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Regional Status Report: East Asia Regional Coordinator: Khalid Siraj Report last updated: 09/30/2010 Reporting Period:

Regional Status Report:

East Asia

Regional Coordinator: Khalid Siraj Report last updated: 09/30/2010 Reporting Period: 04/07/2010 - 08/31/2010

Overview of Report

1. Executive Summary

2. Ongoing PTF Projects

3. Pipeline Projects

4. Completed Projects

5. Regional Initiatives, observations, and lessons learned

6. Annex 1: Project Status Updates

7. Annex 2: Completed Project Status Updates

1. Executive Summary

There are currently eight ongoing PTF projects, three Pipeline projects, and five recently completed projects in the East Asia Region. Out of the eight ongoing projects, the East Asia Region has two new initiatives in the Philippines and Mongolia.

2. Ongoing PTF Projects

Activities in East Asia continue to be concentrated in a limited number of countries (Philippines, Mongolia, Indonesia). This concentration of projects in a few countries allows us to observe the relative merits of developing a critical mass of civil society organizations in close proximity. In addition, it enables us to field-test PTF’s major eligibility criteria such as: (1) limited project duration, usually about 12 months, (2) addressing a specific instance of corruption, rather than awareness raising or research, (3) positive engagement with a public agency that is the object of scrutiny.

Table 1: Ongoing PTF Projects # of months Funds CSO & Date Grant Country Project
Table 1: Ongoing PTF Projects
# of
months
Funds
CSO &
Date Grant
Country
Project Adviser
under
remaining to
Project title
Agrt Signed
impleme-
be disbursed
ntation

1

Mongolia

TI Mongolia: Improvement of

Judicial Code of Ethics

Khalid Siraj

3.26.2009

18

$2,480

   

Table 1: Ongoing PTF Projects

 
         

# of

 

months

Funds

Country

CSO &

Project title

Project Adviser

Date Grant

Agrt Signed

under

impleme-

remaining to

be disbursed

ntation

   

Globe International - Transparency Campaigning at

Khalid Siraj/

     

2

Mongolia

Local Government to Curb Corruption

Stephanie de

7.1.2010

3

$18,000

Chassy

   

Ecolink: SK (Youth Council)

       

3

Philippines

Watch(Monitoring SK Funds and Functionality)

Gerry van der Linden

8.21.2009

13

$2,928

   

Evelio Javier Foundation (EBJIFI): Strengthening Local Mechanisms for Effective Civil

       

4

Philippines

Society Organizations’ Participation in Procurement Processes

Gerry van der Linden

10.15.2009

11

$10,754*

   

Concerned Citizens of Abra for Good Government (CCAGG):

       

5

Philippines

Abra Water and Irrigation Systems (AWIS) Watch

Gerry van der Linden

10.20.2009

10

$9,500*

   

G-Watch of Ateneo School of

       

6

Philippines

Government: Localization of the Protect Procurement Project

Gerry van der Linden

06.25.2010

3

$15,000

   

Philippine Partnership for the Development of Human

       

7

Philippines

Resources in Rural Areas (PhilDHRRA): Bantay Agri Tayo (Let’s Watch Agriculture)

Gerry van der Linden

09.04.2010

8

Philippines

NAMFREL: Medicine Monitoring Project II

Gerry van der Linden

09.06.2010

   
 

Total Number of Ongoing Projects

 

8

* Pending completion

3.

Pipeline Projects

Table 2: Pipeline Projects

Country

CSO & Project Title

Woman for Social Progress: Resolution of Conflict of INterest in Mongolia

Mongolia

Philippines

Central Philippine University: Streamlining Business Permits and Licensing System in Western Visayas

Philippines

Bishops-Businessmen’s Conference for Human Development (BBC) in cooperation with Social Action Center Bacolod:

Procurement Monitoring Systems in Negros Occidental and Negros Oriental

4. Completed Projects

   

Table 3: Project Completion Reports

 
 

Country

CSO & Project

Project

Adviser

Date Grant

Agreement

Date Project

Completed

Months

taken to

Has a project completion report been received and accepted?

signed

complete

   

Building a Citizen Monitoring System on Budget

   

Listed as

 

Two progress

04.15.2009

ongoing;

reports

1 Indonesia

Expenditure Accountability in the Education Sector, PATTIRO

Khalid

$2,500

completed.

Siraj

remaining

Awaiting PCR

to be

disbursed

   

Ecolink: Anti- Corruption and

       

PCR pending.

2 Philippines

Transparency Project II: LGU Vehicle Monitoring

Gerry van

02.04.2008

5.20.2009

15

PCA awaiting

der Linden

completion of

         

PCR.

