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IMPORTANT NOTICE

By the act of enrolling in a course of study, each undergraduate student at Ryerson agrees
to observe and be bound by the terms of this notice, and the terms, conditions, regulations
and policies contained in this Calendar.
Ryerson shall be the sole arbiter of standards for admission to its courses of study and may,
without prior notice, limit enrollment in or admission to any course or program at any level.
Ryerson reserves the right to change, without notice, any information appearing in this
Calendar pertaining to the standards for admission to, the requirements for the continua-
tion of study in, and the requirements for the granting of degrees or certificates in any of its
programs.
Ryerson reserves the right to alter the fees and other charges described in this Calendar
and to impose from time to time additional regulations, policies and codes of conduct.
Enrolling students are expected to familiarize themselves with the Significant Dates and the
Registrar’s Office sections contained in this Calendar and subsequent editions, as well as
with the information pertaining to the course or courses in which they are enrolled.
Ryerson reserves the right to withdraw or cancel programs or courses that are under en-
rolled. Ryerson reserves the right to make such changes in rules, regulations and promo-
tional policies as may be required
Course descriptions are provided in this Calendar as a matter of general information to
assist present and prospective students in selecting their programs of study. While these
descriptions are accurate as of the date of publication, students are cautioned that actual
course content and the hours and type of instruction may vary from the listings in
the Calendar or from other course management information made available. Students are
expected to familiarize themselves with, and be governed by the rules and regulations of the
program department in which they are enrolled, and the promotional policies of that depart-
ment.
It is the responsibility of each Full-time undergraduate student to access the up-
dated Full-time Undergraduate Calendar each year, and follow their curriculum as
stated.
It is the responsibility of each Part-time undergraduate student to complete the cur-
riculum for their program as set out in the edition of the Part-time Undergraduate
Calendar of the year they were admitted to their program, unless stated otherwise.
Students are to follow the Significant Dates in the current calendar.
Undergraduate Online Calendar is available at: www.ryerson.ca/calendar
Graduate School information is available at: www.ryerson.ca/gradstudies
The Chang School information is available at: www.ryerson.ca/ce
Published Online March 2010
Published in Print May 2010
Undergraduate Publications/Curriculum Advising
Office of the Registrar
Ryerson University
350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario,
Canada M5B 2K3
Telephone: (416) 979-5000, Fax: (416) 979-5341
Website: www.ryerson.ca

Member: Council of Ontario Universities (C.O.U.), Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada
(A.U.C.C.), Association of Commonwealth Universities (A.C.U.)
TABLE OF CONTENTS Faculty of Community Services
Important Notice .....................................................................ifc Child and Youth Care (BA)................................................... 128
Significant Dates ...................................................................... 2 Disability Studies (BA) ........................................................ 131
Campus Map ............................................................................ 8 Early Childhood Education (BA) .......................................... 132
Ryerson University Mission ................................................... 10 Health Information Management (BHA) .............................. 139
An Introduction to Ryerson University ................................... 10 Health Services Management (BHA) .................................. 139
Ryerson University Professional Accreditations ................... 10 Midwifery (BHSc) ................................................................. 140
Ryerson’s Notice of Collection and Use of Information ..........11 Nursing (BScN) .................................................................... 145
Admission Procedures and Policies ...................................... 13 Nutrition and Food (BASc) ................................................... 153
The Registrar’s Office ............................................................ 28 Occupational and Public Health (BASc) .............................. 157
General Academic Information .............................................. 48 Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioner Certificate (Cert) ....151
Fees/Financial Information .................................................... 53 Social Work (BSW) .............................................................. 164
Urban and Regional Planning (BURPl) ............................... 168
PROGRAMS AND ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS

Faculty of Arts Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Science


Arts and Contemporary Studies (BA) .................................... 58 Aerospace Engineering (BEng) ........................................... 182
Criminal Justice (BA) ............................................................. 67 Architectural Science (BArchSc) ......................................... 173
English Department ............................................................... 71 Biology (BSc) ....................................................................... 229
French and Spanish Department ........................................... 72 Biomedical Engineering (BEng)........................................... 187
Geographic Analysis (BA)...................................................... 73 Chemical Engineering Co-operative (BEng) ....................... 191
History Department ................................................................ 77 Chemistry (BSc) ................................................................... 238
International Economics and Finance (BA) ........................... 77 Civil Engineering (BEng) ...................................................... 196
Philosophy and Music Department ........................................ 81 Computer Engineering (BEng) ............................................ 202
Politics and Governance (BA) ............................................... 81 Computer Science (BSc) ..................................................... 178
Psychology (BA) .................................................................... 87 Contemporary Science (BSc) .............................................. 244
Public Administration and Governance (BA) ......................... 92 Electrical Engineering (BEng).............................................. 208
Sociology (BA) ....................................................................... 93 Industrial Engineering (BEng) .............................................. 217
Undeclared Arts (BA) ............................................................. 97 Mathematics and its Applications (BSc) .............................. 249
Mechanical Engineering (BEng) .......................................... 221
Faculty of Communication & Design Medical Physics (BSc) ......................................................... 257
Fashion Communication (BDes) ............................................ 99 Undeclared Engineering ...................................................... 227
Fashion Design (BDes) .......................................................... 99 Undeclared Science ............................................................. 262
Graphic Communications Management (BTech) ................ 104
Image Arts (BFA) ................................................................. 107 Ted Rogers School of Management
Interior Design (BID) .............................................................111 Business Management (BComm) ........................................ 263
Journalism (BJourn)..............................................................114 Business Technology Management (BComm) .................... 275
Performance Acting (BFA) ....................................................118 Hospitality and Tourism Management (BComm) ................ 293
Performance Dance (BFA) ...................................................118 Retail Management (BComm) ............................................. 297
Performance Production (BFA) ............................................118
School of Professional Communication............................... 124 Minors ................................................................................. 303
Radio and Television (BA) ................................................... 124 Liberal Studies Policy/Tables ...........................................311

The printed edition of this calendar is intended for internal use only. Some sections, including the
course descriptions, are not included in this publication. The complete, official version of this calendar
is available online at www.ryerson.ca/calendar/2010-2011

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 1


SIGNIFICANT DATES

FALL 2010 SIGNIFICANT DATES

Friday, April 30 Final date for students, admitted Fall 2009 to apply for Transfer Credits.

Tuesday, June 1 First date to apply to graduate on RAMSS for the Fall 2010 Convocation.

Week of June 14 Classes end for The Chang School Spring/Summer 2010 term, Spring session.

Week of June 21 Classes commence for The Chang School Spring/Summer 2010 term, Summer session.

Wednesday, June 30 Final date to clear all fees and financial matters prior to the 2010-2011 academic year, otherwise no
further enrollment will be permitted in undergraduate classes.

Thursday, July 1 Canada Day (University closed).

Friday, July 2 Special Day (University closed).

Monday, July 5 to Friday, Pre-Orientation activities and programs (new undergraduate full- and part-time program students).
August 20

Monday, July 19 First day of open enrollment for classes offered through The Chang School for the Fall 2010 term.

Friday, July 23 Final date to apply for graduation on RAMSS for the Fall 2010 Convocation (no late fee). A
non-refundable late fee will apply after this date until August 20.

Monday, August 2 Civic Holiday (University closed).

Friday, August 6 Final date for new students to apply for Transfer Credit for the start of the Fall 2010/Winter 2011 aca-
demic year. After this date no applications will be assessed for Fall 2010. Applications received after
this date will be assessed for the start of the Winter 2011 term (exception: students approved after
August 6).

Friday, August 20 Final date to apply in person for the Fall 2010 Convocation (with a non-refundable late ap-
plication fee).

Monday, August 23 First day of open enrollment for classes offered through The Chang School for the Winter 2011 term.

Monday, August 30 to Orientation and Enrollment activities for the Fall 2010 term (new undergraduate full- and part-time
Friday, September 3 program students).

Monday, September 6 Labour Day (University closed).

Monday, September 6 to Post-Orientation activities and programs (new undergraduate full- and part-time program students);
Friday, October 15 classes to continue as scheduled.

Tuesday, September 7 Classes commence for full- and part-time undergraduate programs. Note: undergraduate
program students accessing classes through The Chang School, classes will begin the week
of Monday, September 13; see your Fall timetable for further information.

Friday, September 10 Final date for full payment of undergraduate tuition fees* for the Fall 2010/Winter 2011 academic
year.
Students who choose to defer payment of all or part of their Winter 2011 undergraduate tuition fees
until after September 30, will be assessed a $70 (subject to change) deferral fee. Late fees will be
assessed on unpaid Fall 2010 undergraduate tuition fees as of September 11, 2010 and, on unpaid
Winter 2011 undergraduate tuition fees as of January 8, 2011.

Friday, September 10 Final date to clear all outstanding academic graduation requirements to be eligible for the Fall
2010 Convocation and to clear all financial and other obligations to receive an official award
document.

Friday, September 10 Final date to cancel an Application to Graduate for the Fall 2010 Convocation.

Friday, September 10 Final date to change name to appear on all Fall graduation information (including award document).

Monday, September 13 The Chang School classes commence for Fall 2010. Distance and Saturday classes com-
mence September 11, 2010.

Friday, September 17 Final date to request missing Spring/Summer 2010 undergraduate grades.

Friday, September 17 Final date to appeal Spring/Summer 2010 final undergraduate grades or Academic Standing.

* At the �me of publica�on, tui�on fees for Fall 2010/Winter 2011 were pending approval, and the fee payment policy was under review.

pg 2 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


SIGNIFICANT DATES

Friday, September 17 Final date to add or change undergraduate classes, in Fall 2010 for full- and part-time undergraduate
program students.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Friday, September 17 Final date to withdraw from an undergraduate program and be eligible for the majority of fees
to be refunded. ($400 non-refundable charge for Fall admission or re-admission approvals, full-time
programs; $200 non-refundable charge for Fall admission or re-admission approvals, part-time pro-
grams).

Friday, September 17 Final date to drop an undergraduate class to be eligible for a full refund of fees (if a course drop
results in a lower fee range), for full- and part-time undergraduate program students. Refer to Refund
Schedule in this calendar.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Friday, September 17 Final date to submit a GPA Adjustment request for a Fall 2010 course.

Week of September 27 Course Intention changes for the Winter 2011 term must be completed by October 1.

Friday, October 1 Final date to submit an application for admission or re-admission into an undergraduate full- or part-
time degree program for the Winter 2011 term (for guaranteed consideration).

Friday, October 8 Final date to drop a Fall undergraduate class and be eligible for a 50% refund, if applicable, for full-
and part-time undergraduate program students. A 50% drop charge applies if a class drop results in a
lower fee range. Refer to Refund Schedule in this calendar.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Friday, October 8 Final date to withdraw from an undergraduate program and be eligible for a 50% refund of Fall 2010
fees.

Saturday, October 9 A 100% drop charge applies (no fees refunded) if a Fall class drop results in a lower fee range for full-
and part-time undergraduate program students.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Monday, October 11 Thanksgiving (University closed). Undergraduate Monday classes missed will be made up on Friday,
December 3.

Friday, October 15 Final date to submit an appeal for OSAP funds for any trimester, co-op or other programs with a
December year end.

Tuesday, October 19 and Fall 2010 Convocation.


Wednesday, October 20

Thursday, October 21 Final date to submit an OSAP application to be eligible to receive funding for the current September
to April academic year. Applications submitted after this date will be eligible to receive OSAP funding
from the date the application is received.

Monday, November 1 First date to apply on RAMSS to graduate at the Spring 2011 Convocation.

Friday, November 12 Final date to officially drop a Fall undergraduate term class(es) in good Academic Standing (no refund
of fees). Non-attendance in Fall classes after this date will result in a failing grade for full- and part-
time undergraduate program students.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Friday, November 12 Final date to withdraw from an undergraduate program for the Fall 2010 term in good Academ-
ic Standing (no refund of Fall 2010 fees).

Friday, November 26 Last meeting date for Fall 2010 undergraduate classes scheduled on Fridays.

Friday, November 26 Final date for students to apply for Transfer Credit assessment for the start of the Winter 2011 term.
Applications received after this date will be assessed for the start of the Spring 2011 term.

Friday, December 3 Classes end for full- and part-time undergraduate programs. Note: for full- or part-time program
students accessing classes through The Chang School, some classes may continue until the week of
December 13, 2010.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 3


SIGNIFICANT DATES

Friday, December 3 Classes normally scheduled on Mondays will meet for the last class on this day.

Friday, December 3 Final date to pick up OSAP loan documents with a December year end.

Monday, December 6 to Fall term undergraduate examination period, including Saturday, December 11.
Saturday, December 18

Friday, December 10 Deadline for clearing any Fall 2010 and prior outstanding debt, library book/fine, or other borrowed
property in excess of $10 to ensure that Fall 2010 grades are not withheld.

Week of December 13 The Chang School classes end.

Saturday, December 18 Official end of term for undergraduate programs.

Thursday, December 23 to Mid-Year Break, the University will close at 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, December 22. The University
Sunday, January 2 will re-open at 8 a.m. on Monday January 3, 2011.

WINTER 2011 SIGNIFICANT DATES

Friday, January 7 Final date for payment of undergraduate tuition fees* assessed for the Winter 2011 term.
- full- and part-time undergraduate students;
- part-time undergraduate students accessing classes through The Chang School.

Monday, January 10 Classes commence for full- and part-time undergraduate programs.

Week of January 10 The Chang School classes commence for Winter 2011.

Week of January 10 Winter Carnival activities week; classes to continue as scheduled.

Friday, January 14 Final date to request missing Fall 2010 undergraduate grades.

Friday, January 14 Final date to appeal Fall 2010 final undergraduate and The Chang School grades or Academic Stand-
ing.

Friday, January 21 Final date to add or change undergraduate classes, for the Winter 2011 term for full- and part-time
undergraduate program students.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Friday, January 21 Final date to drop a Winter 2011 undergraduate class to be eligible for a full refund of fees (if a
course drop results in a lower fee range), for full- and part-time undergraduate program students.
Refer to Refund Schedule in this calendar.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Friday, January 21 Final date to withdraw from an undergraduate program and be eligible for a full refund of fees
($100 non-refundable charge for Winter 2011 admission or re-admission approvals).

Friday, January 21 Final date to apply for OSAP for the current September to April academic year. Please note that fund-
ing assistance may be prorated based on when the application is received.

Friday, January 21 Final date to submit a GPA Adjustment request for a Winter 2011 course.

Monday, January 24 Students with outstanding Fall 2010 Fees will be unable to use the “add” or “swap” enrollment func-
tions.

Friday, January 28 Final date to submit any outstanding OSAP supporting documentation.

Tuesday, February 1 Deadline to submit an application for admission, re-admission or re-instatement to a full- or part-time
undergraduate degree program, or as a Special Student for the Spring/Summer 2011 and Fall 2011
terms (for guaranteed consideration).

Friday, February 11 Final date to withdraw from an undergraduate program and be eligible for a 50% refund of
Winter 2011 fees.

* At the �me of publica�on, tui�on fees for Winter 2011 were pending approval, and the fee payment policy was under review.

pg 4 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


SIGNIFICANT DATES

Friday, February 11 Final date to drop a Winter undergraduate class and be eligible for a 50% refund, if applicable, for full-
and part-time undergraduate program students. A 50% drop charge applies if a class drop results in a
lower fee range. Refer to Refund Schedule in this calendar.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Friday, February 11 Final date to officially drop a Winter multi-term (A and B combination) undergraduate class(es) in
good Academic Standing (no refund of Winter 2011 fees). Non-attendance in the Winter (B portion) of
the course(s) after this date will result in a failing grade for full- and part-time undergraduate program
students.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Saturday, February 12 A 100% drop charge applies (no fees refunded) if a Winter class drop results in a lower fee range for
full- and part-time undergraduate program students.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Friday, February 18 Final date to submit a review/appeal for OSAP funds for the current September to April academic
year.

Monday, February 21 Family Day (University closed).

Week of February 21 Study Week for undergraduate students.

Monday, February 28 Final date to apply for graduation on RAMSS for the Spring 2011 Convocation (no late fee). A non-
refundable late fee will apply after this date until March 18.

Week of March 14 Course Intentions for Fall 2011 and Winter 2012.

Friday, March 18 Final date to officially drop a Winter undergraduate term class(es) in good Academic Standing (no re-
fund of fees). Non-attendance in Winter classes after this date will result in a failing grade for full- and
part-time undergraduate program students.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Friday, March 18 Final date to withdraw from an undergraduate program for the Winter 2011 term in good Aca-
demic Standing (no refund of Winter 2011 fees).

Friday, March 18 Final date to apply in person for the Spring 2011 Convocation (with payment of a non-refund-
able late application fee).

Friday, March 25 Final date to change name to appear on all graduation information (including award document).

Monday, April 11 Final date to clear any previous term(s) outstanding grades for Spring 2011 Convocation.

Week of April 11 The Chang School classes end.

Friday, April 15 Final date to pick up OSAP loan documents with an April year end.

Friday, April 15 Final date to submit a Spring Session Only OSAP extension application form.

Friday, April 15 Classes end for full- and part-time undergraduate programs. Note: for full- and part-time program
students accessing classes through The Chang School, classes end the week of April 11.

Monday, April 18 to Sat- Winter term undergraduate examination period, including Saturday, April 23.
urday, April 30

Thursday, April 21 Deadline for clearing any Winter 2011 and prior outstanding debt, library book/fine or other borrowed
property in excess of $10 to ensure that Winter 2011 grades are not withheld.

Friday, April 22 Good Friday (University Closed).

Saturday, April 30 Final date for students admitted Fall 2010 to apply for Transfer Credits.

Saturday, April 30 Official end of term for undergraduate programs.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 5


SIGNIFICANT DATES

SPRING/SUMMER 2011 SIGNIFICANT DATES

Monday, May 2 Classes commence for full- and part-time undergraduate programs and classes offered
through The Chang School.

Friday, May 6 Final date for payment of Spring/Summer 2011 fees*.

Friday, May 6 Final date to withdraw from an undergraduate program and be eligible for a full refund of fees
($200 non-refundable charge for Spring/Summer admission or re-admission approvals).

Friday, May 6 Final date to drop a Spring/Summer undergraduate class that began in May for full- and part-time
undergraduate program students accessing classes through The Chang School, and be eligible for a
full refund of fees (if a class drop results in a lower fee range). Refer to Refund Schedule.
Undergraduate program students, who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees, should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Monday, May 9 Final date to add undergraduate classes, or change classes in Spring/Summer (classes that begin in
May) for full- and part-time undergraduate program students.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Change School class fees should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Monday, May 9 Final date to submit a GPA Adjustment request for a Spring/Summer 2011 course that began in May.

Wednesday, May 11 Final date to clear all outstanding academic graduation requirements to be eligible for the
Spring 2011 Convocation and to clear all financial and other obligations to receive an official
award document.

Wednesday, May 11 Final date to cancel an Application to Graduate for the Spring 2011 Convocation.

Friday, May 13 Final date to drop a Spring/Summer undergraduate class(es) that began in May and be eligible for a
50% refund, if applicable, for full- and part-time undergraduate program students.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees, should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Friday, May 13 Final date to withdraw from an undergraduate program in good Academic Standing and be eligible for
a 50% refund, if applicable.

Monday, May 16 to Friday, Course Intention adjustment period for the Fall 2011 and Winter 2012 terms.
May 27

Friday, May 20 Final date to drop a Spring/Summer undergraduate multi-term (A and B combination) class(es) and
be eligible for a 50% refund if applicable for full- and part-time undergraduate program students.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees, should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Monday, May 23 Victoria Day (University closed).

Friday, May 27 Final date to drop a Spring/Summer undergraduate term class(es) beginning in May in good Academ-
ic Standing (no refund of fees) for full- and part-time undergraduate program students.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees, should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.
Non-attendance in Spring/Summer term classes after this date will result in a failing grade.

Friday, May 27 Final date to request missing Winter 2011 undergraduate grades.

Friday, May 27 Final date to appeal Winter 2011 final undergraduate and The Chang School grades or Academic
Standing.

Wednesday, June 1 First date to apply for graduation on RAMSS for the Fall 2011 Convocation.

Friday, June 3 Final date to submit an OSAP Spring/Summer Session extension application form.

Friday, June 3 Final date to submit an OSAP Summer Session Only extension application form.

Wednesday, June 8 to Spring 2011 Convocation, specific ceremony dates to be announced.


Friday, June 17

* At the �me of publica�on, tui�on fees for Spring/Summer 2011 were pending approval, and the fee payment policy was under review.

pg 6 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


SIGNIFICANT DATES

Week of June 13 Classes end for Spring/Summer undergraduate term classes that began in May (June 20 for Monday/
Wednesday classes) and The Chang School Spring/Summer, Spring session classes.

Week of June 20 Classes commence for full- and part-time undergraduate programs and The Chang School for the
Spring/Summer 2011 term, Summer session.

Week of June 27 Final week to add a Spring/Summer undergraduate class(es), or change class sections for classes
that began in June for full- and part-time undergraduate program students. Undergraduate program
students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed individual Chang School class
fees should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Monday, June 27 Final date to submit a GPA Adjustment request for a Spring/Summer 2011 course that began in June.

Thursday, June 30 Final date to drop a Spring/Summer 2011 undergraduate class that began in June and be eligible for
a full refund of fees (if class drop results in a lower fee range), for full- and part-time undergraduate
program students. Please refer to Refund Schedule in this calendar.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees, should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Friday, July 1 Canada Day (University closed).

Friday, July 8 Final date to drop a Spring/Summer undergraduate term class(es) that began in June and be eligible
for a 50% refund, if applicable for full- and part-time undergraduate program students.
Undergraduate students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed individual Chang
School class fees, should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.

Friday, July 8 Final date to drop a Spring/Summer undergraduate multi-term (A and B combination) class(es) that
began in May in good Academic Standing (no refund of fees) for full- and part-time undergraduate
program students. Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are
assessed individual Chang School class fees, should consult The Chang School website for appropri-
ate deadlines.
Non-attendance in a Spring/Summer class(es) after this date will result in a failing grade.

Friday, July 15 Final date to withdraw from an undergraduate program, in good Academic Standing (no refund of
fees).

Friday, July 15 Final date to drop a Spring/Summer undergraduate term class(es) that began in June in good Aca-
demic Standing (no refund of fees) for full- and part-time undergraduate program students.
Undergraduate program students who enroll in The Chang School classes and are assessed indi-
vidual Chang School class fees, should consult The Chang School website for appropriate deadlines.
Non-attendance in a Spring/Summer class(es) after this date will result in a failing grade.

Monday, August 1 Civic Holiday (University closed).

Week of August 8 Classes end for Spring/Summer undergraduate term classes that began in June, and Spring/Summer
multi-term (A and B combination) classes that began in May (consult The Chang School website for
appropriate deadlines).

IMPORTANT NOTE: Full- and Part-time undergraduate program students accessing classes through The Chang School
must consult The Chang School website, www.ryerson.ca/ce for applicable dates and deadlines.
Detailed information on policies and procedures regarding the above dates appears throughout this calendar.
Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Science (FEAS) Transition Program dates differ. Please refer to
www.feas.ryerson.ca for applicable dates.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 7


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BUILDING CODE, NAME, STREET ADDRESS


AMC Toronto Life Square, 10 Dundas Street East PRO Projects Office, 112 Bond Street
ARC Architecture Building, 325 Church Street RAC Recreation and Athletics Centre, entrance through archway at 40 and
BKS Bookstore, 17 Gould Street 50 Gould Street
CED Heaslip House, The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education, RCC Rogers Communications Centre, 80 Gould Street
297 Victoria Street SBB South Bond Building, 105 Bond Street
COP Co-operative Education and Internship, 101 Gerrard Street East SCC Student Campus Centre, 55 Gould Street
CPF Campus Planning and Facilities, 111 Bond Street SHE Sally Horsfall Eaton Centre for Studies in Community Health,
ENG George Vari Engineering and Computing Centre, 245 Church Street 99 Gerrard Street East
EPH Eric Palin Hall, 87 Gerrard Street East SID School of Interior Design, 302 Church Street
GER Research/Graduate Studies, 111 Gerrard Street East THR Theatre School, 44/46 Gerrard Street East
HEI HEIDELBERG Centre – School of Graphic Communications Management, TRS Ted Rogers School of Management – 575 Bay Street (entrance at
125 Bond Street 55 Dundas Street West)
ILC International Living/Learning Centre, entrances at 133 Mutual Street VIC Victoria Building, 285 Victoria Street (temporary home of the School of Image Arts)
and 240 Jarvis Street YDI Yonge-Dundas I, 1 Dundas Street West
IMA School of Image Arts, 122 Bond Street (building closed for renovations; see VIC) YNG 415 Yonge Street
JOR Jorgenson Hall, 380 Victoria Street
KHE Kerr Hall East, 340 Church Street/60 Gould Street
KHN Kerr Hall North, 31/43 Gerrard Street East
KHS Kerr Hall South, 40/50 Gould Street TTC Streetcar stop
KHW Kerr Hall West, 379 Victoria Street
TTC Subway stop
LIB Library Building, 350 Victoria Street
MON Civil Engineering Building, 341 Church Street P Parking
OAK Oakham House, 63 Gould Street
Security
OKF O’Keefe House, 137 Bond Street
PIT Pitman Hall, 160 Mutual Street Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment
PKG Parking Garage, 300 Victoria Street Welcome and Student Information Centre
POD Podium, 350 Victoria Street (area connecting Jorgenson Hall to the
Direct underground access from the Ted Rogers School
Library Building) of Management to the Dundas Subway
Programs, Departments and Centres, Programs, Departments and Centres, Programs, Departments and Centres,
Building Code, Room Number Building Code, Room Number Building Code, Room Number
Aboriginal Services for Students – KHW 389 Duplicating and Printing – POD 52 and SBB (main floor) Interuniversity Sports – KHW 274B
Access Centre for Students with Disabilities – POD 61 Early Childhood Education – KHS 354 Journalism – RCC 141
Access Centre – Test Exam Centre – VIC B21 Early Childhood Education – Early Learning Centre – Learning and Teaching, Office of – KHW 373
Admissions and Student Recruitment – KHW 158 Learning Success Centre – VIC B15
Undergraduate – POD 144 Early Childhood Education – Infant Toddler Centre – Library Entrance (second floor) – LIB 268
Aerospace Engineering – ENG 170 KHW 167 Mail Room – SBB (main floor)
Architectural Science – ARC 203 Economics – JOR 232 Mathematics and its Applications – ENG 220
Arts and Contemporary Studies – JOR 120 Electrical Engineering – ENG 478 Mechanical Engineering – EPH 300
Associate Vice-President, University Planning – JOR 1219 English – JOR 10th Floor Medical Physics – KHS 332A
Athletics and Recreation – RAC 112-B English Language Support –VIC B17 Midwifery – SHE 582
Biology – KHN 212 Enrollment Services and Student Records Nurse Practitioner Program – YNG 1604
Biomedical Engineering – ENG 478 (lower ground floor) – POD 70 Nursing – POD 481
Boardroom – JOR 1410 Experiential Learning Office – SHE 671 Nutrition and Food – KHS 349
Bookstore – BKS and SBB (main floor) Facilities Rental – KHW 185 Oakham House – OAK
Business Management – TRS 1-015A Fashion – KHS 159D Occupational and Public Health – POD 249
Business Technology Management – TRS 2-004 Financial Services – YDI 9th Floor Office of Digital Media Projects (basement) – LIB B99
CESAR Office – SCC First Year and Campus Life – POD 59 Office of Research Services – YDI 11th Floor
CKLN-FM – SCC First Year and Common Engineering Office – ENG 377 Office of University Advancement – YNG 900
Campus Equity, Harassment and Safety Services – First Year and Common Science Office – KHE 124 O’Keefe House (student residence) – OKF
POD 254A Food Services – POD 250A Ombudsperson – OAK 215-216
Campus Parking – JOR 1110 Food Services – The Hub – POD 150 Performance Acting/Dance/Production – THR 103
Campus Planning and Facilities – CPF Food Services – Pitman Hall Cafeteria – PIT 113 Philosophy and Music – JOR 400
Career Development and Employment Centre – POD 60 French and Spanish – JOR 500 Physics – KHE 332
Cashier’s Office (lower ground floor) – POD 66 Gateway for International Professionals Programs, Pitman Hall (student residence) – PIT
Centre for Learning Technologies – TRS 3-174 The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Politics and Governance – JOR 733
Centre for Student Development and Counselling – Education: International Accounting and Finance Politics and Public Administration – JOR 735
JOR 07C Professionals (IAFP) Program; Internationally President’s Office – JOR 1306
Centre for the Study of Commercial Activity (CSCA) – Educated Dietitians Pre-registration Program Prime Time Learning, The G. Raymond Chang School of
TRS 3-183 (IDPP); International Midwifery Pre-registration Continuing Education – CED 306
Chancellor’s Office – JOR 1309 Program (IMPP); Internationally Educated Social Professional Communication – RCC 360M
The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education Work Professionals (IESW) Program; Professional Provost and Vice-President, Academic – JOR 1316
Administrative Offices – CED Communication for Employment (PCE) Program; Psychology – JOR 800
Chemical Engineering Co-operative– KHS 241D Talent Development for Organizational Radio and Television – RCC 104
Chemistry – KHN 212 Effectiveness (TDOE) Program – VIC 6th Floor Receiving/Shipping/Mail Room – SBB (main floor)
Child and Youth Care – SHE 641 General Counsel and Secretary of the Board of Recreation and Athletics Centre (RAC) (under Quad) – RAC
Civil Engineering – MON 221 Governors – JOR 1225 Registrar – JOR 1202
The Commons – POD 250 Geographic Analysis/Geography – JOR 633 Retail Management – TRS 3-035
Computer Engineering – ENG 478 Graduate Studies – YDI 11th Floor Ryerson Medical Centre – KHW 181
Computer Science – ENG 207 Graphic Communications Management – HEI Ryerson OneCard Office – JOR 02
Computer Science Dept. – ENG 287 Gymnasium – KHW 271 Ryerson Students’ Union (RSU) – SCC
Computing and Communications Services – POD B99 Health Information Management – SHE 569 Ryerson Theatre – KHN 162
Computing Centre (student terminal room) – KHW 71 Health Promotion – JOR 05A Secretary of Senate – JOR 1226
Conference Services – ILC 101 Health Services Management – SHE 574 Security and Emergency Services (111 Bond Street) – CPF
Contemporary Science – KHE 124 History – JOR 500 Services for Students/Student Community Life – POD 61
Continuing Education Students’ Association of Ryerson Hospitality and Tourism Management – TRS 3-002 Social Work – EPH 200
(CESAR) – SCC Human Resources – JOR 901 Sociology – JOR 300
Convocation and Awards Office – KHS 47 Image Arts – KHS 46A Student Fees (lower ground floor) – POD 66
Co-operative Education and Internship – COP 108 Industrial Engineering – EPH 300 Student Financial Assistance – POD 59
Criminal Justice and Criminology – JOR 600 Information (Welcome and Student Information Centre) Student Housing – PIT 100
Curriculum Advising – POD 355 – POD 144 Tri-Mentoring Program – POD 54
Dean of Arts – JOR 110 Information Technology Studies, The G. Raymond Chang University Planning Office – JOR 1218
Dean of Communication & Design – RCC 320 School of Continuing Education – VIC 4th Floor University Scheduling – YNG 1801
Dean of Community Services – SHE 694 Interior Design – SID 107 Urban and Regional Planning – SBB 489
Dean of Engineering, Architecture and Science – ENG 359 International Affairs – YDI 11th Floor Used Book Room – SCC
Dean of Ted Rogers School of Management – TRS 3-009 International Cafe – ILC 108 Vice-President, Administration and Finance – JOR 1314
Dean of The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing International Economics and Finance – JOR 200 Vice-President, Research and Innovation –
Education – CED 611 Internationally-Educated Engineers Qualification YDI 11th Floor
Disability Studies – SHE 568 Bridging Program (IEEQB) – ENG 346 Vice-President, University Advancement – JOR 1311
Discrimination and Harassment Prevention Services – International Living/Learning Centre (student Vice-Provost, Faculty Affairs – JOR 1211
POD 254A residence) – ILC Vice-Provost, Students – JOR 1231
Distance Education Programs, The G. Raymond Chang International Services for Students – POD 61 Video Post Production Facility – RCC 230
School of Continuing Education – CED 606 The Writing Centre – LIB 272B
AN INTRODUCTION TO RYERSON UNIVERSITY

RYERSON UNIVERSITY MISSION seven programs at the Doctorate level. More than 2,000
students are enrolled in The School of Graduate Stud-
The special mission of Ryerson University is the ad- ies, established in 2000. More information on Ryerson’s
vancement of applied knowledge and research to ad- graduate programs can be found at www.ryerson.ca/
dress societal need, and the provision of programs of graduate.
study that provide a balance between theory and applica-
The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education
tion and that prepare students for careers in professional
provides opportunities for adult learners to explore new
and quasi-professional fields.
career paths or upgrade professional skills through part-
As a leading centre for applied education, Ryerson is rec- time study. Programs are designed to empower students
ognized for the excellence of its teaching, the relevance to reach their personal and professional goals. The
of its curriculum, the success of its students in achieving Chang School’s 72 career-related certificate programs,
their academic and career objectives, the quality of its numerous course series, 1,100+ courses, seminars,
scholarship, research and creative activity and its com- and workshops, and specialized bridging programs for
mitment to accessibility, lifelong learning, and involve- internationally educated professionals are developed with
ment in the broader community. the same rigour as all Ryerson courses. Instruction is
grounded in practical experience. More than 85 percent
AN INTRODUCTION TO RYERSON of Chang School instructors are currently employed in
their teaching fields. For more information, visit
UNIVERSITY www.ryerson.ca/ce.
Ryerson University is Canada’s leader in career-focused Degree credit courses from other universities may be
education, with close to 90 undergraduate and graduate used for advanced standing in many of Ryerson’s full-
programs in the Faculties of Arts, Communication & De- and part-time degree programs, while The Chang School
sign, Community Services, Engineering, Architecture and certificate programs allow students the opportunity to
Science, and the Ted Rogers School of Management. specialize in a field of study.
Founded in 1948, Ryerson has graduate and undergrad-
Ryerson University’s commitment to delivering a high
uate enrollments of 25,000 students. With over 65,000
quality, relevant, career-focused education is the founda-
registrations annually, The G. Raymond Chang School
tion for the success of Ryerson’s more than 125,000
of Continuing Education is Canada’s leading provider of
alumni.
university-based adult education.
Throughout its history, Ryerson has maintained its RYERSON UNIVERSITY PROFESSIONAL
commitment to provide a high quality of professionally
relevant education - an approach that combines the ACCREDITATIONS
traditional university focus on theory with unparalleled
Professional accreditation is a means of testing and
career-oriented emphasis on professional practice.
evaluating undergraduate educational programs and
Ryerson offers a variety of undergraduate programs recognizing those that meet the required standards in
and degrees, including Bachelors of: Applied Science preparing graduates for professional practice. Because
(BASc), Architectural Science (BArchSci), Arts (BA), its mandate is the provision of applied professional
Commerce (BComm), Design (BDes), Engineering education, over the past decade the University has given
(BEng), Fine Arts (BFA), Health Administration (BHA), priority to obtaining accreditation of its programs wher-
Health Sciences (BHSc), Interior Design (BID), Jour- ever applicable. As a result, accrediting bodies provide
nalism (BJourn), Science (BSc), Science in Nursing input to the development of curriculum in a number of
(BScN), Social Work (BSW), Technology (BTech), Ryerson programs.
and Urban and Regional Planning (BURPl). Full- and
The Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Science
part-time undergraduate degree programs are available
at Ryerson University currently offers seven accred-
within these areas, many of which offer Majors/Options
ited engineering programs. The baccalaureate degree
within the individual program with the option of a Minor in
programs in Aerospace, Chemical, Civil, Computer,
several areas.
Electrical, Industrial, and Mechanical Engineering are
Ryerson’s curriculum presents a unique mix of career-fo- accredited by the Canadian Engineering Accreditation
cused, professionally related and liberal studies courses, Board of the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers
which equip graduates to succeed in their chosen field. (CEAB). Like graduates from other accredited engi-
Lecture material is translated into practice through co-op- neering programs, Ryerson students must acquire four
erative education and internship options, laboratory work, years of relevant experience and successfully complete
field trips, off-campus project work, and regular contact the professional practice and ethics examination of the
with business and industry. Liberal studies courses Professional Engineers of Ontario (PEO) before they can
enhance students’ capacity to understand the social obtain a license. Access to graduate school is enhanced
and cultural environment in which they will function, as with the accreditation.
professionals and as educated citizens.
The Ryerson program in architecture has been granted
Graduates may opt to continue their education through candidacy status by the Canadian Architectural Certifica-
one of Ryerson’s 41 graduate programs, which include tion Board (CACB).

