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ONAP NS&N A-1.

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

Activity 1: Least to Greatest (page 1)

Number of players: two

Goal: to obtain the greatest total after calculating and ordering

How to play:
Step 1 Shuffle the operator cards and place them face down in a pile.

Step 2 Player 1 rolls the number cube four times and writes the results
on the first four spaces on Row 1. When Player 1 is finished,
Player 2 takes a turn. Continue taking turns until all 10 rows
are filled.

Step 3 Draw an operator card from the top of the pile. Write the
operation and number beside the completed spaces on Row 1.
Calculate the answer. (Use a calculator to check the answer if
there is a dispute.) Round the answer to the nearest tenth.
Return the card to the pile and shuffle the cards.

Step 4 Look at the rounded numbers. Try to get those numbers in order
from least to greatest without moving the numbers. Cross out any
numbers that do not fit in the order.

Step 5 Add the numbers that are not crossed out. The player with the
greatest total wins.

Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. NEL


ONAP NS&N A-1.2

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

Activity 1: Least to Greatest (page 2)

Answer Answer
rounded to
nearest tenth

1. ______ ______ • ______ ______ ______ ______  ________________ ________________

2. ______ ______ • ______ ______ ______ ______  ________________ ________________

3. ______ ______ • ______ ______ ______ ______  ________________ ________________

4. ______ ______ • ______ ______ ______ ______  ________________ ________________

5. ______ ______ • ______ ______ ______ ______  ________________ ________________

6. ______ ______ • ______ ______ ______ ______  ________________ ________________

7. ______ ______ • ______ ______ ______ ______  ________________ ________________

8. ______ ______ • ______ ______ ______ ______  ________________ ________________

9. ______ ______ • ______ ______ ______ ______  ________________ ________________

10. ______ ______ • ______ ______ ______ ______  ________________ ________________

Total  ________________

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ONAP NS&N A-2

Activity 1: Operator Cards

 10  10

 100  100

 1000  1000

 10  10

 100  100
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ONAP NS&N A-3

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

Activity 2: Hit the Target


Number of players: two

Goal: to estimate a product

How to play:

Step 1 Each player needs a game board and a number cube. Player 1 rolls Target Zones
the number cube four times and writes the numbers in the boxes 0–999
of part A. Estimate the product and record the Target Zone for 1000–1999
your estimate. 2000–2999
3000–3999
Step 2 Player 2 completes Step 1. 4000–4999
Step 3 Calculate and record the product. (A calculator maybe be used to
check a product if there is a dispute.)

Step 4 Each player scores 1 point if the Target Zone is hit.

Step 5 Play continues until each player completes parts A to E. The


player with the greatest score wins.

Target Zone: __________

A.   ____________ Product: ___________ Score: _________

Target Zone: __________

B.   ____________ Product: ___________ Score: _________

Target Zone: __________

C.   ____________ Product: ___________ Score: _________

Target Zone: __________

D.   ____________ Product: ___________ Score: _________

Target Zone: __________

E.   ____________ Product: ___________ Score: _________

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ONAP NS&N B-1

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

Number Sense and Numeration

1. a) Label the number line below to show the location of each


number. The first one has been done for you.

A 19 500

B 18 300

C 18 000

D 17 250
A

17 000 20 000

b) Which number is the greatest?

A 19 500 B 18 300 C 18 000 D 17 250

c) In the models below, this block represents 1:

Which model shows 2.06?

A C

B D

Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. NEL


ONAP NS&N B-2

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

1. d) The chart below shows some of the high jump results of the
2003 Junior Olympic Championships.
Mark each jump distance on the metre stick number line.
Write the jumper’s name below the marked distance.

Name Final jump (m)

Dara 1.27

Sarah 0.91

Alessandr 1.06

100

100
10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90
0

2. The number 243 can be written in expanded form as 200  40  3.


a) Write the number 34 097 in expanded form.

b) Write the number 35.02 in expanded form.

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ONAP NS&N B-3

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

2. c) If this block represents 1, draw


the base ten blocks to show
each of the following.

i) 0.3

ii) 4 hundredths

iii) 2.03

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ONAP NS&N B-4

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

3. There are 6504 people in Maya’s town. Write 6504 in words.

4. Jane measured her bedroom floor for a new carpet.


She found the floor had an area of 12.67 m2.
Which measurement represents the area of Jane’s bedroom floor
to the nearest tenth?