   

INCITEGov:

         

Participatory Monitoring for

Barangay Infrastructure and Health Projects in the Province of Isabela

listed as

3 Philippines

Gerry van

6.25.2008

ongoing,

$2,469

PCA completed

and posted on PTF website.

der Linden

remaining

to be

disbursed

 
 

Table 3: Project Completion Reports

 

Country

CSO & Project

Project

Adviser

Date Grant

Agreement

Date Project

Completed

Months

taken to

Has a project completion report been received and accepted?

signed

complete

4 Philippines

NAMFREL:

Gerry van

6.12.2008

listed as

ongoing;

$2,330

 

Project Completion Assessment has been prepared and posted on

Medicine Monitoring Project

der Linden

remaining

PTF website. Remaining $2,330 funds pending receipt of financial statements.

to be

 

disbursed

5 Philippines

G-Watch of Ateneo School of Government. Project Procurement Project

(PRO):

Gerry van

5.12.2008

5.20.2009

12

PCR submitted.

PCA under

preparation

Institutionalizing the Capacity Building of CSO Procurement Observers

der Linden

PCR = Project Completion Report PCA = Project Completion Assessment

5. Regional Initiatives, Observations, and Lessons Learned

As reported previously, activities in East Asia continue to be concentrated in a limited number of countries (Philippines, Mongolia, Indonesia). This concentration of projects in a few countries allows us to observe the relative merits of developing a critical mass of civil society organizations in close proximity. In addition, it enables us to field-test PTF’s major eligibility criteria such as: (1) limited project duration, usually about 12 months, (2) addressing a specific instance of corruption, rather than awareness raising or research, (3) positive engagement with a public agency that is the object of scrutiny.

Activities in the Philippines allowed us to observe two advantages of a longer-term relationship with a local partner who acts as an intermediary. First, it allowed for scaling up PTF’s activities. Second, it helped to institutionalize local capacity and strengthen the potential for sustainability of PTF-type activities. However, projects in the Philippines have generally been slow to submit their Project Completion Report. This observation would argue for making some changes in the tranche disbursement schedule. For instance, the final tranche could be set at 20% to create an incentive for the implementing CSO to speed up preparation of the PCR.

In Mongolia we learned an important lesson as well from a series of projects prior to the reporting period that built on each other, intended to prevent and curb corruption in the Mongolian judicial systems. The most outstanding feature of the Mongolia projects was the dogged pursuit of excellent relationships with the public agencies that were the focus of projects. Careful consensus building, rather than confrontation led to positive and sustained results with the Judiciary branch of the Mongolian government. For the

project with PATTIRO in Indonesia we propose to enhance South-South cross-fertilization with the Philippines, which started with a process of decentralization well ahead of its neighboring countries and has some valuable experiences to share with others. A PTF Adviser from the Philippines has strengthened the Philippines team, and is facilitating the dialogue between the two countries.

Projects in both the Philippines and Mongolia have allowed PTF at large to gain important information on the robustness of the PTF model of fighting corruption. Experiences from both countries merit wider dissemination via the PTF website and possibly other communications and outreach tools. Our engagement in Indonesia remains limited to only one CSO, but we are making cautious efforts to broaden it.

PTF-funded initiatives in the Philippines continue to be implemented in collaboration with the Coalition Against Corruption of the Makati Business Club (CAC/MBC). The submission of the Siemens Fund for projects to be implemented by G-Watch of Ateneo University was not successful. As a result of the dialogue started in earlier this year, PTF has approved a new project in Mongolia (Globe International - Transparency Campaigning at Local Government) and has also accepted a Concept Note received from Women for Social Progress. Both these projects are follow-up to our previous initiatives.

Annex 1: Status Updates on Ongoing Projects

1. Mongolia: TI Mongolia, Improvement of Judicial Code of Ethics Project Adviser Khalid Siraj

Budget and Timeline: PTF signed a grant agreement with Transparency International, Mongolia (TI-M) for $22,380 on March 2, 2009. The first tranche of $8,900 was disbursed immediately after the signing of the agreement. A second tranche of $11,000 was disbursed in September 2009.

Background and Objectives: The code of ethics (CoE) for judges in Mongolia, which was first adopted in 1997 and later revised in 2003, suffers from many weaknesses. Mongolia’s General Council of Courts (GCC) has recognized the need for upgrading the current CoE. With this background, the objectives of the TI-M project, supported by PTF, are to:

· Improve the Anti-Corruption and ethics related programs at local law schools

· Train justices and staff of the Supreme Court and GCC for preventing corruption in the judicial system

· Upgrade the CoE in Mongolia to international standards contributing to improved conduct of judges

· Make disciplinary actions more transparent and practical

· Raise public awareness of judicial conduct and thereby public trust in the judiciary

· Reduce corruption in the judiciary and thus protect human rights through better court decisions

· Make the Association of Judges fully operational to safeguard judicial independence, protect the rights of judges and enhance their accountability.

Activities and Current Project Status (September 2010): To achieve the objectives just mentioned, the following activities have been planned under the project:

· Training of 18 law school teachers (distribution of “Corruption in Judicial Systems Handbooks”, training of 54 teachers in these schools and inclusion of judicial corruption as a subject in the courses of law schools)

· Anti-corruption training for Justices of the Supreme Court and staff of Supreme Court and GCC

· Refining of existing COE to comply with the “Bangalore Principles” (adopted by United Nations Centre for International Crime Prevention, in 2000).

