

First day:

100m Hurdles; High Jump; Shot Put; 200m.

Second day:

Long Jump; Javelin Throw; 800m.

4. The Women’s Decathlon consists of ten events which shall be held on two consecutive days in the following order:

First day: 100m; Discus Throw; Pole Vault; Javelin Throw; 400m. Second day: 100m Hurdles; Long Jump; Shot Put; High Jump; 1500m.

U18 Girls (Heptathlon only)

5. The U18 Girls’ Heptathlon consists of seven events, which shall be held on two consecutive days in the following order:

First day:

100m Hurdles; High Jump; Shot Put; 200m.

Second day:

Long Jump; Javelin Throw; 800m.

General

6. At the discretion of the Combined Events Referee, there shall, whenever possible, be an interval of at least 30 minutes between the time one event ends and the next event begins, for any individual athlete. If possible, the time between the finish of the last event on the first day and the start of the first event on the second day should be at least 10 hours.

7. In each separate event, except the last, of a Combined Events competition, the heats and groups shall be arranged by the Technical Delegate(s) or Combined Events Referee, as applicable, so that the athletes with similar performances in each individual event during a predetermined period, shall be placed in the same heat or group. Preferably five or more, and never less than three, athletes shall be placed in each heat or group. When this cannot be achieved because of the timetable of events, the heats or groups for the next

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

17

event should be arranged as and when athletes become available from the previous event. In the last event of a Combined Events competition, the heats should be arranged so that the last one contains the leading athletes after the penultimate event. The Technical Delegate(s) or the Combined Events Referee shall have the authority to rearrange any group if, in his opinion, it is desirable.

8. The Rules for each event constituting the competition will apply with the following exceptions:

(a)

in the Long Jump and each of the throwing events, each athlete shall be allowed three trials only.

(b)

in case a Fully Automatic Timing and Photo Finish System is not available, each athlete’s time shall be taken by three Timekeepers independently.

(c)

in the Track Events, only one false start per race shall be allowed without the disqualification of the athlete(s) responsible for the false start. Any athlete(s) responsible for further false starts in the race shall be disqualified by the Starter (see also Rule 162.7).

(d)

in the Vertical Jumps, each increase of the bar shall be uniform throughout

the competition: 3cm in the High Jump and 10cm in the Pole Vault.

9. Only one system of timing may be applied throughout each individual event. However, for Record purposes, times obtained from a Fully Automatic Timing and Photo Finish system shall be applied regardless of whether such times are available for other athletes in the event.

10. Any athlete failing to attempt to start or make a trial in one of the events shall not be allowed to take part in the subsequent events but shall be considered to have abandoned the competition. He shall not, therefore, figure in the final classification. Any athlete deciding to withdraw from a Combined Events competition shall immediately inform the Combined Events Referee of his decision.

11. The scores, according to the current IAAF Combined Events Scoring Tables, shall be announced, separate for each event and as a cumulative total, to all athletes after the completion of each event. The athletes shall be placed in order according to the total number of points obtained.

Ties

12. If two or more athletes achieve an equal number of points for any place in the competition, the procedure to determine whether there has been a tie is the following:

(a) The athlete who, in the greater number of events, has received more points than the other athlete(s) concerned shall be awarded the higher place.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

18

(b)

If the athletes are equal following the application of Rule 200.12(a), the athlete who has the highest number of points in any one event shall be awarded the higher place.

(c)

If the athletes are still equal following the application of Rule 200.12(b), the athlete who has the highest number of points in a second event, etc. shall be awarded the higher place.

(d)

If the athletes are still equal following the application of Rule 200.12(c), it shall be determined to be a tie.

Note: Rule 200.12(a) shall not be applied when more than two athletes are tied.

RULE 223

Combined Events Competitions

U18 Boys, U20 and Senior Men (Pentathlon)

1. The Pentathlon consists of five events, which shall be held on one day in the following order:

60m Hurdles; Long Jump; Shot Put; High Jump; 1000m.

U18 Boys, U20 and Senior Men (Heptathlon)

2. The Heptathlon consists of seven events which shall be held over two consecutive days in the following order:

First day:

60m; Long Jump; Shot Put; High Jump.

Second day:

60m Hurdles; Pole Vault; 1000m.

U18 Girls, U20 and Senior Women (Pentathlon)

3. The Pentathlon consists of five events and shall be held on one day in the following order:

60m Hurdles; High Jump; Shot Put; Long Jump; 800m.

Heats and Groups

4. Preferably four or more, and never less than three, athletes shall be placed in each heat or group.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

19

HOW TO USE THE TABLES

There are separate tables for all the events in the men's decathlon and pentathlon and the women's heptathlon. The score for any performance on the track or in the field can be read off in the appropriate table.

In many events, all possible times or distances are not given in the table. In such cases, the score for the nearest lesser performances should be read.

For example:

In the men's 1500m, there is no entry for a time of 4:10.25. The nearest slower time given in the table is 4:10.37 for a score of 879 points.

In the women's shot put there is no entry for a distance of 13.12m. The nearer shorter distance given in the table is 13.11 for a score of 735 points.

TIMING

Two methods of timekeeping shall be recognised as official (IAAF Rule 165):

·fully automatic electrical timing, to 1/100th of a second;

·hand timing, to 1/10th of a second; in this case, use the "Manual Timing" Tables.

HOW TO SCORE A COMPETITION

Combined events can be scored by a pre-programmed computer or manually.

When scoring manually it is important to use a system which helps to minimise the chances of error. Further, a standardised system makes it much easier for subsequent readers to check. Examples of normal scoring sheets for decathlon and heptathlon are shown on the next page. This arrangement with vertical additions and a record of the score after each event improves accuracy. Forms can be pre-drawn or pre-printed. Another assistance to accuracy is the entry of the score additions in a different coloured pen.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

20

EXAMPLES OF DECATHLON AND HEPTATHLON SCORE SHEETS

DECATHLON - WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS EDMONTON, 6/7 AUGUST 2001

NAME

Tomáš DVORÁK

Erki NOOL

Dean MACEY

NUMBER

255

328

437

COUNTRY

CZE

EST

GBR

 

Result

Score

Result

Score

Result

Score

100m

10.62

947

10.60

952

10.72

924

PLACE/TOTAL

2

947

1

952

3

924

LONG JUMP

8.07

1079

7.63

967

7.59

957

PLACE/TOTAL

1

2026

2

1919

3

1881

SHOT PUT

16.57

886

14.90

784

15.41

815

PLACE/TOTAL

1

2912

2

2703

3

2696

HIGH JUMP

2.00

803

2.03

831

2.15

944

PLACE/TOTAL

1

3715

3

3534

2

3640

400m

47.74

922

46.23

997

46.21

998

PLACE/TOTAL

2

4637

3

4531

1

4638

110m HURDLES

13.80

1000

14.40

924

14.34

931

PLACE/TOTAL

1

5637

3

5455

2

5569

DISCUS THROW

45.51

777

43.40

734

46.96

807

PLACE/TOTAL

1

6414

3

6189

2

6376

POLE VAULT

5.00

910

5.40

1035

4.70

819

PLACE/TOTAL

1

7324

2

7224

3

7195

JAVELIN THROW

68.53

867

67.01

844

54.61

657

PLACE/TOTAL

1

8191

2

8068

3

7852

1500m

4:35.13

711

4:29.58

747

4:29.05

751

FINAL TOTAL

8902

8815

8603

FINAL PLACE

1

23

 