A 12.0 m2

B 12.7 m2

C 12.6 m2

D 13.0 m2

5. Which list is ordered from least to greatest? You may use any fraction
models to help you, for example, fraction circles, fraction strips,
Cuisenaire rods, or number lines.

12 6 4 2 1
A     
3 3 3 3 3

4 2 2 7 2
B  1 2   
3 3 3 3 3

1 3 5 2 8
C    1 
4 4 4 4 4

4 1 1 5 3
D   1  
2 2 2 2 2

NEL Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd.


ONAP NS&N B-5

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

1
6. a) Shade each picture below so that  of the whole shape is shaded.
3

1
b) Use your pictures in part a) to write one equivalent fraction for 3. _______________

1
c) Explain how you know that your fraction in part b) is equivalent to 3.

7. The models below show two different but equivalent representations


of a decimal number.

a) Write the decimal number in two different ways.

_______________ _______________

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ONAP NS&N B-6

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

7. b) Explain how you know that the numbers you wrote in part a)
are equivalent.

8. a) Write the total amount of money represented in the picture


using numbers.

$50 $50 $50 $5 $20

$50 $50 $20 $100 $10

5¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢

1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢

______________________________________________________________

b) Write your answer from part a) in words.

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ONAP NS&N B-7

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

9. A carton of pencils holds 400 packages of pencils.


Each package has 10 pencils. How many cartons would
you need to hold 100 000 pencils? Explain how you know.

10. Count by hundredths to fill in the boxes on the number line.

0.78 0.80

11. a) Show how you could use mental math to figure out that
4  65  260.

b) Show how you could use mental math to figure out that
4002  2998  1004.

Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. NEL


ONAP NS&N B-8

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

12. Calculate. Show your work.


a) $85.20  $10.93

b) 16.5  0.73

13. a) Without calculating an exact answer, estimate 68  18.


Show your thinking.

b) Calculate 49  27. Show your work.

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ONAP NS&N B-9

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

14. a) Without calculating an exact answer, estimate 536  4.


Show your thinking.

b) Calculate 712  8. Show your work.

15. a) Complete this pattern.


5.6  1  5.6
5.6  10  56
5.6  100  __________
5.6  1000  __________

b) Calculate.

45.73  100

_______________________________________________

12.6 ÷ 10

_______________________________________________
c) How do you know that 10  97.35 is not 9735?

Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. NEL


ONAP NS&N B-10

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

16. The Grade 6 class decides to sell potato chips as a fundraiser for a
class trip. They have to pay 50¢ a bag for the chips, but they sell
them for 75¢ a bag. They hope to make at least $2000 after they pay
for the chips.
Do you think that their goal is reasonable? Use the amounts given in
the question to make your decision. Explain your thinking.

17. Jo runs 2 km every day. Her best time is 4 min. It takes Maria one
and a half times as long as Jo’s best time to run the same distance.
How long does it take Maria to run 2 km?

A 3 min

B 6 min

C 5 min

D 1 min

3
18. a) Shade 
5 of the 10  10 grid.

b) Write a decimal for the part you shaded.

____________________

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ONAP NS&N B-11

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

19. Two concert tickets cost $15.00. What is the cost of 6 tickets?

A $25.00

B $30.00

C $45.00

D $90.00

Show your work using a diagram.

Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. NEL


ONAP INDIVIDUAL STUDENT SCORING GUIDE
GRADE 6: NUMBER SENSE AND NUMERATION — PART B

Name: ________________________________________________________ Date: _______________________________________

Overall Expectation 5m8 (Quantity Relationships):


Read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 100 000, decimal numbers to hundredths,
proper and improper fractions, and mixed numbers.