pg 10 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


AN INTRODUCTION TO RYERSON UNIVERSITY

In Canada, all provincial architecture associations recom- The School of Social Work’s baccalaureate degree
mend a degree from an accredited professional degree program is accredited by the Canadian Association of
program as a prerequisite for licensure. The Canadian Schools of Social Work. Graduates and students are
Architectural Certification Board (CACB), which is the eligible for membership in the Ontario Association of
sole agency authorized to accredit Canadian Profession- Social Workers. Graduates are eligible for membership in
al degree programs in architecture, recognizes two types the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service
of accredited degrees: The Bachelor of Architecture and Workers. Graduates are also eligible to apply to post-
the Master of Architecture. A program may be granted BSW, Master’s in Social Work programs across Canada.
a six-year, three-year, or two-year term of accreditation, To receive membership in the Ontario College of Certi-
depending on its degree of conformance with established fied Social Workers, graduates must acquire two years
education standards. of relevant work experience and successfully complete
an examination. Graduates are eligible to apply to one-
Master’s degrees may consist of a pre-professional un-
year, post-BSW, Master of Social Work programs across
dergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree,
Canada.
which, when earned sequentially, comprise an accredited
professional education in architecture. However, the The School of Urban and Regional Planning’s four- and
Bachelor of Architectural Science, Ryerson’s pre-profes- two-year degree programs are one of only six under-
sional degree, is not, by itself, recognized as an accred- graduate programs in Canada recognized by the Cana-
ited degree. The CACB grants candidacy status to new dian Institute of Planners (CIP). The accreditation means
programs that have developed viable plans for achieving graduates have a shorter time frame required in becom-
initial accreditation. Candidacy status indicates that a ing full members. The CIP is the recognized body for pro-
program should be accredited within six years of achiev- fessional planners in Canada. These programs are also
ing candidacy, if its plan is properly implemented. accredited by the Ontario Professional Planners Institute.
In December 2006, the Association of University Pro-
grams in Health Administration (AUPHA) renewed the full REGISTRAR’S NOTICE OF COLLECTION
certification of the School of Health Services Manage- AND USE OF PERSONAL INFORMATION
ment, originally granted September 2001. The Certifica-
tion was unconditional and extends for a period of five Prospec�ve Students and Applicants
years. The School of Health Services Management is
Ryerson University’s Graduate Admissions Office and
the first Canadian undergraduate program to be formally
Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment Office
recognized by the AUPHA.
collect information under the authority of the Ryerson
In 2003, the Ted Rogers School of Hospitality and Tour- University Act from application forms, request cards, web
ism Management received accreditation from the Institute forms, portals, in-person during advising or information
of Hospitality, an international organization that promotes sessions, online event enrollment, by telephone, volun-
the highest professional standards of management and tary surveys, secondary and post-secondary transcripts,
education in the hospitality industry. as well as other including, but not limited to, essays,
The School of Interior Design offers one of only two uni- letters of reference, report cards, transcripts, portfolios
versity degree programs in Canada accredited by (CIDA) and collections of work for the purposes of recruitment,
Council for Interior Design Accreditation, the recognized admissions, enrollment and other fundamental a ctivi-
accrediting body in North America for interior design ties related to being a member of the Ryerson University
schools. Accreditation of the four-year program ensures community and to attending a post-secondary institu-
that the quality of education is maintained at a high level. tion in the Province of Ontario, including but not limited
to determining scholarships, entrance award decisions,
The Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing has maintained facilitating housing accommodations, university advance-
its accreditation status with the Canadian Association of ment purposes and providing applicants with mentoring
Schools of Nursing since 1993. Successful accreditation and other student services prior to applicants’ enrollment
signifies that the School has achieved a recognized level at Ryerson University, and other purposes consistent
of ‘excellence’ based on national standards. with Ryerson’s educational mission.
The School of Nutrition offers a baccalaureate degree Once approved and enrolled in a Ryerson University pro-
program in Nutrition and Food. The program is accred- gram, information submitted will form part of the student
ited by Dietitians of Canada (DC). Eligible graduates of permanent record at Ryerson and the following notice of
DC accredited programs are required to complete a one- collection for current students, will apply:
year internship or an accredited Master’s degree prior to
becoming members of a provincial college of dietitians. When Informa�on will be Disclosed
The School of Occupational and Public Health has Information collected from prospective students and
remained the leader in undergraduate education for applicants may be shared with the following entities to
Canadian public health since 1960. It continues to meet facilitate recruitment, admissions, resolution of appeals,
unconditionally all the requirements of the Canadian In- enrollment, entrance scholarships and awards, and other
stitute of Public Health Inspectors, the national body that fundamental activities as outlined above:
approves such programs.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 11


AN INTRODUCTION TO RYERSON UNIVERSITY

• Ryerson University personnel in the performance of Student Confiden�ality


their duties or services including, but not limited to, Ryerson University policies as well as the Freedom of
personnel/departments such as: Residence/Housing, Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) permit
University Ombudsperson’s Office, Access Centre, communication pertaining to an applicant’s record/ap-
Faculty Deans, academic program department admin- plication, only with the individual student, unless Ryer-
istrators including program chairs/directors and poten- son has received written permission from the student
tial graduate supervisors, University Planning, Student to discuss their application with an identified third party
Services, Athletics/Coaches, Enrollment Services and (not previously identified under “When Information will be
Student Records, Curriculum Advising, Scholarship Disclosed”, above).
committees, the Library and University Advancement;
• Secondary school officials (e.g., Secondary School Please note that in the course of applying to Ryerson
Principals, Guidance Counsellors, Teachers); University through the Ontario Universities’ Application
• Universities, colleges and other institutions or govern- Centre (OUAC), students will receive additional informa-
ment offices to verify any information provided as part tion about how their personal information will be col-
of an application for admission (including declaration lected, used, disclosed and otherwise treated.
of citizenship and status in Canada, referees);
• Universities and colleges to share incidences of falsi- Current Students
fied documents or credentials or to share incidences The information submitted is used for the purpose of
of incomplete/fraudulent applications for admission; creating or maintaining a student’s academic record. The
• Collaborative program partners (e.g., George Brown information will be used to support decisions relating
College and Centennial College for the Nursing Col- to course and/or certificate enrollment, transfer credit
laborative program, York University for the Communi- (including Letters of Permission and Challenge Credits),
cation and Culture program); tuition fees assessment, determining eligibility for and
• Service providers contracted by Ryerson University access to financial aid programs, scholarships, bursaries,
in support of Ryerson University enrollment manage- awards, including but not limited to, monetary and non-
ment objectives (e.g., specialized systems and sup- monetary student recognition awards and other forms of
port, research, support for business processes). student support.
• Other kinds of disclosures, including, but not limited
to, law enforcement agencies, in compassionate In choosing to pursue a post-secondary education, stu-
circumstances, in compelling circumstances affecting dents accept the University’s right to collect and evalu-
the health or safety of an individual are in compliance ate records of their academic performance. At the same
with Section 42 of the Freedom of Information and time, the student’s right to privacy requires that such
Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). information be used and stored in a manner consistent
with the confidential nature of the information involved.
Documenta�on
The Graduate Admissions and Undergraduate Admis- The University may exercise its discretion to share
sions Office works closely with Ryerson University students’ contact information with collection agencies in
program department administrators in the determina- the event of overdue financial accounts; all such collec-
tion of admissions decisions and many programs will tion agencies are under contract with the University and
require and assess non-academic criteria of prospective are aware of their legal obligations to protect students’
students as part of the competitive selection process. personal information.
Subject to applicable laws, applicants are advised that Students’ contact information is shared with their respec-
documentation pertaining to the scoring, competitive tive student union to enable them to, for example, obtain
ranking, or in the opinions of assessing program depart- health and dental insurance on students’ behalf, to create
ments, faculty, and staff, may not be released to the voters’ lists for student elections, and to provide other
applicant. Reference letters from teachers, counsellors, services as they see fit.
principals, employers and other referees, will not be
shared with an applicant without the written permission of The University will confirm whether a student has gradu-
the referee. ated, the date of graduation and the name of certificate,
diploma or degree obtained.
Documents and other submissions that are provided by
applicants become the property of Ryerson University Students should be aware that aggregated student
and will not be returned. Material submitted by students academic data (grades and Academic Standings, for
who are admitted and then enroll in a Ryerson University example) are occasionally used for statistical, audit
program will either be retained for a minimum period of and research purposes, and for development purposes
one year, or will form part of their permanent student intended to improve university education. Other kinds of
record. Material submitted by students who are not ad- disclosures, including, but not limited to, law enforcement
mitted, will be retained for a minimum period of one year agencies, in compassionate circumstances, in compel-
following the application, and then such material will be ling circumstances affecting the health or safety of an
destroyed. individual, and upon graduation to University Advance-
ment, are in compliance with Section 42 of the Freedom
of Information and Protection of Privacy Acts (FIPPA).

pg 12 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


AN INTRODUCTION TO RYERSON UNIVERSITY / ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

In other circumstances not covered by this notice, no per- ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND
sonally identifiable data, except that which is provided for
by law, is released without the express written consent of
POLICIES
the student. General Admission Requirements .............................. 13
No�fica�on to Current Students of Disclosure of Application Procedures ............................................... 14
Personal Informa�on to Sta�s�cs Canada Step 1-How to Apply ................................................... 14
Statistics Canada is the national statistical agency, which
carries out hundreds of surveys each year on a wide Step 2-Submission of Documents............................... 15
range of matters, including education. It is essential to Methods of Submission ............................................... 16
be able to follow students across time and institutions to
Application/Selection Information ............................... 16
understand, for example, the factors affecting enrollment
demand at post-secondary institutions. The increased Admission Decisions ................................................... 17
emphasis on accountability for public investment means Equivalent Standing Guidelines .................................. 18
that it is also important to understand outcomes.
English Language ....................................................... 23
In order to carry out such studies, Statistics Canada
required all colleges and universities to provide data on Mature Students .......................................................... 23
students and graduates. Institutions collect and provide Special Students ......................................................... 24
to Statistics Canada, student identification information
(student’s name, student ID number), student contact Auditor Students .......................................................... 24
information (address and telephone number), student Information about Engineering .................................... 24
demographic characteristics, enrollment information,
Admission from Other Post-Secondary Institutions .... 25
previous education, and labour activity.
Admission with Advanced Standing ............................ 25
Canada’s Statistics Act provides the legal authority for
Statistics Canada to obtain access to personal informa- Advanced Standing and Ryerson Engineering
tion held by educational institutions. The information may Programs ..................................................................... 26
be used only for statistical purposes and the confidential-
Ryerson Students Wishing to Transfer to Another
ity provisions of the Statistics Act prevent the informa-
Ryerson Program ..................................................... 26
tion from being released in any way that would identify a
student. Ryerson Students Seeking Re-Admission to a
Ryerson Program ..................................................... 26
Students who do not wish to have their information used
may ask Statistics Canada to remove their identification ‘Required to Withdraw’ Students Seeking
and contact information from the national database. Re-Instatement......................................................... 27

Further information on the use of this information can be Application Dates ........................................................ 27
obtained from Statistics Canada’s website www.statcan.
gc.ca, or by writing to the Post-secondary Section, GENERAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Centre for Education Statistics, 17th floor, R. H. Coats
The basis of admission to Ryerson’s undergraduate de-
Building, Holland Avenue, Ottawa, ON, K1A OT6.
gree programs is the Ontario Secondary School Diploma
Questions about the collection, use and disclosure of (OSSD), with six (6) Grade 12U/M courses including
student information by the University, should be directed Grade 12 U English (one of ENG4U, ETS4U, EWC4U) or
to the Secretary to the University Registrar, Office of the Anglais (one of EAE4U, EALAU, EAC4U) (unless other-
Registrar, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, To- wise noted), plus program specific prerequisite courses.
ronto, Ontario, M5B 2K3, or by phone at 416-979-5100.
Applicants not educated in Ontario may present the
equivalent of the OSSD requirements. Canadian pro-
vincial equivalents are available for reference at
www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/overview.
International country equivalents are published at
www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/international.
Note: equivalencies are determined by Ryerson at its
sole discretion.
The OSSD with a minimum overall average of 70
percent* in six Grade 12 U/M courses, or equivalent,
establishes eligibility for admission; subject to competi-
tion, individual Ryerson programs may establish higher
academic averages. All Ryerson programs also stipulate
specific subject prerequisites. Grades required for admis-
sion are determined on the basis of competition.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 13


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

Programs may also specify non-academic require- APPLICATION PROCEDURES


ments for admission (e.g. portfolio, admission essay,
interview, audition, etc.). These programs are referred to Ryerson is a member of the Ontario Universities’ Ap-
plication Centre (OUAC). 170 Research Lane, Guelph,
as Grades-Plus programs. The specific non-academic
Ontario, Canada N1G 5E2 www.ouac.on.ca
requirements for individual Grades-Plus programs,
including specific submission dates and procedures, are If you are planning to apply to Ryerson, you must do so
available by visiting each Academic Program link at through the OUAC.
www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/programs. The following applicants may use the Ryerson Online
Note: for Grades-Plus programs, both academic and Application form available at www.ryerson.ca/
non-academic criteria will be used in the admission undergraduate/admission/apply/forms (unless noted
selection process. otherwise below):
An applicant’s complete academic record, including sec- • a current or former Ryerson student (this includes stu-
ondary school as well as all post-secondary studies (e.g. dents enrolled in continuing education courses) from
college, university, or other post-secondary institutions) Fall 1984 to present;
will be reviewed and considered as part of the competi- • an applicant applying to a part-time degree program,
tive selection process. If applicable, applicants may with the exception of applicants who are applying both
wish to provide context for their academic achievement to a part-time degree at Ryerson, and to one or more
in their Supplementary Form (see How to Apply). The other full-time program(s) at Ryerson or at another
Supplementary Form is available at www.ryerson.ca/ university and, applicants applying to the Midwifery
undergraduate/admission/apply/forms. program. These applicants must apply through the
OUAC.
Applicants are encouraged to achieve as much breadth
• seeking Special Student status.
of preparation as possible in the course of their stud-
ies while also meeting the stated subject prerequisite
requirements of the program(s) to which they intend to STEP 1–HOW TO APPLY
apply.
Ontario Secondary School Students in their Senior Year
* Ryerson receives more applica�ons than spaces available. The Students in Ontario secondary schools apply using the
averages/grades required for admission selec�on to each program is
determined on the basis of compe��on each year. Possession of mini-
OUAC 101 application, available online at www.ouac.
mum averages and/or grades does not guarantee admission. on.ca/101. For assistance, visit your secondary school
guidance office in the Fall for details. A $115 base ap-
Addi�onal Academic Requirement Notes for Graduates plication fee (subject to change) must accompany the
of the Current Ontario Secondary School Curriculum completed application.
The length of time taken by an applicant to complete
Part-�me Program only Applicants
the OSSD will not be a determining factor in admission
decisions. The ‘out of school’ component of Grade 12 If you are applying to a Ryerson part-time program only
(with the exception of Midwifery, please see below),
U/M co-op courses or equivalent is not accepted for
you should apply using the Ryerson Online Application
admission purposes nor is it accepted in the evaluation of
Form available at: www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/
entrance scholarships.
admission/apply/forms. The current Ryerson application
Ryerson permits the mixing of U, M and OAC courses fee is $80 (subject to change).
(for those students who graduated or completed courses
in the pre-2003 Ontario secondary school curriculum), as All other Full- and Part-Time Degree Program Applicants
applicable. If you are applying to a Ryerson part-time degree pro-
gram and/or to a full-time program at Ryerson or any
For current Ontario secondary school applicants, Ryerson other Ontario University or if you are applying to the Mid-
may use Grade 11 results in the early admission selec- wifery program and you are a previous OSSD graduate,
tion process. mature, transfer, or out-of-province applicant, apply using
The above general admission guidelines apply to all the OUAC 105 application form available online at
undergraduate programs and all applicants. Any excep- www.ouac.on.ca/105.
tions are noted on individual program pages. In addition, The OUAC base application fee is $120 plus $80 for
it is strongly recommended that applicants refer to the the Ryerson Supplementary fee. Fees are subject to
Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment website at change. Applicants must submit a completed Supple-
www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission for up-to-date mentary form to Undergraduate Admissions and Recruit-
information. ment at Ryerson. Applications will not be reviewed
until the Supplementary form is received. Supple-
Please Note: These are minimum requirements mentary forms are available online at www.ryerson.ca/
only and are subject to change. Admission is not undergraduate/admission/apply/forms.
guaranteed.

pg 14 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

Interna�onal Students As Ryerson will communicate to candidates via e-


International students who are not attending an Ontario mail, e-mail addresses must be kept current. Appli-
Secondary School apply using an OUAC 105 applica- cants should ensure that they have edited/updated
tion available online at www.ouac.on.ca/105. Application their ‘spam’ filters to prevent important and time-
procedures are provided with the application form. The sensitive e-mail communications from being filtered
OUAC base application fee is $120 plus a surcharge of out as spam.
$10 if the mailing address is outside of Canada (subject NOTE: Changes (e.g. to application/amendments/
to change) (Canadian funds). An $80 (subject to change) condition extensions, etc.) may not be made ver-
Supplemental/Document Evaluation Fee is also required. bally, either in person or by telephone. Most commu-
A completed Supplementary Application form (available nication from Ryerson is date sensitive. Applicants
at www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/apply/ who fail to respond within stated time frames may
forms) must be sent directly to Undergraduate Admis- have their application or Offer of Admission can-
sions and Recruitment at Ryerson. Applications will not celled.
be reviewed until the fee and Supplementary form is
received. STEP 2–SUBMISSION OF DOCUMENTS

Current/Previous Ryerson Students from Fall 1984 to It is the responsibility of all applicants to ensure that all
Present (including students taking con�nuing educa- required documents are received by Undergraduate
�on courses), Candidates Applying to a Part-�me Admissions and Recruitment at the time of application.
Degree Program or Candidates Seeking Special Student Applications are not considered complete until the follow-
Status: ing are received:
Previous or current Ryerson students from Fall 1984 to • Officially certified academic transcripts including pro-
present (including students taking continuing education motion/graduation status of the applicant’s complete
courses), applicants to part-time degree programs (ex- educational background (secondary and all post-
cept Midwifery) and candidates seeking Special Student secondary studies). Transcripts must be submitted
status do not apply through the OUAC unless they regardless if the program of study was successfully
wish to be considered for admission to another Ontario completed.
university. Applicants must apply using the Ryerson • A Ryerson Supplementary form (OUAC 101 appli-
Online Application Form available at: www.ryerson.ca/ cants are not required to submit this form).
undergraduate/admission/apply/forms. The current
• Non-academic admission materials (i.e. portfolios,
Ryerson application fee is $80 (subject to change).
essays, etc.) as applicable (see Application/Selection
All applicants note: Information)
• Before completing either the OUAC 101, 105 or • English language proficiency test scores as required
Ryerson Online Application, the application instruc- (see www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/
tions should be read carefully. The program code(s) overview/english).
that describe most accurately the program(s) chosen Transcripts must show the individual marks or grades
should be selected and are available with each online achieved in each course or subject taken. Students must
application. have successfully completed a minimum of one full sec-
• Applicants may review and change their completed ondary school course at the required level, or equivalent,
application once it has been submitted. If any revi- in each of the subject prerequisites listed for the pro-
sions to the OUAC application are made, Ryerson grams for which they wish to be considered. Additional
will be notified of the applicable changes shortly after information regarding documents and official transcripts
the submission to the OUAC. Although all changes can be found at www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/
are important to the processing of each application, admission/apply.
changes to program choice, surname, mailing, e-mail If applying for advanced standing admission (a level
and home addresses are of significant importance higher than first year/semester), course descriptions and
and should be reported to the OUAC as soon as the teaching outlines of all post-secondary studies are gener-
situation arises. ally not required at the time of application for admission
• Applicants who have applied via the Ryerson Online (if this information is needed, a request will be forwarded
Application must notify Undergraduate Admissions to you by Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment).
and Recruitment of any changes in application, Course/teaching outlines may be required after admis-
address, e-mail, telephone numbers and/or other sion has been granted when you are applying for transfer
information as soon as they arise using the Ryerson credit. Course/teaching outlines are not kept once a
Change Form. transfer credit decision is made. Students are encour-
For applicants that have applied to Ryerson in a pre- aged to keep a copy of all course/teaching outlines
vious academic year: If the name on the application for their records.
has changed in any way, proof of this name change
(i.e. marriage certificate, notarized statement or NOTE: Transcripts and all other supporting docu-
other legal document) must be provided. mentation submitted to Ryerson cannot be returned
to the applicant.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 15


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

All statements on the application must be correct and 6. Applicants who have indicated on their applica-
complete. Applicants withholding, misrepresenting or fail- tion that they are in Canada on a ‘Study Permit’ or
ing to provide information are liable to have their applica- ‘Temporary Resident Visa’ must submit a copy of
tion/enrollment cancelled. The disclosure or discovery their Visa authorization form or ‘immigration papers’
of previously withheld or not-submitted transcripts/docu- confirming this status.
mentation will cause immediate cancellation of admission
7. All documents are routinely verified. Evidence of
and application. Disclosure or discovery arising after
falsified documents during or after the admission
course enrollment, registration or at any time as a current
selection process will result in the cancellation of an
student is considered Academic Misconduct (see www.
offer of admission and any/all courses enrolled in
ryerson.ca/senate/policies/pol60.pdf). The penalty aris-
will be dropped. Information on falsified documents
ing from non-disclosure is de-enrollment and cancellation
is shared with member and affiliated institutions
of admitted status regardless of academic progression at
of the Association of Universities and Colleges of
Ryerson.
Canada (AUCC).
NOTES:
METHODS OF SUBMISSION
1. Grades for current Ontario secondary school stu-
dents will be submitted to the OUAC by their Guid- Officially certified academic transcripts including promo-
ance Office. However, if students apply after June 1, tion/graduation status and any supporting documents are
it is their responsibility to forward officially certified to be provided to Ryerson University, Undergraduate Ad-
transcripts/grades directly to Undergraduate Admis- missions and Recruitment, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto,
sions and Recruitment at Ryerson and the OUAC. It Ontario, Canada M5B 2K3.
is also their responsibility to ensure that their Guid- • Arrange to have one set of officially certified academic
ance Office, the OUAC, and that Undergraduate transcripts submitted directly by the issuing school
Admissions and Recruitment at Ryerson are notified and/or agency to Undergraduate Admissions and
of any plans to upgrade/complete course(s) through Recruitment.
night school, summer school, e-school or corre-
• Make all the necessary arrangements for submission
spondence studies; and receive final grades for the
of required transcripts at the time of application to en-
course(s). (See Application/Selection Information
sure documents are received by applicable deadlines.
section).
• Applicants who are attending or have previously at-
2. Transcripts from Ontario universities and some Col- tended an Ontario university or college can request
leges of Applied Arts and Technology (CAATs) can transcripts via the Ontario Universities’ Application
be requested and received electronically. Applicants Centre (OUAC) Transcript Request Form (TRF).
may arrange the submission of their transcripts via Some exceptions apply. See the OUAC 105 Instruc-
the OUAC Transcript Request Form (TRF) or by tion Booklet for details.
logging on to the OUAC 105 “Review and Change
• FAX documents to (416) 979-5221. We will use fax
Your Completed Application” system at www.ouac.
copies only to commence the application review pro-
on.ca/105.
cess. Officially certified academic transcripts must be
3. International students: Applicants are required to received within four weeks of the FAX transmission;
arrange for the submission of officially certified aca- unless informed otherwise. There is a FAX service
demic transcripts of all secondary and post-second- charge for each transmission received.
ary studies, including promotion/graduation status, All necessary arrangements to submit the required
directly to Undergraduate Admissions and Recruit- documents should be made by the applicant prior to
ment at Ryerson, indicating their program choice the time of application and must be received by all
and Ryerson ID/Reference Number. Applicants must noted deadlines. Ryerson will NOT send reminders
have already completed or be in the process of com- requesting required documents.
pleting the minimum academic requirements at the
time of application submission. If the documents are NOTE: Transcripts and all other supporting docu-
in a language other than English, applicants must mentation submitted to Ryerson cannot be returned
also provide notarized literal English translations. to the applicant.

4. Proof of change of name (i.e. marriage certificate, APPLICATION/SELECTION INFORMATION


notarized statement or other legal document) must
be provided if academic documents show a name Program Types
other than that under which an application is made. 1.a) Grades-Plus Selective Programs: For some of
5. Evidence of proficiency in English must be provid- Ryerson’s programs, factors such as interviews,
ed, if English is not the applicant’s first language auditions, selection tests, essays, portfolios, etc.,
(see www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/ are considered in addition to grades in order to se-
overview/english) lect candidates for admission. Specific information
on non-academic admission criteria is available
from Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment

pg 16 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

or at www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/ or conditional Offer of Admission, are required to


programs. All candidates who are required to sub- successfully complete all admission requirements by
mit essays, letters of reference, portfolios, and/or June 24, 2011. For many programs, this excludes the
other supporting material must do so directly to possibility of summer school, night school, virtual-
Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment at school and/or correspondence courses completed
Ryerson unless directed otherwise. Applications after this date.
will not be considered complete until these are Summer school extensions are not granted for many
received. Essays, portfolios, letters of reference, programs. Visit www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/
and any other supporting material should include admission/apply/after and follow the links for sum-
name, address, Ryerson Student ID Number and mer school in order to make a request for a summer
the name of the program. The normal deadline school extension beyond June 24. Please note that
for equal consideration is February 1, however requests will not be reviewed or responded to until
applications will be accepted after this date subject after May 15.
to space and competition. These programs (subject Courses completed after June 24, 2011 will not be
to change) are: used in Scholarship calculations.
• Architectural Science Extensions are not granted verbally under any cir-
• Child and Youth Care cumstances. Students who are granted extensions
• Disability Studies (Part-Time) beyond June 24 must continue to follow all other
stipulated requirements for confirming their position
• Fashion
at Ryerson (including payment of tuition deposits
- Communication
and the submission of final documents).
- Design
• Health Information Management (Part-Time) 5. Admission requirements and procedures vary with
individual programs. Detailed information is sent to
• Health Services Management (Part-Time) all Guidance Offices in Ontario secondary schools
• Image Arts in October of each year for the following September.
- Film Studies Students may also contact the Undergraduate Ad-
- New Media missions and Recruitment office at Ryerson for this
- Photography Studies information or visit www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/
• Interior Design admission.
• Journalism ADMISSION DECISIONS
• Midwifery
An application will be processed only when it is deemed
• Performance Acting
complete (i.e. receipt of all necessary transcripts, sup-
• Performance Dance porting documents and applicable fees).
• Performance Production
The status of an application may be viewed via the
• Radio and Television
Choose Ryerson portal page at www.choose.ryerson.ca
• Social Work (for Fall admission only).
1.b) Grades-Only Selective Programs: All other Ryer- Applicants who have been approved will be notified by an
son programs primarily use grades in the selection official Offer of Admission.
process. Specific information on academic admis-
sion requirements is available from Undergraduate 1.a) The earliest date by which an Ontario secondary
Admissions and Recruitment or at www.ryerson.ca/ school applicant may receive an Offer of Early Ad-
undergraduate/admission/programs. mission from Ryerson is late January.

2. Application decisions are based on the information b) Non-Ontario secondary school students, including
available at the time of application review. Appli- out-of-province high school applicants, may receive
cants must have, or be in the process of meeting the an Offer of Admission as soon as interim marks are
admission requirements for the program(s) of their received by Undergraduate Admissions and Re-
choice at the time of application. cruitment at Ryerson and as soon as Ryerson has
completed assessment of the application.
3. An applicant’s complete academic record, including
secondary school as well as any post-secondary 2. Each year, Ryerson announces anticipated pro-
studies (e.g. college, university, or other post-sec- gram-by-program first release dates. This informa-
ondary institutions) will be reviewed and considered tion is first available in late fall at: www.ryerson.ca/
as part of the competitive selection process. undergraduate/admission. Ryerson will make every
4. Admission requirements vary from program to pro- attempt, but cannot guarantee projected release
gram. Applicants may be required to achieve grades dates.
above the minimum in prerequisite subjects as well 3. In order to maintain their admitted status, an ap-
as maintain averages higher than the published plicant must follow the instructions and meet all
minimum. In the selection process, Offers are made deadlines contained in supporting, post-admission
to the best qualified candidates for Ryerson pro-
documentation provided as part of the admissions
grams. Applicants, including those given an early

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 17


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

process. This includes but is not limited to applicant Ryerson University


confirmation of acceptance of the offer by the stated Liaison, Recruitment & Communications
deadline, compliance with admission conditions and 350 Victoria Street
tuition deposit dates, and finalization of a timetable Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
during the University Enrollment period. Telephone: (416) 979-5030
www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/visit
4. Ryerson reserves the right to withdraw Offers of
Admission made to students who do not meet the For information on the status of your application, interpre-
condition(s) outlined in their Offer of Admission, tation of admission requirements, admission problems,
who do not respond within the specified response inquiries related to undergraduate degree programs (full-
period, or who do not pay their deposit/fee pay- or part-time) please contact:
ment as required. As well, evidence of any falsified
Ryerson University
document(s) will result in the cancellation of an Offer
Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment
of Admission.
350 Victoria Street
5. International Student Health Insurance - All Interna- Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
tional Students must also register in the University Telephone: (416) 979-5036
Health Insurance Plan (UHIP) for the duration of www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission
their studies at Ryerson. This plan ensures that Please visit www.choose.ryerson.ca in order to person-
all international students are protected from unex- alize your own portal page and check your application
pected expensive medical bills and was established status (for Fall admission only)
by Ontario Universities to provide comprehensive
International Students requesting information, applica-
coverage.
tion materials, admission counselling, status updates and
UHIP coverage is compulsory for International visits should contact:
Students and their dependents. IT IS STRONGLY
Ryerson University
RECOMMENDED THAT STUDENTS DO NOT
International Student Recruitment
PURCHASE HEALTH COVERAGE FROM A
Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment
PRIVATE INSURANCE PLAN AT HOME PRIOR
350 Victoria Street
TO ARRIVAL IN CANADA. The necessary fee for
Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
this coverage will be included in the Fees Statement
Telephone: (416) 979-5036
provided by the Student Fees Office.
www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/international
Any questions concerning UHIP and the application
process should be directed to Enrollment Services EQUIVALENT STANDING GUIDELINES
and Student Records, Room POD-70 or by phone at Applicants educated outside of Ontario must submit
(416) 979-5136. evidence of standing equivalent to the OSSD with six
6. Information regarding course enrollment will be com- (6) Grade 12 U/M courses and subject prerequisites.
municated to students during the Summer. Newly- Ryerson is the sole arbiter of what is considered
approved students who have paid their tuition fees equivalent. It is essential that the required subject
and completed the Enrollment process, may print off prerequisites and grades for specific Ryerson programs
their timetable but must attend course enrollment- form part of the academic background of applicants from
related activities during the specified time during outside Ontario, especially in the last two years of high
Orientation Week. Students who do not register and school studies. Please note that subject prerequisites
attend classes as required, cannot be guaranteed vary by program. The following list suggests guidelines
space in their program unless special written per- for academic comparison. Applicants to the Faculty of
mission has been given. Engineering, Architecture and Science (with the excep-
tion of the Architectural Science program) should note
Where to Obtain Further Informa�on that Grade 12 U Advanced Functions (MHF4U), or its
For pre-application/general inquiries, requests for equivalent, is required.
day and evening studies literature, general admission
counselling, program brochures and applications, please CANADIAN EDUCATION
contact: High School Diploma equivalent to the Ontario
Secondary School Diploma with six (6) Grade 12 U/M
Ryerson University
courses. Each program also has specific subject
Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment
prerequisite requirements, as stated in the individual
350 Victoria Street
program details section of this calendar.
Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
Telephone: (416) 979-5036 Unless noted otherwise, subject prerequisite grades
www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission required for admission (normally in the 65-70 percent
For general inquiries, please also visit http://ask.ryerson.ca range) are determined on the basis of competition.
For information on campus tours, open houses, indus- While minimum averages/grades are stated, applicants
try days, and professional development visits, please may be required to present averages/grades above the
contact: minimum. These should only be used as guidelines.

pg 18 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

ALBERTA and the Northwest Territories NUNAVUT


Alberta High School Diploma Nunavut Secondary School Diploma
Northwest Territories High School Diploma Overall average of at least 70 percent in five academic
Overall average of at least 70 percent in five academic Grade 12 courses (including English 30). Prerequisite
Grade 12 courses (including English 30). Prerequisite subjects(s) must be numbered 30 or 31. Inuktitut 12 and
subject(s) must be numbered 30 or 31. Aulajaaqtut 12 are acceptable courses.
BRITISH COLUMBIA and the YUKON PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
British Columbia Certificate of Graduation High School Graduation Certificate
Senior Secondary Graduation Diploma Overall average of at least 70 percent in five academic
Overall average of at least 73 percent in four academic Grade 12 courses (including English 611 or 621). Prereq-
Grade 12 courses (including English 12). Prerequisite uisite subject(s) must be numbered 611 or 621.
subject(s) must be at level 12.
QUEBEC - CEGEP
MANITOBA Twelve courses from the Diplôme d’Etudes Collègiales
Secondary School Diploma (DEC) program of study.
Overall average of at least 70 percent in five aca- Overall average of at least 70 percent in 12 semestered
demic Grade 12 courses (including English 40S). academic courses in a university preparation program
Prerequisite(s) must be numbered 40. (DEC) in CEGEP (including two English courses-603 lev-
NEW BRUNSWICK el) and all other specific program subject prerequisite(s)
High School Diploma normally in the range of 70-75 percent. Two CEGEP
Overall average of at least 70 percent in five academic courses are required for each prerequisite subject(s).
Grade 12 courses (including English 121 or 122). Prereq- Higher grades/averages may be required.
uisite subject(s) must be numbered 120, 121 or 122. QUEBEC - GRADE 12
NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR Grade 12 Certificate of Graduation
Senior High School Graduation Diploma Overall average of at least 70 percent in six Grade 12
Overall average of at least 70 percent in at least 10 aca- academic (university-preparation level) courses (includ-
demic Grade 12 credits (including English 3201). Prereq- ing Grade 12 English). The prerequisite subject(s) must
uisite subject(s) must be numbered 3000 or higher. be at the Grade 12 level.
NOVA SCOTIA SASKATCHEWAN
Nova Scotia High School Graduation Diploma Secondary School Certificate
Overall average of at least 70 percent in five academic or Overall average of at least 70 percent in five Grade 12
advanced Grade 12 courses (including English 12 ACAD). academic courses (including English A30 and B30). Pre-
Prerequisite subject(s) must be at level 12 ACAD or ADV. requisite subject(s) must be numbered 30.

Grade 12 U Equivalencies From Other Provinces


Province/Territory English Advanced Functions*/ Physics Chemistry Biology
Calculus and Vectors

Alberta and NWT English 30 Pure Math 30/Math 31 Physics 30 Chemistry 30 Biology 30

British Columbia and English 12 Principles of Math 12/ Physics 12 Chemistry 12 Biology 12
Yukon Calculus 12

Manitoba English-ELA 40S Applied Math 40S/ Physics 40S Chemistry 40S Biology 40S
Pre-Calculus Math 40S

New Brunswick English 121 or 122 Advanced Math with an Intro Physics 121 or Chemistry 121 Biology 122
to Calculus 120 122 or 122

Newfoundland and English 3201 Math 3204 or 3205/Math 3207 Physics 3204 Chemistry 3202 Biology 3201
Labrador

Nova Scotia English 12 ACAD Math 12 ACAD or ADV/ Physics 12 ACAD Chemistry 12 Biology 12 ACAD
Pre-Calculus 12 or Calculus or ADV ACAD or ADV or ADV
12 ACAD

Nunavut English 30 Pure Math 30/Math 31** Physics 30 Chemistry 30 Biology 30

Prince Edward Island English 611 or 621 Math 621B/ Math 611B Physics 621 Chemistry 621 Biology 621

Quebec-CEGEP Two from 603-level 201-NYA + 201-NYB or 201- Two from 203- 202-NYA + 202- 101-NYB + 101-
103 + 201-203 / 201-NYC or NYA or 203-NYB NYB CWB
201-105 or 203-NYC

Quebec-Grade 12 Grade 12 English Grade 12 Linear Algebra/ Grade 12 Physics Grade 12 Chem- Grade 12 Biology
Grade 12 Calculus istry

Saskatchewan English A30 and B30 Math 30B and 30C/ Physics 30 Chemistry 30 Biology 30
Calculus 30

*Applicants to Engineering (all programs), Bachelor of Science (Biology, Chemistry, Contemporary Science, Mathema�cs and its Applica�ons,
Medical Physics, Undeclared Entry Op�on) and Computer Science must include Calculus in their program of study.
**Applied Math 30 is acceptable in the calcula�on of an overall admission average, but is not acceptable as a prerequisite for programs requir-
ing mathema�cs.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 19


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

EQUIVALENT QUALIFICATIONS FOR country where English is not the first language are
required to provide acceptable English proficiency score
EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS OUTSIDE OF results. Refer to the English Language section of this
CANADA calendar.
A complete list of international country equivalencies is Applicants are required to achieve a high overall standing
available at www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/ in their studies and to include the appropriate program
international. subject prerequisites with high standing. Candidates are
selected on the basis of their overall academic perfor-
Note: Ryerson reserves the right to be the final arbiter of mance in relation to other candidates. Due to competi-
what it will accept on an equivalency basis. tion, candidates may be required to present averages/
It is mandatory that the required subject prerequisites grades above the minimum. Applicants should refer
and grades for specific programs form part of the appli- to the Admission Guidelines for International Students
cant’s academic background, especially in the last two brochure for specific country requirements and other
years of secondary and/or post-secondary studies as relevant information. This brochure is available at: www.
required. All transcripts must show all courses completed ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/international.
and grades achieved. These guidelines are for information purposes and are
subject to change. Additional information regarding
The following admission guidelines (subject to change)
documents and official transcripts can be found at www.
will assist in equating academic qualifications with the
ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/apply.
Ryerson admission requirements. Applicants from a

COUNTRY RYERSON

Central and South Successful completion of a university preparatory (Bachillerato or equivalent) program with high aca-
America demic standing or first year standing from an accredited university. Refer to the Admission Guidelines
for International Students brochure for specific country requirements.

China, People’s Repub- High School/Senior Middle School Graduation and Chinese National University Entrance Examina-
lic of (PRC) tions or first year standing from an accredited university. (High school transcripts must show courses
completed and grades achieved for all three years of study.)

Commonwealth The Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) and
Caribbean Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examinations (CAPE).The completed CAPE Diploma must include
a total of at least six units with grades of I, II or III. All program specific prerequisite subjects must be
included at either the CSEC or at the CAPE Level.
• Three GCSE/IGCSE/Ordinary (O) Levels may be substituted for the CSEC.
• Two GCE/Advanced (A) Levels may be substituted for the CAPE (see United Kingdom and Com-
monwealth for requirements).
• Ryerson will also consider a preliminary year at the University of the West Indies, Barbados Com-
munity College or equivalent in lieu of the CAPE Diploma.
• CSEC papers must be at the General Proficiency Level, if written before 1998 with grades of 1 or 2,
commencing 1998 with grades of 1, 2 or 3.
• Prerequisites at the CAPE level are highly recommended.
• Preference is given to applicants applying to mathematics and science-based programs that
include mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology at the CAPE level (as per applicable program
prerequisite subject requirements).
• CAPE units with grades of III or better may be considered for transfer credit on an individual basis.
• See also United Kingdom and Commonwealth.

Europe (General) High School Graduation Certificate (Maturity Certificate, Baccalaureate, or equivalent) with high aca-
demic standing from an academic program at an accredited school. Refer to the Admission Guidelines
for International Students brochure for specific country requirements.