HEPTATHLON-WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS EDMONTON, 4/5 AUGUST 2001

NAME

Yelena PROKHOROVA

Natalya SAZANOVICH

Sheila BURRELL

NUMBER

697

70

810

COUNTRY

RUS

BLR

USA

 

Result

Score

Result

Score

Result

Score

100mH

13.77

1011

13.29

1081

13.05

1117

PLACE/TOTAL

6

1011

3

1081

2

1117

HIGH JUMP

1.88

1080

1.76

928

1.67

818

PLACE/TOTAL

2

2091

4

2009

8

1935

SHOT PUT

13.15

737

15.90

921

12.87

719

PLACE/TOTAL

2

2828

1

2930

10

2654

200m

23.73

1007

23.87

993

22.92

1087

PLACE/TOTAL

2

3835

1

3923

4

3741

LONG JUMP

6.61

1043

6.50

1007

6.45

991

PLACE/TOTAL

2

4878

1

4930

3

4732

JAVELIN THROW

50.73

874

46.72

797

48.74

836

PLACE/TOTAL

1

5752

2

5727

3

5568

800m

2:11.53

942

2:20.87

812

2:14.24

904

FINAL TOTAL

6694

6539

6472

FINAL PLACE

1

23

 

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

21

FORMULAE FOR IAAF COMBINED EVENTS SCORING SYSTEM

For a given performance, the point score (P) is calculated using one of the following equations:

Track events

P=a*(b - T)**c

[whereTisTimeinseconds;e.g.10.43for100metres]

Jumps

P=a*(M - b)**c [where M is Measurement in centimetres; e.g. 808 for

Throws

"LJ".] P=a*(D - b)**c [where D is Distance in metres; e.g. 16.69 for Shot]

a, b and c are parameters whose values are listed below. * is the mathematical sign meaning "multiplied by ", and ** is the mathematical sign meaning "raised to the power of".

Note: The value of P (points) must be rounded down to a whole number after calculation (e.g. 123.999 becomes 123).

PARAMETERS (constants for each event)

MEN'S EVENTS

a

bc

100m

(auto)

25.4347

18.00

1.81

200m

(auto)

5.8425

38.00

1.81

400m

(auto)

1.53775

82.00

1.81

1500m

0.03768

480.00

1.85

110mH

(auto)

5.74352

28.50

1.92

High Jump

0.8465

75.00

1.42

Pole Vault

0.2797

100.00

1.35

Long Jump

0.14354

220.00

1.40

Shot

51.39

1.50

1.05

Discus

12.91

4.00

1.10

Javelin

10.14

7.00

1.08

(Indoors)

60m

(auto)

58.0150

11.50

1.81

1000m

0.08713

305.50

1.85

60mH

(auto)

20.5173

15.50

1.92

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

22

WOMEN'S EVENTS

a

bc

200m

(auto)

4.99087

42.50

1.81

800m

(auto)

0.11193

254.00

1.88

100mH

(auto)

9.23076

26.70

1.835

High Jump

1.84523

75.00

1.348

Long Jump

0.188807

210.00

1.41

Shot

56.0211

1.50

1.05

Javelin

15.9803

3.80

1.04

(Decathlon)

 

100m

(auto)

17.8570

21.0

1.81

400m

(auto)

1.34285

91.7

1.81

1500m

0.02883

535

1.88

Pole Vault

0.44125

100

1.35

Discus

12.3311

3.00

1.10

(Indoors)

60mH

(auto)

20.0479

17.00

1.835

NOTE: Points for manual times in events up to 400 metres are calculated either by adding the standard adjustment factor to the time (i.e. 0.24 sec. for events below 400 metres, 0.14 sec. for 400 metres) or by subtracting the factor from the "b" parameter. There are no adjustments for events above 400 metres.

Example (100m Men):

10.40 (auto) for 100m is calculated as

P=25.4347*(18.00 - 10.40)**1.81

= 999

10.4 (manual) for 100m is calculated either as

P=25.4347*(18.00 - 10.64)**1.81

= 942

or as

P=25.4347*(17.76 - 10.4)**1.81

= 942

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

23

Message du Président C’est avec grand plaisir que je vous présente cette réimpression de la

Message du Président

C’est avec grand plaisir que je vous présente cette réimpression de la Table de Cotation IAAF des Epreuves Combinées.

Bien que les Tables de Cotation aient une histoire qui remonte même avant la création de l’IAAF en 1912, elles restent une référence et un outil de travail inestimable pour tous ceux qui suivent de près l’organisation de notre sport.

Basées sur des principes mathématiques, elles ont été régulièrement adaptées au cours du dernier siècle afin de satisfaire les souhaits d’un sport en permanente mutation, en prenant en considération les évolutions physiques et athlétiques du genre humain.

Ces tables garantissent, autant que possible, que le spécialiste dans une épreuve donnée ne puisse pas supplanter les performances dans les autres épreuves. En tant que tel, les meilleures performances dans chacune des épreuves scorent un nombre similaire de points.

Eu égard aux opinions souvent divergentes des statisticiens sur les bases et les critères de calcul, ces tables ne peuvent pas être considérées comme une mesure définitive du niveau de performances mais elles sont néanmoins le seul moyen de comparer les résultats de nos « athlètes complets ».

Sebastian Coe Président de l’IAAF

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

25

UN BREF HISTORIQUE DES EPREUVES COMBINEES

PENTATHLON ET DECATHLON HOMMES

Les compétitions d'épreuves combinées pour les hommes sont une tradition très ancienne. Un Pentathlon (comprenant un saut en longueur, un lancer du disque, un lancer du javelot, une course de 192m et de la lutte) fut introduit aux anciens Jeux Olympiques Grecs environ 700 ans avant Jésus-Christ. Avec la fin des anciens Jeux Olympiques en 390 après Jésus-Christ cette tradition connut une longue interruption.

Les comptes-rendus des compétitions d'épreuves combinées qui suivirent

remontent au milieu de 19ème siècle et viennent d'Angleterre. Par exemple, en

1851 le "Much Wenlock Olympics" comprenait un pentathlon avec le saut en

hauteur, le saut en longueur, le lancer de poids de 36 livres anglaises, 880 yards

et un grimper de corde de 55 pieds. Il existe aussi, à peu près à la même époque,

des rapports provenant d'Allemagne, retraçant des épreuves combinées qui comprenaient un saut à la perche, un lancer de pierre, et un saut en longueur.