Initially, project implementation proceeded as scheduled. An update of the CoE was prepared to make it compliant with the “Bangalore Principles”, and discussed in a series of Round Tables. These CoE have been approved and a resolution by the Chief Justice to adopt and implement the code issued in February

2010. However, the project completion is delayed because of: (a) Political struggle between the new

President of the country and the Parliament. Earlier this year, the President launched a new program aimed at further deepening of the judiciary reforms and asked for the resignation of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court (being resisted), the General Prosecutor and the head of Anti-Corruption Agency. These developments have implications for the effective application of new CoE; (b) The Association of Court Workers approached TI-M for financial support for organizing a conference on CoE to be attended by its members as well as Mongolian Association of Judges and the Association of Women Judges. The objective of this Conference is to issue a declaration on the ethical norms for and vision of workers in the judiciary. This conference is planned in October 2010; and (c) TI-M is waiting for information from the Ministry of Education whether the law schools have incorporated into their curriculums information given in TI-M’s handbooks and the extent to which lecturers are making use of the handbooks.

2. Mongolia: Globe International, Transparency Campaigning at Local Government to Curb Corruption Project Advisers: Khalid Siraj/Stephanie de Chassy

Budget and Timeline: PTF signed, on July 1, 2010, a grant agreement with for Globe International, Mongolia (GI-M) for a grant of $30,000. The first tranche of $12,000 was disbursed at the time the agreement was signed. The project implementation commenced on August 15, 2010 as scheduled.

Project Background and Summary:The mission of GI-M, a non-profit NGO founded in 1999, is to work for sustaining democracy and civil society in Mongolia through spreading the power of information and knowledge. GI-M has been actively working to promote the Mongolian National Anti-Corruption Program (over 80 projects implemented). It is managed by an independent Board (5 members) and employs a core staff of eight. This is second GI-M intiative supported by PTF; the first, Empowering the Public Council for Promoting Transparency to Curb Government Corruption, approved in December 2008 has since been successfully completed.

In Mongolia, citizens’ right to information is guaranteed by the Constitution and the Government is committed to “provide the citizens with rights to access any information”. Yet, in effect, the civil society’s access to critical information remains highly constrained because of the absence of a law on freedom of information and the arcane secrecy laws that enable the government officials to restrict release of information.

In 2007, GI-M drafted and submitted to the Parliament a draft bill on Freedom of Information. But there has not been much progress on this front. However, more recently there are positive signs of promising developments and opportunities. The Government is planning to work on legislations concerning state secrecy, access to information, and media freedom. The Parliament has set up a Working Group for the preparation of a new Secrecy legislation. In 2009, GI-M managed to push the law makers to revise the 2007 FOI law draft. For this purpose the Parliament has established a Working Group with GI-M’s leader as its consultant.

While these positive developments are unfolding, GI-M is keen to continue its efforts to make the government more open within the current legal framework. Towards this end, GI-M has conducted several trainings on freedom of information issues for the government officials, journalists and civil society groups. But more activities are needed, particularly for rural areas and local authorities to better prepare them in handling public requests for information through awareness raising, knowledge of international standards and capacity building.

Project Objectives:

Within its overall goal of improving the transparency of the local public organizations to curb corruption, the projects objectives are:

• To raise the awareness of the local communities and the public right to access information.

officials

on

public’s

• To expose issues of transparency and corruption at local level

through the monitoring

so that the local citizens will be able to obtain

• To identify and expose local corruption so that local communities are preventing and controlling it.

required information.

c a p a b l e

o f

Activities and Current Project Status: The project activities will be carried out in two selected Baghs (the lowest administrative level) of Ovorkhangai and Khentii aimag (about 550 and 353 km from Ulaanbaatar, respectively). Broadly, the project activities will comprise raising awareness of the local communities (audio and video handbooks), community workshops, training and preparation of manual for the local leaders, transparency actions, and monitoring to evaluate the transparency and training. The project implementation commenced as scheduled on August 15, 2010.

3. Philippines: Ecolink SK Watch, Monitoring SK Funds and Functionality Project Adviser: Gerry van der Linden

Budget and Timeline: PTF signed an agreement on August 21, 2009 for an amount of $29,228 with SK Watch in the Philippines. A first tranche of $15,000 has been disbursed, and project implementation has started.

Project Background and Summary:The SK Watch is a citizen-based approach in effectively curbing corruption in the long term. This corruption involves billions of pesos of public funds annually in the Sangguniang Kabataan, or SK (Youth Council). The Youth Council is a government body composed of young citizens elected through regular elections. The initiative highlights the need for direct and active involvement of every young citizen at the community level in monitoring the fiscal administration and functionality of every SK Council all over the country. Direct and active involvement means organizing at least 4,000 young Filipinos in 4 pilot cities all over the country into organized groups of volunteer monitors equipped with the necessary knowledge and skills in monitoring all aspects of SK governance, especially in the area of documenting and reporting corruption issues. This also means that direct and prioritized access for monitors towards all national agencies mandated to resolve corruption cases needs to be established.