5m12 D C B [A]
1. a)
17 000 20 000

1 point for three correct answers

5m12
1. b) A. 19 500
1 point

5m12
1. c) A
1 point

5m12
100

100
10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90
0

1. d)

0.91 m 1.27 m
Sarah 1.06 m Dara
1 point (for name or distance label or both)
Alessandr
5m13
2. a) 30 000  4000  90  7
or
3 ten thousands  4 thousands  9 tens  7 ones
or
3 ten thousands  4 thousands  0 hundreds  9 tens  7 ones
or
(3  10 000)  (4  1000)  (9  10)  7
or
(3  10 000)  (4  1000)  (0  100)  (9  10)  7
1 point

5m13
2
2. b) 30  5  0.02 (or )
100
or
3 tens  5 ones  2 hundredths
or
(3  10)  5  0.02
or
(3  10)  (5  1)  (2  0.01)
1 point

NEL Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. 45


Number Sense and Numeration

5m13
2. c)

i) ; ii) ; iii)

1 point for two correct answers


OR 2 points for three correct answers

5m14
3. six thousand five hundred four
or six thousand five hundred and four
NOTE: For the purposes of this assessment, the use of “and” is acceptable, although the
convention is to not use it.
1 point

5m15
4. B
1 point

5m16
5. C
1 point

5m17
2 4
6. a) drawings should show  shaded and  shaded
6 12
1 point for two correct answers

5m17
2 4
6. b)  or  or any other fraction where the denominator is 3 times the numerator
6 12
1 point

5m17
6. c) 1 point for a reasonable explanation; e.g., Three sections of my fraction would cover the whole.

5m18
7. a) 0.30, 0.3
1 point for both correct

5m18
3 3
7. b) 1 point for a reasonable explanation; e.g., Both pictures show  (or  columns
10 10
30
or   squares) shaded.
100

5m19
8. a) $405.18
1 point

5m19
8. b) four hundred five dollars and eighteen cents
1 point for correctly writing out their response to part a) (even if the amount in part a) is incorrect)

46 Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. NEL


5m20
9. 25 cartons
1 point for a partial answer that demonstrates some understanding; e.g., 10 cartons  4000 pencils
OR 2 points for a complete answer that demonstrates full understanding; e.g., There are
100 000 pencils, and each carton holds 400  10 or 4000 pencils. Therefore,
100 000  4000  25 cartons. I would need 25 cartons to hold 100 000 pencils.
Total for Overall Expectation 5m8:
20

Overall Expectation 5m9 (Counting):


Demonstrate an understanding of magnitude by counting forward and backwards by 0.01.

5m21
10. 0.78, 0.79, 0.80, 0.81, 0.82, 0.83
1 point
Total for Overall Expectation 5m9:
1
Overall Expectation 5m10 (Operational Sense):
Solve problems involving the multiplication and division of multi-digit whole numbers, and involving
the addition and subtraction of decimal numbers to hundredths, using a variety of strategies.

5m22
11. a) 1 point for a reasonable response; e.g., (4  60)  (4  5)  240  20  260

5m22
11. b) 1 point for a reasonable response; e.g., 4000 — 3000  1000, 1000  2  2  1004

5m23
12. a) $96.13
1 point for the correct answer AND for showing their work; e.g.,
1
$85.20
 $10.93
$96.13

5m23
12. b) 15.77
1 point for the correct answer AND for showing their work; e.g.,
5 14 10
16.50
 0.73
15.77

5m24
13. a) 1 point for a reasonable estimate and explanation; e.g., 1400, since 68  18 is close to 70  20

NEL Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. 47


Number Sense and Numeration

5m24
13. b) 1323
1 point for the correct answer AND for showing their work;
e.g., 49  27
 40  20  9  20  40  7  9  7
 800  180  280  63
 1323

5m25
14. a) 1 point for a reasonable estimate and explanation; e.g., 130, since 536 is about 520.
To divide 520 by 4, I calculated 400  4  100  4  20  4 and got 130.

5m25
14. b) 89
1 point for the correct answer AND for showing their work; e.g., 89
1
8 72

64
72
72
0
5m26
15. a) 560, 5600
1 point for two correct answers

5m26
15. b) 4573, 1.26
1 point for two correct answers

5m26
15. c) 1 point for a partial explanation that demonstrates some understanding; e.g., 9735 is too big
or I moved the numbers one place.
OR 2 points for a complete explanation that demonstrates full understanding; e.g., I know this
because 97.35 is about 100, and 10  100 is 1000, not 10 000.