Les compétitions modernes d'épreuves combinées telles que nous les connaissons, ont probablement débuté aux Etats-Unis aux environs de 1880; les performances étant déterminées à l'aide d'une table préparée par l'Union

Américaine d'Athlétisme. Au début le Décathlon - qu'on appelait alors l'Epreuve Complète - comprenait le 100 yards, le lancer de poids, le saut en hauteur, le 880 yards, le lancer de marteau de 16 livres anglaises, le saut à la perche, un 120 yards haies, un lancer de poids de 56 livres anglaises, le saut en longueur et la course du mile. L'ensemble des épreuves était disputé en un seul jour et connut un tel succès que les organisateurs des 3èmes Jeux Olympiques à St. Louis en

1904 s'arrangèrent pour qu'un Décathlon ait lieu en même temps que les Jeux

mais sans que ce soit une épreuve officielle.

Des expériences similaires avec les Pentathlons et les Décathlons commençaient

à faire surface à la même période à travers toute la Scandinavie et en Allemagne.

A l'époque des ''Jeux Olympiques intérimaires" d'Athènes en 1906, les Grecs

essayèrent de faire revivre le Pentathlon classique avec un saut en longueur sans

élan, un lancer du disque "ancien style", un lancer de javelot, une course de 192m

et une lutte, mais les épreuves combinées, pour l'athlétisme seulement, avaient

beaucoup trop progressé. Le Décathlon, mélange harmonieux de courses, de sauts et de lancers, qui exige des qualités d'endurance et beaucoup d'énergie, a connu une ascension irrésistible.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

26

En 1910, les Suédois, qui devaient organiser en 1912 les 5èmes Jeux Olympiques à Stockholm, avaient décidé d'inclure un Pentathlon (saut en longueur, lancer de javelot, 200m, lancer du disque et course de 1500m) ainsi qu'un Décathlon étalé sur deux jours (100m, saut en longueur, lancer de poids, saut en hauteur, 400m, 110m haies, lancer du disque, saut à la perche, lancer du javelot et 1500m). Dans la réalité, à cause de la participation importante, cette épreuve dut être organisée sur trois jours, en déplaçant le disque et le 110m haies. Toutefois, l'ordre initial des épreuves fut confirmé au Congrès de l'IAAF en 1914 et il est resté inchangé jusqu'à nos jours.

Le Pentathlon est aussi resté inchangé à l'exception d'un changement du système de cotation en 1928. Jusque là, la cotation était basée sur l'addition de la position de l'athlète dans chaque épreuve. L'athlète qui avait le plus petit total était le vainqueur. Mais, à partir de 1928, on décida d'utiliser le même système et la même table de cotation que pour le Décathlon et c'est pourquoi le 200m fut inclus dans la nouvelle Table. Après 1924, le Pentathlon fut retiré des Jeux Olympiques, puisque la présence de deux épreuves combinées pour les hommes était considérée comme excessive. Toutefois, le Pentathlon a continué d'être une épreuve officielle de l'IAAF notamment à l'occasion des compétitions d'une journée au niveau national et lors des compétitions de clubs.

PENTATHLON ET HEPTATHLON FEMMES

A la différence de l'athlétisme masculin, les pionniers de l'athlétisme féminin ont eu à lutter contre une montagne de préjugés. Ces difficultés de base étaient accrues par des problèmes d'organisation internationale. L'URSS, qui était l'une des nations les plus solides en athlétisme féminin et particulièrement dans les compétitions d'épreuves combinées, ne devint Membre de l'IAAF qu'après la Seconde Guerre Mondiale. Chose plus grave encore, le Comité International Olympique refusa d'admettre les femmes aux Jeux Olympiques dès le début.

Vers la fin de la Première Guerre Mondiale, une Française, Mme Alice Milliat, créa une fédération nationale féminine. Après une demande infructueuse en 1919, auprès du Comité International Olympique, d'inclure l'athlétisme féminin aux Jeux Olympiques, elle fonda en 1921 une organisation rivale : la Fédération Sportive Féminine Internationale (FSFI). Alors que le CIO considérait la FSFI comme une menace, l'IAAF créa un comité féminin d'athlétisme en 1922. Cela conduisit finalement à la création, en 1926, d'un comité conjoint avec la FSFI pour le contrôle de l'athlétisme féminin dans le monde.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

27

La FSFI organisa des Championnats du Monde Féminins semblables aux Jeux Olympiques en 1922, 1926, 1930 et 1934. Cela ne rendit pas le sport féminin populaire auprès du CIO, mais après des pressions considérables de la part de l'IAAF, les premières épreuves féminines d'athlétisme (seulement 5 il est vrai) furent ajoutées lors des Jeux Olympiques d'Amsterdam en 1928. Il y eut six épreuves féminines en 1932 à Los Angeles, mais, encore une fois, seulement 5 en 1936 à Berlin. Il faut admettre, qu'avant 1948, l'athlétisme féminin n'a jamais véritablement pris un grand essor aux Jeux Olympiques.

L'IAAF amenda sa constitution en 1924, afin d'ajouter l'athlétisme féminin, et, en 1926, ainsi qu'il est mentionné plus haut, elle établit un comité d'athlétisme féminin, en commun avec la FSFI. En 1928, divers records du monde d'athlétisme féminin furent homologués par ce comité commun et inscrits dans le manuel de l'IAAF. Cependant, l'IAAF était de plus en plus déçue par le comité commun et finalement elle décida en 1936 de prendre en charge le contrôle exclusif de l'athlétisme féminin au niveau international. Des règlements spéciaux pour les femmes furent ajoutés dans le manuel en 1937 (mais sans liste ni règlements des épreuves) et le Pentathlon Féminin vint allonger la liste des épreuves qualifiantes pour les records du monde. Au Congrès de Paris en 1938, un record du monde du Pentathlon établi en 1934, fut officiellement homologué.

Au Congrès de l'IAAF à Oslo en 1946, deux commissions spéciales furent créées : I'une pour préparer les nouvelles règles pour l'athlétisme féminin, y compris le Pentathlon, et l'autre pour étudier toutes les questions relatives aux tables de cotation, pour les hommes et pour les femmes. En 1948, I'URSS, bien qu'elle ait concouru aux Championnats du Monde de 1946, devint enfin membre de l'IAAF à l'occasion du Congrès de Londres. Le comité féminin réclama d'urgence la préparation d'une table de cotation officielle pour remplacer les différentes tables de cotation nationales. Les détails de l'évolution ultérieure des tables de cotation féminines sont donnés dans le paragraphe suivant. Avec l'introduction des nouvelles tables de cotation féminines en 1954, l'IAAF avait établi une structure pour les compétitions internationales de Pentathlon, mais ce n'est pas avant 1964 que le CIO accepta d'inclure cette épreuve aux Jeux Olympiques.