Project Objectives:

The goal of this project is to effectively and sustainably curb corruption related to SK funds and properties in 4 pilot cities by establishing accountability and transparency mechanisms within the SK system. There are three interventions that ECOLINK Philippines proposes to carry out to address the root causes of massive corruption of SK funds.

· First, low-cost and popular awareness raising campaigns shall be conducted to raise the awareness of as many Filipino youths and citizens as possible on the extent of corruption in the SK, and the reasons and urgent need to curb it.

· Second, at least 4,000 youths all over the country will be organized and mobilized into SK Watch networks that will monitor their respective SK councils. They will be taught the practical skills and knowledge on SK governance and on handling corruption cases that they may encounter. SK Monitoring kits will be developed and distributed.

· Third, a formal linkage shall be established between the Office of the Ombudsman, the Commission on Audit, National Youth Commission, Presidential Anti-Graft Commission, the Department of the Interior and Local Government, and Department of Education, and the SK Watch networks to provide community-level youths direct access to technical support and action from these agencies.

Activities and Current Project Status: In March 2010 the first progress report was received and the first tranche released. MBC/CAC met with Ecolink in Mindanao to discuss project progress. Ecolink is now strengthening the established networks of volunteer monitors for the SK. A regional workshop on Youth in Philippine Governance will be organized in October 2010 to gather youth volunteers and SK officials to present the SK Watch findings and come up with proposed policy recommendations concerning the SK, the Junior Graft Watch, and other laws concerning youth participation in governance. A similar activity will be organized in Iloilo and Manila by the end of the year. Ecolink is also preparing to launch the SK Watch internet portal which could provide an online venue to discuss youth issues especially concerning the SK.

4. Philippines: Strengthening Local Mechanisms for Effective Civil Society Organizations’ Participation in Procurement Processes Project Adviser: Gerry van der Linden

Budget and Timeline: PTF signed an agreement on October 15, 2009 with the Evelio B. Javier Foundation, Inc. (EBJFI) to provide a grant of $21,508 for a project intended to strengthen local mechanisms for effective civil society participation in procurement processes. A first tranche of $10,754 was disbursed on October 20, 2009. The project is supposed to be completed in October 2010.

Background and project objective: The Government of the Philippines (GOP) spends an average of PhP 121 Billion annually on procurement. This is fifteen percent (15%) of the nation’s annual budget. Approximately thirty percent (30%) or PhP 30 Billion of the said amount is lost annually due to leakages. Repeatedly mentioned reasons for the leakages were corruption, inefficiency, disorganization, and ignorance of the law.

There was a lack of trust and confidence in the public procurement system amongst civil society organizations (CSOs), non-government organizations (NGOs), people’s organizations (POs), and the private sector.

The need to reform public procurement was therefore a must in order to combat graft and corruption and also as an essential part of good governance and a cost-effective public expenditure program which in the case of the Philippines have always been constrained by a limited national budget.

The most obvious and immediate reform measure was to unify the numerous and often conflicting procurement rules and regulations existing in the country and ensure that the end product will be authoritative. As such, Republic Act No. 9184 entitled “An Act providing for the Modernization,

Standardization and Regulation of the Procurement Activities of the Government and for other Purposes” more commonly known as the Government Procurement Reform Act (GPRA) was passed in January 26,

2003.

In this Act, the GOP laid down the foundation of its procurement processes based on the following principles: transparency, competitiveness, streamlined process and utilization of information technology, accountability, and public monitoring.

Positively, GPRA has been hailed locally and internationally. For instance, World Bank Country Director Joachim von Amsberg has been quoted as saying that R.A. 9184 is “one of the best procurement laws in the world.” Also, Dr. Benjamin E. Diokno, former Secretary of Budget and Management in the Philippines, said: “Unknown to many Filipinos, the Philippine Procurement Law is world class. It is seen by international experts as a very good model for other developing countries.”

The goal of the EBJFI is to assist both Steering Committees in Davao del Sur and Cebu to enable them to sustain their activities as a unified force actively participating in public procurement activities and making reforms happen.

In addition, EBJFI, banking on the active participation of several Local Government Units (LGUs) and Local Government Agencies (LGAs) in the Interface, also aspire to:

· Bring about a change in the way Local Government Units (LGUs) and Local Government Agencies (LGAs) view BACOs and their participation in procurement processes,

· Stimulate start-up activities geared towards creating inter-BAC mechanisms aimed at upgrading their capabilities to implement procurement activities so as to assist them in their efforts to fully abide by the provisions of the law.

Activities and Current Project Status: The first project workshop was held in November 2009. MBC/CAC met with the project staff in March 2010 to discuss the progress of the project.

EBJFI organized strategic planning sessions with local partners in Davao and Cebu in January 2010. Training for new observers and retooling for active observers were held in February 2010. The observers met in March 2010 to share their experiences on procurement monitoring.