5m27
16. 1 point for a reasonable response; e.g., The class will make 25¢ for each bag of chips.
They would have to sell 8000 bags to make $2000. I don’t think they will sell that many bags.
Total for Overall Expectation 5m10:
13
Overall Expectation 5m11 (Proportional Relationships):
Demonstrate an understanding of proportional reasoning by investigating whole-number rates.

5m28
17. B 6 min.
1 point

5m29
6 60
18. a) 1 point for shading  or  of the grid
10 100

48 Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. NEL


5m29
18. b) 0.6 OR 0.60
1 point
$15 $15 $15
5m30
19. C $45.00
1 point for the correct answer  

AND 1 point for a reasonable diagram; e.g.,


Total for Overall Expectation 5m11:
5

NEL Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. 49


Number Sense and Numeration

ONAP GR ADE 6: N U M B ER SENSE AN D

Date: ______________________________ Grade: _________ School: ______________________________________________

5m8 (Quantity Relationships)


Overall Expectation Read, represent, compare, and order numbers whole numbers to 100 000, decimal
numbers to hundredths, proper and improper fractions, and mixed numbers.

Specific Expectation # 5m12 5m13 5m14 5m15 5m16 5m17 5m18 5m19
Question # 1. a) 1. b) 1. c) 1. d) 2. a) 2. b) 2. c) 3. 4. 5. 6. a) 6. b) 6. c) 7. a) 7. b) 8. a) 8. b)
Gender IEP/
Student Name
(M/F) ELL 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

50 Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. NEL


N U M ER ATION CL ASS TR ACKI NG SH EET – PART B

Board: _____________________________________________ Teacher Name: _____________________________________


understanding of magnitude
by counting forwards and

5m11 (Proportional
backwards by 0.01

Relationships)
5m9 (Counting)
Demonstrate an

5m10 (Operational Sense)


Demonstrate an
Solve problems involving the multiplication and division of multi-digit
understanding of
whole numbers, and involving the addition and subtraction of decimals
proportional reasoning by
numbers to hundredths, using a variety of strategies.
investigating whole-
number rates.

5m20 5m21 5m22 5m23 5m24 5m25 5m26 5m27 5m28 5m29 5m30
Total Total Total Total
9. 10. 11. a) 11. b) 12. a) 12. b) 13. a) 13. b) 14. a) 14. b) 15. a) 15. b) 15. c) 16. 17. 18. a) 18. b) 19.

2 20 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 13 1 1 1 2 5

NEL Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. 51


Number Sense and Numeration

ONTARIO CURRICULUM CORRELATION TO ONAP NUMBER SENSE AND NUMERATION 6 — PART B


NOTE: This correlation is to the Grade 5 Ontario Curriculum Expectations.

Overall Expectation 5m8 (Quantity Relationships):


Read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 100 000, decimal numbers to hundredths, proper
and improper fractions, and mixed numbers.

Question
Number Specific Expectation

1. a)–d) 5m12: represent, compare, and order whole numbers and decimal numbers from 0.01 to 100 000,
using a variety of tools (e.g., number lines with appropriate increments, base ten materials for
decimals)

2. a)–c) 5m13: demonstrate an understanding of place value in whole numbers and decimal numbers from
0.01 to 100 000, using a variety of tools and strategies (e.g., use numbers to represent 23 011 as
20 000  3000  0  10  1; use base ten materials to represent the relationship between 1, 0.1,
and 0.01)

3. 5m14: read and print in words whole numbers to ten thousand, using meaningful contexts
(e.g., newspapers, magazines)

4. 5m15: round decimal numbers to the nearest tenth, in problems arising from real-life situations

5. 5m16: represent, compare, and order fractional amounts with like denominators, including proper
and improper fractions and mixed numbers, using a variety of tools (e.g., fraction circles, Cuisenaire
rods, number lines) and using standard fractional notation

6. a)–c) 5m17: demonstrate and explain the concept of equivalent fractions, using concrete materials
3 9
(e.g., use fraction strips to show that 4 is equal to 12)

7. a)–b) 5m18: demonstrate and explain equivalent representations of a decimal number, using concrete
materials and drawings (e.g., use base ten materials to show that three tenths [0.3] is equal to thirty
hundredths [0.30])

8. a)–b) 5m19: read and write money amounts to $1000 (e.g., $455.35 is 455 dollars and 35 cents, or four
hundred fifty-five dollars and thirty-five cents)

9. 5m20: solve problems that arise from real-life situations and that relate to the magnitude of whole
numbers up to 100 000

Overall Expectation 5m9 (Counting):


Demonstrate an understanding of magnitude by counting forward and backwards by 0.01.