Alors que la lutte pour le contrôle de l'athlétisme féminin international faisait rage, certaines fédérations nationales établies de longue date établissaient leurs propres règlements et tables de cotation pour les épreuves combinées pour femmes. Ceci eut pour résultat la formation d'une grande variété d'épreuves, presque toujours des Pentathlons, ainsi que le montre le tableau suivant :

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

28

JOURS DE COMPETITION

 

ORDRE DES EPREUVES

 

Pentathlon

80mH

100mH

LP

LJ

LD

SH

SL

60m

100m 200m 800m

1924/27

2

42

 

3

1

5

1927/30

2

423

 

1

5

1928/40

2

24

 

3

1

5

1928/49

2

15

 

42

 

3

1949/60

2

4

1

25

 

3

1961/68

2

1

2

34

 

5

1969/70

2

1

2

34

 

5

1971/76

1 or 2

1

2

34

 

5

1977/80

1 or 2

1

2

34

 

5

Octathlon: (Une seule formule mentionnée ici)

 

1946/77

2

5

64273

 

1

8

Nonathlon:

1970/80

2

1

68237

 

5

4

9

Heptathlon:

1981/82

2

1

26

 

35

 

4

7

1983

2

1

36

 

25

 

4

7

Comme on peut le voir sur ce tableau, de fréquents changements ont continué à intervenir dans les épreuves comprises dans le pentathlon, ainsi que dans l'ordre des épreuves, même après que l'IAAF se soit assurée du contrôle complet de l'athlétisme féminin. Ceci est dû en partie au fait qu'aucun consensus n'existait avant 1936, et également, tout au moins dans une certaine mesure, à l'impossibilité d'établir un test équilibré d'adresse et d'endurance sur les 5 épreuves. Ceci fut démontré vers la fin des années 60 et au début des années 70, dans différents pays avec les essais de compétition des épreuves combinées féminines ayant 6, 7, 8 ou 9 épreuves. Finalement, en 1981, l'IAAF a créé l'Heptathlon, lui conférant le statut de compétition officielle des épreuves combinées féminines. Aujourd'hui, les femmes ont une compétition raisonnablement équilibrée, qui a atteint les mêmes critères que le Décathlon pour les hommes.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

29

DECATHLON

La tendance de la fin des années 90, allait vers l'étude d'une étape supplémentaire dans les épreuves combinées pour les Femmes et peut-être l’introduction d’un Décathlon Féminin dans le troisième millénaire.

Afin de remplir cette mission, le Comité Technique et le Comité Féminin de l’IAAF ont décidé en 2000 de créer un groupe de travail constitué de plusieurs experts dans ce domaine. Athlètes, entraîneurs, organisateurs de meeting et fédérations membres ont été consultés afin d’étudier le besoin pour cette nouvelle épreuve.

Sur base de cette recherche et de leur expérience, les membres du groupe de travail et le Comité Technique ont recommandé l’ajout du décathlon féminin à l’heptathlon. Cette proposition, soutenue par le Conseil de l’IAAF en mars, fut votée par le Congrès en août 2001.

Bien qu’il ait été envisagé de garder le décathlon féminin identique à celui des hommes, on a pensé que cette solution provoquerait des problèmes lorsque les deux épreuves seraient organisées en même temps et dans le même stade. Il a donc été proposé de garder l’ordre des courses des hommes et d’inverser l’ordre des concours entre les deux jours.

Aucun délai n’est fixé pour l’introduction du Décathlon Féminin dans le programme des Championnats du Monde.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

30

EVOLUTION DES TABLES DE COTATION

Pour comprendre l'évolution des tables de cotation, il est utile d'avoir une idée des différentes tables qui ont été utilisées. Heureusement, il n'en existe que trois catégories principales : linéaire, progressive et régressive. Avec la table linéaire, la progression des décomptes par points pour une unité de progression de performance, est la même depuis le bas de la table jusqu'en haut. En termes visuels, le graphique est une ligne droite. Avec une table progressive, la progression par points des résultats, pour une unité de progression de performance, va en s'agrandissant au fur et à mesure que la performance est améliorée. En termes visuels, le graphique se traduit par une courbe ascendante concave vers le haut. Dans une table régressive, la progression par points des résultats, pour une unité de progression de performance, va en diminuant avec l'accroissement de performance réalisée. En termes visuels le graphique représente une courbe ascendante concave vers le bas.

Début des Tables de Cotation pour Hommes

Au début toutes les tables étaient linéaires, probablement parce qu'elles étaient plus faciles à construire. En termes graphiques, il est nécessaire de fixer deux

points sur le schéma : le plus haut (records du monde/nationaux etc

bas (le temps pour une épreuve de marche/les performances moyennes des

.), et ensuite de les rejoindre par le tracé d'une ligne droite. Les

tables les plus importantes parmi ces premières tables pour hommes furent les

suivantes :

et le plus

),

juniors,

Date

Pays

Genre

Le haut de la table

Commentaires

 

deTable

RésultatsPoints de Référence

1884

Etats-Unis

Linéaire

1000

Records du Monde

1901

Danemark

Linéaire

1000

Records Nationaux

Corrigée en 1910

1902

Suède Linéaire

1000

Records Nationaux

Table "Malmö" corrigée en 1906 et 1909

1909

Finlande

Linéaire

100

Records Nationaux

1911

Allemagne Linéaire

1000

Records du Monde

Pour les Jeux Olympiques de 1912

A partir de 1911, I'intérêt essentiel pour toutes les compétitions d'épreuves combinées hommes réside dans une suite de tables préparées initialement pour les Jeux Olympiques et ensuite pour l'IAAF. Cependant, les Fédérations Nationales, ainsi que des personnes individuelles, n'ont pas cessé de préparer de nouvelles tables, dont certaines ont été finalement adoptées par l' IAAF. D'autres, comme "les Tables Portugaises" de 1949/1954/1962, ont acquis une excellente réputation mondiale, et d'autres ont contribué à l'exactitude scientifique et à l'amélioration de la présentation des tables de cotation.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

31

Les Tables de Cotation Olympiques de 1912

Ayant décidé en 1910 d'inclure le Décathlon aux Jeux Olympiques, le Comité d'Organisation suédois commença la préparation d'une nouvelle série de tables pour la compétition internationale. Le travail initial, commencé en février 1911, était basé sur le principe linéaire, mais la réalisation d'un ensemble acceptable de tables rencontra de nombreuses difficultés. En mai 1912, une formule progressive fut examinée brièvement mais le manque de temps ne permit pas de creuser cette idée comme il eût fallu. En juin 1912 le Comité d'Organisation fut obligé de revenir, avec quelques amendements, à sa proposition originale en vue d'un ensemble de tables linéaires qui furent utilisées pour le Décathlon lors des Jeux Olympiques de 1912 et dans lesquelles un Record Olympique 1908 valait 1000 points.

L'une des caractéristiques des tables de 1912 (et aussi des tables de 1920) fut l'utilisation des points fractionnés des décomptes. Les experts qui mettaient ces tables au point, trouvèrent nécessaire de donner les tables à trois décimales près, afin que chaque performance possible dans chacune des épreuves ait un résultat unique. Par exemple, la table, pour le javelot, se présentait ainsi :

Distance (m)

50.50

50.51

50.52

50.53

50.54

Résultats (pts)

880.925

881.200

881.475

881.750

882.025

Mais le mécontentement des athlètes et des entraîneurs devant un système de cotation aussi complexe apparaît clairement à travers la lecture des rapports de discussions.