The Davao Procurement Transparency Core Group (DPTCG) interfaced with business and academe in April 2010 before the training of trainers. In June 2010, the Cebu Observers’ Core Group conducted its own trainers’ training then met with business and academe in July 2010. EBJFI and DPTCG will conduct on-the-job -training of its trainers in September 2010. MBC/CAC will visit Davao during the workshop and conduct a preliminary assessment of DPTCG’s plans after the project ends in October.

5. Philippines: Concerned Citizens of Abra for Good Government (CCAGG) Abra Water and Irrigation System (AWIS) Watch Project Adviser: Gerry van der Linden

Budget and Timeline: PTF signed an agreement on October 20, 2009 with the NGO Concerned Citizens of Abra for Good Government, Inc. (CCAGG) to provide a grant of $19,000 for a project intended to address corruption in water and irrigation projects. A first tranche of $9,500 was disbursed in late October 2009. The project is supposed to be completed in October 2010.

Background, rationale and objective: The Abra Water and Irrigation Systems (AWIS) Watch is a community-led anti-corruption initiative that aims to address massive corruption of public funds in water and irrigation projects covering the five (5) Abra municipalities of Luba, Tubo, San Quintin, Sallapadan, and Villaviciosa through responsive capacity-building and participatory advocacies and the establishment of a participatory mechanism to prevent corruption in the water and irrigation systems sector.

The major problem that this project wishes to address is the rampant corruption of public funds in the implementation of water and irrigation systems projects in the Province of Abra. Based of CCAGG studies, an estimated 30% (10.5 million) of the 36.5 million total worth of projects in the province went to corruption. This further results into four problems currently affecting the sector: defective project plans, anomalies in the disbursement of project funds and implementation of contracts, low and sub-standard quality of completed projects and sluggish implementation of projects.

Rampant corruption in the conduct of water and irrigation systems projects in the province of Abra is a result of three interrelated issues that have been rooted within the existing social and institutional structures concerned. These are: 1) minimal knowledge of the general public on the extent of corruption in the implementation of water & irrigation systems projects and the ways to prevent it; 2) weak transparency and ethical standards within the National Irrigation Authority in Abra; and, 3) weak capacity of community beneficiaries as well as CSO’s in monitoring water & irrigation systems projects. Should these three underlying issues be addressed, then corruption of public funds in water and irrigation systems projects will be prevented and eradicated.

Because of the lengthy project preparation process CCAGG has changed the list of specific projects to be monitored.

Activities and Current Project Status: CCAGG conducted training for irrigators, water system officers, and other stakeholders in cooperation with the Metro Bangued Water District and the National Irrigation Administration of Abra on July 23-24, 2010. The participants from different Irrigators Association (IAs), Water Districts Officers and CCAGG Monitoring Team joined Engr. Roberto Eustaquio, Project Site Engineer of NIA Sub–Office in Bangued, the visit to Cautit and Ballasiang Communal Irrigation Systems

of Pidigan, Abra as part of the on-site monitoring training activity. These activities were documented on video.

After meeting officials of the Local Water Utilities Administration (LWUA), the municipal engineers, and the municipal planning and development officers, CCAGG found that of the seven water system projects of LWUA, the biggest funded is in Bucay costing P32 million while the rest are P26 million to P20 million. CCAGG is concerned because not one of the seven municipalities has a program of work and no procurements were held in these towns. One of the project team members will visit LWUA office in Manila to photocopy pertinent documents.

CCAGG is now suggesting a realignment of project funds to monitor the LWUA projects and to conduct a procurement seminar for 27 municipal engineers and development officers to safeguard resources in collaboration with citizens.

6. Philippines: G-Watch Ateneo School of Government, Localization of the Protect Procurement Project Gerry van der Linden

Budget and Timeline: On June 25, 2010, PTF signed a grant agreement for $30,475 with G-Watch for the Citizen Action for Accountability in Education Procurement project.

Background, rationale and objective: The project builds on earlier projects supported by PTF at the national level, by extending the involvement of CSOs in education procurement by regional and local offices of the Department of Education. G-Watch will partner with local CSOs, including parent-teacher associations to build a local capacity for monitoring the work of the education department and thus enhance transparency and accountability. The grant agreement was signed by Dr. Tony La Vina, Dean of the School of Government of Ateneo University, and Mr. Geert van der Linden, PTF Board member.

Activities and Current Project Status: The first tranche disbursement was made on July 9, 2010 for $15,475. $15,000 remains to be disbursed.

7. Philippines: Partnership for the Development of Human Resources in Rural Areas (PHILDHRRA), Bantay Agri Tayo Project Adviser: Gerry Van der Linden

Budget and Timeline: On September 4, 2010 PTF signed a grant agreement with the Philippine Partnership for the Development of Human Resources in Rural Areas or PhilDHRRA in support of the Bantay Agri Tayo project (‘All of us monitor agriculture’).

