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Shayne - Vice should always disgust because vice is sin, no matter which way it is looked at. These immoral

habits glorify Satan, which should disgust any Christian. All vices should try to be stopped so that people can have a stronger walk with our Lord. Johnson, Samuel. “The Rambler.” British Literature. Ronald A. Horton. 2nd ed. Greenville: BJU Press,

2003. 456-459. Print.

Jerica's Response- I agree with you; I do believe that the wicked behavior should stop. It may be hard, but it's

a step closer to God.

Paige Response-You make a very good point when you say that vice is a sin regardless of the way that it is looked at. I think a lot of times people try to find a way to make sin seem okay or not as bad.

Ari- “Vice must always disgust.” In Rambler 4, Johnson states that vice in fictional narrative is both realistic and a catalyst for any story, but it is also something that must disgust. From any moral viewpoint, vice should be something that is always met with abhorrence. As Christians, we are to be working and growing to become more like the Lord. We should be striving towards Christ likeness and virtue, the very opposite of vice. Johnson, Samuel. “The Rambler.” British Literature. Ronald A. Horton. 2nd ed. Greenville: BJU Press,

2003. 456-459. Print.

Cody Response - I agree with the fact that from any moral viewpoint, vice should be met with abhorrence. Even people who aren't Christians disagree with vice as being "okay" or "acceptable". Courtney Response-The fact that vice is the very opposite of striving towards Christ likeness and virtue is a

really good point. Something that is sinful definitely takes someone farther away from Christ likeness.

Cody - As Christians, we should never support vice. Vice, according to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, can be defined as "moral depravity or corruption: wickedness". Coruption and moral depravity are the very things God commands us to stay away from. Therefore we should always be disgusted by vice. Even the author of "The Rambler" agrees that vice should be "abhorred" (Horton 457). Vice damages our relationship with God, ourselves, and others so its important to stay away from it. "Vice - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary." Dictionary and Thesaurus - Merriam-Webster Online. Web. 02 Dec. 2010. <http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vice>. Johnson, Samuel. "The Rambler." British Literature Ed. Ronald H. Horton. Greenville, SC: BJU Press, 2003. 456-459. Print Courtney Response- I agree with you. Vice really does damage our relationship with God, ourselves, and others. Sometimes we do not even realize how harmful it is.

Courtney- Yes, vice should always disgust because it is something that is wicked and sinful. One should respond to vice with hatred and disgust because it is morally wrong. To practice or allow vice, would be permitting something that is evil and against what God calls us to do. Johnson, Samuel. “The Rambler.” British Literature. Ronald A. Horton. 2nd ed. Greenville: BJU, 2003. 456-459. Print.

Cody Response - God has called us to be good examples for others. You are comepletely right that allowing vice would be disobeying God's command to be Christ-like.

I think you have made a very good point. The fact that vice is not pleasing to God really does show that we

should respond to vice with hatred and not even permit it. Some people tolerate vice and forget that it is actually against what God has called us to do. -Ari Shayne Response - You are right in saying that vice is against God's commands for us. We as Christians need to step up and lead as an example for those who participate in these immoral habits.

Sean- Any form of vice should be seen as a disgusting act. Vice involves evil actions or habits which are sins. As Christians, we should stay away from our own personal vices, and we should be building up our relationship with God. But Christians should try to not hate the person committing the sin more than the sin itself. Hate the sin not the person. Johnson, Samuel. "Rambler." Ed. Ronald A. Horton. British Literature. Greenville: Bob Jones Univeristy Press, 1999. Print.

JN Response- You make a good point at the end about hating the sin and not the person. As Christians, we should try to help the person know what is right and lead them to Christ. Jerica's Response- I do agree with you on your last sentence. It's easy to hate a person because of their faults, but everyone sins and Christians should encourage others to do better instead of looking down on them.

Jerica-Vice should always disgust; the loathing Christians feel towards wicked behavior should be expected. In Johnson’s Rambler 4, he portrays the same Christian viewpoint, “Wherever it appears, it should raise hatred by the malignity of its practices,” (Johnson 457). In the Bible, it states that any act of sin is evil; the “size” of the immoral act doesn’t matter. Furthermore, Satan’s temptations abound, but it is a Christian’s choice to disregard his evil implications with God’s support. Johnson, Samuel. “The Rambler.” British Literature. Ronald A. Horton. 2nd ed. Greenville: BJU Press, 2003. 456-459. Print. JN Response- You are right about a Christian having the choice to follow God or to do what is evil. Satan is always out there trying to tempt us to do what is wrong. But we should be like Job and always trust and follow God no matter what. Shayne Response - I think you do a good job explaining the Christian's ability to choose what he/she wants to do. Christians need to make sure to follow God in order to not fall into the temptations of the Devil.

JN- Vice should always disgust because it is a corruption of man that is displeasing to God. In Johnson’s Rambler 4, he clearly states that vice must disgust. Whenever vice appears, the response should be of hatred, even if the person means it for good in which case is not right. Vice is a sin and could never be meant for good. As Christians, we should know this and try to avoid vice and instead focus more on our walk with Christ and encourage others to do the same. Johnson, Samuel. “The Rambler.” British Literature. Ronald A. Horton. 2nd ed. Greenville: BJU, 2003, 456-459. Print Paige Respnse-I agree with what you say about avoiding vice and encouraging others to avoid vice as well. Good point. Sean Response-

I like how you included the idea of encouraging others to keep their relationship with God strong. You make

a good point in how some people can have a vice or sin that they think they do with good intentions. Those types of thoughts can eventually lead to frustration or anger between people.