Question
Number Specific Expectation

10. 5m21: count forward by hundredths from any decimal number expressed to two decimal places, using
concrete materials and number lines (e.g., use base ten materials to represent 2.96 and count forward
by hundredths: 2.97, 2.98, 2.99, 3.00, 3.01, …; “Two and ninety-six hundredths, two and ninety-seven
hundredths, two and ninety-eight hundredths, two and ninety-nine hundredths, three, three and one
hundredth, …”)

52 Ontario Numeracy Assessment NEL


Overall Expectation 5m10 (Operational Sense):
Solve problems involving the multiplication and division of multi-digit whole numbers, and involving the addition
and subtraction of decimal numbers to hundredths, using a variety of strategies.

Question
Number Specific Expectation

11. a)–b) 5m22: solve problems involving the addition, subtraction, and multiplication of whole numbers,
using a variety of mental strategies (e.g., use the commutative property: 5  18  2  5  2  18,
which gives 10  18  180)

12. a)–b) 5m23: add and subtract decimal numbers to hundredths, including money amounts, using concrete
materials, estimation, and algorithms (e.g., use 10  10 grids to add 2.45 and 3.25)

13. a)–b) 5m24: multiply two-digit whole numbers by two-digit whole numbers, using estimation,
student-generated algorithms, and standard algorithms

14. a)–b) 5m25: divide three-digit whole numbers by one-digit whole numbers, using concrete materials,
estimation, student-generated algorithms, and standard algorithms

15. a)–c) 5m26: multiply decimal numbers by 10, 100, 1000, and 10 000, and divide decimal numbers by
10 and 100, using mental strategies (e.g., use a calculator to look for patterns and generalize to
develop a rule)

16. 5m27: use estimation when solving problems involving the addition, subtraction, multiplication,
and division of whole numbers, to help judge the reasonableness of a solution

Overall Expectation 5m11 (Proportional Relationships):


Demonstrate an understanding of proportional reasoning by investigating whole-number rates.

Question
Number Specific Expectation

17. 5m28: describe multiplicative relationships between quantities by using simple fractions and decimals
1
(e.g., “If you have 4 plums and I have 6 plums, I can say that I have 1 2 or 1.5 times as many plums
as you have.”)

18. a)–b) 5m29: determine and explain, through investigation using concrete materials, drawings, and
calculators, the relationship between fractions (i.e., with denominators of 2, 4, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50, and
100) and their equivalent decimal forms (e.g., use a 10  10 grid to show that 2  4  0
which can
5 100 ,
also be represented as 0.4)

19. 5m30: demonstrate an understanding of simple multiplicative relationships involving whole-number


rates, through investigation using concrete materials and drawings

NEL Ontario Numeracy Assessment 53


Number Sense and Numeration

Next Steps for Number Sense and Numeration


Instructional Next Steps for Overall Expectations
After summarizing individual and class performance on each overall expectation, you
may find that there are areas that could be retaught to some students. The following
suggestions have been provided to assist you in preparing tasks for individuals or
small groups of students.

Overall Expectation 5m8 (Quantity Relationships)


Read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 100 000, decimal numbers
to hundredths, proper and improper fractions, and mixed numbers.

Background
Visualizing, ordering, and comparing numbers and recognizing how they relate to
each other is important in the understanding of quantity relationships. The ability to
compose and decompose numbers helps students when they solve number problems
using a variety of strategies, including mental math. Students need to integrate their
knowledge of base ten concepts, counting, and oral and written representations of
numbers. Students at this grade level are developing their understanding of rational
numbers and should be encouraged to look for the relationships that exist among
fractions, decimals, and whole numbers. Students benefit from using a variety of
manipulatives and by creating multiple representations when learning number and
money concepts.