Les Tables de Cotation Olympiques de 1920

L'Europe entière étant préoccupée par la Première Guerre Mondiale, les Américains ajustèrent en 1915 les tables de 1912 en modifiant les résultats sur 1000 points afin de les faire correspondre avec les Records Olympiques, tels qu'ils existaient après les Jeux Olympiques de 1912. Ces tables furent acceptées officiellement par l'IAAF en 1921, et furent utilisées pour les Jeux Olympiques de 1920, 1924, 1928 et 1932, et même lors des premiers Championnats du Monde Européens de 1934.

Développement de la Théorie des Tables de Cotation

A partir de 1920 trois notions commencèrent à dominer dans la théorie et le développement des tables de cotation. Elles ont, à des degrés différents, influencé toutes les tables à venir par la suite. 1) Le fait que chaque élément d'amélioration des performances d'athlètes devient de plus en plus difficile lorsque ces derniers atteignent leur

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

32

maximum. Ceci peut être exprimé statistiquement ainsi : plus une performance donnée s'achemine vers le record, plus la probabilité qu'un athlète l'atteigne ou la dépasse s'amenuise. La cotation d'une performance est donc inversement proportionnelle à cette probabilité. La table de cotation qui en résulte est progressive mais, appliqué simplement ce principe mène à une table de cotation beaucoup trop progressive et le principal défi a été le contrôle de ces excès.

2)

Le besoin de pouvoir comparer la performance d'un athlète avec celle d'un autre athlète dans une épreuve différente, ou même dans un sport individuel différent.

3)

Le désir d'avoir des bases réellement ''scientifiques'' pour chaque système de cotation. Avec le développement des recherches en physiologie humaine et dans la science des sports , il a paru possible d'établir une base fondée sur des paramètres physiologiques tels que le battement du coeur, le rythme respiratoire, l'augmentation et la diminution d'oxygène dans le corps etc…)

L'interaction de ces éléments et d'autres éléments relatifs à l'évolution des tables de cotation pendant les 65 dernières années est un sujet d'étude passionnant.

Les Tables de Cotation de l'IAAF de 1934

A la fin des années 20, la Fédération Finlandaise se mit au travail pour développer une nouvelle série de tables nationales de cotation. Tout d'abord on décida d'abandonner tous les points fractionnés, le résultat de chaque épreuve étant côté de 0 à 1150 points. Le but des nouvelles tables était de reconnaître une bonne performance dans chacune des épreuves combinées de la même manière qu'une bonne performance dans n'importe quelle autre épreuve, et, par conséquent, de permettre qu'elle marque le même nombre de points. A cette fin, sept performances standard (cataloguées de A à G) furent sélectionnées dans chaque épreuve selon un jugement expérimenté. Toutes les performances marquant 1000 points n'étaient atteintes que rarement par les athlètes des épreuves combinées. Toutes les performances G n'étaient atteintes qu'occasionnellement par les meilleurs athlètes juniors. Le classement des performances dans chaque épreuve entre A et G était divisé en 20 paliers égaux. Le nombre de paliers entre les performances standard était divisé de la manière suivante : A, 1, B, 3, C, 3, D, 3, E, 3, F, 7, G. Une courbe progressive de marquage était utilisée de telle sorte que la pente A soit 2 fois celle de G. De toute évidence, toute la combinaison est parfaitement adaptée aux concours, mais pas aux courses qui utilisent le temps pour chiffrer les performances. Cependant, si les temps sont convertis en vitesse moyenne pour les courses, ils peuvent être utilisés également, aussi bien que les distances, en développant une table de cotation.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

33

Les nouvelles tables de cotation furent établies en 1931 par un Finlandais, J. Ohls. Ces tables étaient progressives et correspondaient à la formule P = f (eM), dans laquelle "P" représente les points, "e" la base des logarithmes naturels et "M" les performances. Les tables étaient prévues pour les épreuves de courses sur courtes distances/sprints jusqu'au centième de seconde et le résultat était noté en points entiers seulement. Une note de 0 point correspondait aux performances moyennes des élèves et une note de 1000 équivalait à peu près aux records du monde de l'époque. Les tables allaient jusqu'à 1150 points.

La nouvelle table de cotation eut tellement de succès en 1932, lors de son introduction en Finlande qu'elle fut adoptée par l'IAAF au Congrès suivant en 1934. La différence principale était constituée par le caractère progressif de l'évaluation finlandaise, par opposition à l'évaluation linéaire des décathlons lors des Jeux Olympiques de 1936 et lors des Championnats Européens de 1938, 1946 et 1950.

Les Tables de Cotation de l'IAAF de 1950/52

L'amélioration des performances athlétiques après la guerre appela d'autres modifications des tables. Celles-ci furent effectuées par les Suédois Gösta Holmér et Axel Jörbeck.

Une commission des tables de cotation fut nommée en 1946 lors du Congrès de l'IAAF. Pendant les deux années qui suivirent, elle reçut des propositions d'un certain nombre de membres qui souhaitaient réviser les tables de 1934 ou en créer de nouvelles. Un groupe de travail fut créé en Finlande et en Suède pour réaliser ce qui était en fait une nouvelle étude des tables de 1934. Toutes les tables restaient progressives avec un résultat maximum pour chaque table fixé à 1500 points, les performances clefs équivalentes réalisant 1300 points. Les principes fondamentaux restèrent à peu près les mêmes avec la ferme intention d'établir chaque performance clef sur des faits plutôt que sur une expérience de jugement. Par exemple, les performances clefs, valant 1300 points pour toutes les courses, furent prises à partir d'une Courbe de Performance. Elle fut tracée en marquant les vitesses moyennes de tous les records du monde existants en rapport avec les distances respectives des courses, la ligne régulière passant par ces points représentant la courbe de performance.

Il faut admettre que toutes les performances clefs au bas des tables et les performances clefs pour les concours étaient encore souvent basées sur une expérience de jugement. Un changement qui nous semble très curieux aujourd'hui est l'augmentation, dans certain cas considérable, du caractère progressif de toutes les tables. Les nouvelles tables de cotation furent présentées en 1950 lors du Congrès au cours duquel les tables des épreuves qui n'étaient

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

34

pas comprises dans le décathlon furent sévèrement critiquées. Ces dernières furent révisées dans les 2 années qui suivirent et l'ensemble des tables fut finalement accepté par le Congrès en 1952.

 

Tableau-résumé

 

Points

100m

SL

LP

SH

400m

110mH

LD

SP

LJ

1500m

1000 P

10.77

758.5

16.00

196.5

48.15

14.35

51.20

442

70.40

3:55.0

 

0 P

16.1

334

3.51

85

71.6

21.4

11.25

193

15.48

5:49.3

Le Début des Tables de Cotation pour les Femmes

 

Il est nécessaire, à ce niveau, de revenir sur l'origine des tables de cotation féminines : après les tables de 1950/52 pour les hommes, le développement des tables de cotation de l'IAAF suit le même chemin pour les hommes et les femmes. Dans les années 20, des systèmes de cotation furent développés indépendamment en Allemagne et en URSS et ils furent largement utilisés pour leurs championnats nationaux de Pentathlon. Les tables de "100 points" allemandes publiées par la "Deutsche Sportbehörde für Leichtatletik" (Fédération Allemande d'Athlétisme) étaient basées sur le principe de la progressivité et elles furent utilisées au niveau international, c'est-à-dire aux Jeux Mondiaux Féminins à Londres en 1934. Vers le milieu et jusqu'à la fin des années 30, la Fédération Française prépara un ensemble de tables de cotation pour les épreuves féminines. Ces tables sont singulières : en termes graphiques elles sont représentées par une "courbe" progressive, formée par une succession de lignes droites ayant des angles abrupts entre elles. Vraisemblablement elles furent établies par des personnes douées de sens pratique plutôt que mathématique. Bien que dans l'introduction des tables, il fût stipulé qu'elles avaient été préparées spécialement pour un usage national, l'IAAF recommanda leur utilisation internationale en 1948.