Hong Kong Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination (HKCEE) plus Hong Kong Advanced Level Examina-
tion (HKALE) (since 1980) with passes in at least five academic subjects, two of which must be at the
Advanced Level and three at the Ordinary Level or four academic papers, three of which must be at the
Advanced Level and one at the Ordinary Level. See also United Kingdom and Commonwealth.
NOTE: Preference is given to applicants applying to Mathematics and science-based programs who
include Mathematics/Physics/Chemistry/Biology at the Advanced Level (as per applicable program
subject prerequisite requirements).
Hong Kong Diploma of Senior Education (HKDSE), first graduating class of 2012 - Ryerson University
admission requirements currently under review.

pg 20 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

India All India Senior School Certificate Examination (awarded by CBSE) or the Indian School Certificate
(awarded by CICSE). Students presenting Year 12 State Board Exams (Higher Secondary School
Certificate; Intermediate Certificate) with high standing will also be considered for admission.

Iran Diplom-Metevaseth and Pre-University year (since 1997) or National High School Diploma after 12
years (before 1997) with high academic standing. Prerequisite subjects must be included in the final
year of secondary school (if completed before 1997) or in the Pre-University year.

Japan Kotogakko Sotsugyo Shomeisho, (Upper Secondary School Leaving Certificate).

Middle East General Secondary School Certificate - e.g., Tawjihi, Tawjihiyya, Shahadat-al-thanawia-al-a. ama or
equivalent. Refer to the Admission Guidelines for International Students brochure for specific country
requirements.

Malaysia Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM); Malaysian Independent Chinese Secondary School Sys-
tem (MICSS) Unified Examination Certificate (UEC). See also United Kingdom and Commonwealth.

Pakistan Intermediate Certificate or Higher Secondary School Certificate with excellent results including the
applicable subject prerequisites.

Philippines Second year standing from an accredited university with a minimum cumulative grade point average of
‘B’ and high standing in the appropriate program subject prerequisites.

Singapore Singapore/Cambridge GCSE/Ordinary Level and GCE/ Advanced Level Examinations. See also
United Kingdom and Commonwealth.

Taiwan Senior High School Leaving Certificate (academic program).

United Kingdom and • The General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE/IGCSE) Ordinary Level and the GCE
Commonwealth Advanced Level Examinations (U.K. Examining boards)
• The Cambridge International Exam (CIE)/Cambridge Higher School Certificate
(under review)
• Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE)
• Scottish Certificate of Higher Education
Applicants must present the following:
GCE A Level – At least two A Levels in different subject areas with predicted and final grades of ‘B’ or
higher in one subject and ‘C’ or higher in another subject. (These requirements are under review.)
GCE AS Level – Two AS Levels are acceptable in place of an A Level.
GCSE O Level – At least three different subject areas at the GCSE O Level with final grades of at least
‘B’ or higher in one subject and ‘C’ or higher in two other subjects.
Notes:
Possession of the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission. Higher results may be
required for some programs due to competition. Candidates who do not meet the above requirements
may also be considered on an individual basis subject to space and competition.
Prerequisite subjects should be presented at the GCE A Level however excellent AS Level and GCSE
O Levels will be considered for some programs.
English at the GCE A Level is required for programs in the Faculty of Arts (excluding Geography and
International Economics and Finance), as well as Journalism, Radio and Television and Business Man-
agement. English at the GCE A Level is recommended for all other programs.
Completion of the GCSE O Level in English as a Second Language with a grade between ‘A’-’C’ will be
considered in order to meet the English prerequisite subject requirement (except where noted other-
wise above).
Applicants to programs in the Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Science must include math-
ematics and either physics or chemistry at the GCE A Level. Preference will be given to applicants who
include all applicable program subject prerequisite requirements at the GCE A Level. Please consult
the subject prerequisites of the chosen program, as listed in this Calendar.
GCE A Levels with grades of ‘C’ or better may be considered for transfer credit on an individual basis.
No transfer credit is given for AS Levels. No transfer credit is given for courses taught by the Faculty of
Engineering, Architecture and Science.
Ryerson University will accept the Cambridge Pre-University Certificates (Principal Subjects) in lieu of
A Levels and welcomes the Pre-U Diploma. Ryerson is currently reviewing minimum grade require-
ments for admission consideration and transfer credit eligibility.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 21


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

United States Graduation from Grade 12 of an accredited academic school with high academic standing including
minimum ‘B’ grades in the program-specific subject prerequisites and a minimum ‘B’ overall average.
Subject to competition, applicants may be required to present averages/grades above the minimum.
The high school profile (including accreditation, grading scheme, etc.) must accompany the academic
record. SAT Reasoning with a minimum score of 550 in each SAT component is recommended. New
SAT standards currently under review. ACT scores (24 minimum) and Advanced Placement (AP) ex-
amination results will also be considered. Applicants who do not present the above criteria will be con-
sidered on an individual basis, taking into consideration their high school performance, SAT/ACT/AP
scores and first year standing from an accredited university or college, where applicable. AP examina-
tion scores of 4 or higher will be considered for transfer credits on an individual basis.

International Baccalau- Completion of the International Baccalaureate Diploma with passes in at least six subjects: three
reate (under review) Higher level and three Standard level with a grade total of at least 26 and with no mark less than 4.
Subject to competition, applicants may be required to present averages/grades above the minimum. IB
Higher Levels with grades of 5 or higher may be considered for transfer credit on an individual basis,
with completion of the International Baccalaureate Diploma.

Other Countries Applicants will be assessed on an individual basis. Generally, applicants with high academic standing
from an academic program at an accredited school, who are eligible for admission to first year univer-
sity studies in their home country, will be considered. Applicants from some countries will require first
year standing from an accredited university in addition to the high school graduation certificate. For
specific country requirements refer to the Admission Guidelines for International Students available at:
www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/international

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS also include notarized literal English translation(s). (See


Applicants who are seeking admission from institutions or section on Submission of Documents as well as www.
locations outside of Canada should apply online through ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/apply).
the Ontario Universities’ Application Centre, 170 Re- Applicants from a country where English is not the first
search Lane, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 5E2, www. language, or where English is an official language but
ouac.on.ca. Application procedures are provided with the not the first language, are required to provide proof of
application. Candidates are strongly urged to apply well English proficiency at a satisfactory level. Please refer to
in advance of February 1. Ryerson programs commence the English Language section which follows.
in September of each year only. Ryerson does not grant
admission in the Winter (January) or Spring/Summer NOTES:
(May) terms. 1. International applicants are not eligible to apply as
mature students.
All International Students are required to obtain a Study
Permit from a Canadian embassy or consulate in their 2. Studies taken to meet the academic admission
home country prior to arriving in Canada. (Applicants requirements must be completed or in the process
from the United States, Greenland or St. Pierre and of being completed, at the time of the application
Miquelon, may apply for a Study Permit at a Canadian submission.
Port of Entry.) International applicants will also require a International Students are charged a different
Temporary Resident Visa (TRV), unless they are from a tuition fee from Canadians, unless they qualify for
country that is exempted from this requirement. The list an exemption based on their status. International
of countries and territories whose citizens need a visa students who qualify for international fee exemption
to enter Canada to study is available at the Citizenship may still be required to obtain a Study Permit (Stu-
and Immigration Canada website at www.cic.gc.ca. It is dent Authorization) from Immigration Canada.
not possible to study in Canada with a Visitor Visa and it
The following categories of International students may be
is not possible/recommended to change status from
exempt from the differential fee:
a visitor to a student when in Canada. The Ryerson Of-
fer of Admission, the Ryerson Letter of Acceptance for 1. Those with diplomatic status in Canada.
International Students (LAIS), proof of financial status, 2. Approved refugee claimants by the Government of
medical clearance and passport are required when ap- Canada.
plying for a Study Permit.
3. Dependents of Canadian citizens and permanent
Applicants must arrange to have one set of officially certi- residents of Canada.
fied academic transcripts submitted by the issuing school
and/or agency directly to Undergraduate Admissions 4. Spouses/dependent children of foreign workers in
and Recruitment and NOT to the OUAC. This includes Canada.
transcripts of all secondary and post-secondary studies To claim exemption, students must take their docu-
showing promotion/graduation status. If the documents mentation to the Enrollment Services and Student
are in a language other than English, applicants must Records Office when they enroll for their courses.

pg 22 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

Interna�onal Op�ons: Exchange Programs in Canada for four years or less, are required to present
Students interested in participating in an exchange pro- proof of English proficiency at a satisfactory level. Ryer-
gram should visit www.ryerson.ca/ri/students/ryerson/ son will not accept English 12U or equivalent in lieu of a
exchange for an up-to-date list of options available. test of English language proficiency.
Generally speaking, applicants who live in Ontario are
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
required to write the Ryerson Test of English Proficiency
All applicants, including International Students must (RTEP) that is administered on the Ryerson campus. Ap-
include English in their studies at the level indicated or plicants who are not within travelling distance of Ryer-
higher in the individual program admission requirements. son may submit Test of English as a Foreign Language
English language tests, such as the Test of English as a (TOEFL), Michigan English Language Assessment Bat-
Foreign Language (TOEFL), the Michigan English Lan- tery (MELAB), International English Language Testing
guage Assessment Battery (MELAB), the International (IELTS) or Canadian Academic English Language As-
English Language Testing System (IELTS), the Cana- sessment (CAEL) results. It is the applicant’s responsibil-
dian Academic English Language Assessment (CAEL) ity to arrange for official results to be forwarded by their
or English as a Second Language studies cannot be testing station to Ryerson within application deadlines.
used as a substitute for the English prerequisite require- The Ryerson code for TOEFL is 0886.
ment. Applicants who have Anglais courses will be given
equal consideration for admission. In addition, Ryerson Refer to Ryerson’s English Language Requirements at
reserves the right to request applicants whose first lan- www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/overview and
guage is not English to write the Ryerson Test of English follow the links for ‘English Language Requirements’.
Proficiency (RTEP).
Minimum English Proficiency Scores (subject to change
English Language Requirements - use as a guideline only)
Applicants from a country where English is not the first Ryerson reserves the right to deny admission to those
language, or where English is an official language but not applicants who do not demonstrate satisfactory English
the first language, including applicants who have resided proficiency, regardless of academic qualifications.

PROGRAM TOEFL* MELAB IELTS CAEL

Journalism & Radio and Television 580 paper-based 90 6.5 70

92-93 internet- based

All Engineering Programs and the following 560 paper-based 85 6.5 60


Bachelor of Science Programs:
83-87 internet-based
Biology, Chemistry, Contemporary Science,
Mathematics and its Applications, Medical
Physics and Undeclared Science

All Other Ryerson Programs including 580 paper-based 85 6.5 70


Architectural Science and Computer
92-93 internet-based
Science

MATURE STUDENTS Notes:


Applicants who do not possess the minimum admission 1. To determine the admission average, all subject
requirements are eligible to be considered for admission, prerequisite course grades are averaged. The aver-
if they: age required for admission purposes will vary by
a. are twenty-one (21) years of age by December 31st program and is determined on the basis of competi-
of the year in which they will commence studies; tion. Where only one prerequisite is required for a
program, the grade in that course must be competi-
b. have been away from formal education for at least tive for admission purposes.
two years;
2. Minimum grades do not guarantee admission.
c. are Canadian citizens or permanent residents, or are Subject to competition, candidates may be required
sponsored by a Canadian governmental agency; to present averages/grades above the minimum.
d. can present tangible evidence of ability to cope with Please contact Undergraduate Admissions and
the program at Ryerson and have completed, typi- Recruitment for detailed information.
cally with grades of 70 percent or higher, all subject 3. In support of their application, it is recommended
prerequisite(s) or equivalent required for individual that applicants include the following in their Supple-
program admission. mentary Application form:

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 23


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

• why they have chosen this program; be submitted to Undergraduate Admissions and Recruit-
• career ambitions/career goals; ment at the time of application. See www.ryerson.ca/
undergraduate/admission/overview/special.html for
• past work experience.
further details.
Admission of Applicants 60 years of Age or Over
The Ted Rogers School of Business Management, Ac-
Applicants 60 years of age or over, by December 31st counting Department requires completion of the Special
of the year of application, presenting proof of age and Business Permission Form. The form is available in the
following regular admissions procedures, may enroll as Prospective Student section of the Ted Rogers School
an undergraduate full- or part-time, special, or auditor of Business Management website. The completed form
student without paying tuition fees. must be submitted to Undergraduate Admissions and
Recruitment at the time of application, and is valid only
SPECIAL STUDENTS
for the period of time and courses specified in the form.
Students are designated ‘Special Student’ if they enroll See www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/
for one or more courses, but have not been admitted to overview/special.html for further details.
a program. A Special Student is eligible for evaluation in
the courses taken and for a final grade statement from AUDITOR STUDENTS
Enrollment Services and Student Records. Special Stu- Students are designated ‘Auditor’ if they enroll for one or
dents are not eligible to obtain transfer credits or study more courses which they do not wish evaluated; they at-
on a Letter of Permission. Applicants should see www. tend classes for their own interest. An Auditor will not be
ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/overview/special. given a statement of attendance. Auditor students may
html only enroll in lecture courses and permission is subject to
Grade 12 U/M students may be admitted as Special Stu- space, generally after courses commence. Applicants for
dents to take a course, subject to receiving authorization Auditor status should contact Enrollment Services and
from the teaching department of the course they wish Student Records.
to take and also subject to space in the desired course.
Candidates must be recommended by their secondary INFORMATION ABOUT ENGINEERING
school and will be considered on an individual basis. If The Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Science is
the course forms part of a program to which the student committed to working with engineering students to over-
is admitted, credit is applied. come challenges and improve their prospects for suc-
Course(s) taken as a Special Student, which an appli- cess as a Ryerson University engineering student and
cant subsequently wants to apply as transfer credit to a as a professional engineer after graduation. The Faculty
program, will not be recorded as a graded course nor will has introduced the Early Intervention Program and the
it be used in the calculation of the student’s Grade Point Communications Proficiency Resource Path as part of
Average (GPA). (See Transfer Credits section). a larger, faculty-wide initiative designed to maximize
students’ potential for success.
NOTE: Access to a course(s) is subject to approval of
the teaching department. Approval may not be granted Early Interven�on Program
until after the commencement of term, as space is an es- Highly innovative and proactive retention strategies play
sential consideration. Individual faculty members may not an important role in helping students build the skills for
grant access to courses. success in a demanding engineering curriculum. Through
While approval as a ‘Special Student’ permits students the First-Year and Common Engineering Office, the Fac-
to attempt to enroll for individual courses, it does not ulty of Engineering, Architecture and Science has incor-
guarantee and is not meant to guarantee enrollment in porated the Early Intervention Program into the first-year
courses, or admission to a Ryerson program. Prospec- engineering experience. At the semester’s mid-point,
tive Special Students should note that, for some courses, students who are failing courses in their core curriculum
no space will be available to Special Students as prefer- are identified and encouraged to attend an interview
ence is given to full-time program students. with a member of our academic support team (First-Year
and Common Engineering Program Director/Academic
Special Students are subject to the same continuation re- Advisor and/or the Student Counsellor). Together, they
quirements as students in degree, diploma or certificate discuss options to help reduce the chances of academic
programs (see Academic Standings section). Special failure.
Students are normally permitted to enroll for one to two
courses per semester unless they are studying on Letter Communica�ons Proficiency Resource Path
of Permission from another university or have previously All students admitted into first year engineering are re-
completed a degree from an accredited university. quired to write a mandatory Writing Skills Test (WST)
The Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Science or the diagnostic Ryerson Test of English Proficiency
(FEAS) requires completion of the Dean’s Office Permis- (RTEP). The WST is conducted annually during Orien-
sion Form for Special Students. This Special Student tation Week before the beginning of the first semester.
status is valid only for the period of time and courses Students who pass the WST by achieving a ‘B’ grade or
specified in the form. The form can be found on the higher may enroll in their chosen Liberal Studies courses.
FEAS Admissions website. The completed form must Those students who do not pass the WST and those stu-

pg 24 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

dents who achieve a ‘C’ level remedial pass on the RTEP from a faculty or program at their home university but
will be required to enroll in LNG 100, LNG 101, LNG who are eligible to apply to another faculty or program at
200, or LNG 300 courses as lower-level Liberal Stud- their home university are also eligible to apply to a similar
ies course(s), depending on the outcome of the WST faculty or program at Ryerson. All eligible applicants
assessment. Students who do not pass the first WST will be assessed in competition with other new appli-
or who achieve a ‘C’ level remedial pass on the RTEP cants, taking into consideration both academic (second-
will have three additional chances to pass the WST. The ary and post-secondary studies) and, where applicable,
second test will be available in May following the comple- non-academic criteria, as well as availability of space.
tion of the First-Year Engineering curriculum. The third
Ryerson endorses the Council of Ontario Universities’
and fourth WST will be conducted during the following
general principles on the transfer of credit:
Orientation Week, and in May of the following year, for
the next cohort of engineering students. Acceptance of transfer credits among Ontario universi-
ties shall be based on the recognition that, while learn-
Students who fail the second WST may benefit from a
ing experiences may differ in a variety of ways, their
four to six-week intensive ESL/writing program which will
substance may be virtually equivalent in terms of their
be available during the Spring/Summer term. Students
content and rigour. Insofar as possible, acceptance of
may not proceed into the third-year of their engi-
transfer should allow for the maximum recognition of
neering program without passing the WST. Engineer-
previous learning experience in university level courses.
ing students who need to further develop their language
and writing skills will have access to additional writing- Subject to degree, grade and program requirements,
intensive Liberal Studies courses. Students who are re- any course offered for credit by one university shall be
quired to take the LNG 100, LNG 101, LNG 200, or LNG accepted for credit by another university when there is
300 are strongly encouraged and expected to take these essential equivalency in course content.
writing- intensive humanities and social science courses. Applicants with the following credentials from an Ontario
Detailed information is available from the First-Year and College of Applied Arts and Technology (CAATs) will be
Common Engineering Office. assessed according to the stated guidelines.
For additional information, please refer to the specific 1. Graduates of a three-year diploma program, with a
engineering program within this calendar or contact the ‘B’ average, will be considered for admission and
First-Year and Common Engineering Office, Room ENG- possible advanced standing. The amount of credit
377 Phone: 416-979-5000 ext. 4261. that may be transferred is program-specific.
Engineering Transfer Credits 2. Graduates of a two-year diploma program, or two
Applicants approved into an Engineering program can- years of a three-year diploma, with a ‘B’ average will
not expect to receive any transfer credits in Engineering be considered for admission and possible granting
discipline or Engineering related discipline courses if their of credits.
applicable post secondary education was not completed
3. Applicants who have successfully completed one
at a program accredited by the Canadian Engineering
Accreditation Board (CEAB). Refer to www.ccpe.ca for a year of a two- or three-year program of an academic
listing of CEAB accredited institutions. nature with an ‘A’ standing will be considered for
admission. Note: Due to competition, preference
Core and professional engineering course transfer cred- may be given to applicants who have completed two
its will ONLY be granted at the time of admission. An Of- years of CAAT studies or more.
fer of Admission will notify the applicant of transfer credit
decision(s) subject to acceptance of their Offer. NOTE: All students must possess the required pro-
gram subject prerequisites, or equivalents, and required
Liberal Studies discipline courses taken at CEAB ac-
entrance averages for these subjects. All admissions
credited or non-accredited schools will be considered for
are subject to competition and higher averages may be
either lower- or upper-level liberal studies transfer credit.
required.
College courses, in general, are not eligible for transfer
credit except in the case of lower-level liberal studies A minimum grade of 70 percent (‘B-’) in an Ontario Col-
courses. lege of Applied Arts and Technology course is required
for credit transfer.
ADMISSION FROM OTHER POST-SECONDARY
INSTITUTIONS ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING
Applicants who wish to attend a Ryerson program and Applicants who have previously completed one or more
have attended an accredited university or college will be years at Ryerson or another accredited post-secondary
considered for admission if they are in good academic institution may be eligible for admission to a level higher
standing (i.e. eligible for enrollment/readmission) in their than first year/semester (advanced standing) and/or for
previous/current program. Applicants who have been transfer credit (refer to the section on Transfer Credits for
required to withdraw will not be considered for admis- additional information).
sion to a comparable program at Ryerson until the term
When advanced standing is granted, all or some of a
of suspension/withdrawal has been served or, until one
student’s previous post-secondary studies is used as a
year after the status was assigned, whichever comes
basis of admission. NOTE: Courses used as basis of
first. Applicants who have been required to withdraw

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 25


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

admission are not recorded as individual transfer and the student’s previous GPA from university/college/
credits and may not be used to apply for transfer high school.
credit. The original grades obtained in the courses used
for advanced standing are not recorded as graded cours- RYERSON STUDENTS WISHING TO TRANSFER
es on the Ryerson academic record. Original grades are TO ANOTHER RYERSON PROGRAM
not used in the calculation of a student’s Grade Point
Students are advised that they can have formal status in
Average.
only one Ryerson degree program (including Special Stu-
Students admitted with advanced standing/transfer dent studies) at any given time. When a student applies
credits must complete, as a Ryerson student, studies that for and is offered a transfer from one Ryerson program
normally include at least one half of the program’s curric- to another, the student forfeits their status in the original
ulum. No more than a total of 50 percent of the program’s program.
requirements may consist of advanced standing/credits
(transfer credits, challenge credits, credits granted on a A request to transfer to another Ryerson program is
Letter of Permission). made by completing a Ryerson online application form
available at: www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/
Applicants applying for advanced standing/transfer apply/forms. In addition, applicants must submit a com-
credits must arrange to have one set of officially certified pleted Supplementary form to Undergraduate Admis-
academic transcripts of their secondary and all post-sec- sions and Recruitment. Supplementary forms are avail-
ondary studies, including promotion/graduation status, able online at www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/
submitted directly by the issuing school and/or agency to apply/forms. An $80 application fee (subject to change)
Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment. Applicants must accompany the completed Ryerson application.
who are currently attending a post-secondary institution
are also required to submit a list of courses in progress Requests for transfer will be considered only if students
and interim/final results for these courses when available. fulfill the admission requirements for the program of their
choice and only if space is available in that program.
If applying for advanced standing admission, course
Transfer requests (including supporting documents,
descriptions and teaching outlines of all post-secondary
where required) will be given guaranteed consideration
studies are generally not required at the time of applica-
provided they are received by the deadline date for guar-
tion for admission (if this information is needed, a request
anteed consideration. Requests received after this date
will be forwarded to you by Undergraduate Admissions
will be considered subject to space availability. There
and Recruitment). Course/teaching outlines may be
required after admission has been granted when you is no guarantee that a student will be able to transfer
are applying for transfer credit (see www.ryerson.ca/ to another program. Students requesting a transfer will
transfercredits). compete with all other candidates for admission and
availability of space.
NOTE: For students admitted into a direct entry/degree
completion/advanced standing policy program; if a psy- Students who have been Required To Withdraw (RTW)
chology upper level liberal studies course, or any course may not transfer to ANY Ryerson program until 12
offered through the Faculty of Arts requires a prerequi- months have elapsed following the RTW standing
site, a transfer credit must be requested for that prerequi- (regardless of program). No courses taken at Ryerson
site course. This will only serve as proof of the prerequi- (or elsewhere) between when a student is RTW and rein-
site course, and will not apply towards the degree. statement or transfer to another program will be granted
Ryerson credit.
ADVANCED STANDING AND RYERSON
Students cannot apply to transfer to ANY Ryerson pro-
ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
gram immediately after receiving Permanent Program
Students who have successfully completed one or more Withdrawal status. Students may only apply to a different
years of engineering studies at another qualifying ac- program for the Fall semester of the following calendar
credited university-level engineering program are eligible year (regardless of program).
for consideration for admission with transfer credits or
advanced standing into a related engineering program RYERSON STUDENTS SEEKING RE-ADMISSION
at Ryerson, subject to space, competition and academic TO A RYERSON PROGRAM
performance. No transfer credits will be approved beyond This applies to students who left under one of the follow-
second-year level.
ing conditions:
Students with a complete degree or partially completed
• officially withdrew or did not complete term;
degree in Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, or other Sci-
ence with appropriate credits in natural sciences, math- • did not enroll for one complete year but left in good
ematics or computer science may be eligible for course Academic Standing.
transfer credits or advanced standing into an engineering Application for re-admission for students who attended
program, subject to space, competition and academic Ryerson from Fall 1984 to present is made by complet-
performance. Transfer credits will be assessed on the ing a Ryerson online application form available at: www.
basis of strict course-by-course equivalency. ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/apply/forms. A
Ryerson student who last attended prior to Fall 1984
Admission with advanced standing into Ryerson pro-
grams is competitive and depends on space availability must apply online through the Ontario Universities’ Ap-
plication Centre, 170 Research Lane, Guelph, Ontario,

pg 26 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

Canada N1G 5E2, www.ouac.on.ca. Applications for Students Required to Withdraw prior to September
re-admission may not be processed if the student has an 2008
outstanding debt to the University in excess of $10, (sub- Students seeking reinstatement into the same program
ject to change) or has not returned books, supplies, or following their period of REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW
equipment which have a value in excess of this amount. Standing should:
Equal consideration will be given to those who apply for • Complete a Ryerson online application form available
re-admission by February 1 for the Fall term; applications at: www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/apply/
received after this date are reviewed subject to space forms.
availability. Students seeking re-admission for the Winter • Submit the following directly to Undergraduate Admis-
term will receive equal consideration if they apply by sions and Recruitment: any written conditions (e.g.
November 1. All returning students should be aware School or Departmental Statement of Understand-
of space limitations in all levels. Admission/readmis- ing); a letter that outlines academic and non-aca-
sion is subject to space, competition and academic demic activities since receiving your REQUIRED TO
consideration. Ryerson is bound by written admis- WITHDRAW Standing status, and provide reason-
sion/readmission offers and does not give verbal able evidence of the prospect of successful study. If
offers. applicable, include any officially certified transcripts
Students should ensure that they fully understanding the for courses taken at other post-secondary institu-
graduation requirements of their program when apply- tions during the term of REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW
ing for re-admission including: timespan and curriculum Standing. NOTE: Reinstatement is subject to space,
requirements, as well as ensuring that their Requirement competition, and academic consideration. Courses
Term has been appropriately adjusted in order to run an completed during a period of REQUIRED TO WITH-
accurate Advisement Report. DRAW Standing will not be credited towards degree
requirements unless previous written approval is given
Admission decisions are made by Undergraduate Admis- by a School or department, to a maximum of two
sions and Recruitment, which reserves the right to defer single-term courses or equivalent.
or refuse admission to applicants whose qualifications do
not fulfill the demands of the program for which they have Application for reinstatement should be made as early as
applied. Ryerson reserves the right to request a personal possible. The equal consideration date for the Fall term
is February 1 and for the Winter term is November 1.
interview and to limit the number of students admitted
Applications received after these dates will be reviewed
to any program. Admission is subject to the competitive
subject to space availability.
process.
Reinstatement, if granted, will be with PROBATIONARY
‘REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW’ STUDENTS SEEK- Standing, and its requirements for defined limited studies.
ING RE-INSTATEMENT (See section on Academic Standings)

Students Required to Withdraw a�er September 2008 APPLICATION DATES


Students who have been REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW
Before referring to the following sections you must
(RTW) from a Ryerson program may not continue their
determine if the program you are considering is
program studies and are not be eligible for reinstatement
offered on a Full-time or Part-time basis. Programs
in their program for 12 months.
that are offered on both a Full- and Part-time basis
Reinstatement will be considered by faculty/program may have differing application deadlines.
committees based on criteria, assessments and/or
Application for admission should be made as early
procedures developed by the School or Department.
as possible.
Past academic performance and space availability will
normally be considerations. Students who are reinstated
FULL-TIME PROGRAM APPLICATION DATES:
to their program will be placed on PROBATION and will
be required to have a Probationary Contract authorized The date for guaranteed consideration for Fall 2011 ad-
by their program School or Department prior to com- mission for Grades-Plus Selective Programs (programs
mencing studies. which select students on the basis of grades plus audi-
tions, interviews, portfolios, essays, etc.) is February
No courses taken at Ryerson (or elsewhere) between
when a student is RTW and reinstatement or transfer to 1, and March 1 for programs that select on the basis of
another program will be granted Ryerson credit. grades (Grades-Only Selective Programs). All complete
applications and amendments received by Undergradu-
Students seeking reinstatement within 24 months of
ate Admissions and Recruitment by these dates will
their RTW date must contact their program School or
receive equal consideration. Applications, supporting
Department directly.
documents, and amendments received after these dates
Students seeking reinstatement after 24 months has will be reviewed subject to space availability and might
elapsed from their RTW date must apply for reinstate- not be considered because of a program filled status.
ment using a Ryerson online application form available
at: www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/apply/ If applying to Ryerson through the Ontario Universities’
forms. Applications will be subject to space availability, Applications Centre (OUAC), please allow at least two
admission deadline dates and procedures determined by weeks for processing the application (or amendments
Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment. to the application).

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 27


ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND POLICIES / THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

The above dates have been selected in order to allow THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE
sufficient time for auditions, interviews, and selection
tests to be arranged where required, and to ensure that RAMSS—Ryerson’s Administrative Management
applications (and amendments to applications) for all Self Service .............................................................. 28
programs will be received in time for consideration by the Advisement Report/Academic Advising...................... 28
selection committees.
Personal Information Update ...................................... 29
Please note that applicants to Midwifery are to submit
E-mail Account Policy ................................................. 29
directly to Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment
at Ryerson, the required Midwifery Program Supple- Enrollment/Course Intention ....................................... 30
mentary Application Form and Personal Letter by Attendance .................................................................. 31
February 1.
Course Numbers-All Programs ................................... 31
NOTE: Applicants are advised that these dates are
to be used as a guideline only. Applications with Course Management Policy ........................................ 31
complete documents received by these dates will be Examinations ............................................................... 31
considered. Applications received after these dates
Graded Course Performance Designations................ 32
will be considered until the program(s) and their wait
list(s) are filled. In all areas, it is recommended that Other Course Performance Designations................... 33
candidates apply as soon as possible. Ryerson re- Grade Point Averages (GPA) ...................................... 34
serves the right to terminate the application process
Final Grades ................................................................ 34
without notice.
Academic Standings ................................................... 35
Application dates are correct at the time of printing. Sub-
sequent amendments to application dates will be posted Transcripts ................................................................... 39
on the Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment of- Transfer Credits ........................................................... 40
ficial website: www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission
Challenge Credits ....................................................... 42
PART-TIME PROGRAM APPLICATION DATES: Letters of Permission ................................................. 43
Applications received for Fall Term, Winter Term, and
Course Substitution / Course Directive ....................... 43
Spring/Summer Term will be guaranteed consideration
if they are ‘complete’ with all supporting documentation Graduation and Convocation ...................................... 43
(see ‘Submission of Documents’) and if received by: Application to Withdrawal Procedures ....................... 47
• Fall Term - February 1 for Grades-Plus programs* Keeping Ryerson Informed of Current Address .......... 47
• Fall Term - March 1 for Grades-Only programs
Operational Policies .................................................... 47
• Winter Term - October 1
• Spring/Summer Term - February 1 RAMSS—RYERSON’S ADMINISTRATIVE
Students should note that the program offerings for both
MANAGEMENT SELF SERVICE
the Winter Term and Spring/Summer Term are limited. Ryerson’s Administrative Management Self Service
Program availability can be verified at www.ryerson.ca/ (RAMSS) is a one-stop shop for just about everything
undergraduate/admission by selecting ‘Programs Ac- you need to do online, such as viewing your academic,
cepting Applications’. financial and personal information at Ryerson.
Students should ensure that when they apply they For example, students have the opportunity to verify
specify ‘Part-time’ program on the application form, e.g. and/or update their records. Students can update their
‘Child and Youth Care (Part-time)’ program. address and contact information; add, drop and swap
courses; request an Advisement Report; apply to gradu-
*Midwifery—Students applying to this program must ap- ate; view their grades, view their Academic Standings
ply on the OUAC 105 application form. Applications are and Grade Point Averages; view and print their timeta-
accepted only once per year for the Fall term. The 2011 bles; verify course enrollment and class sections; check
deadline for applications is February 1. for time, availability and location of courses; view Student
NOTE: Applicants are advised that the dates given Fees tables, etc. This website also has other useful
are to be used as a guideline only. Applications with administrative links and help menus such as manu-
complete documents received by these dates will be als and job aids. RAMSS is accessible by logging into
my.ryerson.ca and clicking on the RAMSS tab.
considered. Applications received after these dates
will be considered until the program(s) and their wait ADVISEMENT REPORT/ACADEMIC ADVISING
list(s) are filled. In all areas, it is recommended that
candidates apply as soon as possible. Ryerson re- Ryerson offers via RAMSS an online, self-service Aca-
serves the right to terminate the application process demic Advising tool called the Advisement Report which
without notice. generates an Advising In-Progress report that will tell
students:

pg 28 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

• which courses students have taken changes you wish to make. Graduating students have the
• which courses students are enrolled in option of requesting a derivative and/or middle name for
• what a students’ program course requirements are graduation purposes, e.g., Anthony Smith could request
Tony Matthew Smith to appear on his degree document.
• how successfully completed and currently enrolled
All requests must be submitted by the stated deadline
courses fulfill degree requirements
- See Significant Dates. See above for the Name Change
• external transfer credits procedure.
• any extra courses taken that are not being applied to
degree requirements Address Update
• any course substitutions or courses directed to degree You are required to inform Ryerson of a change of ad-
requirements. dress each time you move so that you can receive timely,
and important information that is mailed to you through-
Students are advised to regularly run an Advisement out the year. You can confirm what address we have on
Report from the RAMSS Student Centre, ‘My Academ- file for you on RAMSS at my.ryerson.ca.
ics’ link to track their progress through their program’s
curriculum towards graduation. The Advisement Report You can have up to two different addresses on file:
should be run each and every time students make a 1. Permanent Home Address: This address could be
changes to an academic record i.e., add, drop, swap out of the country or province, or anywhere in On-
courses. This report does not represent an irrevocable tario. All mail will be sent to your permanent home
contract between the student and the University.
address if it is the only address on file.
The official status of degree requirements will be as-
2. Mailing Address: This address is where you live
sessed in a students’ final year by the Curriculum
during the school year. It should only be given when
Advising Office as soon as an application to graduate is
received. it differs from your permanent home address. Mail
sent during the school year will be sent to your mail-
It is the responsibility of the student to understand and ing address.
to meet the requirements for graduation. If inaccuracies
are found, students should identify the problem(s) and To update your address, complete the Address Update
contact their program department immediately. Form found online at www.ryerson.ca/essr, and submit
to Enrollment Services and Student Records, or update
The Advisement Report is available to all full-time un- your address online through the RAMSS Student Centre.
dergraduate students. The online Advising Report is not
Address changes cannot be made over the telephone.
available for Part-time undergraduate program students.
Part-time undergraduate students can request a manual Phone Number Changes
audit using the Manual Advisement Report Request form
It is important to keep Ryerson informed of your current
available online at www.ryerson.ca/forms. All requests
must be received by the applicable deadline dates re- phone number(s), so that you do not miss information
flected on the form. which may be of an urgent nature. To update your phone
number(s), complete the Address Update Form found
PERSONAL INFORMATION UPDATE online at www.ryerson.ca/essr, and submit to Enrollment
Services and Student Records, or update your phone
It is essential that you keep Ryerson informed of any number(s) online through the RAMSS student Centre.
changes to your name, permanent home and/or mailing Phone number changes cannot be made over the tele-
address, and phone number. You may miss important phone.
mailings or other notifications if you do not do so.
E-MAIL ACCOUNT POLICY
Name Changes
If you legally change your name, or your name is in incor- All students in full- and part-time undergraduate degree
rect/incomplete in Ryerson’s records, it is your respon- programs are required to activate a Ryerson online
sibility to notify Ryerson as soon as possible. The name identity to be able to access many of Ryerson’s central
on your Ryerson record is the name which will appear on computer resources including RMail (Ryerson e-mail),
your transcript and on your graduation document. the my.ryerson portal, or a workstation in the central
computer labs. The Ryerson e-mail account shall be an
To change your name in Ryerson’s records, you must official means by which students receive University com-
submit the Personal Data Change Form, found online munications.
at www.ryerson.ca/essr, to Enrollment Services and
Student Records, along with supporting documenta- To activate your account, use the ‘Account Activation’
tion in the form of either: Certificate of Birth, passport, routine available in many of the computer labs or activate
Certificate of Marriage, divorce papers, or Legal Change online at: www.ryerson.ca/accounts. Account activation
of Name Certificate. Name changes cannot be submitted for new students is available at the beginning of August.
online through RAMSS. More information about the Ryerson online identity acti-
vation process and resources available for students, can
Gradua�on Name be found at: www.ryerson.ca/ccs/myaccounts.
The name on your Ryerson record will appear on your The CCS Usersguide for Computing and Internet is avail-
graduation document, unless you notify Ryerson of any able at: www.ryerson.ca/acs/usersguide.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 29