Background, rationale and objective: The project aims to reduce corruption by establishing transparency and accountability in the operations of the Department of Agriculture in the Central Visayas Region of the country. Under the project a volunteer monitor group will be created, public forums organized and audit findings widely published. The grant agreement was signed by Ms. Annie Cynthia C. Corpin, Chairperson, Regional Board of Trustees, PhilDHRRA, and Mr. Geert van der Linden, PTF Board member.

Activities and Current Project Status: Pending first tranche disbursement.

8. Philippines: NAMFREL: Medicine MOnitoring Project II Project Adviser: Gerry van der Linden

Budget and Timeline: On 6 September PTF signed a grant agreement with the National Citizens’ Movement for Free Elections (NAMFREL) for a second project aimed at monitoring de procurement, delivery and stocking of essential drugs and medicines.

Background, rationale and objective:The project, entitled Medicine Monitoring II, will build on the experience gained through the first project in reducing corruption in a vital area of public service. NAMFREL will work with the Department of Health and deploy volunteers at critical stages in the cycle from procurement to management of stocks of drugs and medicines. In this second phase the target will be 21 hospitals and 7 regional health offices, selected on the basis of reports from the government’s Commission on Audit. The grant agreement was signed by Mr. Eric Jude O. Alvia, Secretary General of NAMFREL, and Mr. Geert van der Linden, PTF Board member.

Activities and Current Project Status: Pending first tranche disbursement.

Annex 2: Status Updates Projects Completed

1. Indonesia: Building a Citizen Monitoring System on Budget Expenditure Accountability in the Education Sector Project Adviser: Khalid Siraj

Timing and Budget: PTF approved a grant of $25,000 on April 5, 2009 for the Centre for Regional Information and Studies, Indonesia (PATTIRO). The agreement was signed on April 15 2009, and two tranches totaling $22,500 have been disbursed.

Background: PATTIRO is an Indonesian NGO established in 1999, with a mission to promote and create good governance and develop public participation in Indonesia, particularly at local level. In its ten years of existence, PATTIRO has carried out successfully a number of programs/projects, some in collaboration with international organizations.

Corruption in the education sector in Indonesia is becoming a more pressing issue given the substantial increase in public funds channeled into this sector, after the national constitution mandated an education budget of - at least - 20 percent of the national budget, starting from 2009. However, corruption and inefficiency in the education sector are significant and anti-corruption initiatives are few. Despite the increasing budget allocation for the education sector, students do not achieve desirable results; drop out rates and effective costs to students are high.

Project Objectives, Expected Outcomes and Activities: This project will focus on developing a monitoring mechanism and empowering community groups to monitor special government funds expenditure in West Bandung Regency. Its goal is to improve participation of civil society in monitoring of the education budget with a view to improve budget efficiency at school level. The specific objectives are to:

· Develop a monitoring model to identify misuse of funds and sources of corruption so that necessary improvements can be identified and implemented

· Improve participation capacity of community organizations in education fund management monitoring.

· Improve participation capacity of community organizations in revealing various violations of education fund management at the school level.

The following project activities are to be undertaken:

· Conducting research on special government funds at school and district level to identify sources of corruption and inefficiency

· Conducting research on the capacity of citizen organizations to monitor funds

· Enhancing the capacity of citizen organization in this area

· Conducting training on monitoring funds management

· Preparing guidelines on funds monitoring and disseminating these guidelines to civil society organizations

· Providing technical assistance to CSOs

· Conducting a dialogue among stakeholders to formulate solutions with regard to prevention of corruption and misuse of education funds

In addition PATTIRO will conduct advocacy for the establishment of a system for monitoring education funds through a regional seminar and distribution of a newsletter.

Current Status (September 2010): The project implementation has proceeded according to schedule. PATTIRO submitted two progress reports including financial report. The President of PATTIRO, Mr. Ilham C. Srimaga, visited Washington in November 2009 and met with Khalid Siraj, the Project Adviser, and with Dan and Pietronella of PTF. All project activities have been completed excep printing and publishing of a book on the findings school budgeting system. We expect to receive the project completion report shortly.

2. Philippines, Ecolink: Anti-Corruption and Transparency Project II: LGU Vehicle Monitoring (Completed. Still awaiting the PCR)

Adviser: Gerry van der Linden

Budget and Timeline

PTF signed a new grant agreement for $27,168 with ECOLINK on 23 January 2008. The first tranche of $7,467 was released on February 4, 2008 and the second tranche of $11,250 on 24 March 2008. A third tranche of $8,451 was released upon project completion in the middle of 2009. The project is now completed. A Project Assessment is awaiting the submission of a completion report.

Background and Approach

ECOLINK’s project builds on its successful implementation of the Vehicle Use Monitoring of the City Government of Oroquieta, replicating the same approach in two more city governments, namely Pagadian City and Dipolog City. These are both semi-urbanized cities in Region IX and XII, respectively.