Tables de Cotation de 1954 pour les Femmes

 

Ces tables furent le commencement d'une ère fondamentale dans le développement des tables de cotation de l'IAAF. En effet, elles furent :

1)

La première série de tables féminines étudiée à fond, mise à la disposition des compétitions internationales.

2)

La première série de tables préparée sous la direction d'Axel Jörbeck, Membre du Comité Technique de l'IAAF, qui devait présider pendant 25 ans le travail de l'IAAF sur les tables de cotation. La première série de tables de l'IAAF utilisant les principes proposés par un Autrichien, le Dr. Karl Ulbricht qui publia une étude très complète sur

3)

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

35

l'évaluation du point dans les performances athlétiques sur la base de laquelle L. Miettinen, Axel Jörbeck et Tage Ericson préparèrent les premières tables de l'IAAF pour les épreuves combinées féminines.

L'aspect le plus remarquable des tables de cotation de 1954, c'est qu'en quelques années, Jörbeck put assembler suffisamment de données sur l'athlétisme féminin, étudier toute la documentation, ainsi que toutes les propositions existantes pour la préparation des tables de cotation, et choisir un système basé sur les théories d'Ulbricht. Il utilisa alors toutes ces informations avec tant de jugement et de modération que ces tables demeurèrent, à l'exception d'un léger ajustement en 1971, inchangées pendant 30 ans.

Les principes d'Ulbricht sur la base desquels les nouvelles tables furent construites, sont en réalité très simples. Utilisant les données statistiques disponibles, il est nécessaire de sélectionner deux performances : l'une marquera zéro point et l'autre, 1000 points (par exemple). Pour les courses, il est ensuite nécessaire de convertir le temps en vitesses, puis d'utiliser celles-ci pour la construction d'une table linéaire basée sur la vitesse. L'échelle de vitesses dans cette table est alors convertie à nouveau en temps de courses afin d'obtenir la table de cotation finale. Utilisée de la manière dont l'a fait Jörbeck, cette table s'avère être très modérément progressive et, d'après l'expérience, idéale.

Pour les concours, le problème est beaucoup plus difficile. Ulricht partit du principe que la vitesse est la propriété de base transmise par l'athlète à son corps lors d'un saut, ou à un engin lors d'un lancer. Etant donné que la distance réalisée par l'engin (ou le corps) est proportionnelle au carré de la vitesse initiale, il suffit de substituer la racine carrée de chaque performance à la vitesse afin d'obtenir un calcul mathématique cohérent. Ceci donne une table de cotation qui est modérément régressive.

La différence entre les tables pour les courses qui sont légèrement progressives et celles pour les concours qui sont légèrement régressives constitue le point faible des tables d'Ulricht. Cela résulte du postulat erroné que ce qui est transmis par l'athlète à un engin, c'est la vitesse, alors qu'en fait, c'est l'énergie cinétique qui est proportionnelle au carré de la vitesse. L'habileté et la modération déployées par Jörbeck lors de la préparation des tables de l'IAAF ont fait que ce point faible est resté dissimulé pendant de nombreuses années. Cependant, par la suite, l'échelle des performances devint si large dans les compétitions d'épreuves combinées modernes, que la différence des tables pour les courses et celles pour les concours apparut très clairement.

Les nouvelles tables de cotation féminines Jörbeck/Ulbricht furent acceptées en 1954 par le Congrès de Berne au grand soulagement de tout le monde.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

36

Les Tables de Cotation de 1962 pour les Hommes

 

A la fin des années 50, les inconvénients des tables de 1950/52 pour les hommes, extrêmement progressives, devenaient de plus en plus apparents. Un groupe de travail, sous la direction d'Axel Jörbeck entreprit alors la préparation d'une nouvelle série de tables utilisant exactement les mêmes principes que pour les tables des femmes de 1954. Ces tables furent établies à partir des données statistiques disponibles à l'époque et sur la base des équations de 1950 du Dr. K. Ulbrich.

Une équation spécifique a permis une évaluation progressive des performances obtenues par les coureurs.

Une autre équation a permis une dépendance régressive des points par rapport aux résultats des épreuves techniques.

Elles furent acceptées par le Congrès en 1962 et elles sont restées en vigueur jusqu'en 1984.

 

Tableau-résumé

 

Points

100m

SL

LP

SH

400m

110mH

LD

SP

LJ

1500m

1000 P

10,2

790

18,75 217

46,00

13,70

57,50

478

81,00

3:40,2

0

P

15,7

359

4,70

113

78,10

32,0

12,81

149

14,02

6:39,7

Amendements des Tables de 1954 pour les Femmes, et des Tables de 1962 pour les Hommes

Le seul changement dans les tables pour les hommes fut l'introduction de tables pour les courses chronométrées avec un appareil de photographie d'arrivée. En ce qui concerne les tables pour les femmes, il a été nécessaire d'ajuster quelques unes d'entre elles en 1971, afin de prendre en considération l'amélioration rapide des performances constatée dans les années 50 et 60. D'autres ajustements furent nécessaires afin de tenir compte des changements dans les épreuves de pentathlon, qui devaient finalement se transformer en heptathlon. En outre il y eut bien sûr l'introduction des tables pour les courses chronométrées avec un appareil de photographie d'arrivée.

Nécessité de Changement des Tables en 1984 pour les Hommes et pour les Femmes

Dans la deuxième moitié des années 1970, de plus en plus de pressions se firent sentir afin de réviser les deux tables de cotation pour les hommes et pour les femmes, et ceci pour les raisons suivantes :

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

37

Premièrement, toutes les tables de cotation précédentes de l'IAAF avaient été réalisées afin de remplir deux fonctions : fournir un système de cotation pour les compétitions d'épreuves combinées et fournir une méthode de comparaison entre les performances des différents athlètes dans les différentes épreuves.

Deuxièmement, selon les principes physiques d'Ulbricht, toutes les tables pour les courses étaient progressives, alors que toutes les tables pour les concours étaient régressives.