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

ENROLLMENT/COURSE INTENTION 3. Prior to enrolling in a course, a student must verify


the relevance of the course to their curriculum
NEW STUDENT ENROLLMENT requirements. For instance, some Sociology courses
Generally speaking newly-approved students who have are classified in the Calendar as Liberal Studies (LL)
paid their tuition fees, will be automatically enrolled in and (UL). Students must ensure they are enrolling
program core/required courses, as per the published in the correct classification of a course. This can be
curriculum. During a specified open enrollment period in verified in RAMSS.
mid August, students must choose elective courses and 4. Course offerings may vary from term to term. All
can view and make changes to their timetables through courses listed within a table under a particular pro-
RAMSS, accessible at my.ryerson.ca. Students who gram may not necessarily be offered in all terms.
have not paid their tuition fees cannot be guaranteed
space in their program unless special written permission 5. Some course enrollment adjustments must be au-
has been given. thorized by the student’s program department, and
all must be initiated by the dates listed in this Calen-
During this period of Open Enrollment students are dar. Students are permitted to make changes to their
advised to make careful course choices while taking into course enrollment during the specified period each
account possible Liberal Studies restrictions; requisites, term - see Significant Dates section for enrollment
etc. To assist in determining which courses to choose and drop deadlines.
and to ensure that the courses selected will be used
toward degree requirements, students should run an 6. Course Intention/Section Confirmation: Students
Advisement Report. Advisement Reports are available have full access to Ryerson’s Administrative
for all Undergraduate full-time students and are available Management Self Service (RAMSS) to verify the
via RAMSS using the ‘My Degree Progress Report’ link. courses and sections in which they are enrolled.
Your program department or the Curriculum Advising Students are required to verify this information
Office will be able to assist you with any questions you by the deadline to add courses for the appro-
may have. priate term. Students are required to make any
necessary corrections on RAMSS or with their
COURSE INTENTION FOR RETURNING STUDENTS program department within two weeks. A $100
Returning students enrolled in degree programs will par- (subject to change) Addition to Enrollment Record
ticipate in a Course Intention process in early March for fee will be levied for each course or grade added to
the following Fall and Winter terms. a student’s enrollment after the deadline dates. Stu-
dents are academically and financially responsible
Students normally will not be allowed to enroll in courses
for all courses selected, unless they make correc-
unless they have passed the immediate prerequisite
tions by the designated deadline.
or other prior level courses. Students with outstand-
ing financial accounts from previous years will be 7. Students wishing to drop courses without academic
prohibited from further enrollment, until satisfactory penalty should consult the Significant Dates section
payment arrangements have been made. of this Calendar for deadline dates.
STUDENT ENROLLMENT RESPONSIBILITIES 8. Courses Not Counted/Course Replacement:
Students are required to submit a GPA Adjustment
Students are academically and financially responsible
Form to Enrollment Services and Student Records
for all courses and charges that accrue as a result of the
no later than the final date to add a course for the
Course Intention and/or the Open Enrollment processes,
term, to advise which courses are being substituted
unless Enrollment Services and Student Records is noti-
for previously failed courses, or of courses which
fied in writing within university deadlines (see section on
are not in their curriculum. See the GPA Adjustment
Withdrawals). These charges also apply to Chang School
Section of this Calendar for further information.
course enrollments, changes and drops. Students will not
be dropped from courses for non-attendance or non-pay- 9. Students will obtain final grades at the end of term
ment. Further, non-attendance and non-payment will not only for those courses in which they are officially
warrant the removal of courses and fee charges. enrolled. The onus is on students to ensure that they
are officially enrolled in courses being taken. A $15
GENERAL COURSE ENROLLMENT INFORMATION
(subject to change) search fee per course will be
1. Students are responsible for ensuring that the cours- charged if students have not enrolled properly but
es in which they enroll are correct and appropriate to have attended classes. There is no guarantee that
their degree plan, and will meet the requirements for grades will be found by this search.
graduation. Students must remember that they are
10. Program Change/Course Directive/Course Substitu-
financially and academically responsible for each tion: Students are required to complete the curricu-
course in which they enroll in. lum for their program as outlined in this Calendar.
2. Students are advised to run an Advisement Report It is the responsibility of each Full-time under-
prior to enrolling in courses, to determine program graduate student to access the new online Full-
requirements, and again after enrolling in courses, time Undergraduate Calendar at www.ryerson.ca/
to ensure that enrolled courses fulfill requirements. calendar each year, and follow the curriculum as
stated.

pg 30 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

It is the responsibility of each Part-time under- given until completion of both A and B parts of any multi-
graduate student to complete the curriculum term course. The A-portion of a multi-term course, there-
for their program as set out in the edition of the fore, does not appear on a students academic record or
Part-time Undergraduate Calendar of the year transript. Examples are as follows:
they were admitted to their program, unless
stated otherwise. Course Subject Area Course Title
Number
Any requests for curriculum/course directive/course
substitutions or other modifications to program GMS 750 GLOBAL Consulting to
requirements must be approved by the Chair/Direc- MANAGEMENT Management
tor of both the appropriate program and teaching
POL 27A POLITICS Canadian Politics and
departments. Course Directive/Course Substitution
Government
forms are available from the Curriculum Advising Of-
fice and at www.ryerson.ca/forms. Failure to obtain POL 27B POLITICS Canadian Politics and
written permission on the appropriate form and Government
within the established deadline will result in ineligibil-
ity to graduate. Prior to Fall 2005
11. No course can be repeated more than twice (three Single-term courses were referred to as one-term
completions in total when the original attempt is courses and multi-term courses, as two-term courses.
included). If at least one of the course attempts Two-term courses were identified by the placement of a
zero (0) as the first digit followed by any two numbers.
results in a passing grade, the course will count
Examples:
towards graduation requirements irrespective of the
sequence of grades earned. A student will receive a
Course Subject Area Course Title
PERMANENT PROGRAM WITHDRAWAL Standing
Number
after three failures in the same course. Equivalent
courses taken and failed elsewhere under a Letter of GMS 750 GLOBAL Consulting to
Permission will also be included in the three failure MANAGEMENT Management
count.
POL 027 POLITICS Canadian Politics and
Ted Rogers School of Business Management Government

Full-time students are limited to enroll in a maximum


POL 027 is a two-term course in Politics. GMS 750 is a
of seven credit courses per semester, including Chang one-term course in Global Management.
School courses. Exceptions may be made only with the
prior approval of the Ted Rogers School of Business COURSE MANAGEMENT POLICY
Management.
Students will be provided with a course outline by, or
The Ted Rogers School of Business Management at the first meeting of every course. The outline lists
students who are found to be enrolled in one or more basic course information, course description, texts and
courses in excess of the aforesaid regulations, will have readings, scheduled class and out-of-class activities,
their courses reduced accordingly at the discretion of the other course issues, course variations, relevant depart-
School. ment/school and University policies, and the evaluation
schedule. This outline represents the commitment to the
ATTENDANCE provision of a shared educational experience. Students
are responsible for knowing what is presented in the
Regular attendance at classes, seminars, and labora-
course outline.
tory periods is expected of all students. Students should
make themselves aware of specific attendance regula- Please consult the Ryerson Student Guide for details.
tions, since in many courses, participation by the student The complete Course Management policy is available at
in the classroom or laboratory is part of the total evalu- www.ryerson.ca/senate/policies.
ation. If a medical certificate is required to verify your
EXAMINATIONS
absence, please contact your family physician or the
Ryerson Health Centre at the start of the illness. It is strongly recommended that all students read the full
University Examination Policy which is found at www.
COURSE NUMBERS–ALL PROGRAMS ryerson.ca/senate.

Fall 2005 to Present 1. Final examinations may be held at the end of each
term for single-term courses, or in April for multi-
All courses are designated by letters and digits. The
term courses. The final Examination Schedule will
three letters identify the subject area. The digits identify
be available on RAMSS (my.ryerson.ca) approxi-
a unique course title. Three digits identify a single-term
mately one month prior to each examination period.
course. Two digits and an “A” or “B” identify the first half
(A) or second half (B) of a multi-term course. No grade is 2. Students are responsible for presenting themselves

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 31


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

at the place of examination on the scheduled day GRADED COURSE PERFORMANCE


and hour. Examinations may commence as early as DESIGNATIONS
8 a.m. Students who are more than 30 minutes late
for an exam will not be admitted.
Performance Letter Conversion Ryerson
3. Examinations may be held on any day of the Description Grade Range Percent- GPA
week or during the evening; on campus or at age Scale to
another designated location. Letter Grades
4. Should students discover conflicts in their examina- Excellent A+ 90 - 100 4.33
tion schedules, they should report them immediately
to their program department for resolution. A 85 - 89 4.00

5. Students with religious observance obligations on a A- 80 - 84 3.67


date that a final exam is scheduled should utilize the
B+ 77 - 79 3.33
policy ‘Accommodation of Student Religious Obser-
vance Obligations’ outlined in this calendar to make Good B 73 - 76 3.00
alternative arrangements.
B- 70 - 72 2.67
6. Absence from a Final Examination: If a student is
unable to write an examination due to illness or a C+ 67 - 69 2.33
personal/family emergency, she/he must notify her/ Satisfactory C 63 - 66 2.00
his professor and program department by telephone
or e-mail as soon as possible within 72 hours of the C- 60 - 62 1.67
exam. If applicable, the student must provide their
D+ 57 - 59 1.33
professor and program department with a completed
Ryerson medical certificate (www.ryerson.ca/forms) Marginal D 53 - 56 1.00
as soon as possible within 72 hours.
D- 50 - 52 0.67
7. At all final examinations, students must be prepared
to identify themselves with their Ryerson Photo Unsatisfactory F 0 - 49 0
Identification card (Ryerson OneCard). For students
who do not have a Photo ID card, for whatever rea-
son, Enrollment Services and Student Records will GRADED COURSE PERFORMANCE DESIGNA-
provide a temporary ID card for a particular exam, TIONS FOR THE FACULTY OF ENGINEERING,
however, students are responsible for obtaining ARCHITECTURE AND SCIENCE
replacement ID cards.
8. Situations regarding Academic Misconduct during Performance Letter Conversion Ryerson
examinations are covered in detail under the Student Description Grade Range Percent- GPA
Code of Academic Conduct, (full documentation is age Scale to
available at your program/school, in the Ryerson Letter Grades
Student Guide, or on the Senate website (www.
Excellent A+ 90 - 100 4.33
ryerson.ca/senate).
Academic Consideration: A student who, because of A 85 - 89 4.00
illness or compassionate considerations, cannot do pre- A- 80 - 84 3.67
scribed term work or cannot complete it by the pre-
scribed deadline or misses an examination, should B+ 75 - 79 3.33
request academic consideration from the faculty member Good B 70 - 74 3.00
concerned. The faculty member may require verification
of the circumstances on which the request is based. It B- 66 - 69 2.67
is recommended that students use the Ryerson Student
C+ 63 - 65 2.33
Medical Certificate available at www.ryerson.ca/forms to
accompany the request for consideration. If the problem Satisfactory C 60 - 62 2.00
affects more than one course, the student should consult
with her/his program department. C- 57 - 59 1.67

D+ 54 - 56 1.33

Marginal D 52 - 53 1.00

D- 50 - 51 0.67

Unsatisfactory F 0 - 49 0

pg 32 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

Final academic performance in each course is recorded a written statement of outstanding work to be com-
as one of the above letter grades or as one of the ‘other’ pleted and the date by which it must be completed
designations listed under Other Course Performance (or the date of the alternate final examination). The
Designations following this page. At the discretion of instructor must also file a copy of this documentation
the teaching department, performance on term work or with the Chair/Director of the teaching department/
specific assignments may be marked on a numeric scale. school.
When a numeric scale is used, it will result in a tradi-
AEG (Aegrotat) - credit granted by a Dean, in con-
tional percentile scale with ranges of conversion to letter
sultation with the instructor, only under exceptional
grades as shown in the Calendar. If any other numeric
circumstances when there has been acceptable
scale is to be used, its ranges of conversion to letter
performance in a course and some course work
grades shall be defined for the students at the start of the
remains to be completed.
course.
DEF (Deferred) - an interim grade assigned dur-
OTHER COURSE PERFORMANCE ing the investigation of academic misconduct (as
DESIGNATIONS described under the Student Code of Academic
Conduct). The DEF grade will be replaced by an of-
1. Non-graded designations acceptable for trans-
ficial course grade upon resolution of the matter.
fer credit purposes, not included in the calcula-
tion of grade point averages: F-S (Failure-Supplementary) - marginally failing
performance that may be raised to a minimum pass
PSD (Passed) - acceptable performance in a course
through a supplemental examination. Students with
graded only pass or fail (as pre-defined in the
an F-S designation must apply to write such an
course outline).
examination which will be scheduled prior to the end
CHG (Challenge) - transfer credit achieved through of the second week of classes during the next aca-
a successful challenge examination. demic term. The F-S grade will be converted only to
CRT (Credit) - transfer credit achieved through an a ‘D-’ or to an ‘F’, depending on performance. Mean-
acceptable grade in an equivalent course (as deter- while, the F-S grade is treated as an interim failed
mined by the Ryerson course teaching department) grade and is calculated in the grade point average at
completed at another post-secondary institution. zero grade points. The resulting grade point average
Such credit may be granted as a part of the admis- is normally considered to be provisional until the end
sions process. For students already enrolled in their of the period during which the redeemable failure
program, this type of credit is normally granted only would be written. If an Academic Standing cannot
on the basis of a prior Letter of Permission from the change as a result of clearing an F-S grade, the
course teaching department. provisional standing will automatically be converted
to a formal standing.
2. Other course performance designations which
may be assigned at the discretion of the teach- FNA (Failure, Non-Attendance) - awarded by the
ing department: professor when the student has been absent from
most course meetings and/or has submitted no work
INC (Incomplete) - incomplete course work or for grading. This grade will be assigned when a stu-
a missed final examination due to documented dent abandons a course without completing a formal
medical or compassionate grounds*. An INC can be withdrawal prior to established deadline dates. This
awarded only when some work remains to be com- grade is counted as a failure in the calculation of
pleted and when the completion of the outstanding grade point average.
work or an alternative final examination may result in
a passing grade. The outstanding work or alterna- 3. Designations assigned by the Office of the
tive examination must be completed by a specified Registrar that are not included in GPA calcula-
date within three months of the submission of the tions, or in establishing Academic Standing, or
INC. The INC will be replaced by an official course as academic program credit:
grade when the work is completed. If the work is not AUD (Audit) - course attended as auditor only; no
completed by the deadline, the INC will become a grade will be assigned.
grade of ‘F’. The designation INC is not included in
CNC (Course Not for Credit) - course not for credit in
calculating the grade point average, nor is it counted
the current program, this designation is recorded on
as a course credit or failed course. An INC can be
the transcript as information supplementary to the
changed to an AEG (see below) by a Dean under
grade earned in the course.
exceptional circumstances.
GNR (Grade Not Recorded) - grades have not been
*Students must petition their instructor to receive an
submitted for an entire class. The student should
INC grade within three working days or as soon as
initiate an inquiry with the faculty member and/or
reasonably possible of the missed final examination
teaching department within one month of receiving
or final assignment deadline. Supporting documen-
the GNR grade unless a grade revision is received.
tation (e.g., Ryerson Medical Certificate) must be
provided. Instructors awarding an INC grade must INP (In Progress) - indicates course work is in prog-
provide the student, within seven working days, with ress and requires at least one more term of formal

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 33


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

course enrollment and study for completion (e.g., GPA Adjustment


extended absence requires repeating the course, Only students who are active in a program for which a
or a final thesis is still in progress). The designation CGPA is calculated, may submit a GPA Adjustment re-
INP is not included in calculating the grade point av- quest. Forms are available online at www.ryerson.ca/
erage, nor as either a credit or a failed course. The essr/forms and must be submitted no later than the
INP grade remains on the student’s transcript, and final date to add a course for the term in which the GPA
a final grade is assigned for the subsequent enroll- Adjustment will apply. Only the CGPA for the current term
ment when course work has been completed. will be adjusted. Academic Standings and CGPAs from
previous terms will not be adjusted.
GRADE POINT AVERAGES (GPA)
A GPA Adjustment can occur under one of the following
A cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is calculated conditions:
as an indicator of overall academic performance and 1) Course Replacement: Permits a student to use a
is used as a criterion for graduation requirements, for new course to replace, for GPA purposes only, a
honours graduation or other academic distinctions, and previously graded Professional, Professionally-Re-
for determining Academic Standing during study in a lated, Liberal Studies course, or a course within a
program. Required Group, both of which belong to the same
group or table.
General:
• For purposes only of calculating grade point averages, 2) Course Exclusion: Permits a student to request
that certain courses be excluded from his/her CGPA
courses of single-term and multi-terms in duration will
calculation, if the course is a course that is not appli-
be given weights of 1.00 and 2.00 respectively, with
cable to the student’s program of study; OR an extra
provision for variation from this norm under excep-
course that was taken in addition to the student’s
tional circumstances;
program requirements.
• The grade point average is calculated as the sum
of the products of course weights and earned grade GPA and Transfer/Challenge Credits
points, divided by the sum of the course weights, and Courses completed at other post-secondary institutions
rounded up to the next higher second decimal place; or work experience gained prior to or after formal pro-
• The following course performance designations are gram admission will not be included in the calculation of
NOT included in calculating the grade point average GPAs. Transfer or Challenge Credits, if applicable, will be
AEG, AUD, CHG, CRT, DEF, INC, INP, GNR, and used toward graduation requirements.
PSD;
FINAL GRADES
• Courses completed prior to formal program admis-
sion will not be included in the calculation of grade Students will receive grades and an Academic Stand-
point averages. Such courses may qualify for transfer ing for single-term courses at the end of each term, and
credits towards the program and receive CRT desig- grades for multi-term courses at the end of the aca-
nations; demic year or in August for Spring/Summer courses.
Grade Reports are no longer produced in paper format.
• The designation F-S is counted as an interim failure All final grades and Academic Standings are available
grade, and is included in the grade point average at on RAMSS (my.ryerson.ca), at the end of each term,
zero grade points until a final grade is calculated; approximately 10 days after the end of the Examination
• The designation FNA is included in the grade point Period. Under the section ‘Academic Record’, students
average at zero grade points and counts as a failure can view their grades at ‘My Grades’ and their Academic
when Academic Standings are assigned; Standing at ‘My Academic Standing’ (both must be
• The grade earned for a repeated course is substi- viewed).
tuted for the previous grade in calculating subsequent Students are responsible for all books, materials, etc.,
grade point averages even if the later grade is lower, borrowed against their library cards, unless loss or theft
but both attempts are recorded on the transcript. No has been previously reported. Students who fail to return
course can be repeated more than twice. If at least books to the library or any other borrowed property to
one of the course attempts results in a passing grade, the rightful department, or fail to pay outstanding fees or
the course will count towards graduation requirements debts to Ryerson, will have their grades and transcripts
irrespective of the sequence of grades earned; withheld until the status of these items is cleared to the
• The cumulative grade point average is calculated at satisfaction of the University.
the end of each academic term for which additional To verify what is outstanding, go to ‘My Holds’ in the
course grades have been recorded on the student’s ‘Academic Record’ section of RAMSS.
transcript, and is calculated on all of the student’s Grades and transcripts will be withheld if a student has
formal Ryerson course grades in the program in which an outstanding debt to the University in excess of $10
the student is enrolled. (subject to change) or has not returned books, sup-
plies, or equipment which have a value in excess of $10
(subject to change). Students who owe the University

pg 34 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

more than this amount will receive a Withhold Notice in semester will be advised about their prospects for
lieu of their graduation award at the relevant convocation success. Such students who continue in their pro-
ceremony. Once the debt has been paid the student’s gram for the subsequent Winter semester will do so
grades and award document will be released. on PROBATION.
Also refer to the section on Transcripts. Students REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW from their
program will not be eligible for reinstatement in their
ACADEMIC STANDINGS program for 12 months. However, in cases where a
In undergraduate degree programs, each student’s further semester of study could result in a CLEAR
Academic Standing will be established from the student’s Standing by the end of that semester, students may
formal course grades at the end of each academic term request the permission of their Department/School
on the basis of the following categories and criteria for to continue to take courses on PROBATION in the
overall academic performance: immediately following semester (or a later semester
with the permission of their Department/School). If
1. CLEAR - a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) the student fails to achieve a CGPA of 2.00 at the
of at least 2.00 (except where the student has end of that semester, s/he will be REQUIRED TO
violated an approved Department/School Stand- WITHDRAW.
ing variation or, while on Probation, the student has
violated the terms of their Probationary Contract). Students who have been REQUIRED TO WITH-
Students with CLEAR Standing may continue their DRAW from a Ryerson program may not continue
program studies with no restrictions except for the their program studies. Applications for reinstate-
obligation to satisfy prerequisite requirements. ment to the student’s original program or for transfer
to another program will be considered. In such
2. PROBATIONARY - a cumulative grade point aver-
cases a student may not return to studies until 12
age (CGPA) of 1.00 to 1.99. Students with PROBA-
months have elapsed following the REQUIRED TO
TIONARY Standing may not continue their program
studies until a Probationary Contract outlining a WITHDRAW standing. No courses taken between
specific plan for studies and academic supports has when a student is REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW and
been authorized by their Department/School, and reinstatement or transfer to another program will be
signed by the student. Students who fail to have granted Ryerson credit.
such a Probationary Contract by the last date to Applications for reinstatement will be considered
add courses for the semester will have their course by faculty and/or program admission committees
enrollments and course intention requests cancelled based on criteria, assessments and/or procedures
for the term in question and will be REQUIRED TO developed by the faculty or program in consulta-
WITHDRAW (RTW) from their program unless their tion with the Registrar’s Office. Past academic
Department/School determines otherwise. performance and space availability will normally be
Students with a PROBATIONARY Standing at the considerations. Students who are reinstated to their
start of any semester will be eligible to continue their program will be reinstated on PROBATION, and will
studies in a subsequent semester as long as they be required to have a Probationary Contract.
achieve a term grade point average (TGPA) of 2.00 Some programs may reinstate students with a Pro-
or higher and provided they meet the terms of their
bationary Contract which may significantly restrict
Probationary Contract and do not violate approved
course load and require successful completion
Department/School Standing variations. Failure to
of specific program courses. Programs may also
meet the terms of the Probationary Contract as set
specify grades which must be achieved. Success-
out by the Department/School will result in the stu-
ful completion will allow the student to continue on
dents being REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW from their
PROBATION (or CLEAR Standing if a CGPA of 2.00
Ryerson program.
or higher is achieved). Students who are unsuccess-
3. REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW - Students will be ful will be permanently withdrawn from their pro-
REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW from their program for gram. Normally a student may not receive more than
one of the following reasons: one Probationary Contract of this sort.
i. A CGPA of less than 1.00 (except students en- 4. PERMANENT PROGRAM WITHDRAWAL -
rolled in their first semester); or Students will be permanently withdrawn from their
ii. A term GPA below 2.00 while on PROBATION; or program for the following reasons:

iii. Violation of any approved Department/School i. Any academic performance that would result in
Standing variation; or ‘REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW’ Standing for a second
time; or
iv. Violation of a Probationary Contract (including
unauthorized changes to the contract or failure to ii. Failure of a course required by their program for a
negotiate a Probationary Contract). third time; or

No student in their first semester at Ryerson will be iii. Failure to meet the terms of a Probationary Con-
REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW (RTW) in December. tract following return after a REQUIRED TO WITH-
Students with a GPA of less than 1.00 in their first DRAW Standing.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 35


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

Students who are permanently withdrawn from a ACADEMIC STANDING VARIATIONS


program may not apply for reinstatement into that
program. Students with a PERMANENT PROGRAM Child and Youth Care
WITHDRAWAL Standing may apply to a different A failure in CYC 30A/B or CYC 60A/B leads to PROBA-
program for the Fall semester of the following calen- TIONARY status and a second failure in the same course
dar year. leads to a REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW Standing.
5. DISCIPLINARY SUSPENSION - Students who have Collabora�ve Nursing Degree Program (see Table
been placed on DISCIPLINARY SUSPENSION (DS) below)
for Student Code of Conduct violations will not be
permitted to enroll in any course at the University Disability Studies
during their period of DISCIPLINARY SUSPEN- A grade of ‘C-’ or lower in DST 501, DST 502, DST 725
SION. Students who have served their period of and DST 99A/B will result in a PROBATIONARY stand-
DISCIPLINARY SUSPENSION must contact their ing. A second consecutive ‘C-’ in any of these courses
Department/School to make arrangements for rein- will result in a REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW Standing.
statement.

Collabora�ve Nursing Degree Program

COLLABORATIVE NURSING DEGREE NURSING POST DIPLOMA DEGREE

Standing Grade Consequence/ Grade Consequence/


Comment Comment

Clear - ‘C’ or above in all - ‘C’ or above in all


Theory* courses and a Theory* courses and a
‘Pass’ in all Practice† ‘Pass’ in all Practice†
courses. courses.

Probation - ‘C-’ or below in any - Probationary Contract - ‘C-’ or below in any - Probationary Con-
Theory* course and/or required Theory* or Practice† tract required
- an ‘F’ in any Practice† - Repeat all Theory* course regardless of - Remain on Proba-
course. course(s) with a grade overall GPA. tion until a ‘C’ or
of ‘C-’ or below, and/or above is achieved in
the Practice† course(s) all Nursing courses.
- Repeat all of the des-
ignated corequisite¶
courses with a grade
of ‘C+’ or below
- Currency plan for all
designated corequi-
site¶ courses with a
‘B-’ or above.

Required to Withdraw Students on Probation May apply for reinstate- Students on Probation May apply for rein-
who ment after one year. who statement after one
- get a ‘C-’ or below in - get a ‘C-’ or below in year.
a Theory* course other a Theory* course other
than one in which they than one in which they
previously received a previously received a
‘C-’ or below and/or ‘C-’ or below or
- get an ‘F’ in a Prac- - get a ‘C-’ or below in a
tice† course. Practice† course.

Permanent Withdrawal - ‘C’ or below in a re- - Applied regardless - Second ‘C-’ or below - Applied regardless
peated Theory* course of GPA in the same Theory* of GPA
and/or - May not apply for course or - May not apply for
- Two ‘F’s in any Prac- readmission to the - A second ‘C-’ in any readmission to the
tice† course. program. Practice† course, either program.
new or repeated.

* Nursing Theory courses: Courses with NSE, NUR ant PAT prefixes.
† Nursing Prac�ce courses: NSE 12A/B, NSE 22A/B, NSE 32A/B, NSE 417, NSE 418.
¶ Corequisite courses: All Nursing courses in a given year have designated corequisites. All clinical prac�ce courses have Nursing Theory courses as
corequisites. Please refer to the Course Descrip�ons sec�on of the calendar.

pg 36 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

Early Childhood Educa�on Students with a PROBATIONARY Standing may not con-
A failed grade in any Field Practice course (CLD 161, tinue their program studies until a specific plan of studies
CLD 262, CLD 363, CLD 464, CLD 465) will result in a has been authorized by their program and recorded with
PROBATIONARY Standing. the Office of the Registrar. Such a plan will set out a
group of specific courses (including all requirements for
Students will remain on Probation, until they have suc- the failed course) that if successfully completed, could
cessfully passed the failed course. result in a CLEAR Standing within not more than three
Given its importance and the vital role it plays in the academic terms of study. Students who fail to have a
integrity of the program, students are not permitted to fail probationary plan of studies (i.e., probationary contract)
the same field practice twice. If a student fails the same approved by their program will have their course intention
field practice course twice, the student will be assigned a requests or course enrollment cancelled for the semester
PERMANENT PROGRAM WITHDRAWAL Standing, and in which they are on PROBATION.
will be ineligible to continue in the program. A student must meet the minimum course grade require-
The School of Early Childhood Education reserves the ment for the course being repeated and maintain a Term
right, at any point during the academic term, to remove Grade Point Average (TGPA) of 2.33 for the duration of
a student from a placement site, in a situation in which the PROBATIONARY period.
clients or others are placed at risk. This will result in the Students should note that under certain circumstances, it
student receiving an ‘F’ grade. may be impossible to achieve a CLEAR Standing without
In this circumstance, students shall have established repeating and upgrading, as part of the PROBATIONARY
rights of appeal; however, they cannot remain in the program of study.
course while an appeal is underway. The appeal will be Students with PROBATIONARY Standing will be eligible
conducted promptly in order to protect student rights. to continue their studies as long as they achieve a Term
Grade Point Average (TGPA) of 2.33 or higher with no
Graphic Communica�ons Management failed grades (‘F’, or ‘F-S’) during each term of their
A failed grade in any of GRA 102, GRA 103, GRA 104, PROBATIONARY program, even when their Cumulative
GRA 202, GRA 203, GRA 204, GRA 322, GRA 323, Grade Point Average (CGPA) has not been raised to 2.33
GRA 324, GRA 422, GRA 423, or GRA 424 will result in (67 percent). Students who, while on PROBATION, raise
a PROBATIONARY Standing. their Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) to a mini-
mum 2.33 and meet the minimum course grade require-
Journalism ments and have no failures during their PROBATIONARY
Students receiving a grade of less than ‘C’ in JRN 121 studies, will normally receive an Academic Standing of
will be placed on PROBATION. As a condition of the CLEAR. Students require CLEAR Academic Standing
PROBATIONARY plan of study, students will be required in order to enroll in the first Midwifery clinical placement,
to repeat and successfully complete JRN 121. Students MWF 120.
will not be permitted to take second year JRN courses Notwithstanding the above, students are required to
until a grade of ‘C’ is obtained in JRN 121. meet the terms of the PROBATIONARY contract agreed
to with their Program Department, unless changes are
Journalism (former program - Admits prior to Fall
subsequently agreed to, in writing, with their Program
2007)
Department. Failure to meet the terms of their PROBA-
Students receiving a grade of less than ‘C’ in JRN 16A/B TIONARY contract may result in the assignment of a
or JRN 19A/B will be placed on PROBATION. As a PERMANENTLY WITHDRAWN Standing from their pro-
condition of the PROBATIONARY plan of study, students gram. Specifically, failure to successfully complete (either
will be required to successfully repeat the course(s). through failure or withdrawal without written permission
Students will not be permitted to take second year JRN of the Program) all courses stipulated in the student’s
courses until a grade of ‘C’ is obtained in JRN 16A/B PROBATIONARY plan of studies, will result in a PERMA-
and/or JRN 19A/B. NENTLY WITHDRAWN Standing.
Midwifery A failed grade in two non-clinical courses in an academic
A Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of at least term; OR a failed grade in any two clinical courses; OR
2.33 AND meeting the minimum course grade require- a second failed grade in the same course; OR failure to
ment in each enrolled course will result in a CLEAR achieve the minimum required grade in the same course
Standing. for a second time; OR a Term Grade Point Average
(TGPA) less than 2.33 or a failed course at the end of a
A Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of less than
PROBATIONARY period will result in a PERMANENTLY
2.33; a grade of less than ‘C-’ in two or more Midwifery
WITHDRAWN Standing.
foundation courses (MWF 11A/B, MWF 109, MWF 113,
MWF 114, MWF 155, MWF 201); OR a grade of less The Midwifery Program reserves the right to determine a
than ‘B-’ in MWF 12A/B, MWF 150, MWF 250, MWF student’s eligibility to participate in the clinical component
344, MWF 345; OR a grade of less than ‘C-’ in BLG of any course.
10A/B; OR one failed grade in any course listed above or The Midwifery Education program reserves the right,
in any MWF required course will result in a PROBATION- at any point during the term, to remove a student from
ARY Standing.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 37


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

a clinical placement or laboratory setting if the student patterns of behaviour place self, clients or others at risk.
exhibits unsafe clinical practice or behaviour that places This will result in the student receiving an ‘F’ grade for
clients or others at risk and/or violates the Midwifery Act the course. In this circumstance, students shall have es-
of Ontario. Such removal will result in the student receiv- tablished rights of appeal; however, they cannot remain
ing an ‘F’ grade and may result in dismissal from the in the course while the appeal is underway. The appeal
program. In this circumstance, students shall have es- will be conducted promptly in order to protect students’
tablished rights of appeal; however, they cannot remain rights.
in the course while the appeal is underway. The appeal The student may be assigned PERMANENT PROGRAM
will be conducted promptly in order to protect students’ WITHDRAWAL from the Nursing program for reasons of
rights. unprofessional behaviour or professional misconduct.
The student may be PERMANENTLY WITHDRAWN All nursing courses must be completed within five years
from the Midwifery program for reasons of unprofessional of the prerequisite professional course. (For example,
behaviour or professional misconduct. no more than five years can elapse between completion
All Midwifery clinical placement courses must be com- of Year 1 professional courses and enrollment in Year 2
pleted within four years of completing the first clinical professional courses.)
course. For example, no more than four years may
elapse between completion of MWF 120 and completion Performance Ac�ng
of MWF 410 or MWF 41A/B. The Theatre School requires that all students enrolled in
Performance Acting must achieve a satisfactory grade
Collabora�ve Nursing Degree Program - See Table on (‘C+’ or higher) in the core acting courses (THA 100,
pg 36. THA 101, THA 200, THA 201, THA 300, THA 301, THA
400 and THA 401) in order to achieve a CLEAR Stand-
Nursing Post Diploma Degree Comple�on Program
ing. Students who pass these courses with a grade
All students enrolled in the Post Diploma Degree Com- lower than ‘C+’ will be given PROBATIONARY Standing
pletion Program in Nursing must have valid or pending regardless of their overall Grade Point Average (GPA).
registration with the College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO). Students who fail any of the above courses will receive
Students are required to notify the Daphne Cockwell a REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW Standing regardless of
School of Nursing of any change in CNO registration their overall GPA. Students who receive grades below
status. Failure to attain/maintain CNO registration will ‘C+’ in any two consecutive courses above will receive a
result in WITHDRAWAL from the Nursing course(s) and REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW Standing regardless of their
a REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW status from the program. overall GPA.
The exception to the policy of CNO registration is those
students from an approved bridging program. Performance Dance
Students must achieve a grade of ‘C’ or above in all The Theatre School requires that all students enrolled in
nursing theory and practice courses (all NCL, NUC, Performance Dance must achieve a satisfactory grade
NUR courses) in order to be eligible to enroll in nursing (‘C+’ or higher) in its core dance courses (THD 100,
courses in subsequent semesters. THD 101, THD 200, THD 201, THD 300, THD 301, THD
400 and THD 401) in order to achieve a CLEAR Stand-
Students who earn a grade of ‘C-’ or below in any nursing
ing. Students who pass these courses with a grade
theory or practice course will be given a PROBATION-
lower than ‘C+’ will be given PROBATIONARY Standing
ARY Standing regardless of their overall GPA.
regardless of their overall Grade Point Average (GPA).
Students will remain on PROBATION until they receive a Students who fail any of the above courses will receive
grade of ‘C’ or above in all nursing courses. a REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW Standing regardless of
Students on PROBATION who earn a grade of ‘C-’ or their overall GPA. Students who receive grades below
below in a nursing theory course other than the nurs- ‘C+’ in any two consecutive courses above will receive a
ing theory course(s) in which they previously obtained REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW Standing regardless of their
a grade of ‘C-’ or below, OR who receive a first time ‘C-’ overall GPA.
or below in a nursing practice course, will be given a
Performance Produc�on
REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW status.
The Theatre School requires that all students enrolled
Students who receive a second grade of ‘C-’ or below in Performance Production must achieve a satisfactory
in the same nursing theory course OR, who receive grade (‘C’ or higher) in the core Production courses
a second ‘C-’ in any nursing practice course (either a (THP 101, THP 102, THP 201 and THP 202) in order to
repeated or subsequent practice course) will result in a achieve a CLEAR Standing. Students who pass these
PERMANENT PROGRAM WITHDRAWAL Standing. courses with a grade lower than ‘C’, will be given PRO-
This variation will be enacted even when the student has BATIONARY Standing regardless of their overall Grade
taken less than three courses and has not acquired a Point Average (GPA). Students who fail any of the above
cumulative grade point average. courses will receive a REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW
At any point during the academic year, the Daphne Cock- Standing regardless of their overall GPA. Students who
well School of Nursing reserves the right to terminate a receive grades below ‘C’ in any two consecutive courses
student’s experience in a nursing practice setting when above, will receive a REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW Stand-
ing regardless of their overall GPA.

pg 38 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

Primary Health Care Nurse Prac��oner Enrollment Services and Student Records websites for
Students must obtain a minimum grade of ‘B-’ in all detailed information on the various academic consid-
required courses. A grade of less than ‘B-’ constitutes erations that may be requested; necessary documents
failure of the course. such as appeal forms, medical certificates and forms for
religious accommodation; and procedural instructions.
In addition to the above, failure of one course will result Information is also available from the Departments and
in PROBATIONARY Standing status for the student. Schools, Dean’s Offices and the Secretary of Senate.
Failure of two courses, or one course twice, requires
Students are responsible for reviewing all pertinent
mandatory PERMANENT PROGRAM WITHDRAWAL
information prior to the submission of a formal academic
Standing from the program. If a student has a manda-
appeal. Incomplete appeals will not be accepted. Stu-
tory PERMANENT WITHDRAWAL, reapplication cannot
dents are responsible for ensuring that a formal appeal is
be processed at any of the Ontario Consortium Nurse
submitted by the deadline dates published in the un-
Practitioner programs for one year. dergraduate calendar, and must adhere to the timelines
Social Work established in the policy.
A failure in SWP 36A/B or SWP 51A/B leads to PROBA- TRANSCRIPTS
TIONARY Standing. A second consecutive failure in any
of these courses leads to a REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW Since September 1, 1984, all students have one academ-
Standing from the program. ic record at Ryerson. This record incorporates all courses
studied both through day school and through continuing
The Director of the School of Social Work may remove a education and contains all courses studied at Ryerson as
student from field placement and/or suspend them from well as credits granted.
the program when there is reason to conclude that the
student: Official Transcripts
a. has behaved/performed in a manner which endan- Students are eligible to receive transcripts of their aca-
gers students, clients, agency staff, faculty, or staff; or demic results or to have these results forwarded to third
parties, such as educational institutions and business
b. has harassed/abused a student, client, agency staff, organizations. Transcript requests must be made by
faculty, staff or others; or completing a Transcript Request form available at www.
c. has been convicted of, or has been charged with, a ryerson.ca/forms or at Enrollment Services and Student
criminal offence involving violent or abusive behav- Records.
iour; or The cost per individual official transcript is $10 Canadian
d. is in violation of Chapter 4 of the Canadian Associa- (subject to change) and is non-refundable. Payment
tion of Social Workers Code of Ethics (1994). methods are as follows: By mail: Visa, MasterCard,
American Express, or cheque payable to Ryerson Uni-
Urban and Regional Planning versity; By Fax: Visa, MasterCard, American Express;
Students on PROBATIONARY status and/or out-of- In-person: Visa, MasterCard, American Express, cash or
phase in the program shall normally proceed according debit. No transcript will be prepared without the required
fee payment. Student Records cannot be responsible for
to the School’s course prerequisite requirements and
transcripts lost or delayed in the mail.
shall normally complete outstanding course requirements
first. A second failed grade in any given course will lead Normal processing time for transcripts is as soon as pos-
to a REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW Standing. sible within five (5) business days, however, processing
time may be delayed during peak periods, such as the
UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC CONSIDERATION end and start of term, to as soon as possible within ten
AND APPEALS (10) business days. Students are encouraged to submit
Transcript Requests well in advance of any deadlines for
The policy is available in its entirety at www.ryerson.
which the transcript is required.
ca/senate and at www.ryerson.ca/essr/appeals and
in the Student Guide. Requests for official transcripts can be made:
Ryerson University is committed to promoting academic In person: Complete and submit the Transcript Request
success and to ensuring that students’ academic records form with payment to the Enrollment Services and Stu-
ultimately reflect their academic abilities and accomplish- dent Records or the Student Fees Office.
ments. The University expects that academic judgments By mail: Complete and submit the Transcript Request
by its faculty will be fair, consistent and objective, and form with the appropriate payment to Enrollment Ser-
recognizes the need to grant academic consideration, vices and Student Records, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto,
where appropriate, in order to support students who face Ontario, Canada M5B 2K3.
personal difficulties or events. It is also expected that
students will deal with issues which may affect aca- By fax: Complete the Transcript Form and fax with pay-
demic performance as soon as they arise. It should ment to 416-979-5236.
be understood that students can only receive grades In accordance with University policy, the student’s
which reflect their knowledge of the course material. signature is required for the release of official records.
Students should refer to the Student Guide, Senate and All officially certified transcripts will be complete and