Like Oroquieta City, Pagadian and Dipolog suffer from problems of abusive and unregulated expenditures on gasoline and lubricants, misuse of vehicles, minimal citizen awareness on proper use of government vehicles, weak capacities or absence of transparency networks, and weak local institutional policies. To address the situation, ECOLINK will consult with other government and civil society stakeholders, and sign a Memorandum of Understanding, and Covenant during the Project Launching Ceremonies.

The monitoring and evaluation scheme undertaken in Oroquieta will be repeated in the two other cities. Citizens’ vigilance and engagement with media, such as through SMS, are considered to be crucial in the monitoring. To address sustainability, the project plans to seek the passage of a City Ordinance setting the rules and guidelines for vehicle use and maintenance.

Observations and Achievements so far

As of 25 March 2008, ECOLINK reported that it had won the cooperation of key stakeholders with the signing of the Memorandum of Agreement. The transparency and accountability networks had also been formed in the target localities while multi-stakeholder action planning sessions were in full swing.

By September 2008, ECOLINK had accomplished the following:

Reduced expenses in LGU vehicles’ use and maintenance. Oroquieta City reported a savings of P877,999.10 for gasoline, lubricants, repairs, and maintenance costs. Dapitan City reported a reduction of P100,203.00 for repairs and maintenance. No available data yet from Pagadian City.

Documented and prevented cases of vehicle misuse. In Oroquieta City, 11 cases of vehicle misuse by provincial and municipal officials were reported. Dapitan City had 17 cases. The government vehicles were often seen at beach resorts, markets, club houses, and the cockpit. Pagadian City received 21 reports of vehicle misuse coming from the local media and the Junior Graft Watch Units.

Increased citizens’ awareness and participation on anti-corruption and transparency programs. About 1,000 young people joined the Youth Festival at Pagadian City in June 2008, which featured a live-band, arts, and literary competitions. In Dapitan City, at least 800 people watched the cultural shows and dances depicting the negative effects of corruption. Oroquieta City also had a youth festival that brought together thousands of people.

Strengthened CSO capabilities. After training in corruption monitoring, the CSOs were accredited by the Office of the Ombudsman of Mindanao and recognized in local procurement bodies and fiscal councils. A group of 14 NGOs, church groups, and individuals formed the Pagadian Transparency and Accountability Network (PTAN).

Improved LGU policies in procurement, use and maintenance of vehicles. Policy formulation workshops led to the drafting of ordinances in Pagadian and Dapitan. ECOLINK and the local networks inspected the

motor pools, checked gasoline gauges, logos, and “For Official Use Only” stickers. The Oroquieta Coalition Against Corruption, with ECOLINK as secretariat, is now observing 17 Bids and Awards Committees. Moreover, three officials in Oroquieta City have been dismissed from office due to vehicle misuse.

ECOLINK encountered problems in project implementation due to the war in Pagadian and the dismissal of its project coordinator. On February 2009, the ECOLINK was presented at the CODE-NGO Development Week in Manila.

The project completion report is still awaited and is long overdue.

3. Philippines, INCITEGov: Participatory Monitoring for Barangay Infrastructure and Health Projects in the Province of Isabela (Completed. PCA prepared)

Adviser: Gerry van der Linden

Budget and Timeline

PTF signed an agreement on June 24 2008 for $25,069 with INCITEGov. A first tranche of $12600 was disbursed on June 26, 2008. A second tranche of $10,000 was released subsequently. A final tranche of $2,469 has been released.

Background and Approach

Isabela is the second largest province in the Philippines located in the northeastern part of Luzon. Grace Padaca, its governor and one of the country’s reform minded politicians, realized that there is a need to strengthen citizens’ participation, improve transparency in the use of public funds, and monitor local service delivery.

INCITEGov spearheaded the project in partnership with the provincial government of Isabela and the People’s Alliance for Justice, Democracy and Good Governance (PAJDGG), a multisectoral organization composed of professionals, farmers, women leaders, and church workers of different faith denominations.

Project Objectives and Activities

This participatory project aims to set up systems to improve transparency in the use of public funds, empower civil society organizations, and improve the procurement of medicines in five (5) provincial hospitals.

As of September 2008, INCITEGov reported that it has set up procedures in determining the criteria for project selection. To implement the system, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was signed between the Provincial Government of Isabela and the PAJDGG.

Monitoring teams were also organized after convening the PAJDGG members and signing of another MOU between INCITEGov and PAJDGG. After finalizing the list of projects, 14 monitoring teams are ready to check infrastructure projects and two study groups will review drug procurement.

At least 65 participants joined the basic training on participatory monitoring held on September 3 – 5 2008. Barangay officials and chiefs of hospitals were invited on the last day of the workshop.

A project assessment report has been prepared and posted on PTF's website.

4. Philippines, NAMFREL: Medicine Monitoring Project (Completed. PCA prepared)

Adviser: Gerry van der Linden

Budget and Timeline

PTF signed an agreement on June 12 2008 for $23296 with the National Citizens’ Movement for Free Elections (NAMFREL), a volunteer based organization active during elections. By November 2009 two

tranches had been released for a total of $20,966. A remaining tranche of $2330 will be released upon receipt of the financial statements from NAMFREL.