La double utilisation des tables a pour effet que les résultats en points des records du monde des épreuves individuelles devraient être à peu près égaux. Les meilleures performances d'épreuves individuelles dans les épreuves combinées de classe mondiale sont inévitablement moins bonnes, et, à un degré moindre, vient s'ajouter la différence de pression rencontrée lors d'une performance d'épreuve individuelle et lors des compétitions d'épreuves combinées. Il en résulte que les meilleurs résultats établis dans chaque épreuve individuelle varieront largement. Techniquement, cela ne change rien si la différence des résultats entre les athlètes participant à la même épreuve est approximativement proportionnelle aux différences de leurs performances, mais l'impact émotionnel pourrait être très dur pour les athlètes. Ils pourraient être amenés à se demander : ''Pourquoi faire tant d'efforts pour des résultats maximum si bas?''

L'effet des tables de cotation régressives pour les concours a pris de l'importance à mesure que l'échelle des performances des épreuves combinées s'est élargie avec l'amélioration considérable des performances de haut niveau. Avec la table de cotation régressive il arrive un moment où il ne semble pas valoir la peine de faire des efforts supplémentaires dans une épreuve, puisque chaque amélioration de la performance ne rapportera qu'une augmentation de points proportionnellement moins importante.

Un groupe de travail du Comité Technique de l'IAAF (Robert Blanchet, Carl-

Gustav Tollemar, Viktor Trkal et Etienne Wante), sous la direction d'Emmanuel Rose, Président du Comité Technique, se réunit à Prague les 2 et 3 mars 1983, rassemblant des observateurs de la République Fédérale d'Allemagne, de la République Démocratique d'Allemagne et des Etats-Unis, ainsi que plusieurs statisticiens. L'on s'accorda sur neuf points qui furent acceptés comme principes de base pour l'élaboration de nouvelles tables :

1. Les nouvelles tables seront utilisées seulement pour les épreuves combinées.

2. Dans toute la mesure du possible, les résultats obtenus dans différentes épreuves attribueront le même nombre de points dans le cas de résultats comparables par la qualité et la difficulté.

3. Les nouvelles tables correspondront à l'une des définitions suivantes :

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

38

a) modification des tables existantes

b) linéaires pour toutes les épreuves

c) tables légèrement progressives pour toutes les épreuves.

4. Les tables devront pouvoir servir pour les débutants, les juniors ainsi que pour les athlètes d'élite.

5. Il y aura une table de cotation spécifique pour les hommes et une spécifique pour les femmes.

6. Toutes les nouvelles versions des tables de cotation devront être basées sur les données statistiques des épreuves combinées, tout en tenant rigoureusement compte des données statistiques des performances des athlètes aux épreuves individuelles.

7. Les nouvelles tables s'appliqueront maintenant et à l'avenir.

8. Il est souhaitable, sans pour autant créer d'autres problèmes, que les résultats totaux obtenus en utilisant les nouvelles tables pour les athlètes appartenant à l'élite mondiale restent approximativement les mêmes, c'est- à-dire environ 8500 points pour le décathlon et environs 6500 points pour

l'heptathlon.

9. Dans toute la mesure du possible, les nouvelles tables devront être conçues de façon qu'un spécialiste d'une épreuve ne puisse surpasser les performances dans les autres épreuves.

Le respect de tous ces principes ne fut pas facile, en particulier le N° 8 qui exigeait que tout changement de points dans une épreuve soit répercuté dans toutes les autres épreuves. L'alternative 3 c) - tables légèrement progressives pour toutes les épreuves - fut retenue pour l'élaboration des tables.

Puisque les Tables de Cotation de 1984 s'appliquent uniquement aux compétitions des épreuves combinées, les meilleures performances de chaque épreuve individuelle dans les épreuves combinées peuvent marquer à peu près le même nombre de points. Avec l'abandon des principes d'Ulbricht, les désavantages de la table régressive pour les concours ont été évités. Ces tables sont toujours valables mais avec les modifications concernant les lancers longs, les ajouts des tables de cotation pour compétition en salle ainsi que les épreuves du décathlon féminin.

Recherche Historique réalisée avec le concours de M. Viktor Trkal (CZE)

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

39

REGLE 200

Les Epreuves Combinées

U18 Garçons, U20 et Hommes Séniors (Pentathlon et Décathlon)

1. Le pentathlon comprend cinq épreuves qui se déroulent en une seule journée et dans l’ordre suivant : saut en longueur, lancer du javelot, 200m, lancer du disque et 1 500m.

2. Le décathlon pour les U18 Garçons et pour les Hommes comprend dix épreuves, qui se déroulent en deux journées consécutives et dans l’ordre suivant:

100m, saut en longueur, lancer du poids, saut en hauteur et 400m. 110m haies, lancer du disque, saut à la perche, lancer du javelot et 1 500m.

Première journée

Deuxième journée

Femmes Juniors et Seniors (Heptathlon et Décathlon)

3. L’heptathlon comprend sept épreuves qui se déroulent en deux journées consécutives et dans l’ordre suivant:

Première journée Deuxième journée

100m haies, saut en hauteur, lancer du poids et 200m. saut en longueur, lancer du javelot et 800m.

4. Le décathlon pour femmes comprend dix épreuves, qui se déroulent en deux journées consécutives et dans l’ordre suivant:

Première journée 100m, lancer du disque, saut à la perche, lancer du javelot et 400m. Deuxième journée 100m haies, saut en longueur, lancer du poids, saut en hauteur et 1 500m.

U18 Filles (Heptathlon uniquement)

5. L’heptathlon pour les U18 Filles comprend sept épreuves qui se déroulent en deux journées consécutives et dans l’ordre suivant:

Première journée Deuxième journée

100m haies, saut en hauteur, lancer du poids et 200m. saut en longueur, lancer du javelot et 800m.

Généralités

6. A la discrétion du Juge-Arbitre des épreuves combinées, il y aura, lorsque cela est possible et pour chaque athlète, un intervalle d’au moins 30 minutes entre la fin d’une épreuve et le commencement de la suivante. Si possible, le temps s’écoulant entre la fin de la dernière épreuve du premier jour et le début de la première épreuve du deuxième jour sera d’au moins 10 heures.

7. Dans chacune des épreuves d’une Compétition d’Epreuves Combinées, sauf dans la dernière, les séries et les groupes devront être composés par le(s) Délégué(s) Technique(s) ou par l’Arbitre des Epreuves Combinées, selon le

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

40

cas, de telle sorte que les athlètes ayant réalisé des performances similaires dans chaque épreuve individuelle pendant une période prédéterminée, soient placés dans la même série ou le même groupe. De préférence cinq athlètes ou plus, et jamais moins de trois, seront placés dans chaque série ou groupe. Quand ceci n’est pas réalisable à cause de l’horaire des épreuves, les séries ou les groupes pour l’épreuve suivante devraient être composés en tenant compte de la disponibilité des athlètes après leur participation à l’épreuve précédente. Lors de la dernière épreuve d’une Compétition d’Epreuves Combinées, les séries devront être composées de telle sorte que la dernière d’entre elles regroupe les athlètes les mieux placés après l’avant dernière épreuve. Le(s) Délégué(s) Technique(s) ou le Juge-Arbitre des épreuves combinées aura(ont) le pouvoir de réaménager tout groupe si, à son (leur) avis, cela est souhaitable.