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 39


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

unabridged. Partial transcripts will not be issued. Transfer credits cannot be used to replace a graded
course for GPA purposes.
Documents pertaining to a student’s achievement at
another institution, which may have been received by Students do not need to apply for equivalency for
Ryerson, will not normally be released or redirected. courses taken through The Chang School of Continuing
NOTE: Student Records cannot guarantee to forward Education or from a previous Ryerson program. Students
the transcripts of graduates until two weeks after the who completed similar courses through a previous Ryer-
graduation ceremony. Students who either owe money son program may apply for Course Substitution.
to Ryerson, have equipment, cage cards, and/or library
Transfer Credit Restric�ons
books overdue; wireless NetReady cards or ResNet
equipment owed to Computing and Communications Ser- Transfer credits are only assessed for Ryerson degree or
vices (CCS), are not eligible to receive transcripts until certificate students.
the status of these items is cleared to the satisfaction of Courses must have been taken within the past 10 years
the University. to be eligible for transfer credit.
Unofficial Transcripts Performance designations other than letter or percentage
Students can request an Unofficial Transcript through grades are not acceptable for transfer credit, (i.e. exam,
RAMSS at my.ryerson.ca. This transcript provides the CRT, passed, etc.).
student with an unofficial record of their complete Ryer- Transfer credits, are not granted on the basis of a Statu-
son academic history. tory Declaration or Affidavit submitted in lieu of officially
certified academic transcripts.
Advisement Reports
Full-time undergraduate students can request an Ad- Course(s) or program(s) of study used as a Basis of
visement Report from the RAMSS Student Center, ‘My Admission and/or transfer credit(s) may not be used for
Academics’ link. This Report will ensure that all course further transfer credit.
selections will fulfill degree requirements and determines Students who transfer between Ryerson programs will
those courses outstanding towards graduation require- have any Basis of Admission reassessed and must reap-
ments. ply for transfer credits.
TRANSFER CREDITS If the Offer of Admission is cancelled or revoked, all
transfer credit(s) will be automatically voided.
POLICY
Policies contained in this official calendar supersede any
Applicability of Transfer Credit toward Gradua�on
information received to the contrary. Information received
Requirements
from service or program departments or faculties must Students are cautioned that not all granted transfer
be approved in advance, in writing, from the Registrar’s credits may be applicable to their program of study and
Office. Ryerson reserves the right to assess transfer graduation requirements. To determine what transfer
credits on an individual basis and to make such changes credit(s) will apply to their program, full-time students
in transfer credit equivalencies, regulations and policies must run an Advisement Report on RAMSS Self-Service.
as may be required. Part-time students can request a Manual Advisement
Report Request from Curriculum Advising.
Transfer Credit Eligibility
If the transfer credit is not applicable, a student may wish
Transfer Credit refers to the course equivalencies to petition their program department for a Course Direc-
granted towards a program of study based on acceptable tive or Course Substitution to allow the credit to be used
academic degree/diploma level course work from an ac- towards their graduation requirements.
credited post-secondary institution.
No more than a total of 50 percent of the program’s cur-
Transfer Credit Applications will be accepted after a riculum requirements may consist of credits/advanced
student has confirmed their offer into an undergraduate standing (transfer credits, challenge credits, credits
degree program or received registration confirmation into granted on a Letter of Permission). Students who receive
a certificate program. transfer credit(s)/advanced standing must complete
Courses from accredited universities are considered for studies that normally include at least one half of the
transfer credit when successfully completed with a grade program’s curriculum.
of ‘C’ or better, where ‘C’ equals 60 percent or higher.
Courses from accredited colleges and institutions of Impact of Transfer Credit on Fees and Enrollment
technology may be considered for transfer credit when Students are responsible for frequently checking the
completed with a grade of ‘B’ or better, where ‘B’ equals results of their transfer credit application(s) on RAMSS.
70 percent or higher. Transfer Credit is recorded on the If the credit(s) granted affect course enrollment or future
Ryerson academic record as CRT (credit) and will not be course intentions, students are required to adjust their
used in the calculation of a student’s Cumulative Grade course enrollment or future course intentions within the
Point Average. Please refer to the section on Grade Point specified deadlines in the Significant Dates section of
Averages in this calendar. this official calendar.

pg 40 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

Appeals of a Transfer Credit Decision Ted Rogers School of Business Management Direct
Decisions with a denied status can be appealed only as Entry students are not required to apply for transfer cred-
long as additional supporting documentation can be pro- it for courses which are part of the exempted first through
vided. Appeals must be made in writing to the Transfer fourth semesters of their program in order to fulfill minor
Credit Unit, POD-363, and must include a completed requirements.
Transfer Credit Application Form, course outline, and a Direct Entry students may apply for the same number
detailed letter outlining the reasons for the appeal based of transfer credits as the number of their reachback
on course content concerns and not on personal opinion. courses. For example, if five reachbacks were assigned,
A student has one year from when the original denied students may only submit a maximum of five transfer
credit is posted on RAMSS to appeal the decision. Nor- credit application submissions. If the number of transfer
mally students cannot appeal a denied decision that was credits granted is less than the number of reachback
based on accreditation of the external institution or if the courses assigned, then students may at a later date
minimum grade has not been met. submit additional Transfer Credit Applications up to the
maximum number of reachback courses assigned.
Transfer Credits for Students Transferring Between
Ryerson Programs Transfer Credit will not be granted using any Community
Students approved into a different Ryerson program may College course for ACC 414, ACC 514, FIN 300, FIN 401,
need to have their transfer credits reassessed. Some MKT 300 and MKT 400.
of the transfer credits that were previously granted may
Engineering Students and Transfer Credits
be applicable to the new program and will be confirmed
by the Transfer Credit Unit upon switching programs. Transfer credits for core and professional engineering
PRE GEN (Generic Professionally Related) credits will courses will ONLY be granted at the time of admission
be automatically removed from the record and students and students will be notified on their Offer of Admis-
will need to reapply to have the external courses evalu- sion to an engineering program. Engineering students
ated and granted towards the new program. Students with questions about core and professional engineering
will also have the opportunity to apply for transfer credits transfer credits should contact the Faculty of Engineer-
that were previously denied while enrolled in their former ing, Architecture and Science.
program. Engineering applicants cannot expect to receive any
transfer credits in an engineering discipline or engineer-
Liberal Studies Transfer Credits ing related discipline courses if their applicable post
To be eligible for a lower level liberal studies trans- secondary education was not completed at a program
fer credit a course must have a written out-of-class accredited by the Canadian Engineering Accreditation
assignment(s) totalling in the range of at least 1,200 to Board (CEAB).
1,500 words; for an upper level liberal studies transfer
Engineering students may be eligible to apply for liberal
credit, a written out-of-class assignment(s) totalling in the
studies transfer credits or for non-professional engi-
range of at least 1,500 to 2,000 words. Transfer credit will
neering courses such as CMN and ECN subject areas.
not be granted for liberal studies credits using introducto-
Students may apply for these credits through the Transfer
ry level courses from college. Upper level liberal studies
Credit Unit after confirming their Offer of Admission.
credits will not be granted using courses from college.
Please note that some courses are not eligible for credit
HOW TO APPLY
in your program. For a list of program restricted liberal
studies courses, please refer to the liberal studies restric- Online Applica�ons
tions within Tables A and B.
Ryerson undergraduate students who have confirmed
Cer�ficate Transfer Credits their Offer of Admission are eligible to submit online
transfer credit applications for courses that were com-
Continuing education certificate students may only apply
pleted at accredited Ontario colleges or universities.
for transfer credits for courses listed within the certifi-
cate they are currently registered in, and use the paper Online applications are available via the ‘Evaluate My
Transfer Credit Application Form once registered in a Transfer Credits’ link on RAMSS. Complete instructions
certificate program has been confirmed. for applying online are available online at www.ryerson.
ca/transfercredits and on the Transfer Credit Job Aids on
Direct Entry Students and Transfer Credits RAMSS.
Students granted admission to a Direct Entry program
are not required to complete courses in the exempted Paper-Based Applica�ons
semester(s) to fulfill their core program/major require- All confirmed Ryerson students can use the paper-based
ments unless specifically told to do so or assigned reach- Transfer Credit Application Form to apply for transfer
backs in their Offer of Admission. For example, first and credit from any accredited post-secondary institution.
second year courses will not appear as transfer credits. Transfer Credit Application Forms are available online at
The Advisement Report will outline remaining require- www.ryerson.ca/forms and at the Office of Enrollment
ments including any additional courses as outlined in the Services and Student Records, POD-70. One application
Offer of Admission. form should be submitted for each external course being

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 41


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

used to apply for transfer credit. Complete instructions The final date for newly approved students to apply
are available online at www.ryerson.ca/transfercredits or for transfer credit and have the results for the start
on the back of the form. Transfer Credit decisions will be of the 2010/2011 academic year is August 6, 2010
available via ‘Transfer Credit Report’ in RAMSS. (with the exception of students approved after this date).
Applications received after this date will be assessed for
Course Outlines the start of the Winter 2011 Term.
Students who apply online and whose course(s) appear
The final date for students approved Fall 2010 to apply
as ‘No Rule’ must submit course/teaching outlines to the
for transfer credit and be assessed for the start of the
Transfer Credit Unit as soon as possible to complete their
Winter 2011 Term is November 26, 2010.
application. Students submitting paper-based Transfer
Credit Application Forms must include detailed course Students approved Fall 2010 have until April 30, 2011 to
outline(s) with their application unless advised otherwise. apply for any remaining transfer credits.
Course outlines must be in English and include the A $50 (subject to change) Transfer Credit Applica-
course title, course number, calendar type description, tion Late Fee applies to all returning undergradu-
objectives, outline of delivery modes and an evaluation ate students applying for transfer credits. Students
scheme that includes type, length and weight of assign- approved Fall 2009 have until April 30, 2010 to apply for
ments. Current course outlines will be accepted as long transfer credits without being subject to the late fee.
as the course title or course number has not changed.
CHALLENGE CREDITS
If the original material is not in English, a certified trans-
lation of the course outline is required as well as the Ryerson’s Challenge Credit policy enables students to
original course outline. Exception: uncertified translations earn academic credit for learning and experience outside
of French course outlines will be accepted. of the traditional post-secondary environment. This gives
students the opportunity to be examined in, and receive
Students are encouraged to keep a copy of all course credit for, a recognized Ryerson course, without meeting
outlines for their records as they are destroyed once a the normal requirements of enrollment, attendance, and
transfer credit decision has been made. instruction.
Incomplete Applica�ons The cost per challenge is $175 (subject to change).
Students will be notified in writing if their transfer credit Complete information and applications for Challenge
application is incomplete and if additional information Credits are available from the Enrollment Services and
must be submitted before processing can continue. Student Records counter. A successful Challenge Credit
is recorded on the student’s academic record as a CHG,
Official transcripts must be included with applications if and is not included in the student’s Grade Point Average.
they were not previously submitted to Ryerson. A failed Challenge Credit is not recorded on a student’s
If required course outline(s) are not received by the academic record and again is not included in the stu-
Transfer Credit office within six weeks from applying on- dent’s Grade Point Average.
line, the courses will be removed from the Transfer Credit Not all courses are available for challenge; consult the
Report on RAMSS. If students would still like to have the teaching department of the course you want to challenge.
courses evaluated for transfer credits after this six week A maximum of five single-term Challenge Credits may be
period has elapsed, they may submit the course outline acquired in a degree program. A maximum of two single-
to Enrollment Services and Student Records at POD-70. term Challenge Credits may be obtained in a certificate
An incomplete application will be kept by the Transfer program.
Credit Unit for one year from the date of the incomplete A student may not challenge a course in which he or
notification. If no additional information is received within she is or has previously enrolled at Ryerson or any other
this time period the application form and any other sup- institution, or which he or she has already challenged and
porting documentation will be destroyed. If a student has previously failed.
would like to pursue an outstanding decision they must
No more than a total of 50 percent of a program’s re-
re-apply using a paper-based Transfer Credit Application quirements may consist of credits/advanced stand-
Form. ing (Transfer Credits, Challenge Credits or credits
APPLICATION DEADLINES granted on a Letter of Permission).
Students are strongly advised to apply for transfer credits Challenge Credit policies contained in this official calen-
as soon as they have confirmed their Offer of Admission. dar supercede any information received to the contrary.
Confirming transfer credits early facilitates course plan- Information received from service or program depart-
ning and prevents students from enrolling in courses that ments or faculties must be approved in advance, in writ-
could be eligible for transfer credit. ing, from the Registrar’s Office.

Students in the process of completing post-secondary NOTE: ‘Special Students’ and students who have a SUS-
studies must wait until final academic transcripts are PENDED Academic Standing are not eligible to apply for
available as applications cannot be processed until final Challenge Credits.
and official certified academic transcripts are received by Students must have received and accepted an Un-
the Transfer Credit Unit. dergraduate Offer of Admission or have enrolled in a

pg 42 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education can submit the form to the Curriculum Advising Office
Certificate program before they are eligible to apply for a c/o Enrollment Services and Student Records. Curricu-
Challenge Credit. lum Advising will assess the suitability of the substitu-
tion only and authorizations will be recorded. Approved
LETTERS OF PERMISSION Course Substitutions/Course Directives will be reflected
Students who wish to take courses at another accred- on Advisement Reports available on RAMSS. Students
ited post-secondary institution for credit towards their will be notified by Ryerson e-mail if requests have been
Ryerson Degree or Certificate must apply for a Letter of denied.
Permission prior to enrolling to ensure that the course(s), PLEASE NOTE: Forms should be filled in, signatures
if completed successfully, will be credited towards their obtained, and approvals received BEFORE the sub-
program. Applications for Letters of Permission are avail- stituting course is taken.
able online at www.ryerson.ca/forms.
Policies contained in the official calendars supercede any
Students are responsible for making formal application to information received to the contrary. Information received
the institution where they intend to study. Upon comple- from service or program departments or faculties must
tion of the course(s), students are required to complete be approved in advance, in writing, from the Registrar’s
a Ryerson Application for Transfer Credit (also available Office.
online) and provide an officially certified transcript of
final results. Transfer credit is recorded on the Ryer- GRADUATION AND CONVOCATION
son academic record as CRT and is not included in the
GRADUATION PROCEDURES
calculation of the student’s Grade Point Average. The fee
for each Letter of Permission is $40 (subject to change). Apply online at: my.ryerson.ca (RAMSS)
Apply early. Convocation information at: www.ryerson.ca/convocation
No more than a total of 50 percent of a program’s re- Application to Graduate deadlines: see Significant
quirements may consist of credits/advanced stand- Dates section of this calendar.
ing, (transfer credits, challenge credits or credits Students enrolled in their final course, year or se-
granted on a Letter of Permission). mester of their program must apply to graduate by
Transfer credit is dependent upon achieving a grade of the appropriate deadlines. A $40 (subject to change
‘C’ or better, where ‘C’ equals 60 percent or higher from a and non-refundable) Administration Fee will be payable
University or ‘B’ or better, where ‘B’ equals 70 percent or at time of application. Students can submit the fee by
higher from a Community College. credit card when applying to graduate online via RAMSS,
or in person by cash or cheque with their Application to
NOTE: ‘Special Students’ and students who have a SUS-
Graduate, if payment by credit card is not an option.
PENDED standing are not eligible to apply for Letters of
Permission. Degrees and certificates are awarded to students who
successfully complete programs as prescribed by Sen-
Students must have received and accepted an Under-
ate. Convocation exercises will take place in the Spring
graduate Offer of Admission or have enrolled in a G.
and Fall of each year. Please note it is the student’s
Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education Certifi-
responsibility to ensure that all courses required for
cate program before they are eligible to apply for a Letter
graduation have been successfully completed and that
of Permission.
they make formal application to graduate (by the deadline
Policies contained in this official calendar supercede any date) during their graduating semester or year. Students
information received to the contrary. Information received can confirm their application to graduate has been re-
from service or program departments or faculties must ceived by the university by checking the Student Admin
be approved in advance, in writing, from the Registrar’s Centre in RAMSS. The late fee for applications to gradu-
Office. ate is $50 (subject to change and non-refundable). Stu-
dents may withdraw their application to graduate, if they
COURSE SUBSTITUTION / COURSE DIRECTIVE do so by the deadline date as published in this calendar.
A Course Substitution/Course Directive assesses the NOTE: NO APPLICATIONS TO GRADUATE WILL BE
suitability of substituting a Ryerson course that is not ACCEPTED AFTER THE FINAL DEADLINE, WITH
part of the normal curriculum for a course within a THE EXCEPTION OF ANY DATE STAMPED COPY
student’s program. In some cases, the required course OF AN APPLICATION OR ONLINE CONFIRMATION,
is not being offered in the term requested by the stu- VERIFYING SUBMISSION OF THE APPLICATION
dent, or it may be as a result of changes to a program’s PRIOR TO THE DEADLINE.
curriculum or a transfer credit. The substitute course
Should a student complete, prior to graduation, the
must be of equal value (course weight) and same level of
requirements for two options/majors of the same degree
difficulty and can only be used once towards graduation
program, the options/majors will be reflected on the
requirements. Substitution forms are available online at
academic (transcript) record. Depending on the program,
www.ryerson.ca/forms.
it may also be recorded on the graduation award. Such
Approval, by way of signatures from both the teaching students must first obtain permission, as well as a pro-
and program departments is required before students gram of study, from the program department concerned

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 43


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

and must indicate the request for a double option/major graduation. This report does not represent an irrevocable
on the Application to Graduate (paper only). Please contract between the student and the University.
note that it is not possible to declare two options/majors
The official status of degree requirements will be ap-
when applying on-line. Students applying on-line should
proved in your final year by the Curriculum Advising Of-
indicate their primary option/major and then notify the
fice once an application to graduate is received.
Curriculum Advising Unit of their intent to graduate with
two options/majors. It is the responsibility of the student to understand and
to meet the requirements for graduation. If inaccuracies
For degree recipients, Minors will not be indicated on
are found, students should identify the problem(s) and
the graduation award document, but will be recorded on
contact their program department.
the official transcript. Depending on the program, the
major/option may be recorded on the graduation award; GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
however, the majority of majors/options are only reflected
on the transcript. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that all courses
required for graduation have been successfully complet-
Students who are eligible to graduate from a degree ed and they apply to graduate.
program regardless of whether they have completed the
requirements to also obtain a minor within their program To be eligible for their program’s graduation award, as
of study, will graduate with a degree. authorized by Senate, students must have met the follow-
ing academic requirements:
Graduates who wish to have their original graduation
document reissued should complete a Document Reissue 1. Successful completion of all courses in the pro-
Request form, available online at www.ryerson.ca/forms. gram’s curriculum with at least a minimum pass-
The fee for replacement of the graduation document is ing grade (or a non-graded course credit) in each
$70 (subject to change). course; AND
Students who have a Negative Service Indicator (check 2. Achievement of a cumulative grade point average of
on RAMSS for this) for either an outstanding debt in ex- 2.00 or higher in graded Ryerson courses; AND
cess of $10 (subject to change) or have equipment, cage
cards, and/or library books overdue, wireless NetReady 3. Completion of the program’s curriculum within a time
cards or ResNet equipment belonging to Computing and span from first enrollment to graduation that normal-
Communications Services as of the final date to clear ly does not exceed the number of years calculated
their record for graduation, will receive a Withhold No- as follows:
tice in lieu of their graduation award at their convoca-
(a) for full-time programs, the maximum number of
tion ceremony.
years is the number of years scheduled for full-time
Students must clear their record and supply proof of study after admission multiplied by 2 (typically 8
clearance to Curriculum Advising prior to convoca- years);
tion to receive their official document at the ceremo-
nies or to Enrollment Services after the ceremonies, (b) for full-time co-op programs, the maximum
to receive their award document or an officially number of years is the number of years scheduled
certified transcript. for full-time study (including co-op semesters) after
While every effort has been made to ensure that only admission multiplied by 2 (typically 10 years);
eligible students graduate, errors can occur, and the (c) for part-time degree programs, the maximum
Registrar’s Office will contact the student/graduate if a number of years is the number of single-term
graduation eligibility statement or an award document
courses required (or equivalent) divided by 3;
has been issued in error. Eligibility statements and/or
award documents WILL be revoked until all outstanding (d) for part-time certificate programs, the maximum
graduation requirements have been met. Official tran- number of years is 6.
scripts will be withheld until documents awarded in error
have been returned to the University. Under extenuating circumstances, students may be
granted permission by the Dean of the relevant Fac-
After graduating, a student’s Cumulative Grade Point ulty or School to extend these time limits. In order
Average (CGPA) for their program of studies is final-
to graduate, a student will be required to meet the
ized. Students cannot upgrade their CGPA in a Ryerson
academic requirements in effect when the extension
program after graduation from the program. Similarly,
students may only meet requirements for the Ryerson is granted or such alternative requirements as may
Minors during their Ryerson program studies. A student be stipulated by the Program, School or Department
cannot become eligible for a Ryerson Minor after gradua- in keeping with Ryerson’s academic policies.
tion from their Ryerson program. Students should be aware that even though they
ADVISEMENT REPORT may not be attending Ryerson for one or more
semesters, they continue to use up their time span
Students are advised to regularly run a Advise-
calculated to complete their program of study; AND
ment Report at my.ryerson.ca (RAMSS) to track their
progress through their program’s curriculum towards 4. Completion as a Ryerson student enrolled in the

pg 44 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

program, studies that normally include at least the must submit proper documentation to substantiate the
final one half of the program’s curriculum; name change, for example, a copy of your marriage
certificate. Please note that you cannot have your name
(a) All applicable continuing education courses may changed on your official academic record (transcript).
be used to meet Ryerson degree or diploma require-
Your record will be reviewed to confirm your gradua-
ments;
tion status, and a replacement document will be created
(b) Students enrolled in (or who have graduated and sent to you by mail. This process can take up to 10
from) Ryerson degree or diploma programs, may weeks.
pursue a certificate by completing 50 percent of the
Copies
required number of courses as an enrolled Chang
If you wish to have officially certified photocopies of your
School student in a certificate program. award document, you must bring your original graduation
Students should be aware that some certificates are document along with the number of photocopies to En-
restricted to students enrolled in, or graduated from, rollment Services and Student Records (POD-70). There
is a $20 fee (subject to change) for the first certified copy
certain degree programs; AND
and $5 for each additional copy. This service is available
5. Must have been formally admitted to, and enrolled in in person only.
the program for which the award is sought. Application forms are available online and at The Office
of Enrollment Services and Student Records.
GRADUATION CONVOCATION CEREMONY
HONOURS GRADUATION
The Graduation Ceremony, known as Convocation,
takes place twice a year in the Spring (typically early to Students graduating from a degree program with an
mid-June) and in the Fall (typically late October). You overall cumulative grade point average of 3.50 or higher
can check out dates in advance at www.ryerson.ca/ will graduate with ‘Honours’ and will have this academic
convocation/dates. Visit www.ryerson.ca/convocation distinction recorded on their official transcript and on
for complete details. their graduation award document.

GRADUATION IN ABSENTIA GRADUATION REQUIREMENT VARIATIONS

Students not planning to attend the Convocation Child and Youth Care
Ceremony, are required to notify the university. The In addition to fulfilling Ryerson University’s Graduation
university must be notified of a students non-atten- Requirements (see previous section), students in the full-
dance and whether the student will be picking up their time undergraduate Child and Youth Care program are
academic award during the pick-up period or wish to required to obtain a minimum grade of ‘C’ in all required
have it mailed. Students are required to provide the professional second, third and fourth year courses.
University with the address they want to have their Students must receive a Pass grade (‘PSD’) in each of
document mailed to. Confirm the above information at the internship courses (CYC 30A/B and CYC 60A/B) to
www.ryerson.ca/convocation/rsvp graduate.
After the two week pick up period, any remaining award Child and Youth Care Advanced Standing program
documents will be mailed to the address students have students, in addition to fulfilling Ryerson University’s
provided on the RSVP site. Students who do not RSVP Graduation Requirements (see previous section), must
will be mailed their document to theicurrent address as receive a minimum grade of ‘C’ in all required profes-
indicated on RAMSS. There is a $70 document reissue sional courses taken here at Ryerson.
fee for replacing lost documents (see below).
Midwifery
Please note that all outstanding fees owed to the Uni-
versity must be cleared in order to receive your award In addition to fulfilling Ryerson University’s Graduation
document (this applies whether you attend Convocation Requirements (see previous section), students in the
or you are graduating in absentia). Midwifery program are required to obtain the following:
1. a minimum grade of ‘B-’ in MWF 12A/B or MWF
AWARD DOCUMENT REISSUE/COPIES 150, MWF 250, MWF 344, MWF 345 in order to
proceed to higher-level midwifery courses. Students
Reissues
with less than a ‘B-’ will be placed on academic
If you have lost or damaged your original award gradu- PROBATION and students who receive less than a
ation document (diploma/degree/certificate), require an ‘B-’ for a second time in MWF 12A/B or MWF 150,
additional copy of your document, or if you have had a
MWF 250, MWF 344, MWF 345 will be REQUIRED
legal name change since the time you graduated, you
TO WITHDRAW from the program.
may request a document reissue by submitting a ‘Gradu-
ation Document Reissue Application Form’ along with a 2. a minimum grade of ‘C-’ in BLG 10A/B before pro-
cheque or money order for $70 (subject to change) made ceeding to MWF 201.
payable to Ryerson University.
3. a minimum grade of ‘C-’ in all but one of the follow-
If the request is due to a legal name change and you ing courses: MWF 11A/B, MWF 109, MWF 113,
want this name to appear on your award document, you MWF 114, MWF 155, MWF 201. A grade of ‘D’ or

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 45


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

above in at most one course from the above list sional category of courses in their program. A Minor is
is acceptable. Students who receive less than a a concentration of six or more, single-term courses or
‘C-’ in more than one of the above courses will be the equivalent with a coherence based upon discipline,
placed on academic PROBATION and students who theme and/or methodology.
receive less than ‘C-’ for a second time in the same
Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson
course will be REQUIRED TO WITHDRAW from the
subject to:
program.
• the Minor’s subject area is not within the same subject
4. an overall academic performance of at least a cumu- area as the student’s major area of program study
lative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.33 in graded (e.g., a Business Management - Accounting major
Ryerson courses. student is not eligible to earn an Accounting Minor);
5. completion of all studies within seven years of first • the inclusion of at least one-half of the Minor’s
approval. courses included in the student’s program;
• space availability in the courses that constitute the
Nursing - Collabora�ve and Post-Diploma Programs Minor;
In addition to fulfilling Ryerson University’s Gradua- • the completion of appropriate prerequisites;
tion Requirements (see previous section), students in • timetable compatibility.
all Nursing programs are required to have obtained a Student’s priority should be given to enrollment in, and
minimum grade of ‘C’ in all nursing theory and practice the completion of, their program’s graduation require-
courses (NCL, NUC, NUR, NSE, PAT). ments. Students are cautioned that taking courses
over and above basic program requirements in order
Nursing - Primary Health Care Nurse Prac��oner to earn a Minor, may adversely affect overall academic
In addition to fulfilling Ryerson University’s Graduation performance and jeopardize Academic Standing. Extra
Requirements (see previous section), students in the courses may result in additional fees. Students on
Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioner program are PROBATIONARY standing will not be authorized to take
required to have obtained a minimum grade of ‘B-’ in all extra courses for the purposes of earning a Minor.
required courses.
A maximum of two single-term (or equivalent)
Nutri�on and Food professional/compulsory/required courses may be
In addition to fulfilling Ryerson University’s Graduation applied towards the Minor.
Requirements (see previous section), students graduat- Students are not permitted to earn more than one
ing from the Nutrition and Food program after June 2006 Minor. Minor courses cannot be substituted.
will be required to have one interdisciplinary or interna-
Successful completion of the requirements for all Mi-
tional course, course project (charrette) or exchange
nors will be reflected on all Ryerson official transcripts.
experience as part of their degree requirements. Students may only meet the requirements for a Minor
Social Work during their Ryerson program studies. A student cannot
become eligible for a Ryerson Minor after graduation
In addition to fulfilling Ryerson University’s Graduation from their Ryerson program. It is the student’s responsibil-
Requirements (see previous section), students in the ity to apply for the Minor at the same time as they apply to
Social Work program are required to have attained a graduate (they are two separate procedures on RAMSS).
cumulative grade point average of 2.00 (‘C’) in the fol-
lowing Social Work courses: SWP 130, SWP 131, SWP NOTE: Students should also be aware, that if they are
302, SWP 402, SWP 31A/B, SWP 538, SWP 638, SWP eligible to graduate from the program, regardless of
50A/B, SWP 331, and SWP 341. whether they have completed the requirements of the
Minor they have applied for, they will still graduate from
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR OUT-OF-PHASE the program.
STUDENTS
LIBERAL STUDIES POLICY
Given changes to Ryerson program curriculum from
year to year, out-of-phase students may not be subject Students must complete Liberal Studies as part of the
to the curriculum requirements presented in the CUR- requirements for graduation in all Ryerson programs.
RENT Calendar. Students are required to complete the Such studies must be in disciplines outside the student’s
curriculum for the years they attended from first approval, field of professional specialization; their purpose is to
unless stated otherwise. For example, students first ap- develop the capacity to understand and appraise the
proved in Fall 2009, must complete all first year courses social and cultural context in which graduates will work
listed in the 2009-2010 calendar and all courses listed as professionals and live as educated citizens.
in the 2010-2011 calendar for second year, etc. Stu-
These studies are offered at two levels: the Lower (LL),
dents are responsible to ensure that all other graduation which are normally taken during the first two years of a
requirements are met. four-year program, and the Upper (UL), which are nor-
MINORS POLICY mally taken during the last two years.
Students at Ryerson may earn a Minor outside their core The courses offered at each Level are listed in Table
program/major/option, and primarily, outside the profes- A and Table B. Tables A and B do not represent all

pg 46 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE

Liberal Studies courses at Ryerson, they list only the all courses and charges, unless the University has been
courses that are planned to be offered for the coming notified in writing by the appropriate deadline dates.
year.
Undergraduate program students who do not have any
The required number of Lower Level Liberal Stud- course enrollments for more than three semesters will
ies courses, and of Upper Level, varies according to be deemed inactive and ineligible to enroll in courses.
program, and is specified in the program overview of Students who are inactive may re-activate their status
each program published in this calendar. through their program department.
NOTE: Certain courses listed in Table A and Table B due Students who do not have any course enrollments for
to their close relation to the professional fields, cannot more than six semesters will be discontinued from their
be taken for Liberal Study credit by students in some program. Students who have been discontinued from
programs. A list of these programs and the restricted their program, must apply for re-admission through the
courses is provided following Table A and Table B in this Office of Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment.
Calendar. Re-admission is not guaranteed. Students should be
Students are responsible for selecting appropriate aware that even though they are not attending Ryerson
courses. They should consult the descriptions of for one or more semesters, they continue to use up the
their programs published in this calendar with care. timespan calculated to complete their program of study.
Consultations with Liberal Studies Advisors during For more information on timespan, please refer to the
Open Enrollment in late August-early September and Graduation Requirements section of this calendar.
in early January is recommended if students have
any uncertainty about the appropriateness of their KEEPING RYERSON INFORMED OF CURRENT
intended course enrollment selections. ADDRESS
Students are advised that not all Liberal Studies courses All students in full- and part-time undergraduate
will be offered in each semester. Where space con- degree programs are required to activate Ryerson
straints make it impossible to provide a student with a re- online identity to be able to access many of Ryer-
quested Liberal Studies elective, the student must make son’s central computer resources including RMail
arrangements to enroll for an alternative Liberal Studies (Ryerson e-mail), the my.ryerson portal or a work-
elective during Open Enrollment. station in the central computer labs. Ryerson e-mail
shall be an official means by which students receive
Courses not identified as either (LL) or (UL) are NOT
University communications.
Liberal Studies courses and will not be used towards
the fulfillment of a Liberal Studies Requirement for gradu- Important mailings will go out to students prior to and
ation purposes. during the term. It is essential that all students keep En-
rollment Services and Student Records informed of any
APPLICATION TO WITHDRAWAL PROCEDURES change in their permanent home address and/or mailing
address, otherwise Ryerson cannot be responsible for
Withdrawal in Good Academic Standing students not receiving material through the mail.
Students who find it necessary to discontinue their
The quickest and easiest way to keep all addresses
program for any reason should initiate their withdrawal by
complete, correct and up-to-date is to use my.ryerson.ca
requesting an Application to Withdraw from Enrollment
(RAMSS).
Services and Student Records or at www.ryerson.ca/
forms. Change of address forms are available from Enrollment
Services and Student Records or online at www.ryerson.ca/
Students are considered officially withdrawn, in good essr.
Academic Standing, when they obtain the appropriate
signatures and return the completed application to Enroll- Students who have applied to graduate and wish to
ment Services and Student Records by the appropri- change the address submitted on their application form,
ate deadline date. Please refer to the Significant Dates should do so directly at my.ryerson.ca (RAMSS).
section of this calendar for deadlines. If a student wishes
OPERATIONAL POLICIES
to re-enter the program at a later date, an application for
re-admission must be submitted to the Office of Under- Specific criteria defined for graduation requirements,
graduate Admissions. Re-admission is not guaranteed. honours graduation, Academic Standing, and for course
weights are intended to be university-wide standards.
Program Discon�nua�on/Stop Out/Non Return However, amended or additional criteria may be autho-
Students who decide not to return to Ryerson after rized by Senate for a particular program or Faculty. Refer
completion of the academic year and have completed the to the sections in this calendar on Graduation Require-
course intention process for the next academic year must ment Variations and Academic Standing Variations for
inform Enrollment Services and Student Records in writ- more details.
ing by September 1 for the Fall term; January 4 for the Only final course grades, with the exception of the interim
Winter term; and April 30 for the Spring/Summer term. grade ‘F-S’, will be used as a basis for determining Aca-
Students are academically and financially responsible for demic Standing.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 47


THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE / GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION

Academically equivalent courses (as determined by the GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION


Department teaching the course) offered through any
Ryerson academic organizational unit, have the same Student Codes of Academic
academic status for purposes of graduation and Aca-
and Non-Academic Conduct .................................... 48
demic Standing as the courses designated and normally
offered for a program’s curriculum. This principle of Community Regulations .............................................. 49
academic equivalence does not preclude administrative Financial Responsibility .............................................. 49
limitations on student’s enrollment in a particular course
or course section if enrollment is desired in courses other Academic Accommodation of Students with
than those intended for a particular program. Eligibility of Disabilities ................................................................ 49
use for equivalent courses may be affected by Ryerson’s
residency policy. See item 4 under Graduation Require- Accommodation of Student Religious Observance
ments. Obligations ............................................................... 49
Grades for Ryerson courses completed prior to a Computer Services/Facilities ...................................... 49
student’s formal admission to a Ryerson program will not
Library Services and Facilities .................................... 50
normally be included in the student’s cumulative grade
point average. If applicable, these courses will be used Student Identification Cards - Ryerson OneCard ....... 50
for graduation requirement purposes.
Animals on Campus .................................................... 51
An Academic Standing, which may impose restrictions
Consumption of Alcohol .............................................. 51
on a student, may result from either unsatisfactory aca-
demic performance or serious violation of the University’s Discrimination and Harassment Prevention Policy ..... 51
Codes of Conduct. Access to University Facilities..................................... 51
In the application of all academic policies, students have Lockers ........................................................................ 51
established rights of academic appeal.
Posters ........................................................................ 52
Safety .......................................................................... 52
Security and Emergency Services .............................. 52
Smoking on Campus ................................................... 52
Telephones .................................................................. 52
Parking ........................................................................ 52

STUDENT CODES OF ACADEMIC AND NON-ACA-


DEMIC CONDUCT
Information on Academic Integrity can be found at
www.ryerson.ca/academicintegrity.
For information on student non-academic matters, please
visit www.ryerson.ca/studentcode.
Please refer to the complete Ryerson University
Student Code of Academic Conduct and the Student
Code of Non-Academic Conduct at www.ryerson.ca/
senate.
Intellectual freedom and honesty are essential to the
sharing and development of knowledge. In order to
demonstrate Ryerson’s adherence to these fundamental
values, all members of the community must exhibit integ-
rity in their teaching, learning, research, evaluation, and
personal behaviour.
The Ryerson University Code of Academic Conduct ap-
plies to the academic activities, both on and off campus,
of all students enrolled in courses at the University. Ryer-
son students are responsible for familiarizing themselves
with this policy.
The Ryerson Student Code of Academic Conduct defines
academic misconduct, the processes the University will
follow when academic misconduct is suspected, and the
consequences that can be imposed if students are found
to be guilty of misconduct.

pg 48 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION

The University recognizes the gravity of a charge of the terms of the Ontario Human Rights Code. This oc-
academic misconduct and is committed to handling the curs through a collaborative process that acknowledges
disposition of such charges in a respectful, timely and a collective obligation to develop an accessible learning
thoughtful manner. The University will apply this policy in environment that both meets the needs of students and
a manner that is consistent with the principles of natural preserves the essential academic requirements of the
justice and the rights of students to a timely and fair as- University’s courses and programs. This policy reflects
sessment of their academic performance. the shared responsibility of students with disabilities,
instructors, Departments/Schools, Faculties, the Access
The Ryerson Student Code of Non-Academic Conduct
Centre and administrative staff to exercise flexibility and
reflects an expectation that students conduct themselves
creativity in the provision of academic accommodations.
in a manner consistent with the educational objectives
of the University, in accordance with generally accepted The complete policy can be viewed on the Senate web-
standards of behaviour, and in accordance with pub- site: www.ryerson.ca/senate.
lished University regulations and policies.
ACCOMMODATION OF STUDENT RELIGIOUS
Instructors1 and staff members have a responsibility to OBSERVANCE OBLIGATIONS
take action if they suspect either Code of Conduct has
Refer to www.ryerson.ca/forms; www.ryerson.ca/equity;
been violated. The procedures described in the Codes
www.ryerson.ca/senate for the complete policy on Reli-
have been designed to provide a fair process in such
gious Observance Obligations*.
matters. It is imperative that all members of the commu-
nity abide by the Codes in order to maintain an environ- Ryerson recognizes that a student’s religious obser-
ment that is consistent with the values and behaviour we vance may require an absence from any required course
espouse. activity as scheduled in the course syllabus (available
and/or distributed by the first day of class), or scheduled
1
For the purposes of this document, ‘Instructor’ shall mean any per-
son who is teaching a course at Ryerson.
after the first day of class, or from a final examination
as announced later in the term. Final examinations may
COMMUNITY REGULATIONS be scheduled seven days a week. This policy provides
Ryerson is a vibrant university that enjoys a great sense a mechanism to address student religious observance
of community. Dedicated to learning, it also encourages requirements as they relate to meeting these course
social activities and recognizes freedom of expression requirements. Requests must be made within two
and the rights of individuals. weeks of the start of classes, or, for final exams
within five days of the posting of the exam schedule.
As in all large communities, Ryerson has a variety of
policies and regulations to ensure that members share *The Student Declara�on of Religious Observance form is available
on the above websites, which are linked to Religious Observance
equally in the benefits and responsibilities associated calendars through the Discrimina�on and Harassment Preven�on
with campus life. It is a student’s responsibility to familiar- Services website, providing students and faculty with a comprehensive
ize themselves with Ryerson’s Significant Dates policies, descrip�on of some observance obliga�ons.
regulations and Ryerson’s codes of conduct described
COMPUTER SERVICES/FACILITIES
in this undergraduate calendar and the Ryerson Student
Guide. All students in full- and part-time undergraduate degree
programs are required to activate Ryerson online identity
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
to be able to access many of Ryerson’s central com-
Students are personally responsible for paying tuition puter resources including RMail (Ryerson e-mail), the
fees, library fines, fees for services rendered, University my.ryerson.ca portal or a workstation in the central com-
loans, or costs incurred for damage to, or loss of, Uni- puter labs. To activate your account, use the ‘Account
versity property. Non-payment of fees/costs may result Activation’ routine available in many of the computer labs
in the cancelling of the Offer of Admission, withholding or activate online at: www.ryerson.ca/accounts.
of grades, enrollment and/or graduation ineligibility, or
More information about Ryerson online identity activa-
any other action deemed appropriate by the University.
tion process and resources available for students can be
(Ryerson cannot be held responsible for debts incurred
found at www.ryerson.ca/ccs/myaccounts.
by individual students or student organizations).
Ryerson students enjoy a full range of computer services
ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATION OF STUDENTS WITH
and facilities. Students should be aware, however, that
DISABILITIES
misuse of the computing facilities is an offence. Such
The University is committed to the fostering of an in- offences include the use of the computing technology for
clusive climate of equitable access, understanding and purposes other than that for which computing authoriza-
mutual respect which recognizes the dignity and worth tion was originally issued; accessing, using, modifying,
of all persons, provides equal rights and opportunities reading, copying, or distributing of data or programs not
without discrimination, and protects the privacy, confi- yours or not intended for public use; interfering with the
dentiality, comfort, autonomy and self-esteem of students legitimate use of the computer by others; use of an ac-
with disabilities. count other than the one specifically assigned to you; not
taking reasonable steps to ensure that no other person
To that end, the University provides academic accommo-
knows your password. Minor offences may be dealt with
dations for students with disabilities in accordance with
by making restitution to the parties who have suffered

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 49


GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION

damage or injury. Serious abuse may result in expulsion. RETURNING STUDENTS


For the purposes of definition of computer and datasets,
Returning students need to get an annual validation
all computer facilities operated within Ryerson University
sticker by October. During the busy Fall Orientation
shall be deemed included, and datasets may be stored
period until the end of September, validation stickers are
either online to the computer, or offline in any form.
available at the Library Circulation Desk, Admissions/Re-
Misuse of computer services and facilities by any user is cruitment Information Counter, Enrollment Services and
an offence. Such offences may be dealt with under the Student Records counter and from the Cashier’s counter.
Code of Student Conduct. To obtain a validation sticker, students must provide an
Any tampering with, or unauthorized use of Ryerson’s official fees statement, timetable with name identi-
computing facilities is indictable under sections 301 and fied on print out, or other proof of attendance as noted
387 of The Criminal Code (Bill C-19). in other communications from the University. If you do
not have this information, you can go to the Library Circu-
LIBRARY SERVICES AND FACILITIES lation counter where your information can be looked up
Students are responsible for making themselves familiar and you can get your validation sticker. Another benefit of
with the various regulations relating to the use of the going to the Library for your validation sticker is their ex-
Library and the Archives. tended hours including evenings and weekends to serve
you. The sticker is available year round at the OneCard
Misuse of the Library’s resources and facilities by any
Office.
user is an offence. Such misuse includes the defacement
of materials and property (e.g. underlining, highlighting, Specifics of the Ryerson OneCard
the removal of property marks and labels etc.); and/or the
The OneCard is used for identification purposes within
theft or attempted theft of all or part of an item from the
the University. The front of the card shows the student
Library without adherence to sign-out procedures. Such
photo, name, student number and library bar code. The
actions can result in a $100 (subject to change) fine plus
the cost of replacing the material. Offences may also be back of the card has the magnetic black stripe. Within the
dealt with under the Code of Student Conduct. card is Smart Card technology.