Background and Approach

Because of NAMFREL’s large network and monitoring experience, the Department of Health (DOH) sought its help to monitor procurement, delivery, and inventory of medicines in DOH-managed hospitals. Over 100 volunteers were mobilized and deployed in 66 public hospitals from 2004 to 2007.

NAMFREL, however, needs to improve further its training module and strengthen citizens’ participation

as well as focus its monitoring on selected hospitals that play a crucial role in providing health services to the public.

Identification of Issues and Needs

In July-August 2008, the project started to review its training module for medicine monitoring. NAMFREL has consulted the chiefs of hospitals of eight (8) DOH Retained Hospitals. In addition NAMFREL consulted regional directors of three (3) Centers for Health Development during the period 4 September to 29 October 2008. The issues raised were as follows:

· Volunteers should have basic knowledge of health management and medicines to understand the nuances of their procurement.

· Hospitals accepted delivery of medicines that were less than the required shelf life of 18 months because they assumed that suppliers will replenish the delivered medicines three (3) months prior to their expiration.

· NAMFREL volunteers will join the Integrity Development Committees (IDCs), the anti- corruption units in the hospitals.

· Observers are expected to give their comments right after the bid proceeding to determine if the BAC complied with RA 9184.

· Carry out the delivery and inventory monitoring for drugs and medicines once a month to optimize volunteer mobilization.

· Suggested a penalty of 1% per day of delay to deliver the goods should be imposed to suppliers who fail to make the full delivery on time.

· Suggested to establish and implement a Code of Conduct for suppliers participating in hospital biddings.

· NAMFREL suggested to the IDCs to create a report-handling mechanism.

Results

As of October 2008, 40 volunteers have been monitoring a total of P233.9 million-worth of medicines and medical supplies in the project sites.

After the orientation of volunteers in November 2008, monitoring started in the first quarter of 2009. It was done for P5.3 million worth of drugs and medicines in four hospitals in Western Visayas, Cordillera Autonomous Region, Central Luzon, and National Capital Region. Of this amount, P2.4 million have already been accounted for while the protect team is processing additional monitoring reports.

There was also an effort to augment the volunteer base through a meeting with Gawad Kalinga, especially

in National Capital Region. Lastly, the project team attended the Department of Health’s Integrity

Development Committee to share initial findings of the monitoring.

A project assessment report has been prepared and posted on PTF's website.

5. Philippines G-Watch of Ateneo School of Government. Project Procurement Project (PRO):

Institutionalizing the Capacity Building of CSO Procurement Observers (Completed. PCA prepared)

Adviser: Gerry van der Linden

Budget and Timeline

PTF signed an agreement for $27,500 with the Ateneo School of Government through its G-Watch program on 15 April 2008. In the meantime the entire grant has been disbursed and a Project Completion Report has been submitted to PTF. A Project Completion Assessment is in preparation.

Background and Approach

The objective of the G-Watch’s PRO project was to sustain and expand the gains of civil society participation in the Department of Education (DepEd), specifically arising from the Textbook Count Project, which enabled transparency in the bidding and delivery of textbooks.

PRO sought to reinforce the gains of CSOs and DepEd, thus ensuring the procurement of books at reasonable prices and the timely delivery of high quality textbooks to students. The CSO-government collaboration has helped institutionalize the Government Procurement Reform Act’s (RA 9184) requirement for third-party observers.

G-Watch met with the DepEd-Procurement Service to fine-tune the project and sealed the partnership through a memorandum signed by DepEd Undersecretary Teodosio Sangil Jr. on 14 July 2008. Education officials were receptive to a project that would enhance the capacity and influence of CSO observers.

Project Outcomes

After 12 months of implementation, the project successfully set up and piloted a system of mobilization, capacity building and recognition of civil society observers in the procurement process. These accomplishments are detailed as follows:

· Commitments to pilot test PRO were solicited from 12 CSOs on 9 May and 5 June 2008. The project produced 31 “graduates” from seven organizations, who underwent intensive and on-the- job training on procurement monitoring.

· An orientation-workshop was conducted in August 2008 to instruct the volunteers about the government procurement process, role of civil society in monitoring of processes in the Education sector, raising red flags, and reporting and documentation responsibilities. It made use of a variety of learning tools, including lecture-discussion, case analysis, small group work, organization planning, and diagnostic tests.

· Proceedings were observed in 10 procurement items, the contracts for which amount to P1.3 billion.

· The proceedings observed were found systematic and according to prescribed process, which could partly be attributed to the presence of observers.

· The project’s culminating activity was the public forum entitled, “The Institutionalization Question: Forum on Ways and Means to Institutionalize the Mobilization and Capacity-Building of CSO Procurement Observers”. It reaffirmed the value of sustained government-civil society partnership and vital recommendations to enhance participation, such as strategic targeting of items to monitor.

A project assessment report has been prepared and posted on PTF's website.