Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 3

The Bebop Scale

Matt Olson, Furman University


Conn-Selmer Endorsing Artist

Bebop era jazz musicians experimented with adding chromaticism to diatonic modal scales. The
result was scale concept that has become known as the Bebop scale. The basic premise of the
Bebop scale is to add one (or more) chromatic pitches to a pre-existing scale in order to achieve a
smoother melodic line with better voice leading. While the Bebop scale concept can have many
different permutations, the most commonly used version is played over a dominant 7th chord, as
in the example below.

C7

& œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ nœ bœ œ œ œ
œ œ w

œ remain onŒ downbeats.


C7

œ chord tones
Notice
C 7 that, especially on the descending scale, the extra chromatic note (in our example, a B

œ nallows
œ b œ the Œ of theœ C7n œ chord
b œ to œ nœ bœ Œ
& œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ b œ n œ œ n œ b œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œw œ œ
&
natural)

Countless
C7 jazz musicians play the phrase below, often referred to as “The Bebop Lick.”

& œœ œ œ œ œ œœ b œœ nœœ œ n œœ b œ œ œœ œœ œ œ˙ œ œ w
C7
C7

nœ bœ nœ b˙ œ n œ bbœœ œ œœ œ œ ˙ Œ
&& œ n œ b œ œ œ ˙ œ œ Œ b œ nœœ n œ œb œ n œ b œœ œ Œ
C7

& Cœ7 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
w
œ to œ
& Cœœare n some
œ b œ ways œ practice
œ œ n œ Scale.
Œ the Bebop b œ First,
œœ play
œ œ nofœ the
Œfragments b œ scale descending,
œ œ Œ
C7

œ œ œ œ
C7

œ of chord
n œ œtones,
b œœ œbutn œalways œ on aœœchord
b ˙ œ starting œ ˙ tone.Œ b œ œ Ó
Here
&& œœ nnœœ b œb œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ ˙Œ
7
starting on a variety
& C7 œ œ Œ œ nœ bœ œ œ Œ œ nœ bœ œ œ
œ
œ œ œ nœ b˙ œ œ œ œ ˙
& Cœœ7 n œ b œ œ ˙ bœ œ œ œ ˙
C7
C7

nœ bœ
&& œ n œ bœœ œ œ n œ œœ b œœ œ œ nœœœ b ˙ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œb œ ˙ œŒ bœœ Óœ œ
& C7 œ ˙ œ œ œ ˙
Cœ7
& Cœ7 œœ œœ n œ b œ œ
Now, combine the fragment concept and the Bebop lick for a longer phrase.
œ œ œ Œ Ó
C7

nœ bœ œ œ
&& œœ n œœ b œ œ œ n œ œ b œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œŒb œ œ Óœ œ
& C7 œ œ œ bœ

& œœ n œœ b œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ
C7

œ œ involves œ ab œdescending
œ œœ Bebop œ
œcombined with œascending
C7

& œ advanced
œ exercise
œ nœ bœ œ n œ œœ b œb œ œ œ
œ œ bœ
C7

& œ chords,
n œ basœ in the examples below. œ
A more playing scale
& C7 œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
diatonic
œ œ œ bœ œ
Cœ7 œœ œœ œœ
& Cœœ7
b n œœ bœ œ œ œ œœ b œœ œœ
C7

& œ œ œ œ
œ œ
nœ b œœ nœœ bœœ bœ œ œ œ
&œ œ œ nœ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ
& C7 œ œ œ œ
œC 7 œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ nœ bœ bœ
C7

œ œ œ nœ bœ œ œ œ Œ Ó
& 2 œ

C7

&œ nœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ bœ
C7

œ œ œ nœ bœ bœ œ œ
& œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ
C7

œ œ œ nœ bœ œ bœ œ œ
& œ

bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ
C7

œ œ œ nœ bœ œ
&

Notice that these examples begin on the root, third, fifth, and seventh of the chord, respectively,
then build an ascending chord on only the third, fifth, and seventh. Without worrying about a
specific time signature, but with a steady beat, try mixing and matching these concepts freely.
This will help you drill the scale into your muscle memory. One possible version appears below,
but realize that this exercise is limitless. Be creative, experiment, and be sure to practice these in
every key!
2 [Title]

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
C7

œ n œ b œ œ œ œ œ n œ b œ œ œ œ n œ b œ œ
2& œ œ œ œ œ[Title]
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
C7

It& œ n œ b œ œ œthatœ you œ œ œ n œ b œ œ œ


œ chromaticism n œ b œ œ
is worth noting
œ œcan add additional œ to the Bebop scale, as in the example

&
below.
!
C7

&œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ
& !
C maj7

step inœ between


Finally, the Bebop scale concept extends to other scales, too! In the first example, we add a half
& œ the 5œth andb 6œth notesœ of a major
œ œ œ
scale, and play the resulting scale over a CMaj7
w
! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !
chord.
&
C 7( b 9)

&œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ bœ w
& ! ! !

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& n œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ b œ œ œ œ n œ b œ
C7

& œ œ b œ œ œ œ 3 œ bœ œ bœ œ
C7

&œ œ bœ œ œ œ
C maj7

œ bœ œ bœ œ
&œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ w
C maj7

& œ example
C 7( b 9)
œ incorporates
œ b œ the harmonic
œ
The
œ in minor.
last
œ minorœ scale,œand is especially
w
effective at resolving a
& œ bœ bœ œ œ œ bœ
V chord
w
C 7( b 9)

&œ œ bœ bœ œ œ
& ! ! ! ! !œ bœ ! w ! ! !

& !Resources! on the Bebop


Further ! Scale! ! ! ! ! !
• David Baker’s How to Play Bebop, Volume 1, 2, and 3, published by Alfred
• Jerry Coker’s Elements of the Jazz Language, published by CPP Belwin
• The Barry Harris Workshop Video, produced by Bop City Productions