Students are responsible for all material borrowed on The Library bar code is used by the Library to keep track
their library card. Loss or theft of cards should be report- of your account with them. For more information on this
ed immediately at the Library circulation desk. Lending of please contact the Library.
library cards is prohibited. Food, beverages and smoking The magnetic black stripe is used to make purchas-
are prohibited throughout the Library. es on campus. This is called the Ryerson OneCard’s
Website: www.ryerson.ca/library. ‘stored value’ prepaid service which effectively al-
lows you to carry money on your Ryerson OneCard.
STUDENT IDENTIFICATION CARDS - RYERSON Money can be put on your card (it is not actually on
ONECARD the card but on a computer database – if you lose
The OneCard is the official identification card for the Ry- your card you do not lose your money) at 14 add
erson University community. As well as being the single cash machines on campus (three are in the Library)
most important piece of ID you possess during your time and at the OneCard office. The OneCard office is the
here at Ryerson, it also serves as a convenience card only place that accepts debit and credit cards.
for many of the services available on campus, including Use your ‘stored value’ funds for: all Ryerson Food
the library, printing and photocopying, food purchases, Services for meals (for example - the Hub Market Serv-
discounts, savings and more. ery, Tim Horton’s and Starbucks kiosks, ILLC Maggies,
FIRST TIME RYERSON STUDENTS Oakham House Cafe and Ram in the Rye); student pho-
tocopiers; student laser printers; drink and snack vending
The OneCard is issued free of charge by the OneCard
machines (approximately 100 on campus), purchasing
Office at first admission/enrollment, and must be picked
Ryerson theatre tickets and other school related transac-
up within one academic year from term of approval
tions at Ryerson Theatre School, Image Arts, Interior
with two pieces of government issued identification.
Cards are not mailed and must be picked up in person. Design, Architecture, Rogers Post Production. Services
Your OneCard is designed to last throughout the duration are expanding all the time please check our website for
of study at Ryerson and an annual validation sticker must exciting details and specifics.
be affixed starting 2nd year. We have started an “Apply The OneCard is also used for door access if granted.
Early Program” for your OneCard, please check our web The card contains Smart Card technology. Activation of
page for the exciting details. Cards issued after this this security feature is under the control of your school/
time frame are subject to the $30 replacement card department.
charge (subject to change).
In addition to the “Apply Early Program” The OneCard of-
Care of The Ryerson OneCard
fice sets up special facilities for you to get your OneCard The initial Ryerson OneCard is free, however, stu-
during Fall Orientation which is the last week of August dents will be required to pay $30 (subject to change)
through the first week of September. It is important to get for replacement cards due to damaged or loss cards.
your card prior to the 2nd week of September, so that Students should carry their validated OneCard with
your card can be set-up properly for your use. them at all times when on campus. Failure to pro-

pg 50 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION

duce a validated OneCard upon request by Security DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT PREVENTION
Officers, may lead to removal from Ryerson Prop- POLICY
erty. Ryerson is committed to fostering a study, living and
Putting a hole in the OneCard could damage the Card work milieu that is free of discrimination and harassment
which would require a replacement card at a cost of $30 and where all individuals are treated with respect and
dignity. Students, staff and faculty have a right to equal
(subject to change). The Ryerson OneCard should be
treatment with respect to employment, accommodation,
treated with care. Holes, creases, cuts and improperly
and receipt of education related services and facilities
applied stickers will render the card inoperable. Please without discrimination or harassment on the basis of the
do not leave the card in direct sunlight, near heat sources following grounds: race, ancestry, place of origin, colour,
or in contact with magnetic fields. ethnic origin, citizenship, religion, sex, sexual orienta-
tion, age, record of offences, marital status, family status
Lost or Stolen Cards and disability. Ryerson’s Discrimination and Harassment
It is important they you report a lost or stolen card im- Prevention Policy is informed and guided by the Ontario Hu-
mediately. Prior to notifying us, you are responsible for man Rights Code and can be located at www.ryerson.ca/
unauthorized transactions resulting from the theft or loss equity/dhpspolicy.
of your card. If you would like to confidentially discuss a matter relat-
Accounts can be immediately frozen to protect your ing to the above or to file a complaint, please contact
funds. Notification occurs once you have reported your the Office of Discrimination and Harassment Prevention
lost/stolen card to the OneCard Office. Services, Room POD-254A, Jorgenson Hall, second
floor, (416) 979-5349. The office hours are 9 a.m. to 5
WE ARE HERE TO HELP YOU. WE WELCOME YOUR p.m., Monday through Friday. Evening appointments are
QUESTIONS. available upon request.
Visit us at www.ryerson.ca/onecard ACCESS TO UNIVERSITY FACILITIES
E-mail: onecard@ryerson.ca
Students typically enjoy freedom of movement on the
Telephone: (416) 979-5000 ext. 7565
campus. There are, however, areas which are restricted
This provides you with 24 hour availability to put a hold for safety and/or security reasons. These areas are
on your account which will be done during office hours. always clearly identified. Other areas are accessible
within the accepted or publicized open hours for buildings
The OneCard Office, JOR-02 hours are (subject to
on campus. A schedule for hours of access to buildings
change):
is published each Fall. Exceptions to these regulations
Monday – Thursday 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. must be approved by appropriate University personnel.
Students are expected to leave an area upon the request
Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
of Security personnel.
The OneCard Office is open year round (excluding
LOCKERS
public holidays and mid-year/Christmas break). Special
extended hours during September and January and During the Fall and Winter terms of the academic year
shortened summer hours will be posted outside the (see specific dates below) lockers in Jorgenson Hall,
Kerr Hall and The Library Building are allocated only to
OneCard Office.
enrolled students by their specific academic department.
ANIMALS ON CAMPUS During the Spring/Summer term (see specific dates be-
low), lockers in Jorgenson Hall, Kerr Hall and The Library
Pets and other animals are not permitted in University Building are under the jurisdiction of the Department of
buildings, with the following exceptions: Student Services and are allocated only to enrolled stu-
• guide dogs for the blind; dents by the staff at the Recreation and Athletics Centre
(RAC).
• animals housed in laboratory areas.
Pets on campus grounds must be properly licensed and Lockers in buildings other than those listed above, are
restrained by a leash or other appropriate control at all under the jurisdiction of that particular building’s specific
times. academic department(s), and students should refer to the
‘Guidelines for Administration of Lockers’ in their aca-
CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOL demic department.

Ryerson has a liquor license permitting the sale and Students may only use the locker assigned to them and
must provide their own lock. Locks put on unassigned
consumption of alcoholic beverages in designated areas.
lockers will be removed. Students are personally respon-
Liquor, beer, or wine purchased by Ryerson under this sible for the contents of their lockers. It is not advisable
license may be consumed on Ryerson premises, in the to leave valuables (laptop computers, wallets, jewellry,
locations classified as licensed areas. Liquor, beer, or etc.) in lockers. Ryerson will not, under any circum-
wine from any other source is not allowed on Ryerson stances, accept responsibility for the loss, damage,
premises. removal of locks or locker contents, or the loss of
locker contents after removal.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 51


GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION

From September to April, lockers are assigned to SAFETY


enrolled students by academic departments up until Sep-
Safety is a community responsibility. All members of the
tember 17, 2010. After September 17, 2010, should there
Ryerson community are expected to comply with safe
be any unassigned lockers available, students can claim
working practices on all assignments and activities, as
a locker for the remainder of the academic year. Please determined by the Occupational Health and Safety Com-
refer to the ‘Guidelines for Administration of Lockers’ in mittee and individual departments.
your specific academic department. Whether a locker is
assigned before September 17 or claimed after Septem- If the fire alarm sounds evacuation must be immediate:
ber 17, 2010, ALL locks and contents of lockers must • remain calm;
be removed by May 6, 2011. As of May 7, 2011 any • use stairs, not elevators;
remaining locks and/or contents will be removed from all • leave the building by the nearest exit and remain out-
lockers. side until advised to return.
From May to August, lockers are assigned to enrolled SECURITY AND EMERGENCY SERVICES
students on an in-person, first-come, first-served basis
done at the RAC. Locks left on lockers not assigned to Ryerson’s Security and Emergency Services operates 24
students during these months will be removed. To re- hours a day. The main Security and Emergency Services
quest a locker for the Summer, students must bring proof office is located at 111 Bond Street, CPF-100.
of Spring/Summer enrollment to the RAC Admin Centre. When emergency security assistance is required, dial
Lock and contents must be removed by August 5, ‘80’ from a University phone, or the RSU ‘free’ phone,
2011. and staff will be dispatched. Calls of a routine nature can
be processed by dialing (416) 979-5040 or 5001.
When locks are cut off, contents are stored at RAC.
Locker contents may be retrieved prior to the deadline SMOKING ON CAMPUS
(see below) for a charge of $10 (subject to change). After In response to the City of Toronto by-law 23-88, respect-
the listed deadline date, contents are irretrievable as ing smoking in the workplace, smoking is prohibited
they are donated to charity. Retrieval of locker contents within all University buildings.
from RAC storage must be requested at least 24 hours in
Individuals found to be in violation of the by-law are
advance before picking up at the RAC Admin Centre.
subject to fines, imposed by the City of Toronto, of up to
Locker cut offs content pick-up deadlines: $5,000 for each offense.
- for locks cut in May 2011, please pick up any locker TELEPHONES
contents before June 24, 2011
Use of Ryerson’s telephone system requires appropriate
- for locks cut in August 2011, please pick up any locker authorization from the Chair of the Department con-
contents before September 23, 2011 cerned, or other authorized University personnel. Public
telephones are available on campus.
On occasion, the University will have to clear individual
or sections of lockers in order to allow for repairs, renova- PARKING
tions, construction, etc. Signage will be posted to notify
There are three parking facilities at Ryerson.
locker users of the need to vacate lockers. In the case
that a student does not remove their contents by the 1. International Living Learning Centre (ILLC)
special notification deadline, any locker contents will be Garage located at 240 Jarvis Street on the West
stored at the RAC. Deadline for retrieval of locker con- side of Jarvis Street between Gerrard and Dundas
tents from these special notification locker cut offs are Streets.
one month from the date of the specific locker cut off. 2. Bookstore Garage located at 300 Victoria Street,
POSTERS on the West side of Victoria Street between Dundas
and Gould Streets.
Bulletin boards and equivalent areas throughout cam-
pus are reserved for the posting of approved student, 3. Pitman Hall Garage located at 160 Mutual Street,
academic and administrative information posters/notices. on the West side of Mutual Street between Gerrard
Posters cannot be posted on any other surfaces. Com- and Gould Streets.
mercial advertisements and external publications are not The ILLC is the main garage for student permit holders.
permitted on campus. Daily parking is available at the Bookstore and Pitman
Hall garages.
Students wishing to post notices related to depart-
ment/school activities should seek approval from their Permit applications are available in mid-August on a first
department/school Chair. Full-time degree student clubs come, first served basis in Jorgenson Hall, 11th floor,
must seek approval from RSU or the Office of Student Room JOR-1110. The permits are sold for the academic
Community Life. Part-time/continuing education student year (September to April), at a cost of $1,016.40 (subject
clubs must seek approval from CESAR or the Office of to change), plus applicable taxes. Payment can be made
Student Community Life. by debit card, credit card, cheque or cash. The permit
can be used seven days a week with no restrictions.
Student-related notices for general campus posting must
For further information, please contact Ancillary Services
be directed to the Office of Student Community Life.
at (416) 979-5008.

pg 52 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FEES/FINANCIAL INFORMATION

FEES/FINANCIAL INFORMATION Full-Time program students are required to pay the


total Fall 2010/Winter 2011 fees by September 10,
FEES ........................................................................... 53 2010. Students who choose to defer payment of all or
part of their Winter 2011 undergraduate tuition fees until
Enrolled Student – Full- and Part-Time ....................... 53
after September, will be assessed a $70 Deferral Fee.
International Student Fees Exemption ........................ 54 To remain in good financial standing and maintain enroll-
Method of Fee Payment .............................................. 54 ment, a student must pay all Fall 2010 fees by the start of
Fall classes, and the balance of fees owing including late
Late Fee Service Charges .......................................... 55 fees and Deferral Fee, by the start of Winter classes.
Departmental Ancillary Fees....................................... 55 Part-Time program students are required to pay the cur-
Grade Withholds ......................................................... 55 rent term/semester fees due, by the start of classes. To
remain in good financial standing with the University, a
Fee Refunds ................................................................ 55 student must pay all fees due for the current academ-
Refund Schedule ......................................................... 55 ic term by the start of classes, or the total amount due
including late fees, before the start of the next academic
Income Tax Receipts................................................... 55
term.
Administrative Charges ............................................... 55
For more information on University policy regarding Late
Collections Block ......................................................... 55 Fee Service Charges, please refer to www.ryerson.ca/
STUDENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND AWARDS .. 56 currentstudents/fees_finances

General Awards........................................................... 56 FEES ASSESSMENT POLICY

Entrance-Level Scholarships ...................................... 56 Fees are assessed each term/semester for the total num-
ber of enrolled courses and their respective course unit
The Ryerson Gold Medal ............................................ 57 values as assigned per University policy. Program fee
Governor General’s Academic Medal – Silver ............ 57 rates are approved annually by the Board of Governors.
Fees are charged on an annual basis and all fees are
Federal and Provincial Loans...................................... 57 due by the commencement of classes in September. Stu-
Cost of Attending Ryerson .......................................... 57 dents are academically and financially responsible for all
enrolled courses and fees incurred unless they withdraw
by the appropriate University deadline dates.
FEES
FEES/PAYMENT SCHEDULES
Fees charged by Ryerson are approved annually by the
Board of Governors for an academic year. Ryerson re- Refer to the Fees and Finance information at www.
serves the right to make changes in both the fees and the ryerson.ca/currentstudents/fees_finances a complete
procedures given in this section of the calendar without explanation and breakdown of fees charged.
prior notice. SENIOR CITIZENS
At the time of publication, the fee assessment policy Students who are 60 years of age or over at the start of
was under review and tuition fees for Fall 2010-Winter the term will have their fee charges waived for their day
2011 were pending approval. school undergraduate credit course(s)/programs. Please
Details of Tuition Fees information for the 2010-2011 aca- note that Departmental Ancillary Fees are not waived.
demic year will be available on RAMSS at my.ryerson.ca. COURSE AUDIT STUDENTS
To view your fees account you may access your Student
Students may only audit lecture courses; this is subject
Centre and choose ‘Account Inquiry’, after logging in with
to approval of the teaching department. Refer to the Fees
your Matrix user ID and password.
and Finance information at www.ryerson.ca/
Additional Fees information will be available in the 2010- currentstudents/fees_finances a complete explanation
2011 edition of the Ryerson Student Guide and on the and breakdown of fees charged.
Student Guide website at www.ryerson.ca/studentguide/
SPECIAL STUDENTS
MoneyMatters.html.
Special Students are individuals who have not been
Fee payments made by students are applied first to any
admitted to an undergraduate program, but are allowed
previous fee debts, and then any balance to the most
to take program courses providing space is available.
recent debt.
Special Students pay a fee per course unit per term, for
ENROLLED STUDENT—FULL- AND PART-TIME all courses as outlined in the calendar, plus any appli-
Students are considered enrolled if they have partici- cable University ancillary fees.
pated in the course intention process and/or are en- FEES STATEMENTS
rolled in courses for the current academic term/year.
Fees Statements are available in August, on RAMSS
Ryerson reserves the right to prohibit enrollment or (my.ryerson.ca) to all:
withdraw a student who does not maintain good financial
• returning Full-and Part-time program students who
standing at the end of an academic term/year.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 53


FEES/FINANCIAL INFORMATION

participated in the course intention process for the METHOD OF FEE PAYMENT
upcoming academic semester/year,
Students may pay their fees by:
• newly approved students who have confirmed accep-
tance of their Offer of Admission. Online/Telephone Banking with CIBC, Desjardins
Fees statements for the Winter and Spring/Summer Bank, HSBC, Bank of Montreal, National Bank, Presi-
semesters are available on RAMSS (my.ryerson.ca). dent’s Choice Bank, RoyalBank, Scotiabank, TD/Canada
Trust.
Students who make adjustments to their academic
record at any time are responsible for ensuring the By mail to Ryerson University - Student Fees Office,
timely payment for any fee changes that may oc- Room POD-64, 350 Victoria St., Toronto, Ontario,
cur, and should come to the Student Fees Office or Canada M5B 2K3. Enrolled students may pay by certified
check on RAMSS for an updated Fees account cal- cheque or money order only, in Canadian funds payable
culation. Please examine your statement very carefully to Ryerson University. Post-dated cheques are not ac-
and direct any questions regarding Fees to the Student cepted.
Fees Office (416) 979-5015. When paying by Online/Telephone Banking or by mail,
Non-receipt of a Fees Statement does not constitute please allow three business days for the timely posting of
a valid reason for non-payment of fees. The student your payment to your fees account.
is responsible for ensuring that their fees are paid In person at 350 Victoria St., Student Fees Office Room
on a timely basis. POD-64, enter through the Library Building. Be sure to
bring a copy of your Fees Statement, your Ryerson On-
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT FEES EXEMPTION eCard for identification, along with your payment to your
Refer to the Fees and Finance information at www. fees account.
ryerson.ca/currentstudents/fees_finances for a complete • Full-time students - pay with bank card, certified
explanation and breakdown of fees charged. cheque, money order or cash;
There are two different academic fee rates for Ryerson • Part-time students - pay with bank card, credit card,
Students: certified cheque, money order or cash;
• the Regular Fee Rate for students who are Canadian • The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Educa-
Citizens, Permanent Residents, and who are specifi- tion students - pay with bank card, credit card, certi-
cally exempted by government regulation from the fied cheque, money order or cash.
International Fee Rate. • Travelex Bank to Bank Transfer for International
• the International Fee Rate for students on Student Vi- Students
sas, Visitor Visas, other Visas, and students who have Requesting that their fees be deducted from their
not provided or are unwilling to provide documentary Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) or
proof of exempt status to the Enrollment Services and Out-of-Province Assistance. Only students who can
Student Records Office. demonstrate that they have insufficient funds to cover the
If students wish to be considered under one of the ap- fees and whose actual OSAP documents are available in
proved exempt categories, they must provide the official the Financial Aid and Awards Office by course enroll-
documentation necessary to support such a request. ment week, are eligible to make this request (First year
Original documents must be presented each term of students excluded). PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL AP-
enrollment. Photocopies of documents are not accept- PLICABLE UNIVERSITY PAYMENT DEADLINES AND
able. All documents presented in support of consider- REGULATIONS APPLY.
ation for exemption, or if requested as proof of status, Where fees are to be deducted from the loan, the
must be submitted to the Enrollment Services and National Student Loan Centre is requested to remit the
Student Records Office, Room POD-70, enter through fees payment directly to Ryerson. Students are respon-
the Library Building. If students are unable to provide sible for ensuring that the National Student Loan Centre
the required documentation before paying tuition deducts the amount of the fees from the loan portion they
fees, they will be required to pay the International have received and submits it to the University on a timely
Fee Rate. Official documentation must be presented by basis. Students are required to pay any remaining
October 1 for the Fall term, and February 2 for the Winter balance due as per the applicable University pay-
term in order to be eligible for tuition fees re-assessment. ment deadline dates or, be subject to late payment
Payment of the University Health Insurance Plan is charges.
compulsory for all International Students. Students requiring financial assistance should read
If the acceptable documentation for exemption from the the section on Federal and Provincial Aid, and General
International Fee Rate contains an expiry date, it is the Scholarships and Bursaries. Students classified as
student’s responsibility to bring updated documenta- ‘Special’ or ‘Audit’ students are not eligible for financial
tion to Enrollment Services and Student Records no later assistance under the OSAP.
than ten (10) working days before the expiry date on Requesting that Ryerson invoice a sponsoring
the original documentation. This must be done to retain agency for their fees. Students are required to present
exemption status. a letter to the Student Fees Office, from their sponsor-

pg 54 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FEES/FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ing organization indicating that arrangements have been REFUND SCHEDULE


made for the payment of fees. Documents must be sub-
mitted on a timely basis in order to avoid the assessment Program Withdrawals
of late fee charges.
Refund Term
LATE FEE SERVICE CHARGES Spring/
Fall Winter
Summer
There is a late fee service charge of 1.25 percent per
100%* to September 17 to January 21 to May 6
month (or portion of a month) (16.08 percent effective an-
nual rate) on any unpaid balance in the student account. 50% of September 18- January 22- May 7- May 13
Fees October 8 February 11
Exceptions will only be made for compassionate reasons Refunded
with documented evidence. Appeals must be made in
No Fees after October 8 after February 11 after May 13
writing to the Manager, Student Fees. Refunded

DEPARTMENTAL ANCILLARY FEES *less $400 for new Full-Time Fall approvals
*less $200 for new Part-Time Fall approvals
Refer to the Fees and Finance information at www. *less $100 for Winter and/or Spring/Summer approvals
ryerson.ca/currentstudents/fees_finances for a complete
explanation and breakdown of fees charged. Course Drops (Course changes which result in a drop to
Some courses/programs have mandatory departmental a lower fee range)
ancillary fees which must be added to tuition fees. These
Refund Term
include: field trip fees, co-operative program fees, fees for
Spring/
learning materials and clothing retained by students, etc. Fall Winter
Summer

GRADE WITHHOLDS No Drop to September 17 to January 21 Inquire at the


Charge Student Fees
Grades are withheld when a student has not met the Office
minimum payment requirement for enrollment, and/or 50% Drop September 18- January 22- Inquire at the
has an unpaid balance owing to the University in excess Charge October 8 February 11 Student Fees
Office
of $10 (subject to change). In addition, students who fail
to return books to the Library, wireless NetReady cards 100% after October 8 after February 11 Inquire at the
Drop Student Fees
or ResNet equipment to CCS - Computing and Com- Charge Office
munications Services, or any other borrowed property,
will have their grades withheld. Students are respon-
sible for all books, materials, etc. borrowed against their INCOME TAX RECEIPTS
library cards, unless a loss or a theft has been previously
Income tax receipts and education deduction certificates
reported.
(T2202A) are available online at Ryerson’s Administrative
Students who have grade withholds, receive a With- Management Self Service (RAMSS) by the end of Febru-
hold Notice in lieu of their graduation award at the ary if fees per term are $100 or more.
relevant convocation ceremony. Documents will be
Income tax receipts and education deduction slips
released when the Withhold has been cleared.
(T2202A) may be withheld to those students with an
FEE REFUNDS outstanding fees balance in their account.

Students, who officially withdraw from their program, There is a $10 (subject to change) charge for each dupli-
within the deadline date schedule that follows, will re- cate tax receipt requested. Please direct all inquires to
ceive any applicable refund. Students who drop courses the Student Fees Office.
(within the deadline dates that follow) should contact the ADMINISTRATIVE CHARGES
Student Fees Office to determine if they are eligible to
make an application for a refund. Please allow 30 days Refer to the Fees and Finance information at www.
for processing of refunds. All inquiries regarding refund of ryerson.ca/currentstudents/fees_finances for a complete
fees should be directed to the Student Fees Office. explanation and breakdown of fees charged.
Students are required to pay administrative charges for
various services provided by some University depart-
ments.

COLLECTIONS BLOCK
A Collections Block (COL) service indicator may be
placed on an individual student’s account by the Credit
and Collections unit of the Financial Services Depart-
ment if a student’s outstanding account balance has
become seriously past due. As a result, further enroll-
ment activity, issuance of official University documenta-

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 55


FEES/FINANCIAL INFORMATION

tion may be denied until payment of the account has average for consideration is 80 percent in six Grade
been received, or other suitable arrangements have been 12 U/M courses. Values range from $1,000 to $4,000,
made. Any fee in excess of $10 will result in a student’s depending on academic program. Scholarships are either
graduation document being withheld until payment has guaranteed or competitive. No applications are required.
been made. Unless otherwise specified in writing, to be eligible for Uni-
If you have a Collections Block (COL) on your versity Entrance Scholarships, students are required to:
account, please email Credit and Collections at: • Be a current full-time Ontario Grade 12 U/M Second-
collections@ryerson.ca. ary School applicant, who is a Canadian Citizen or
Permanent Resident who will start a four-year under-
STUDENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE graduate degree program at Ryerson in the Fall, and
AND AWARDS who is enrolling in a post-secondary institution for the
first time;
GENERAL AWARDS • A separate scholarship application is not required,
however you must have an active application to a full-
The University is greatly indebted to the federal and
time undergraduate four-year degree program at Ryer-
provincial governments, foundations, industrial and busi-
son via the Ontario Universities Application Centre
ness firms, technical and professional associations and
(OUAC) 101 Application process by May 2nd;
individuals for their contributions to the bursaries, schol-
arships and other awards received by students attending • Be enrolled in a minimum of four U/M courses within
Ryerson. the current Fall-Winter school year and must be en-
rolled in a post-secondary institution for the first time;
Scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic ex-
• Scholarship averages are based on courses taken
cellence. With some exceptions, students need not apply
during the regular school year (Fall and Winter
for scholarships, as these awards are generally granted
terms). Students must present a minimum average of
to the recipients on the basis of their performance during
80 percent in best six Grade 12 U/M courses (mid-
the previous year.
term and/or final). If the student is not qualified for a
Full details of all scholarships and awards are published Guaranteed Scholarship based on grades available
annually on the Student Financial Assistance website: mid-May, student will be automatically reconsidered,
www.ryerson.ca/financialaid. as final grades become available (grades must be re-
ENTRANCE-LEVEL SCHOLARSHIPS ported to the OUAC by July 31st). Grade adjustments/
corrections received after July 31st cannot be used
President’s National Entrance Scholarships - Award- for scholarship purposes. Scholarship calculations are
ed to high school graduates (Canadian citizenship/per- based on two decimal points and are not rounded;
manent resident status required) who demonstrate • Grade 12 U/M courses with credit values of less than
academic accomplishment, leadership qualities, original
1.00 are not eligible for scholarship consideration;
thought and creative ability. Valued at $10,000, four to six
scholarships are awarded annually and are renewable. • The ‘out-of-school’ component of Grade 12 U/M co-op
By application only. Deadline: April 1st. courses (or equivalent) is not eligible for scholarship
consideration;
Terence Grier Entrance Scholarship - Awarded to a
• A maximum of one repeat grade will be used to calcu-
high school graduate (Canadian citizenship/permanent
late the student’s scholarship average;
resident status required) who demonstrates academic
accomplishment and exceptional aptitude for, or interest • The entrance scholarship is not transferable between
in, the chosen field of study at Ryerson. Valued at one programs and is only valid for the academic year in
year’s tuition. By application only. Deadline: April 1st. which it is offered.
Official notification of an Entrance Scholarship offer is
H. Graham Walker Awards - Awarded to current On-
subject to the terms and conditions included with the spe-
tario high school graduates who demonstrate academic
excellence (85 percent in six Grade 12 U/M courses), cific scholarship offer. It is the student’s responsibility to
involvement in extracurricular activities in high school or comply with the terms and conditions of the scholarship
volunteer work and financial need. Valued at $2,500, four and to request the information if not received.
scholarships are awarded annually. By application only. The Director of Undergraduate Admissions and Re-
Deadline: August 1st. cruitment will only make exceptions to these policies
John Brooks Community Foundation Scholarship - in writing. Exceptions, if made, must be specifically for
Awarded to high school graduates who demonstrate aca- scholarship purposes and are not to be confused with
demic accomplishment (80 percent in six Grade 12 U/M exceptions for general admission purposes.
courses), involvement in school, community, self-devel- Appeals in scholarship consideration must be made in
opment programs and other activities. Valued at $1,500, writing to the Director of Undergraduate Admissions and
two scholarships are awarded annually. By application Recruitment, and received by August 15th of the year of
only. Deadline: Mid-July. enrollment.
University Entrance Scholarships - Awarded to General Scholarships - Awarded to students currently
current Ontario high school students who have demon- attending secondary school in a province other than On-
strated academic excellence in U/M studies. Minimum

pg 56 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FEES/FINANCIAL INFORMATION

tario, or those attending an international out-of-country A full-time student is defined as a student enrolled
high school taking a minimum of three full-year courses in a minimum of 3 units per semester (60 percent or
within the current academic year, or to individuals not more of a full course load each term; minimum of 2
currently in high school or in post-secondary studies; billing units for students with a permanent disabil-
based on academic excellence and personal motivation ity). Refer to the Fees/Financial Information section
to study at Ryerson University. Valued at $1,000, up to of this calendar for information on units of study
50 scholarships may be awarded annually. Deadline: and associated fee charges. The Ryerson Calendar
May 30th. under Programs of Study details the individual pro-
Industry-Sponsored Entrance Scholarships - Tar- grams and associated courses which represent a full
geted to specific programs with varying values. Normally, course load. They may vary for individual programs.
eligible students are notified of scholarship availability Students are encouraged to review their units of
and application procedures following acceptance or study each semester and ensure they contact their
enrollment in the program. Department/School to discuss course load issues.
International Student Merit Scholarships - Awarded Detailed information on eligibility, application forms and
to students currently enrolled in an Ontario secondary deadlines are available on the Ministry website at http://
school with Study Permit authorization, who have ap- osap.gov.on.ca, Student Financial Assistance Office web-
plied to Ryerson via the Ontario Universities’ Application site at www.ryerson.ca/financialaid or at the Student Fi-
Centre (OUAC) 101 Application process by May 2nd, and nancial Assistance Office.
have a minimum average of 80 percent in their best six
Grade 12 U/M courses by May 30th, or enrolled in their OSAP applications for the upcoming academic year are
final year of a school outside of Ontario and will be enter- usually available in early Spring. Students are urged to
ing Canada to study at Ryerson with Study Permit autho- apply early.
rization, and have first-class standing in their country’s
equivalent of the Ontario Grade 12 U program. Valued at Textbook and Technology Grants for Full-Time
$1,000, up to 35 scholarships may be awarded annually. Students
No applications are required. Ontario’s annual Textbook and Technology Grant (TTG)
THE RYERSON GOLD MEDAL helps full-time students pay for textbooks and computer
costs. In the 2009-2010 academic year, the annual grant
The Ryerson Medal is the University’s highest award. will be $225.00 per student and will increase to $300.00
It is awarded on the basis of high academic standing per student in 2010-2011.
throughout a student’s program of study and extensive
participation in co-curricular activities. Six gold medals Eligibility Criteria: Canadian Citizen, Permanent Resi-
can be awarded annually, one for each of the six aca- dent or a Protected Person and enrolled full-time and
demic faculties and are awarded once each year at the attending a minimum of 60 percent of a full course load,
Spring Convocation. Each medalist is also the recipient or 40 percent for a student with a permanent disability.
of a $1,000 Howard H. Kerr Memorial Scholarship, estab-
Students are eligible to receive only one Textbook and
lished in memory of Howard H. Kerr, the University’s first
principal and founder of the Ryerson Medal. Technology Grant per OSAP academic year.

GOVERNOR GENERAL’S ACADEMIC MEDAL – For complete details and application information, visit the
SILVER OSAP website at http://osap.gov.on.ca.