Strategies
The following materials are useful for representing whole numbers, decimals,
fractions, percents, and money amounts: base ten blocks, fraction circles and strips,
number lines, numeral cards, play money, and Cuisenaire rods.
Representations
Provide a variety of materials (e.g., base ten blocks, fraction pieces, geoboards, coins,
calculators, counters, blocks, ten frames, and 100ths charts) and have students model
1 3
the following quantities in a variety of ways: 0.05, 2, 4, 1.5, 5, 21, 1021, 25 051
1
For example, students may represent  in the following ways:
2

3
8
8

80 Ontario Numeracy Assessment NEL


Overall Expectation 5m9 (Counting)
Demonstrate an understanding of magnitude by counting forward and
backwards by 0.01.

Background
Counting is both the recitation of a series of numbers and the conceptualization of
a symbol as representative of a quantity.

Strategies
Counting Decimals
Provide number lines and decimal 100ths charts for students to use to guide their
oral counting.

0 0.5 1.0

0.01 0.02 0.03 0.04 0.05 0.06 0.07 0.08 0.09 0.10

0.11 0.12 0.13 0.14 0.15 0.16 0.17 0.18 0.19 0.20

0.21 0.22 0.23 0.24 0.25 0.26 0.27 0.28 0.29 0.30

0.31 0.32 0.33 0.34 0.35 0.36 0.37 0.38 0.39 0.40

0.41 0.42 0.43 0.44 0.45 0.46 0.47 0.48 0.49 0.50

0.51 0.52 0.53 0.54 0.55 0.56 0.57 0.58 0.59 0.60

0.61 0.62 0.63 0.64 0.65 0.66 0.67 0.68 0.69 0.70

0.71 0.72 0.73 0.74 0.75 0.76 0.77 0.78 0.79 0.80

0.81 0.82 0.83 0.84 0.85 0.86 0.87 0.88 0.89 0.90

0.91 0.92 0.93 0.94 0.95 0.96 0.97 0.98 0.99 1.00

0 5 cm 10 cm 13 cm
0.05 m 0.10 m 0.13 m

Mystery Number
Ask one student to think of a mystery number within a given range and have the class
ask questions to determine the number (e.g., Is the number greater than 0.50?). The
mystery number can be a fraction, decimal, or whole number. Write the numbers that
are eliminated on the board and have the class continue to ask questions until the
mystery number is determined.

NEL Ontario Numeracy Assessment 81


Number Sense and Numeration

Overall Expectation 5m10 (Operational Sense)


Solve problems involving the multiplication and division of multi-digit whole numbers,
and involving the addition and subtraction of decimal numbers to hundredths, using a
variety of strategies.

Background
This overall expectation relates to students’ development of operational sense.
Students with operational sense understand that operations are related to each other
in various ways, have good number sense (including an understanding of place value
and the partitioning and combining of numbers), and understand the patterns
inherent in basic operations.

Encouraging students to use a variety of strategies, including invented algorithms,


helps with the discovery of properties governing our number system. Students’ ability
to compute with whole numbers, decimal numbers, and money amounts can be
enhanced by modelling the problem-solving process using a variety of manipulatives
and representations.

Strategies
Modelling Multiplication
Create multiplication problems and model the answers.

For example, 13 students baked a dozen (12) muffins for the bake sale.
How many muffins were there in total?
10  2

10 12
13
A B 100 (10  10) A
 20 (10  2) B
30 (3  10) C
6 (3  2) D
156
3 C D

The distributive property a  (b  c)  (a  b)  (a  c) is very useful for developing


mental math strategies. It also helps in the understanding of the conventional
two-digit multiplication algorithm. Using varied examples, show students that
numbers can be broken apart in different ways to make partial products that can then
be combined.

82 Ontario Numeracy Assessment NEL


Modelling Division
Model division using arrays.

For example, 180  15


15

10 150
12
2 30

180  15  (150  15)  (30  15)

Teach the different meanings of division and link them to specific math problems.

For example, 6  2  3

Partitive: If six blocks are divided Quotative: If six blocks are divided
into two groups, how many are into groups of two, how many
in each group? groups can be made?

Model, and encourage students to use, a variety of algorithms for long division. The
example below is often easier to use for students with weaker multiplication skills.
This approach also allows students to divide even if they are able to multiply only by
10s, 5s, 2s, and 1s.