8. Les Règles de l’IAAF établies pour chaque épreuve seront applicables, exception faite de ce qui suit:

(a)

Dans le saut en longueur et dans chacun des lancers, chaque athlète aura droit à trois essais seulement.

(b)

Dans le cas où un dispositif de chronométrage entièrement automatique accompagné d’un système de photographie d’arrivée n’est pas disponible, le temps enregistré pour chaque athlète sera pris indépendamment par trois chronométreurs.

(c)

Dans les épreuves de courses, un seul faux départ par course sera toléré sans la disqualification du ou des athlète(s) responsable du faux départ. Tout athlète responsable de faux départs supplémentaires dans la course sera disqualifié (voir également règle 162.7).

(d)

Dans les Sauts Verticaux, les montées de barre devront être uniformément

de 3 centimètres pour la hauteur et de 10cm pour la perche.

9. Pour une épreuve donnée, un seul système de chronométrage doit être utilisé. Néanmoins, dans le cas de record, les temps automatiques résultant d’un système de chronométrage entièrement automatique et de photo d’arrivée devront être retenus même s’ils ne sont pas disponibles pour les autres athlètes de l’épreuve.

10. Tout athlète ne prenant pas le départ ou ne faisant pas au moins un essai dans l’une des épreuves ne sera pas autorisé à prendre part aux épreuves suivantes, mais sera considéré comme ayant abandonné la compétition. Il ne figurera donc pas dans le classement final. Tout athlète qui décide d’abandonner une Compétition d’Epreuves Combinées doit immédiatement informer de sa décision le Juge-Arbitre des épreuves combinées.

11. Les points, attribués selon la Table de Cotation des Epreuves Combinées de l’IAAF en vigueur, seront annoncés séparément pour chaque épreuve et les

totaux cumulés devront être annoncés à tous les athlètes après la fin de chaque épreuve.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

41

Les athlètes seront classés dans l’ordre correspondant au nombre total de points obtenus.

Ex Aequo

12. Si deux ou plusieurs athlètes obtiennent un nombre égal de points pour une

place quelle qu’elle soit dans une compétition, la procédure sera la suivante :

(a)

L’athlète qui, dans le plus grand nombre d’épreuves, aura obtenu plus de points que le (ou les) autre(s) athlète(s) sera le mieux placé ;

(b)

Si les athlètes sont à égalité après application de la règle 200.12(a), le mieux placé sera l’athlète qui aura marqué le plus de points dans l’une quelconque des épreuves ;

(c)

Si les athlètes sont à encore égalité après application de la règle 200.12(b), le mieux placé sera l’athlète qui aura marqué le plus de points une seconde épreuve, et ainsi de suite.

(d)

Si les athlètes sont à encore égalité après application de la règle 200.12(c), le résultat sera un ex æquo.

Note: La règle 200.12(a) ne sera pas appliquée lorsque plus de deux athlètes sont ex aequo.

REGLE 223

Compétitions d’Epreuves Combinées

U18 Garçons, U20 et Séniors Hommes (Pentathlon)

1. Le pentathlon comprend cinq épreuves qui se déroulent en une seule journée dans l’ordre suivant:

60m haies, saut en longueur, lancer du poids, saut en hauteur, 1 000m.

U18 Garçons, U20 et Séniors Hommes (Heptathlon)

2. L’heptathlon comprend sept épreuves qui se déroulent en deux journées consécutives dans l’ordre suivant:

Premier jour :

60m, saut en longueur, lancer du poids, saut en hauteur

Deuxième jour :

60m haies, saut à la perche, 1 000m.

U18 Filles, U20 et Séniors Femmes (Pentathlon)

3. Le pentathlon comprend cinq épreuves et se déroule en une seule journée selon l’ordre suivant:

60m haies, saut en hauteur, lancer du poids, saut en longueur, 800m.

Séries et Groupes

4. De préférence quatre athlètes ou plus, mais jamais moins de trois, seront placés dans chaque série ou groupe.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

42

COMMENT UTILISER LES TABLES

Il y a des tables séparées pour toutes les épreuves du décathlon et du pentathlon hommes, et de l'heptathlon femmes. Le résultat pour chaque performance dans les courses ou dans le concours peut se lire dans les tables appropriées.

Pour beaucoup d'épreuves, tous les temps ou toutes les distances possibles ne sont pas donnés dans la table. On doit prendre en compte les points correspondants à la performance immédiatement au-dessous du résultat obtenu.

Par exemple :

Dans un 1500m hommes, il n'y a pas de cotation pour un temps de 4'10"25; le temps supérieur le plus proche donné est de 4'10"37 marquant 879 points.

Dans le lancer de poids femmes, il n'y a pas de cotation pour une distance de 13m 12; la distance inférieure la plus proche donnée est de 13m 11 pour 735 points.

CHRONOMETRAGE

Deux systèmes de chronométrage seront reconnus officiellement (Article 165 des Règlements de l'IAAF) :

- Le chronométrage électrique entièrement automatique qui se fera au 1/100 de seconde;

- Le chronométrage entièrement manuel qui se fera au 1/10 de seconde; dans ce cas, utiliser les tables spécifiques pour le chronométrage manuel.

COMMENT NOTER UNE COMPETITION

La cotation des épreuves combinées peut s'effectuer à l'aide d'un ordinateur programmé à cet effet ou bien manuellement.

Lors d'une cotation manuelle, il est important d'utiliser un système tendant à minimiser les risques d'erreurs. En outre, un système standardisé rend la vérification plus facile pour les futurs lecteurs. Des exemples types de feuilles de résultats pour le décathlon et l'heptathlon figurent sur la page suivante. Cette présentation avec des additions verticales et un total récapitulant les points acquis après chaque épreuve améliore la précision. Des formulaires peuvent être établis ou imprimés à l'avance. Un pas supplémentaire vers la précision consisterait à inscrire tous les récapitulatifs de points acquis d'une couleur différente.

IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events / Tables de Cotation pour les Epreuves Combinées

43

EXEMPLES TYPES DE FEUILLES DE RESULTATS

 

DECATHLON-CHAMPIONNATS DU MONDE D’EDMONTON, 6/7 AOUT 2001

NOM

Tomáš DVORÁK

Erki NOOL

Dean MACEY

DOSSARD

255

328

437

PAYS

CZE

EST

GBR

 

Resultat

Points

Resultat

Points

Resultat

Points

100m

10.62

947

10.60

952

10.72

924

PLACE/TOTAL

2

947

1

952

3

924

SAUT EN LONGUEUR

8.07

1079

7.63

967

7.59

957

PLACE/TOTAL

1

2026

2

1919

3

1881

LANCER DU POIDS

16.57

886

14.90

784

15.41

815

PLACE/TOTAL

1

2912

2

2703

3

2696

SAUT EN HAUTEUR

2.00

803

2.03

831

2.15

944

PLACE/TOTAL

1

3715

3

3534

2

3640

400m

47.74

922

46.23

997

46.21

998

PLACE/TOTAL

2

4637

3

4531

1

4638

110m HAIES

13.80

1000

14.40

924

14.34

931

PLACE/TOTAL