The Silver Medal is presented to the graduating student COST OF ATTENDING RYERSON
with the highest Academic Standing (Cumulative GPA in Regardless of the educational institution or course of
the final two years of study) in his/her Bachelor’s degree study, post secondary education is expensive. Students
program. are advised to prepare a realistic budget reflecting their
FEDERAL AND PROVINCIAL LOANS own situation, taking into consideration academic ex-
penses, personal expenses, accomodation and transpor-
The Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) is
intended to provide opportunities for full-time students by tation costs.
providing financial assistance for education costs (such Please refer to the section Fees/Financial Information for
as tuition fees, books, and supplies) and basic living complete details on University fees. Fees are subject to
expenses. Students (and their families, if applicable) are change each year.
responsible for meeting the basic costs of post-second-
ary education. The purpose of OSAP is to supplement, Academic Expenses: Books, paper, pens, calculators,
not to replace the financial resources that the student is drawing equipment, binders, project materials, typing,
expected to contribute. OSAP is not intended to supply cameras, dance shoes, etc., are all considered academic
all the funding to meet students’ educational and living expenses. The requirements vary widely depending
costs. The amount of OSAP funding received depends on the program. New students should speak to senior
on individual circumstances. students, and academic advisors, for guidelines before
It is important to remember that once you have received making any purchases. Book lists are available during
a federal and/or provincial student loan, it is your respon- the first week of classes. Do not make any purchases
sibility to understand and respect the terms and condi- before seeing each professor or academic advisor unless
tions of your loan agreement. specifically directed otherwise.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 57


FEES/FINANCIAL INFORMATION / FACULTY OF ARTS - ARTS AND CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

STUDENT ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES


Faculty of Arts
The following represents some expenditures that you
may need to consider. PROGRAMS AND ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS
Transportation: Almost 90 percent of Ryerson students
take public transportation to get to class and should allow ARTS AND CONTEMPORARY STUDIES
approximately $750 per academic year if travelling in the Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Arts (BA)
GTA (Greater Toronto Area). If commuting from outside
the GTA, allow approximately $1,400. Administered by the Faculty of Arts
Pocket Money/Entertainment/Miscellaneous: Stu-
dents should budget for a minimum of approximately $50 ADMISSION INFORMATION
to $75 a week or about $1,700 to $2,500 per academic DEGREE: Four years of study following Grade 12 U/M
year, depending on their own personal lifestyle. graduation.
Clothing: Although most students dress casually, the ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses,
amount to be budgeted for this category can vary widely. including Grade 12 U English.
Students may have to consider the purchase of suit-
able clothes for part-time or summer employment or NOTES:
job interviews prior to graduation. For budget purposes, 1. ENG4U/EAE4U is the preferred English.
students should allow at least $800 for clothing during
2. A minimum grade of 70 percent or higher will be
the academic year.
required in Grade 12 U English.
Living Away From Home: Students who do not live with 3. Subject to competition, candidates may be required
their parents will naturally incur higher expenses than if to present averages/grades above the minimum.
they were living at home.
Rent: Approximately $450 to $750 per month for shared PROGRAM OVERVIEW
accommodation. Approximately $750 to $1,200 for single This four-year degree in Arts and Contemporary Studies
accommodation. prepares graduates to think, work, and actively partici-
Food: Approximately $90 to $125 per week per person, pate in the changing environments of the 21st century.
depending on dietary needs. It is an innovative interdisciplinary degree that also pro-
vides students with insight into the nature of contempo-
rary society and the skills and competencies necessary
for career mobility.
The degree consists of a range of required interdisciplin-
ary courses that allow students to focus on those thinkers
whose ideas have most deeply affected our society, the
‘Ideas that Shape the World’. In these courses, students
also develop key skills and competencies: the ability to
read precisely and critically, to communicate effectively,
to develop strategies for life-long learning, to mediate
conflict and work in teams, to do analysis and engage in
research design.
Students may choose an area of concentration from
the professional courses from Table I. Eight options are
available; four of these options are subject-based and the
other four are interdisciplinary.

Subject-Based Op�ons
The subject-based options allow students to combine
their interdisciplinary studies with a focus in one of four
humanities disciplines:
• English Option – This option provides students with
a course of study that focuses on how to read critical-
ly—that is, analyze, historicize, and politicize—a wide
range of literary and cultural texts. Students examine
how such things as genre, form, method, historical
period, geography and nation inform narrative media,
including works of literature, film, television, digital
culture, and the visual arts. Through an engagement
with narratives of the past and the present, students
develop a critical understanding of contemporary
cultural production.

pg 58 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - ARTS AND CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

• French Option – This option provides students with Management, Law, Entrepreneurship and Innovation, and
the opportunity to gain a specialization in this im- Finance. Students can pursue a Minor in some of these
portant linguistic and cultural field. It allows students areas if desired.
to develop a better understanding of the culturally This unique program combines the intellectual agility and
diverse populations of the Francophone world in Af- other benefits of a liberal arts education with the hands-
rica, Asia, Europe and North America, while acquiring on, applied skills and competencies in areas critical to
critical insights into the important role that French and career flexibility in the 21st century. The option of pursu-
Francophone culture play both at a national level in ing a complementary Minor in a professionally-related
this country and in the broader international context. area will round out and equip the graduate for success
• History Option – This option offers not only a study and mobility through a wide range of private and public
of the past, as a way to understand the present, career choices.
but also a range of skills applicable to many jobs
The goals of the program are: to offer a context in which
– those which require an understanding of research
students can explore the nature of change and the
techniques, analysis, and logic. Each of these is a
theories about change in order to analyze it, understand
requirement of historical studies, as students must
it, anticipate it, plan it, precipitate it. The program allows
understand how to collect data, how to analyze it as
students:
to accuracy and sufficiency, and how to construct a
logical argument from the evidence, if it is judged that • To examine types of communication, including spo-
there is sufficient evidence to support an argument. ken, cultural, and computer languages, to study the
• Philosophy Option – This option provides students relationship between economic, political and cultural
with a broad understanding of the main histori- groups, and to explore the great humanist and scien-
cal trends and contemporary developments within tific ideas that have shaped the modern world.
the discipline of philosophy. With its sustained and • To develop competencies in basic qualitative and
systematic plan of study in Philosophy, the option has quantitative research skills, cognitive skills such as
two general objectives. First, it encourages students critical thinking and ethics analysis, and interpersonal
to read and think about philosophical issues and skills such as conflict resolution and negotiation.
problems in an active and critical manner. Second, it • To develop the literacy skills of oral and written
provides students with an understanding of, and ap- language, methodologies of textual analysis and
preciation for, the contributions made by some of the contextual knowledge, “digitacy” skills that involve un-
greatest thinkers of the past and present. derstanding of and training in the digital (or computer)
world and its impact on our society, and numeracy
Interdisciplinary Op�ons skills involving an understanding of numbers and sta-
The four interdisciplinary options allow students to focus tistics and their impact on the way society does things.
in on one of four themes: • To educate students in the meanings that societies
• Culture Studies Option – This option examines the attach to themselves depending on differing cultural
forms of entertainment that become a measure of points of view.
who we are and who we dream of becoming. Cultural • To develop a capacity for imaginative, critical, and
identity is examined through its expression in both ethical thinking that provides the foundation for profes-
high culture and popular entertainment. sional and business activity through a study of the
humanities and social sciences that focuses on the
• Diversity and Equity Studies Option – Our diverse dynamics of cultural and technological change within
and politically charged social space is the focus of this diverse, evolving cultural and linguistic parameters.
interdisciplinary option. It explores the encounters of
language, perspective and value that shape contem- Graduates of this four-year interdisciplinary program will
porary politics, culture and society. be prepared for career opportunities in event planning
• Global Studies Option – This option explores the and organization, policy development, art and cultural
advocacy, equity advising in human resources, career
often volatile mix of cultural passions, environmental
consultancy, mediation, policy analysis, marketing, pro-
concerns and corporate interests that drive contempo-
ducing and criticism in culture and entertainment.
rary society and culture at a time when global trans-
formations are transcending political boundaries. Liberal Studies
• Inquiry and Invention Option – This option explores Students must take three lower level liberal studies
the institutions and ideas that generate – and depend courses and three upper level liberal studies courses to
on – scientific discovery and technological innovation. graduate.
The focus is on ways in which science and technology
influence our lives, individually and as a society, in the Minors
21st century. Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson (with
Students will also select courses in professionally-re- exceptions), and are eligible for only one Minor. Please
lated areas such as Psychology, Sociology, Economics, refer to the Minors Policy section of this calendar for
Politics, Criminal Justice, Marketing, Information Sys- further information on individual Minor requirements and
tems and Telecommunications Management, Human restrictions.
Resources Management, Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 59


FACULTY OF ARTS - ARTS AND CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

The G. Raymond Chang School of Con�nuing Educa�on 5th SEMESTER


Cer�ficates
REQUIRED:
Undergraduate students wishing to pursue a continuing
education certificate program should be aware of pos- ACS 500 Ideas that Shape the World V
sible restrictions. Please refer to the Curriculum Advis- LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
ing website at www.ryerson.ca/curriculumadvising for
PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table I.
complete details.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table II.

Bachelor of Arts PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One


ARTS AND CONTEMPORARY STUDIES course from either Table I or Table II.

6th SEMESTER
1st SEMESTER
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
REQUIRED:
ACS 100 Ideas that Shape the World I PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table I.
ACS 103 Introduction to the Humanities PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table II.
SSH 205 Academic Writing and Research
PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One
REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from the following: course from either Table I or Table II.
ACS 106 Introduction to Language
7th SEMESTER
FRE *** A French Course
SPN *** A Spanish Course LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table I. PROFESSIONAL: Three courses from Table I.

2nd SEMESTER PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table II.

REQUIRED: 8th SEMESTER


ACS 200 Ideas that Shape the World II
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
SSH 105 Critical Thinking I
PROFESSIONAL: Three courses from Table I.
PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table I.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table II.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table II.
PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One
course from either Table I or Table II.
NOTE: Students wishing to pursue an Op�on must make their choice
by the end of 2nd semester. Once an Op�on has been chosen, students
must complete all the requirements of that Op�on to graduate. Indi-
vidual requirements for the eight Op�ons are iden�fied in Table I.

3rd SEMESTER

REQUIRED:
ACS 300 Ideas that Shape the World III
SSH 301 Research Design and Qualitative Methods
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table I.
PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One
course from either Table I or Table II.

4th SEMESTER

REQUIRED:
ACS 400 Ideas that Shape the World IV
ACS 401 Introduction to Research and Statistics
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table I.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table II.

pg 60 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - ARTS AND CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

PROFESSIONAL TABLE I DIVERSITY AND EQUITY OPTION


A total of 12 courses is required from Table I. 12 courses are required as grouped and noted below†.
Students are not required to complete an Option in order to REQUIRED:
graduate. Students who do not choose an Option may select
any 12 courses from any of the eight Options listed throughout ACS 403 Introduction to Diversity and Equity
this Table, with the following qualification: Students must com- Eleven courses from the following†:
plete at least one of ACS 800, ACS 900, or ACS 950 in order
to graduate. ACS 800* Senior Group Project
ACS 900* Senior Seminar
If an Option is chosen, students must select it by the end of first
year in order to make the appropriate Option’s course inten- ACS 950* Directed Research Course
tions. A total of eight Options is available, and each Option’s CRB 100 Introduction to the Caribbean
requirements are identified below. Once an Option is selected,
CRB 500 Families in the Caribbean
students must complete all the requirements of that Option to
graduate. CRB 501 Caribbean Peoples and Racism in Canada
CRB 502 Cultural Traditions in the Caribbean
CULTURE STUDIES OPTION ENG 413 Colonial and Post-Colonial Literatures
12 courses are required as grouped and noted below†. ENG 940 Discourses of Difference and Diversity
ENG 941 Gender and Sex in Literature/Culture
REQUIRED: ENG 942 Postcolonial Interventions
ACS 302 Introduction to Culture Studies FRS 502 French Feminisms
Eleven courses from the following†: HST 565 Immigrant Experience in Canadian History
ACS 800* Senior Group Project HST 580 Natives and Newcomers to 1763
ACS 900* Senior Seminar HST 680 Natives and Newcomers from 1763
ACS 950* Directed Research Course HST 720 The African Diaspora
ENG 705 Reading Visual Cultures HST 721 The African American Experience
ENG 921 Narrative in a Digital Age MUS 211 Music Cultures of the City
ENG 930 High and Low Culture MUS 401 Music, Religion and Spirituality
ENG 931 Critical Theory: Literary and Cultural MUS 406 Chinese Instrumental Music
FRS 502 French Feminisms MUS 501 Traditional Musics of the World
HST 564 History of Canadian Cultural Industries MUS 506 Chinese Music Studies
HST 930 Film, Television and 20th-Century History PHL 400 Human Rights and Justice
IRL 100 Intro to World Art I: Pictoral Arts PHL 420 Philosophy, Diversity and Recognition
IRL 500 Contemporary Art and Art of the Recent Past PHL 621 Beyond the Western Academic Tradition
MUS 110 Music and Film PHL 922 Religious Belief, Diversity, and Truth
MUS 211 Music Cultures of the City POG 315 Equity and Human Rights
MUS 401 Music, Religion and Spirituality POL 510 The Politics of Sexual Diversity
MUS 501 Traditional Musics of the World PSY 620 Psychology of Immigration
MUS 505 Popular Music and Culture PSY 807 Psychology of Prejudice
PHL 365 Philosophy of Beauty PSY 941 Cross Cultural Psychology
PHL 366 Existentialism and Art and Culture SOC 203 Social Class and Inequality
PHL 401 Philosophy and Mass Culture SOC 474 Immigration, Minorities and Citizenship
PHL 504 Philosophy of Art SOC 507 Race and Ethnicity in Canada
PHL 530 Media Ethics SOC 603 Sociology of Gender
PHL 621 Beyond the Western Academic Tradition SOC 608 Feminism and Society
PHL 710 Philosophy and Film SOC 633 Sexualities, Identities and Society
PHL 810 Philosophy of Cinema SOC 885 Women and Islam
PHL 921 Intellectual Property and Technology SOC 941 Race, Ethnic and Aboriginal Studies
SOC 202 Popular Culture SOC 943 Poverty Issues
SOC 902 Hollywood and Society * All students must complete a minimum of one of the following: ACS
SOC 903 Action Cinema and Modernity 800, ACS 900, ACS 950
† Students approved prior to Fall 2008 will take ACS 403 and 10
SOC 932 The Entertainment Industry courses from above, PLUS one addi�onal course from Table I, any
* All students must complete a minimum of one of the following: ACS Op�on.
800, ACS 900, ACS 950.
† Students approved prior to Fall 2008 will take ACS 302 and 10
courses from above, PLUS one addi�onal course from Table I, any
(Con�nued)
Op�on.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 61


FACULTY OF ARTS - ARTS AND CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

ENGLISH OPTION A minimum of four courses from the following:

12 courses are required as grouped and noted below. FRE 301 Intermediate French I
FRE 401 Intermediate French II
REQUIRED:
FRE 402 French Conversation and Pronunciation
ENG 108 The Nature of Narrative I
FRE 501 Speaking and Writing French I
ENG 900 Senior English Seminar
FRE 502 Business French I
ENG 931 Critical Theory: Literary and Cultural
FRE 507 Intro to Stylistics and Translation I
Nine courses from the following as grouped and noted
FRE 515 Introduction to Business French
below:
FRE 601 Speaking and Writing French II
Minimum four courses from: FRE 602 Advanced Business French II
ENG 421 16C Literature and Culture FRE 607 Intro to Stylistics and Translation II
ENG 422 17C Literature and Culture FRE 701 French for Today I
ENG 531 18C Literature and Culture I FRE 707 Intro to Stylistics and Translation III
ENG 532 18C Literature and Culture II FRE 801 French for Today II
ENG 624 20C Literature and Culture I A minimum of two courses from the following:
ENG 626 20C Literature and Culture II FRE 508 Intro to 20th C French Literature I
ENG 632 19C Literature and Culture I FRE 509 Franco-Canadian Literature I
ENG 633 19C Literature and Culture II FRE 608 Intro to 20th C French Literature II
ENG 706 Shakespeare and Performance FRE 609 Franco-Canadian Literature II
Minimum two courses from: FRE 703 French Theatre: Classicism to the Absurd I
ENG 200 Writing as a Cultural Act FRE 704 Intro to Franco-Canadian Culture I
ENG 413 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature FRE 706 Cultural Evolution of the French Language
ENG 416 Modern American Experience FRE 709 Children’s Literature in French
ENG 621* Reading Gender in a Global Context FRE 803 French Theatre Classicism to the Absurd II
ENG 631* Reading/Writing Women FRE 804 Intro to Franco-Canadian Culture II
ENG 701 Studies in Canadian Literature FRE 901 Francophone Women Writers
ENG 801 Canada on the World Stage FRE 902 Gender and Decadence 1850-1920
ENG 940 Discourses of Difference and Diversity FRE 903 The Francophone Short Story
ENG 941 Gender and Sex in Literature and Culture FRS 602 French Caribbean Literature and Culture
ENG 942 Postcolonial Interventions NOTE: French courses cannot be used toward the Liberal Studies
requirement if the French Op�on is chosen.
Minimum two courses from:
ENG 208 The Nature of Narrative II GLOBAL STUDIES OPTION
ENG 222* Fairy Tales and Fantasies
12 courses are required as grouped and noted below†.
ENG 224* Children’s Fiction
ENG 520* The Language of Persuasion REQUIRED:
ENG 703 Popular Literature of Sensation ACS 402 Introduction to Global Studies
ENG 705 Reading Visual Cultures Eleven courses from the following†:
ENG 803 Popular Literature of Exploration ACS 800* Senior Group Project
ENG 888 Televisual Texts and Contexts ACS 900* Senior Seminar
ENG 921 Narrative in a Digital Age ACS 950* Directed Research Course
ENG 930 High and Low Culture ECN 110 The Economics of Markets
*All courses except those marked with an asterisk require ENG 108 as ECN 220 Evolution of the Global Economy
a prerequisite. The Department recommends that students take ENG
108 in first year. ECN 511 Economy and Environment
NOTE: English courses cannot be used toward the Liberal Studies ENG 942 Postcolonial Interventions
requirement if the English Op�on is chosen.
GEO 108 Geography of the Global Village
GEO 206 Regions, Nations and the Global Community
FRENCH OPTION
GEO 208 Geography of the Global Economy
12 courses are required as grouped and noted below. GEO 910 Structure of the Global Village
REQUIRED: HST 426 Major Themes in International Relations
FRE 505 Language and Culture I HST 500 Modern International Relations
FRE 510 Advanced Grammar and Writing I HST 562 Science, Corporations and the Environment
FRE 605 Language and Culture II HST 563 History of International Organizations
FRE 610 Advanced Grammar and Writing II HST 720 The African Diaspora
FRE 900 Senior French Seminar HST 722 The British Empire and the World

pg 62 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - ARTS AND CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

HST 911 Canada in the International Sphere HST 510 United States after 1945
PHL 621 Beyond the Western Academic Tradition HST 511 Quebec in Canada: A History
POG 100 People, Power, and Politics HST 522 The Middle East: 1914 to the Present
POG 225 Global Governance HST 532 Elizabethan England
POG 323 The Politics of Development HST 533 Themes in African History I
POG 340 Intro to Comparative Politics HST 540 Espionage: A 20th-Century History
POG 411 Canadian Foreign Policy HST 541 Unknown Canada: Rebels, Rioters, Strikers
POG 423 Nationalism and Identity HST 550 Ontario to 1896: The Formative Years
POG 424 Human Rights and Global Politics HST 551 Problems in 20th-Century Western Europe
POG 426 Contemporary Global Conflicts HST 555 Modern China I: 1839-1949
POG 443 Global Cities HST 561 Controlling the World
POL 203 Politics of the Environment HST 562 Science, Corporations and the Environment
POL 607 Technology and Globalization HST 563 History of International Organizations
POL 688 Colonialism and Imperialism HST 564 History of Canadian Cultural Industries
PSY 941 Cross Cultural Psychology HST 565 Immigrant Experience in Canadian History
SOC 706 Sociology of the Global Economy HST 580 Natives and Newcomers to 1763
* All students must complete a minimum of one of the following: ACS HST 584 Mediaeval Europe: 400-1400
800, ACS 900, ACS 950. HST 585 Southeast Asia: War and Peace since 1945
† Students approved prior to Fall 2008 will take ACS 402 and 10
courses from above, PLUS one addi�onal course from Table I, any HST 587 18th-Century Britain: 1688-1815
Op�on. HST 600 Innovators, Capitalists and Managers
HST 602 The History of Modern Propaganda
HISTORY OPTION HST 603 The Third Reich
Revised Commencing 2010-2011 HST 604 The Uneasy Peace: The Cold War, 1945-90
12 courses are required as grouped and noted below. HST 610 Modern U.S. Foreign Relations
HST 632 England in the 17th Century
REQUIRED:
HST 633 Themes in African History II
HST 900 Senior History Seminar HST 641 Wine, Women, Warriors, Saviours and Sinners
Four to six courses from the following: HST 650 Ontario since 1878
HST 110† U.S. History: Colonial Era to 1877 HST 651 Problems in 20th-Century Eastern Europe
HST 111* World Turned Upside Down: Europe 1350-1789 HST 655 Modern China II: 1949-Present
HST 112* East Meets West: Asia in the World HST 657 Culture/Politics of Difference in the U.S.
HST 113* Themes in Modern Asian History HST 658 Sex and the American City
HST 119* Fact and Fiction: History Through Film I HST 680 Natives and Newcomers from 1763
HST 210† U.S. History: 1877 to the Present HST 701 Scientific Technology and Modern Society
HST 211* A Century of Revolution: Europe 1789-1914 HST 702 The First World War
HST 213† Themes on Latin American History HST 711 Canada and the United States
HST 219* Fact and Fiction: History Through Film II HST 712 The American City
HST 222† The History of the Caribbean I HST 720 The African Diaspora
HST 301 Human Rights and the Canadian State HST 721 African-American History
HST 307† Canada to 1885: The Founding Societies HST 722 The British Empire and the World
HST 325 History of Science and Technology I HST 723 The Material Cultures of North America
HST 407† Canada from 1885: The Struggle for Identity HST 731 Renaissance and Reform: Europe 1350-1650
HST 425 History of Science and Technology II HST 777 Medicine from Antiquity to 1500 CE
HST 426 Major Themes in International Relations HST 786 Science and Technology in Islamic History
HST 488 Britain since 1815 HST 787 Astronomy vs Astrology
HST 581† Canada, the Origins of Conflict HST 788 Water Use in History
HST 681† Canada, Defining a Nation HST 789 British Society since 1939
* A minimum of two must be taken. HST 802 The Second World War
† A minimum of two must be taken. HST 807 The Canadian Revolution: Canada from 1968
Five to seven courses from the following: HST 851 Experiential History
HST 911 Canada in the International Sphere
HST 500 Modern International Relations
HST 930 Film, Television and 20th-Century History
HST 501 The American Civil War
HST 503 Crime and Punishment in Modern Canada NOTE: History courses cannot be used toward the Liberal Studies
requirement if the History Op�on is chosen.
HST 504 War to War: World Conflict 1900-45
HST 508 The Child in History (Con�nued)

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 63


FACULTY OF ARTS - ARTS AND CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

INQUIRY AND INVENTION OPTION A minimum of two from the following:

12 courses are required as grouped and noted below†. PHL 110 Philosophy of Religion I
PHL 550 Knowledge, Truth and Belief
REQUIRED:
PHL 551 Metaphysics
ACS 303 Introduction to Inquiry and Invention
PHL 552 Philosophy of Science
Eleven courses from the following†:
PHL 611 Philosophy of Mind
ACS 800* Senior Group Project PHL 709 Religion, Science and Philosophy
ACS 900* Senior Seminar PHL 808 Language and Philosophy
ACS 950* Directed Research Course PHL 922 Religious Belief, Diversity, and Truth
ECN 511 Economy and Environment PHL 923 Philosophy of Religion II
ENG 503 Science Fiction PHL 924 Critical Thinking II
ENG 507 Science and the Literary Imagination A minimum of two from the following:
ENG 921 Narrative in a Digital Age
PHL 420 Philosophy, Diversity, and Recognition
GEO 110 The Physical Environment
PHL 449 Issues in the Philosophy of Punishment
HST 325 History of Science and Technology I
PHL 500 Philosophy of the Natural Environment
HST 561 Controlling the World
PHL 501 Social Thought and the Critique of Power
HST 562 Science, Corporations and the Environment
PHL 504 Philosophy of Art
HST 701 Scientific Technology and Modern Society
PHL 509 Bioethics
HST 777 Medicine from Antiquity to 1500 CE
PHL 603 Modern and Contemporary Ethics
HST 786 Science and Technology in Islamic History
PHL 612 Philosophy of Law
HST 787 Astronomy vs Astrology
PHL 621 Beyond the Western Academic Tradition
HST 788 Water Use in History
A maximum of five may be taken from the following:
PCS 181 Introduction to Astronomy
PHL 306 Freedom, Equality, Limits of Authority
PHL 500 Philosophy of the Natural Environment
PHL 307 Business Ethics
PHL 509 Bioethics
PHL 334 Ethics in Professional Life
PHL 552 Philosophy of Science
PHL 365 Philosophy of Beauty
PHL 709 Religion, Science and Philosophy
PHL 366 Existentialism and Art and Culture
PHL 921 Intellectual Property and Technology
PHL 400 Human Rights and Justice
SCI 181 Biology of a Living City
PHL 401 Philosophy and Mass Culture
SCI 182 Chemistry Applications to Living Systems
PHL 406 Issues of Life, Death, and Poverty
* All students must complete a minimum of one of the following: ACS
800, ACS 900, ACS 950. PHL 530 Media Ethics
† Students approved prior to Fall 2008 will take ACS 303 and 10 PHL 602 Health Care and Distributive Justice
courses from above, PLUS one addi�onal course from Table I, any
Op�on. PHL 606 Philosophy of Love and Sex
PHL 710 Philosophy and Film
PHILOSOPHY OPTION PHL 810 Philosophy of Cinema
Revised 2010-2011 PHL 921 Intellectual Property and Technology
NOTE: Philosophy courses cannot be used toward the Liberal Studies
REQUIRED: 12 courses are required as grouped and noted requirement if the Philosophy Op�on is chosen.
below.
A minimum of one from the following:
PHL 900 Senior Philosophy Seminar
PHL 910 Senior Philosophy Seminar
PHL 950 Directed Research Course
A minimum of two from the following:
PHL 101 Plato and the Roots of Western Philosophy
PHL 187 Ancient Greek Philosophy
PHL 333 Philosophy of Human Nature
PHL 503 Ancient and Modern Ethics
PHL 505 Hegel and Marx
PHL 553 Post-Existentialist Philosophy
PHL 605 Existentialism
PHL 708 Introduction to Modern Philosophy

pg 64 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - ARTS AND CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE II FIN 621 International Finance


GMS 522 International Marketing
A total of seven to 10 courses is required.
INP 900 Intro to the Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector
ACC 100 Introductory Financial Accounting INP 901 Developing Effective Organizations
ACS 201* Conflict Resolution and Negotiation INP 902 Program Evaluation
BLG 143 Biology I INP 910 Strategic Planning
BLG 144 Biology II INP 911 Advocacy and Governmental Relations
BLG 311 Cell Biology INP 912 Marketing for NonProfit Organizations
BLG 400 Genetics INP 913 Leading Through Change
CHY 103 General Chemistry I INP 914 Diversity and Conflict Resolution
CHY 113 General Chemistry II INP 915 Financial Management
CLD 215 Creative Arts I INP 920 Critical Issues
CRM 100 Introduction to Canadian Criminal Justice INT 917 Urban Community Development
CRM 102 Introduction to Crime and Justice ITM 102 Business Information Systems I
CRM 200 Criminal Law ITM 200 Fundamentals of Programming
CRM 202 Victims and the Criminal Process ITM 305 Systems Analysis and Design
CRM 300 Policing in Canada ITM 350 Concepts of eBusiness
CRM 304 Youth Justice in Canada ITM 410 Business Process Design
CRM 306 Corrections in Canada ITM 420 Information Systems Security and Control
CRM 308 Criminal Courts in Canada ITM 500 Logical Database Analysis and Design
CRM 314 Criminal Justice and the Charter ITM 505 Managing Information Systems
CRM 402 Criminal Justice and Social Equality ITM 750 IT Project Management
CRM 404 Criminal Justice Policy LAW 122 Business Law
ECN 104 Introductory Microeconomics LAW 321 The Law of Hospitality and Tourism
ECN 204 Introductory Macroeconomics LAW 525 The Law of the Marketplace
ECN 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics I LAW 529 Employment and Labour Law
ECN 504 Intermediate Microeconomics I LAW 603 Advanced Business Law
ENG 108 The Nature of Narrative I LAW 723 Issues in Information Technology Law
ENG 200 Writing as a Cultural Act LAW 724 Legal Aspects of International Business
ENG 208 The Nature of Narrative II MHR 405 Organizational Behaviour and Interpersonal Skills
ENG 222 Fairy Tales and Fantasies MHR 505 Organizational Behaviour II
ENG 224 Children’s Fiction MHR 522 Industrial Relations
ENG 421 16C Literature and Culture MHR 523 Human Resources Management
ENG 422 17C Literature and Culture MHR 600 Diversity and Equity in the Workplace
ENG 520 The Language of Persuasion MHR 623 Recruitment and Selection (Staffing)
ENG 531 18C Literature and Culture I MHR 700 Cross-Cultural Dimensions of Org Behaviour
ENG 532 18C Literature and Culture II MHR 721 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution
ENG 621 Reading Gender in a Global Context MHR 733 Training and Development
ENG 631 Reading/Writing Women MHR 741 Managing Interpersonal Dynamics
ENG 632 19C Literature and Culture I MHR 749 Compensation Management
ENG 633 19C Literature and Culture I MHR 841 Organizational Theory and Design
ENH 121 Health Law MHR 849 Human Resources Planning
ENT 500 New Venture Startup MHR 850 Organization Development
ENT 526 Entrepreneurial Behaviour and Strategy MKT 100 Principles of Marketing
FIN 300 Managerial Finance I MKT 300 Marketing Metrics and Analysis
FIN 401 Managerial Finance II MKT 400 Understanding Consumers and the New Media
FIN 501 Investment Analysis I MKT 403 Marketing Communications I
FIN 502 Personal Financial Planning MKT 423 Marketing Research
FIN 510 Entrepreneurial Finance MKT 500 Marketing Research
FIN 512 Risk Management and Insurance MKT 502 Consumer Behaviour
FIN 521 Advanced Portfolio Management MKT 504 Effective Persuasion
FIN 601 Investment Analysis I MKT 510 Innovations in Marketing
FIN 610 Short-Term Financial Management MKT 530 e-Marketing
FIN 611 Applied Investment Management MKT 600 Integrated Case Analysis
FIN 612 Retirement and Estate Planning
(Con�nued)

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 65


FACULTY OF ARTS - ARTS AND CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

MKT 621 Business-to-Business Marketing FACULTY/ADVISORY COUNCIL


MKT 700 Business Intelligence/Decision Modelling
MKT 723 Marketing in the Service Industry Dean
MKT 724 Sales Management Faculty of Arts
MKT 731 Competitive Intelligence C. CASSIDY
OHS 208 Occupational Health and Safety Law
Faculty
OHS 477 Integrated Disability Management
PHL 334 Ethics in Professional Life This is an interdisciplinary degree program with faculty drawn
PLE 535 Housing from all nine departments in the Faculty of Arts
POG 100 People, Power and Politics
Advisory Council
POG 110 Canadian Politics
POG 210 Canadian Government DR. HELEN J. BRESLAUER
Researcher and Consultant
POG 225 Global Governance
LAUREN FRIESE
POG 310 Ontario Politics Entrepreneur
POG 313 Race and Ethnicity in Canada Talentegg.com
POG 314 Controversial Policy Topics JANE GILL
Public Relations Consultant
POG 316 Social Policy Jane Gill & Associates
POG 317 Education Politics and Policy Public Relations

POG 320 Social Identity and Citizenship ROBERT JOHNSTON


Senior Advisor
POG 323 The Politics of Development Canadian Institute for International Affairs
POG 330 Western and Political Thought ROBERT D. JOHNSTON
Executive Director
POG 340 Intro to Comparative Politics Cultural Careers Council of Ontario
POG 440 Aboriginal Governance/Justice TIM OWEN
POG 443 Global Cities Director
World Education Services (WES)
PPA 322 Canadian Public Administration I
ALBERT SCHULTZ
PPA 422 Canadian Public Administration II Artistic Director
Soulpepper Theatre Company
PPA 629 Administrative Law
PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology I
Arts and Contemporary Studies Course Union President
PSY 124 Social Psychology
(ex-officio)
PSY 202 Introduction to Psychology II
PSY 300 Psychology and Law Arts and Contemporary Studies Alumni Association President
(ex-officio)
PSY 302 Child Development
PSY 325 Psychological Disorders
PSY 518 Environmental Psychology
PSY 605 Psychology of Health and Health Care
PSY 802 Death, Dying and Bereavement
PSY 808 Community Psychology
SCI 102 Chaos and Fractals
SCI 104 Physics Answers to Everyday Questions
SOC 104 Understanding Society
SOC 107 Sociology of Everyday Life
SOC 300 The Sociology of Diversity
SOC 302 The City and Society
SOC 319 Sociological Perspectives on Crime
SOC 470 Toronto: The Changing City
SOC 472 Sociology of Work and Occupations
SOC 500 Youth and Society
SOC 525 Media and Images of Inequality
SPN 515 Introduction to Business Spanish
SPN 702 Advanced Business Spanish
SSH 502 Community Action Research
* Available as a Professionally-Related Table II as of Fall 2009 First
Year Admits.

pg 66 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - CRIMINAL JUSTICE

shared with Ryerson’s Bachelor of Arts programs in


CRIMINAL JUSTICE Politics and Governance, Psychology, and Sociology,
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Arts (BA) with specialized study in Criminal Justice in the final two
years.
Administered by the Department of Criminal Justice and
Criminology Semesters one through four: Students are introduced to
Criminal Justice through a number of core courses that
address the nature of policing, the criminal courts, and
ADMISSION INFORMATION
the correctional system in Canada, as well as the main
Administered by the Department of Criminal Justice and theories of crime and the nature and extent of crime in
Criminology Canada. Students also acquire the quantitative research
skills relevant to the study of criminal justice. In addition
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Arts (BA)
to Criminal Justice courses, students select courses
DEGREE: Four years of study following Grade 12 U/M from other social science disciplines including Econom-
graduation. ics, Geography, Politics and Governance, Psychology,
ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses, and Sociology. To ensure breadth, students may take no
including Grade 12 U English. more than four courses in any one of these subject areas
in the first two years.
NOTES:
Because students achieve breadth in the Social Sciences
• ENG4U/EAE4U is the preferred English. through course selection in Table I, only the following
• A minimum grade of 70 percent or higher will be lower level Liberal Studies (Table A) subject courses can
required in Grade 12 U English. be selected: ENG, FRE, HST, IRL, ITM, MUS, NPF, PHL,
• Subject to competition, candidates may be required to SCI, SPN and THL.
present averages/grades above the minimum. Semesters five through eight: In the upper years,
students study criminal justice issues in greater depth,
PROGRAM OVERVIEW exploring such topics as youth justice, aboriginal justice,
The four-year baccalaureate degree program in Criminal strategies of crime control and prevention, social inequal-
Justice has as its major focus a critical understanding of ity and the criminal justice system, how crime is depicted
the structural, administrative, political and professional in the media, the establishment of the International
context of the criminal justice system and its related Criminal Court, and many more. In addition to program
agencies. Students will learn to question the assump- courses, students choose courses from a broad range of
tions behind both administrative practice and policies that subject areas that complement their professional studies
emerge from a variety of sources, and to evaluate them and broaden their career preparation. These include
on a range of criteria, including the empirical, theoretical, courses in Business Communication, Human Resources
and ethical bases. This will also include an analysis of Management, Law, Nonprofit and Volunteer Sector Man-
the influence of race, class, gender, and other forms of agement, Interdisciplinary Studies, Economics, Geog-
social inequality on the administration of criminal justice. raphy, Politics and Governance, Sociology, Psychology,
The tools to engage constructively with both state and and the sciences such as Biology, Chemistry, Mathemat-
non-state/community responses to crime will be a theme ics, and Physics.
throughout. This will include analyses of events that initi- Through a range of courses in all four years, students
ate the criminal process, the various paths through which also develop core competencies necessary to succeed
the criminal cases proceed, the professional roles and at the university level and in the modern workforce.
responsibilities of workers within that process, prospects Through an introduction to the Social Sciences, students
of reform and the policies that provide the professional explore an approach to critical analysis that is shared
context in which decisions are made. by several disciplines and will guide life-long learning.
Students also develop skills in basic qualitative research
Career Opportuni�es methods, critical and analytical thinking, and effective
Graduates of the Criminal Justice program will be able to communication.
pursue careers in a variety of capacities both inside and
outside government. These may include working with Transferability Guidelines
victims, people in conflict with the law (such as young Students admitted to either the Bachelor of Arts in
offenders), policing, the criminal courts, the correctional Criminal Justice, Politics and Governance, Psychology,
system, or community-based justice agencies. Graduates or Sociology may transfer from their current program and
may also pursue further education through law school or plan to any one of the other three plans for the Fall term
graduate studies in disciplines such as Criminology. of either their second or third year of studies. Applica-
CURRICULUM INFORMATION tions are available through the Program Office and must
be submitted by February 2nd. Transfer applications are
Criminal Justice as a discipline draws on the theories, considered on a competitive basis subject to program
methods, and practices of a broad range of social sci- capacity, and therefore program choice cannot be guar-
ences. The Criminal Justice program thus builds on anteed.
two years of predominantly social science foundations,

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 67


FACULTY OF ARTS - CRIMINAL JUSTICE

In order to transfer to Criminal Justice from Politics and 4th SEMESTER


Governance, Psychology or Sociology, students must:
(1) have a CLEAR Academic Standing at the end of the REQUIRED:
Winter term in which they apply to transfer; and (2) have CRM 202 Victims and the Criminal Process
successfully completed CRM 100 and CRM 102. CRM 204 Criminal Justice Research and Statistics

Liberal Studies REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from Table I.

Students must take three lower level liberal studies PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table III.
courses and three upper level liberal studies courses to
graduate. 5th SEMESTER

Minors REQUIRED GROUP 1: Two courses from the following:


Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson (with CRM 300 Policing in Canada
exceptions), and are eligible for only one Minor. Please CRM 306 Corrections in Canada
refer to the Minors Policy section of this calendar for CRM 308 Criminal Courts in Canada
further information on individual Minor requirements and
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
restrictions.
PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table II.
The G. Raymond Chang School of Con�nuing Educa�on PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED : One course from Table III or IV.
Cer�ficates
Undergraduate students wishing to pursue a continuing 6th SEMESTER
education certificate program should be aware of pos-
sible restrictions. Please refer to the Curriculum Advis- REQUIRED:
ing website at www.ryerson.ca/curriculumadvising for CRM 322 Ethics in Criminal Justice
complete details. CRM 324 Security Threats
CRM 402 Criminal Justice and Social Inequality
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
Bachelor of Arts
CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III or IV.

1st SEMESTER 7th SEMESTER

REQUIRED: REQUIRED:
CRM 100 Introduction to Canadian Criminal Justice CRM 400 Aboriginal Governance/Justice
SSH 100 Introduction to the Social Sciences CRM 404 Criminal Justice Policy
SSH 205 Academic Writing and Research LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from Table I. PROFESSIONAL: Two courses from Table II.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
8th SEMESTER
2nd SEMESTER
REQUIRED:
REQUIRED: CRM 406 Seminar in Criminal Justice
CRM 102 Introduction to Crime and Justice PROFESSIONAL: Two courses from Table II.
SSH 105 Critical Thinking I PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table III or IV.
REQUIRED GROUP 1: Two courses from Table I.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.