7 )167
70 10
97
70 10
27
21 3
6 23 R6

Overall Expectation 5m11 (Proportional Relationships)


Demonstrate an understanding of proportional reasoning by investigating
whole-number rates.

Background
At this level students are just beginning to recognize proportional relationships. With
proportional reasoning, students are learning that the size or quantity of one object or
set may be related to another.

NEL Ontario Numeracy Assessment 83


Number Sense and Numeration

Proportional reasoning is important in mathematics because the thinking involved


can be applied to a variety of topics. Part of proportional reasoning is understanding
the relationships of parts of wholes, such as fraction–decimal equivalents. Rates are
also part of proportional reasoning that students should be familiar with at this grade
level (e.g., grapes cost $3 per kilogram). Proportional reasoning can be applied in all
five strands of the mathematics curriculum and is frequently used in daily life
(e.g., pricing, distance and rate of travel, predicting the weather, etc.).

Strategies
Use a variety of representations to help students with proportional relationships.

Fractions, Decimals, and Rates


• Use base ten materials and drawings to model equivalent relationships between
simple fractions and their decimal forms.

1
= 50 or 0.5 67
= 0.67
2 100 100

• If 3 slices of pizza cost $6, how much do 12 slices of pizza cost?

Slices Total cost


3 $ 6
6 $12
9 $18
12 $24

• There are three times as many basketballs as baseballs or for every baseball,
there are three basketballs.

84 Ontario Numeracy Assessment NEL


ONAP NS&N C-1.1

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

Performance Task 1: Pizza Night (page 1)

Mrs. Chin and her two children, Li and Jin,


order an 8-slice pizza every Friday night.

1 1
1. Two weeks ago, Li ate 4 of the pizza, Jin ate 2 of the pizza,
and Mrs. Chin ate one slice of pizza. Is there any pizza left?
How much of the pizza did the family eat? Show your work.

1 1
2. One week ago, Li ate 4 of the pizza, and Jin ate 3 of what was left.
Mrs. Chin ate two slices of pizza. What fraction of the pizza was left
over after all three had their pizza?
Show your work.

Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. NEL


ONAP NS&N C-1.2

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

Performance Task 1: Pizza Night (page 2)

3. Last week the Chin family went to a different pizza shop.


At this pizza shop they make pizzas that are rectangular.
The Chin family ordered a 12-slice rectangular pizza.
– Jin ate 14 of the entire pizza.
– Li ate 13 of the entire pizza.
– Mrs. Chin ate 1 slice.
What fraction of the entire pizza was left over? Show your work.

NEL Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd.


ONAP NS&N C-2.1

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

Performance Task 2: Sharing Strawberries


(page 1)

Imtiyaz went strawberry picking on the weekend.

On Monday, Imtiyaz brought fewer than 80 strawberries to school to


share with his friends.

Imtiyaz shared the strawberries with his friends Kendra, Craig, and Julie.
When Imtiyaz shared the strawberries equally between the four of them,
there was one strawberry left over.

Before they had a chance to eat any strawberries, Shazir joined them.
They decided to put the strawberries back into one pile and share the
strawberries again. When Imtiyaz shared the strawberries equally, there
was one strawberry left over.

Then Colin came to sit with them. Imtiyaz started over again. When he
shared the strawberries equally, there was one strawberry left over.

1. How many strawberries did Imtiyaz bring to school? Show your work.

2. Suppose Julie was not at school that day. Would your answer to
Question 1 be the same or different? Explain.

Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. NEL


ONAP NS&N C-2.2

Name: __________________________________________ Date: ____________________________

Performance Task 2: Sharing Strawberries


(page 2)

3. If you didn’t know that Imtiyaz had fewer than 80 strawberries,


would another answer be possible? Explain.

NEL Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd.


Number Sense and Numeration

ONAP PERFORMANCE TASK CLASS TRACKING SHEET


GR ADE 6: N U M B ER SENSE AN D N U M ER ATION
PART C
Date: _____________________________________________________________ Grade: __________________________________
School: _________________________________________________ Board: ___________________________________________
Teacher Name: _____________________________________________________________________________________________

Performance Task Title: ___________________________________________________________

Student Name Level 1–4 Comments

62 Copyright © 2010 by Nelson Education Ltd. NEL