3rd SEMESTER

REQUIRED:
CRM 200 Criminal Law
SSH 301 Research Design and Qualitative Methods
REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from Table I.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III.

pg 68 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - CRIMINAL JUSTICE

REQUIRED GROUP 1 - TABLE I PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE III


Five courses are required. No more than four courses may be A minimum of three courses is required.
selected from any one subject area.
ACC 100 Introductory Financial Accounting
CRM 100* Introduction to Canadian Criminal Justice ACC 333 Core Concepts of Accounting
CRM 102* Introduction to Crime and Justice ACC 406 Introductory Management Accounting
CRM 200* Criminal Law ACC 414 Intermediate Accounting I
CRM 202* Victims and the Criminal Process BLG 143 Biology I
ECN 104 Introductory Microeconomics BLG 144 Biology II
ECN 204 Introductory Macroeconomics BLG 151 Microbiology I
ECN 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics I CHY 103 General Chemistry I
ECN 504 Intermediate Microeconomics I CHY 113 General Chemistry II
GEO 131 Environmental Analysis CHY 213 Analytical Chemistry III
GEO 141 Geography and GIS CMN 279 Introduction to Contemporary Business Comm
GEO 151 Urban Analysis CMN 313 Organizational Problem Solving and Report Writing
GEO 231 Principles in Recreation and Demography CMN 314 Professional Presentations
POG 100 People, Power and Politics CYC 101 Intro to Child and Youth Care
POG 110 Canadian Politics CYC 201 Child Abuse and Neglect
POG 210 Canadian Government CYC 401 Theories of Change for Children and Youth
POG 225 Global Governance INP 901 Developing Effective Organizations
PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology I INP 902 Program Evaluation
PSY 124 Social Psychology INP 910 Strategic Planning
PSY 202 Introduction to Psychology II INT 900 Program Planning and Evaluation Strategies
PSY 325 Psychological Disorders INT 905* Conflict Resolution in Community Services
SOC 105 Introduction to Sociology INT 908 Homelessness in Canadian Society
SOC 107 Sociology of Everyday Life INT 917 Urban Community Development
SOC 470 Toronto: The Changing City ITM 102 Business Information Systems I
SOC 525 Media and Images of Inequality ITM 305 Systems Analysis and Design
SSH 102 Learning and Development Strategies ITM 350 Concepts of eBusiness
* Required courses CRM 100, CRM 102, CRM 200, and CRM 202 are LAW 122 Business Law
not available as a choice in Table I.
LAW 525 Law of the Marketplace
LAW 529 Employment and Labour Law
PROFESSIONAL TABLE II
MHR 405 Organizational Behaviour and Interpersonal Skills
A total of five courses is required. MHR 505 Organizational Behaviour II
CRM 300*† Policing in Canada MHR 522 Industrial Relations
CRM 302* Criminological Theories MKT 100 Principles of Marketing
CRM 304* Youth Justice in Canada MKT 300 Marketing Metrics and Analysis
CRM 306*† Corrections in Canada MKT 423 Marketing Research
CRM 308*† Criminal Courts in Canada MKT 600 Integrated Case Analysis
CRM 310 Advanced Research Methods OHS 208 Occupational Health and Safety Law
CRM 312 Representing Crime OHS 477 Integrated Disability Management
CRM 314 Criminal Justice and the Charter OHS 508 Occupational Health
CRM 316 International Perspectives PCS 120 Physics I
CRM 318 Communities and Crime PCS 130 Physics II
PHL 400 Human Rights and Justice SCI 102 Chaos and Fractals
PHL 449 Issues in the Philosophy of Punishment SCI 104 Physics Answers to Everyday Questions
PSY 300 Psychology and Law * INT 905 is an an�requisite to INP 914 from Table IV.
* Available to Fall 2007 1st yr admits (and a�er) as a Table II elec�ve.
† If not selected in 5th semester.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 69


FACULTY OF ARTS - CRIMINAL JUSTICE

PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE IV POG 412 Government and the Economy


POG 416 Canadian Federalism
Professionally-related courses other than those listed in the fol-
POG 417 Canadian American Relations
lowing table may be selected subject to Program and Teaching
Department approval, space availability and requisite require- POG 423 Nationalism and Identity
ments. POG 424 Human Rights and Global Politics
POG 426 Contemporary Global Conflicts
CYC 402 Group Work with Children and Youth
POG 430 Contemporary Political Thought
CYC 602 Children’s Rights
POG 431 Power, Hegemony and Resistance
CYC 802 Incident Response with Children and Youth
POG 442 Women and Politics
CYC 805 Special Issues: Program Development
POG 443 Global Cities
ECN 104 Introductory Microeconomics
POG 446 Voters, Elections, and Parties
ECN 204 Introductory Macroeconomics
PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology I
ECN 321 Introduction to Law and Economics
PSY 124 Social Psychology
ECN 703 Public Finance I
PSY 202 Introduction to Psychology II
ECN 803 Public Finance II
PSY 325 Psychological Disorders
GEO 131 Environmental Analysis
PSY 335 Clinical Psychology
GEO 151 Urban Analysis
PSY 602 Developmental Psychopathology
GEO 231 Principles in Recreation and Demography
PSY 806 Behaviour Modification
GEO 581 GIS, Geographic Data and Mapping
PSY 808 Community Psychology
GEO 681 GIS and Geographic Analysis
SOC 105 Introduction to Sociology
GEO 691 Canadian Immigration: Patterns and Place
SOC 107 Sociology of Everyday Life
INP 900 Intro to the Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector
SOC 300 The Sociology of Diversity
INP 911 Advocacy and Governmental Relations
SOC 402 The City and Social Problems
INP 914* Diversity and Conflict Resolution
SOC 470 Toronto: The Changing City
INP 915 Financial Management
SOC 472 Sociology of Work and Occupations
INT 902 Disability Issues
SOC 474 Immigration Minorities and Citizenship
INT 907 Team Work for Community Services
SOC 479 Communities and Social Networks
LAW 603 Advanced Business Law
SOC 500 Youth and Society
LAW 723 Issues in Information Technology Law
SOC 502 Violence and the Family
MHR 523 Human Resources Management
SOC 609 Women and Human Rights
MHR 600 Diversity and Equity in the Workplace
SOC 706 Sociology of the Global Economy
MHR 623 Recruitment and Selection (Staffing)
SOC 941 Race, Ethnic, and Aboriginal Studies
MHR 700 Cross-Cultural Dimensions of Org Behaviour
SOC 942 Women and Structural Change
MUS 110 Music and Film
SOC 943 Poverty Issues
MUS 211 Music Culture of the City
SSH 500 Peer Learning Experience
MUS 401 Music, Religion and Spirituality
SSH 502 Community Action Research
PHL 334 Ethics in Professional Life
SWP 903 Crisis Intervention
PHL 400 Human Rights and Justice
SWP 919 Addictions I
PHL 449 Issues in the Philosophy of Punishment
SWP 920 Addictions II
PLE 535 Housing
* INP 914 is an an�requisite to INT 905 in Table III.
POG 100 People, Power and Politics
POG 110 Canadian Politics
POG 210 Canadian Government
POG 225 Global Governance
POG 310 Ontario Politics
POG 313 Race and Ethnicity in Canada
POG 314 Controversial Policy Topics
POG 315 Equity and Human Rights
POG 316 Social Policy
POG 320 Social Identity and Citizenship
POG 323 The Politics of Development
POG 330 Western Political Thought
POG 340 Intro to Comparative Politics
POG 410 Urban Government in Canada
POG 411 Canadian Foreign Policy

pg 70 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - CRIMINAL JUSTICE / ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

FACULTY/ADVISORY COUNCIL ENGLISH DEPARTMENT


Dean
The Department of English offers courses intended
Faculty of Arts
to expand students’ awareness of their culture and of
C. CASSIDY themselves, to encourage the skillful use of the English
language and to develop recognition of the masterful use
Chair
of language by others.
K. ISMAILI
Literature courses provide opportunities to study the
Faculty prose and poetry of the English language and of other
languages in translation. The Department’s wide range of
S. CLARK, BA (Hons.), BA, Car., PhD, Edin. literature courses enables serious students to acquire an
K. ISMAILI, BA, S. Fraser, MPhil, Camb., PhD, W. Ont.
understanding of the social and political concepts which
T. LANDAU, BSc, MA, PhD, Tor.
A. ORLOVA, LLB, PhD, York (Can.) have appeared in literature, thus enhancing their ability to
A. M. SINGH, BA, MA, Tor., PhD, Lond. comprehend the characteristics of their own culture.
J. SPROTT, BA, Wat., MA, PhD, Tor.
Liberal Studies courses in English complement the
S. THOMPSON, BA (Hons.), MA, Tor.
K. VARMA, BA, W. Laur., MA, PhD, Tor.
professional and professionally related components of
student curricula, developing “the capacity to understand
Advisory Council and appraise the social and cultural context in which the
graduate will work as a professional and live as an edu-
SHARRYN AIKEN cated citizen.” In addition to its Liberal Studies offerings,
Professor
Faculty of Law the English Department offers an English Option to stu-
Queen’s University dents in Arts and Contemporary Studies and an English
ANTHONY DOOB Minor to students in other programs.
Professor
Centre for Criminology LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY COURSES
University of Toronto
MIKE FEDERICO Along with its literature courses, the English Department
Staff Superintendent offers Liberal Studies courses designed for students
Staff Planning and Community Mobilization whose first language is not English. LNG 100 Language
Toronto Police Service
and Identity, LNG 200 Language and Public Life and
KIMBERLEY MURRAY
Executive Director LNG 300 Language: Spoken and Written are language
Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto and writing intensive courses available to students who
JUSTICE MICHAEL H. TULLOCH have been assessed as likely to benefit from this type
Superior Court of Justice of Canada of program. Students for whom English is a second
language and who are enrolled in programs that accept
ESL courses for credit may take all three ESL courses,
LNG 100, LNG 200 and LNG 300. However, a maximum
of two credits only may be used towards their degree
requirements. These courses are Lower Level Liberal
Studies courses.

Dean
Faculty of Arts

C. CASSIDY

Chair

D. DENISOFF

Faculty

J. BURWELL, BA (Hons.), Qu., MA, PhD, Northwestern, Chicago


R. BOYAGODA, BA (Hons.), Tor., MA, PhD, Boston University
D. DENISOFF, BBus. Admin., S.Fraser, MA, PhD, McG.
I. GAMMEL, MA, PhD, McM.
S. HENSTRA, BA (Hons.), McM., MA, W. Ont., PhD, Tor.
L. JANZEN KOOISTRA, BA (Hons.), Brock, MA, PhD, McM.
A. M. LEE-LOY, BA (Hons.), MA, Car., PhD, Warw.
K. MULHALLEN, BA, Wat., MA, PhD, Tor.
S. MURRAY, BA, Tor., MA, King’s College, London, MA, Katholieke Univer-
siteit Leuven, Belgium, PhD, Calif.
N. NAGHIBI, BA (Hons.), Tor., MA, Guelph, PhD, Alta.
A. O’MALLEY, BA (Hons.), McG., MA, Tor., PhD, Alta.
R. PANOFSKY, BA (Hons.), Car., MA, PhD, York (Can.)
(Con�nued)

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 71


FACULTY OF ARTS - ENGLISH DEPARTMENT / FRENCH AND SPANISH DEPARTMENT

E. M. PODNIEKS, BA, McG., MA, PhD, Tor.


J. ROLLINS, BA (Hons.), Ott., MA, PhD, Tor.
FRENCH AND SPANISH DEPARTMENT
R. SAPRA, BA (Hons.), MA, MPhil, Delhi University, PhD, Qu.
A. SHEPARD, BA, St. Olaf College, PhD, University of Virginia French and Spanish Studies at Ryerson place a strong
H. SIMPSON, BA, MPhil, WI, PhD, York (Can.) emphasis on language skills, oral comprehension and
S. THOMAS, BA (Hons.), S. Fraser, MA, Tor., PhD, Oxf. expression. In French, the department has a range of
M. Y. TSCHOFEN, BA, PhD, Alta. offerings from introductory level language courses to up-
per level courses in both language and literature. Some
Professor Emeriti/ae of the more advanced courses focus on communication
skills, composition, literature, stylistics, translation, and
M. BRANDIS Business French. In Spanish, three levels of language
R. M. CONRAD courses are offered: introductory, intermediate and ad-
C. DOWLER
vanced, along with courses in language and culture. The
M. DOWLER
department also offers a limited number of courses in
W. EMERY
English on the literature and culture of the French-speak-
A. G. FUERSTENBERG
ing and Spanish-speaking world.
D. B. GRICE
R. S. HARLOW Correct French and Spanish, like English, are the same
R. A. IMBODEN regardless of the country in which they are spoken.
Y. P. KERR However, there are regional differences in intonation, ac-
J. KEYES cent and idiom just as literatures differ from one country
S. LAUDER to another. Our courses reflect this by exposing students
N. MACKENZIE to French as it is spoken in Canada and in the rest of the
P. MCLAUGHLIN French-speaking world; similarly, students of Spanish
D. G. PRIESTMAN learn to appreciate the differences between Spanish as it
R. SHIRTLIFF is spoken in Spain and in the various Spanish-speaking
R. E. C. SOUTHGATE countries of Latin America and the Caribbean.
S. J. WARD
E. WRIGHT Admission and Enrollment Procedures
The process is the same for both disciplines. Admission
is by an online placement test and/or by an interview dur-
ing specific periods in the year. Students should check
the Website of the Department of French and Spanish to
find out when the placement test is available. Admission
is granted on a first-come, first-served basis and late
registrants are normally not accepted.
The wide diversity of students’ educational backgrounds at
Ryerson makes testing necessary: it allows faculty to coun-
sel students accurately as to which course or courses are
appropriate and it ensures a uniform level of language skills
in each class. Students who have never taken language
courses at Ryerson University are therefore required to
take the placement test to ensure that they are placed in the
appropriate level. Please note that students willfully or inad-
vertently enrolled in the wrong course(s) may be forced to
re-enroll at the Instructor’s discretion, or drop the course(s).
Website: www.ryerson.ca/french-spanish.

Dean
Faculty of Arts

C. CASSIDY

Chair

M. FIOLA

Faculty

M. ATAY, BA, U.C.L.A., MA, Tor.


M. COLLETTE, MA, PhD, Tor.
M. FIOLA, BA, MA, Montr., PhD, Université de la Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris
III, France
K. KELLETT-BETSOS, BA, S. Fraser, MA, PhD, Tor.

Adjunct Professor

M. R. FINN, BA, MA, Tor., PhD, Harv.

Faculty Emeritus

J. P. CHAVY

pg 72 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - GEOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

deal with current problems in the real world. Program


GEOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS courses offer students both flexibility and depth by
familiarizing them with various techniques and research
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Arts (BA)
designs and by stressing the need to recognize indica-
Administered by the Department of Geography tors of social change and societal processes. As well as
the compulsory courses, there is ample opportunity for
students to plan a course of study in consultation with
ADMISSION INFORMATION academic advisors.
DEGREE: Four years of study following Grade 12 U/M
Career Opportuni�es
graduation
Graduates of the Geographic Analysis program pursue
ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses, widely varied careers throughout the public and private
including Grade 12 U English. sectors. Courses emphasizing concepts, issues, tech-
NOTES: niques and decision processes combined with practical
work experience in the context of a co-operative educa-
1. ENG4U/EAE4U is the preferred English. tion environment lead to employment opportunities that
2. The minimum grade required in the subject prereq- are both responsible and rewarding. Two fully equipped
uisite (normally in the 65-70 percent range) will be computer laboratories ensure that students receive prac-
determined subject to competition. tical training on major statistical, database and graphics
software as well as the state-of-the-art Geographical
3. Students are encouraged to include one Grade 12 Information Systems.
U/M Geography course and one Grade 12 U Math-
ematics course in their Grade 12 program. Liberal Studies
4. Applicants will be invited to appear for an admis- Students must take three lower level liberal studies
sions preview where traveling distance permits. courses and three upper level liberal studies courses to
graduate.
5. Subject to competition, candidates may be required
to present averages/grades above the minimum. Minors
Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson (with
PROGRAM OVERVIEW exceptions), and are eligible for only one Minor. Please
Ryerson’s Geographic Analysis program aims to provide refer to the Minors Policy section of this calendar for
courses of career relevance with emphasis on the appli- further information on individual Minor requirements and
cation of geographic knowledge to real world problems. restrictions.
The curriculum design allows students to specialize in at
least two of the following areas: The G. Raymond Chang School of Con�nuing Educa�on
Cer�ficates
- Retail/Industrial location, which focuses on the prob- Undergraduate students wishing to pursue a continuing
lems and issues that must be considered in determining education certificate program should be aware of pos-
the location and development of retail and industrial
sible restrictions. Please refer to the Curriculum Advis-
activities at local and regional levels
ing website at www.ryerson.ca/curriculumadvising for
- Recreation studies, which explores the various eco- complete details.
nomic, social, and environmental factors that influence
Bachelor of Arts
urban and rural recreation, park planning, recreational
GEOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS
resource management, market research, and regional
tourism development
1st SEMESTER
- Environmental and Resources Management, which em-
phasizes the study of management and planning policies REQUIRED:
that address conflicts arising as economic development GEO 131 Environmental Analysis
severely reduces the physical resource base and strains
GEO 141 Geography and GIS
the quality of the natural environment
GEO 151 Urban Analysis
- Urban Analysis, which examines the factors that com- GEO 161 Introductory Analytical Techniques
bine to create the structure of an urban environment-resi-
dential patterns, business and industrial developments LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
and transportation systems, and the dynamics of these
factors in the state and growth of an urban centre 2nd SEMESTER

- GIS, Geographic Information Systems which employ REQUIRED:


computer-based software to store, manipulate, analyze, ENC 107 Writing Strategies
and map spatial data for environmental, economic, ur-
GEO 221 Location Analysis
ban, recreational and social analysis
GEO 231 Principles in Recreation and Demography
Through a combination of in-service training, guest GEO 241 Cartographic Principles and Practice
lecturers from business and government, and classroom
study, the program provides students with an ability to LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 73


FACULTY OF ARTS - GEOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

3rd SEMESTER 7th SEMESTER

REQUIRED: REQUIRED:
GEO 361 Inferential Statistics in Problem Solving GEO 771 Practicum
PROFESSIONAL: Two courses from the following: LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
GEO 313 Geography of the Physical Environment PROFESSIONAL: Two courses from the following:
GEO 351 The Internal Structure of the City GEO 513 Physical Geography in Decision Support
GEO 372 Global Shift in the 21st Century GEO 514 Resource Management in Northern Canada
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table I. GEO 521 Geodemographics
GEO 541 GIS Programming
4th SEMESTER
GEO 542 Introduction to Remote Sensing
REQUIRED: GEO 551 Urbanization and Regional Development
GEO 441 Geographic Information Science GEO 553 Studies in Rural Geography
GEO 561 Multivariate Analytical Techniques
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
GEO 772† Individual Research Paper
PROFESSIONAL: Two courses from the following: GEO 773 Field Studies
GEO 411 Resource and Environmental Planning
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table I.
GEO 421 The Retail Economy
† Students must select either GEO 772 in 7th semester or GEO 873 in
GEO 431 Recreation Analysis 8th semester.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table I.
8th SEMESTER
5th SEMESTER
REQUIRED:
REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from the following: GEO 871 The Professional Geographer
GEO 521 Geodemographics
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
GEO 541 GIS Programming
GEO 561 Multivariate Analytical Techniques PROFESSIONAL: Two courses from the following:
GEO 612 Environmental Decision Making
PROFESSIONAL: Three courses from the following:
GEO 621 Advanced Retail Analysis and Planning
GEO 513 Physical Geography in Decision Support
GEO 631 Exploration in Travel and Tourism
GEO 514 Resource Management in Northern Canada
GEO 641 GIS and Decision Support
GEO 542 Introduction to Remote Sensing
GEO 642 Advanced Remote Sensing and GIS
GEO 551 Urbanization and Regional Development
GEO 645 Place and Population Health
GEO 553 Studies in Rural Geography
GEO 652 Urban Transportation Systems
GEO 773 Field Studies
GEO 671 Development and Environmental Law
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table I. GEO 773 Field Studies

6th SEMESTER GEO 873† Geographic Entrepreneurship and Consulting


PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table I.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
† Students must select either GEO 772 in 7th semester or GEO 873 in
PROFESSIONAL†: Three courses from the following: 8th semester.
GEO 612 Environmental Decision Making
GEO 621 Advanced Retail Analysis and Planning
GEO 631 Exploration in Travel and Tourism
GEO 641 GIS and Decision Support
GEO 642 Advanced Remote Sensing and GIS
GEO 645 Place and Population Health
GEO 652 Urban Transportation Systems
GEO 671 Development and Environmental Law
GEO 773 Field Studies
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table I.
† Students may subs�tute one course from 4th semester Professional
grouping with permission of Department.

pg 74 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - GEOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE I MKT 504 Effective Persuasion


MKT 510 Innovations in Marketing
ACC 100 Introductory Financial Accounting
MKT 600 Integrated Case Management
ACC 406 Introductory Management Accounting
MKT 621 Business-to-Business Marketing
CMN 313 Org Problem Solving and Report Writing
MKT 700 Business Intelligence/Decision Modelling
CMN 314 Professional Presentations
MKT 702 Marketing Management I
CPS 125 Digital Computation and Programming
MKT 723 Marketing in the Service Industry
CPS 305 Data Structures
MKT 724 Sales Management
CRM 100 Introduction to Canadian Criminal Justice
MKT 730 Assessing/Managing Marketing Opportunities
CRM 102 Introduction to Crime and Justice
MKT 731 Competitive Intelligence
CRM 200 Criminal Law
MKT 802 Advanced Market Planning
CRM 202 Victims and the Criminal Process
PLE 515 Environmental Planning
ECN 104 Introduction to Microeconomics
PLE 525 Urban Transportation Planning
ECN 204 Introduction to Macroeconomics
PLE 535 Housing
ECN 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics I
PLE 555 Site Planning I
ECN 321 Intro to Law and Economics
PLE 565 Community Sustainable Development
ECN 502 Economics of Natural Resources
PLE 625 Advanced Transportation Planning
ECN 504 Intermediate Microeconomics I
PLE 635 Feasibility Analysis of Property Development
ECN 506 Money and Banking
PLE 655 Site Planning II
ECN 510 Environmental Economics
PLE 715 Environmental Assessment
ECN 606 International Monetary Economics
PLE 735 Private Development Seminar
ECN 702 Econometrics II
PLE 765 International Development
ECN 703 Public Finance I
PLE 815 Facility Siting and Environ Risk Assessment
ECN 707 Economics of International Trade
PLE 895 Conflict Resolution and Dispute Negotiation
ECN 710 Transportation Economics
POG 100 People, Power and Politics
ENH 121 Health Law
POG 110 Canadian Politics
ENH 617 Applied Ecology POG 210 Canadian Government
ENT 500 New Venture Startup POG 225 Global Governance
GMS 200 Introduction to Global Management POG 310 Ontario Politics
GMS 522 International Marketing POG 314 Controversial Policy Topics
HTT 202 Tourism Concepts POG 410 Canadian Urban Politics
HTT 509 Issues/Policies in Hospitality/Tourism POG 412 Government and the Economy
HTT 510 Sustainable Tourism Development POG 424 Human Rights and Global Politics
INP 900 Intro to the Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector POG 443 Global Cities
INP 901 Developing Effective Organizations POL 122 Local Government and Politics in Canada
INP 902 Program Evaluations POL 332 Power and Influence in Canada
INP 910 Strategic Planning PPA 322 Canadian Public Administration I
INT 908 Homelessness in Canadian Society PPA 422 Canadian Public Administration II
ITM 200 Fundamentals of Programming PPA 601 Collaborative Governance
ITM 305 Systems Analysis and Design PPA 623 Public Policy
LAW 122 Business Law PPA 629 Administrative Law and Government
LAW 321 The Law of Hospitality and Tourism PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology I
LAW 525 The Law of the Marketplace PSY 124 Social Psychology
LAW 529 Employment and Labour Law PSY 202 Introduction to Psychology II
LAW 603 Advanced Business Law PSY 325 Psychological Disorders
LAW 723 Issues in Information Technology Law PSY 518 Environmental Psychology
LAW 724 Legal Aspects of International Business SCI 102 Chaos and Fractals
MHR 405 Org Behaviour and Interpersonal Skills SCI 104 Physics Answers to Everyday Questions
MHR 505 Organizational Behaviour II SOC 104 Understanding Society
MKT 100 Principles of Marketing SOC 107 Sociology of Everyday Life
MKT 300 Marketing Metrics and Analysis SOC 300 The Sociology of Diversity
MKT 400 Understanding Consumers and the New Media SOC 302 The City and Society
MKT 403 Marketing Communications I SOC 402 The City and Social Problems
MKT 423 Marketing Research SOC 470 Toronto: The Changing City
MKT 500 Marketing Research SOC 504 Children and Society
MKT 502 Consumer Behaviour SOC 525 Media and Images of Inequality

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 75


FACULTY OF ARTS - GEOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

FACULTY/ADVISORY COUNCIL MARK LOWRY


Geography & Geotechnologies Consultant
Toronto District School Board
Dean ANDREW LYSZKIEWICZ
Faculty of Arts Director, Land Information Toronto
Information & Technology Division
C. CASSIDY Corporate Services Department
PETER MOORE
Chair Principal Planner
City Planning, Metro Hall
S. WANG
RUDY M. OVCJAK
Faculty Manager, Corporate Strategy
Canadian Tire Corporation Limited
D. ATKINSON, BES (Hons.), MES, Wat. NANCY PROUT
D. BANTING, BA (Hons.), W. Ont., MSc, Guelph, PhD, W. Ont. Director of Geomatics
M. BARDECKI, BA, MSc, Guelph, PhD, York (Can.) Regional Municipality of York
H. BAUDER, BA, MA, Wayne State University, PhD. W. Laur. MAX SHERMAN
E. CARLSON, BS, Northwestern, MA, Wis., PhD, Calg. President
B. CEH, BES, Wat., MA, W. Laur. PhD. W. Ont. Macroplan Limited/Macrotech Ltd.
P. COPPACK, BES (Hons.), MA, PhD, Wat. MARIO J. SILVA
M. DOUCET, BA, Tor., MA, York (Can.), PhD, Tor. Land Use Planning Officer
Planning Section, Facility Services
K. W. FORSYTHE, BSc (Hons.), Sask., MSc, Calg., DrPhil, Salzburg Toronto District School Board
L. FULLERTON, BA, MA, York (Can.)
S. GHOSH, BA (Hons.), Calc., MA, J. Nehru U., PhD, York (Can.)
J. A. HERNANDEZ, BA (Hons.), Staffordshire, MSc, Leic., PhD, Manches-
ter Metropolitan
H. JACOBS, BA, Brock, MA, Car., PhD, Tor.
S. LASKIN, BA (Hons.), York (Can.), MA, Tor.
I. LINDSAY, BA, Belf., MA, Alta., PhD, Tor.
A. MILLWARD, BSc, MSc, Guelph, PhD, Wat.
C. RINNER, Vordiplom, Diplom, University of Osnabruck, Dr. rer. Nat.,
University of Bonn
S. SWALES, BA (Hons.) Liv., MA, Calg.
L. WANG, BSc, East China Normal University, BSc, Chinese Academy of
Sciences, PhD, York (Can.)
S. WANG, BSc, Shangdong Teachers’ University, People’s Republic of
China, MA, PhD, Alta.

Adjunct Professor

A. LEA, BA, MA, PhD, Tor.

Professor Emeriti/ae

D. DANSEREAU
F. DUERDEN
R. GOLDSMITH
D. MOCK
N. J. SILLER
M. TRUELOVE

Advisory Council

ARTHUR BERRILL
Vice President of Research Canada
Pitney Bowes MapInfo Canada
BILL BILKAS
Director of Real Estate
Shoppers Drug Mart
RICARDO GOMEZ-INSAUSTI, PhD
VP Research
BBM Canada
JAN KESTLE
President and CEO
Environics Analytics
NARGIS LADHA
Senior IT Consulting Manager
Enterprise Technology Services
Ontario Hydro 1
DAVID LAYTON
Director, Transaction Management & Lease Administration
Corporate Real Estate Services
O & Y CB Richard Ellis

pg 76 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - HISTORY DEPARTMENT / INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND FINANCE

HISTORY DEPARTMENT
INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND FINANCE
The Department of History serves full- and part-time stu- Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Arts (BA)
dents through the university’s regular programs and the
G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education. Stu- Administered by the Department of Economics
dents typically take History courses to meet their Liberal
Studies requirements out of interest in the subject matter
and/or to enhance their professional competencies (such ADMISSION INFORMATION
as Business or Journalism). Other people study History DEGREE: Four years of study following Grade 12 U/M
as part of a specific program requirement, such as the
graduation.
Arts and Contemporary Studies program Options ‘Global
Studies’ and ‘Inquiry and Invention’. Others pursue the ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses
comprehensive History Option within the program, which including Grade 12 U courses in: English and Mathemat-
not only allows for the in-depth study of many fascinating ics (one of Grade 12 U Advanced Functions (MHF4U),
questions as part of a person’s intellectual formation and Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U) or Mathematics of Data
career training, but also prepares individuals for graduate
Management (MDM4U).
school or subject specialization in Teachers’ College.
Some courses survey broad historical topics while others NOTES:
explore specialized themes, and both lower-level and 1. ENG4U/EAE4U is the preferred English.
upper-level offerings provide excellent opportunities to
deepen students’ appreciation of the forces that have 2. The minimum grade(s) required in the subject pre-
shaped the human experience. Instructors draw upon requisites (normally in the 65-70 percent range) will
such diverse sources as cultural, economic, gender, be determined subject to competition.
intellectual, international, material, political, scientific,
and social history in presenting their courses. They also 3. Please note that Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U)
train students in key aspects of the historian’s craft, or Advanced Functions (MHF4U) are the preferred
including approaches to framing questions and marshal- Mathematics courses.
ling evidence to support arguments. Courses range 4. Subject to competition, candidates may be required
from explorations of history through film, to the history
to present averages/grades above the minimum.
of technology and science, to the national and regional
histories of North America, Europe, Africa, and Asia,
PROGRAM OVERVIEW
to other critically-important issues, such as diasporas,
“race,” urbanization, international relations and conflict, Few contemporary trends are as significant as the
and espionage and propaganda. integration of the global economy. With the rapid expan-
Dean sion in international trade and cross-border investment
Faculty of Arts flows, businesses throughout the world are being forced
C. CASSIDY to meet foreign competition with improved products and
Chair streamlined production methods, in markets at home as
C. BENN well as abroad. These trends have produced rewarding
new career opportunities for graduates who possess
Faculty a solid understanding of the global economy and have
C. BENN, BA, MDiv, Tor., PhD, York (Can.) the skills required to evaluate and manage risk in a
A. BLAKE, BA (Hons.), Sus, PhD, American University global setting. These careers require not just a practical
J. CARSON, BA, MA, W. Ont., PhD, Tor. grasp of economic theory, but also a capacity to access
C. ELLIS, BA (Hons.), Dal., DPhil, Oxf. relevant data sources and judge their reliability, model
Y. GAO, BA, MA (China), MA, PhD, University of Iowa economic relationships, and provide forecasts of key
M. GREIG, BA, Tor., MA, Qu., PhD, Camb. economic variables.
I. HEHMEYER, Pharmacist’s License, Diploma in Agriculture, DAgrSc,
University of Bonn To meet these emerging needs in the global marketplace,
J. HUBBARD, BSc (Hons.), New Br., MA, PhD, Tor. Ryerson has introduced a program in International Eco-
A. KISLENKO, BA (Hons.), MA, W. Ont., PhD, Tor.
nomics and Finance. The program combines the theoreti-
D. C. MACKENZIE, BA, McG., MA, PhD, Tor.
J. MORGAN, BA, York (Can.), MA, DipEd, W. Ont., PhD, Camb. cal aspects of economics and quantitative methods with
J. C. POWER, BA, Tor., MA, PhD, Dal. the practical skills and social awareness needed to apply
R. STAGG, BA, MA, PhD, Tor. this knowledge in an effective manner. It is the only eco-
R. TEIGROB, BA (Hons.), Winn., MA, S.U.N.Y. (Albany), PhD, University of nomics degree of its kind in Canada - combining a formal
New Mexico
internship with an international focus.
Adjunct Professor Upon graduation, students will be ready to take on chal-
R. FAIR lenging positions in global business, finance, or the public
Professor Emeriti/ae sector, in fields such as international market research,
F. W. C. ABBOTT
global mutual funds, or policy evaluation. Graduates of
T. BARCSAY the program can also further their education through
T. BYRAM graduate studies such as an MA in Economics or an
R. W. KAPP MBA. Whatever a student’s particular career path, their
M. MACMILLAN
J. A. WARGO
future success will be based in large part on the broadly

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 77


FACULTY OF ARTS - INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND FINANCE

based proficiency they have acquired with this degree. Internship courses are graded on a pass/fail basis.
Participation and successful completion of an in-
The goals of the program are:
ternship course, however, appears on the student’s
• To provide students with a highly structured and rigor- academic transcript.
ous program of study combining both analytical depth
and hands-on practical experience. Liberal Studies
• To develop graduates with a range of skills and knowl- Students must take three lower level liberal studies
edge in high demand in today’s workplace: courses and three upper level liberal studies courses to
• analytical proficiency in economic theory, statistical graduate.
techniques (including forecasting), and finance (in
areas such as foreign exchange and derivative securi- Minors
ties) Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson (with
• a knowledge of international agreements and orga- exceptions), and are eligible for only one Minor. Please
nizations (e.g. NAFTA, WTO, the IMF), basic busi- refer to the Minors Policy section of this calendar for
ness practices (financial accounting and manage- further information on individual Minor requirements and
rial finance), and a range of historical, political and restrictions.
cultural issues (through core courses in subjects such
as economic history, international relations, and non- The G. Raymond Chang School of Con�nuing Educa�on
Western philosophy) Cer�ficates
• well-developed communications skills with a series of Undergraduate students wishing to pursue a continuing
oral reports, written essays, and computer-based as- education certificate program should be aware of pos-
signments spread throughout the four years of study sible restrictions. Please refer to the Curriculum Advis-
ing website at www.ryerson.ca/curriculumadvising for
• integrated learning, with three capstone courses (a
complete details.
special project, a seminar course on a geographic
region or economic sector, and country risk analysis)
in the final year of study, allowing students to apply Bachelor of Arts
their knowledge and skills while exploring specialized INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND FINANCE
topics in the same professional manner as expected
during their future careers 1st SEMESTER
During their years of study at Ryerson, students will
benefit from the professional expertise of the Econom- REQUIRED:
ics faculty. Department members specialize in areas as ECN 104 Introductory Microeconomics
diverse as trade theory, financial theory, econometrics, ECN 220 Evolution of the Global Economy
economic development, industrial organization, economic MTH 189 Introduction to Mathematics for Economics
history, and public finance. The Department also has a
strong commitment to undergraduate teaching. LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.

Students have a chance to interact with professional PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table I.
economists in private industry and government, who
2nd SEMESTER
participate in the program as guest lecturers, advisers on
special projects and sponsors of work placements. These REQUIRED:
professional economists include members of the program
ECN 204 Introductory Macroeconomics
advisory committee.
ECN 230 Mathematics for Economics
Internship ECN 320 Introduction to Financial Economics
Integral to the degree is an opportunity for students to REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from the following:
apply their knowledge and skills in a practical context. FRE *** A French Course
All students in the program are required to participate
SPN *** A Spanish Course
in a three-month internship between the programs third
and fourth years*. The benefits of this work placement LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
are considerable. Students gain a valuable employment
record while forging vital professional contacts for their 3rd SEMESTER
future careers. They also deepen their understanding of
REQUIRED:
real world opportunities and challenges as they refine
their career goals. Moreover, the internship’s position ECN 129 Statistics for Economics I
between the third and fourth years of the program means ECN 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics I
it will help enrich each student’s final year of study. ECN 504 Intermediate Microeconomics I
* Students may be offered the opportunity by some employers to REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from the following:
extend their internship to 16 months. FRE *** A French Course
SPN *** A Spanish Course
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.

pg 78 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND FINANCE

4th SEMESTER Bachelor of Arts


INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND FINANCE
REQUIRED:
ECN 329 Statistics for Economists II
Fall 2007 1st Yr Admits
ECN 600 Intermediate Macroeconomics II
7th SEMESTER
ECN 700 Intermediate Microeconomics II
FIN 401 Managerial Finance II Last Offered Fall 2010

PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table I. REQUIRED:


ECN 720 Seminar
5th SEMESTER
ECN 721 International Financial Markets
Revised Program Commencing Fall 2010 HST 500 Understanding International Relations

REQUIRED: REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from the following:


ECN 627 Econometrics I ECN 900*† Internship
ECN 707 Economics of International Trade WKT 77A/B† Intl Economics Internship Program
FIN 501 Investment Analysis I LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table II.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table II.
* ECN 900 will be offered in both the Fall and Winter semesters.
† This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
6th SEMESTER

Revised Program Commencing Winter 2011 8th SEMESTER

REQUIRED: Last Offered Winter 2011


ECN 501 Industrial Organization
REQUIRED:
ECN 606 International Monetary Economics
ECN 820 Project
ECN 702 Econometrics II
ECN 821 Country Risk Analysis
FIN 601 Investment Analysis II
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table II.
7th & 8th SEMESTER

Revised Program Commencing 2011-2012 PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE I


REQUIRED:
A total of two courses is required.
ECN 720 Seminar
ECN 820 Project ACC 100* Introductory Financial Accounting
ECN 821 Country Risk Analysis ACC 333 Core Concepts of Accounting
HST 500 Modern International Relations ACC 406 Introductory Management Accounting
CRB 100 Introduction to the Caribbean
REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from the following:
GEO 108 Geography of the Global Village
ECN 900*† Internship
GEO 208 Geography of the Global Economy
WKT 77A/B† Intl Economics Internship Program
HST 113 Themes in Modern Asian History
REQUIRED GROUP 2: Four courses from the following:
ITM 350 Concepts of ebusiness
ECN 321 Introduction to Law and Economics
LAW 122 Business Law
ECN 330 Economic Systems in the New World Economy
MKT 100 Principles of Marketing
ECN 502 Economics of Natural Resources
MKT 300 Marketing Metrics and Analysis
ECN 506 Money and Banking
MKT 400 Understanding Consumers and the New Media
ECN 510 Environmental Economics
MKT 500 Marketing Research
ECN 601 The Economics of Information
ECN 605 Labour Economics POL 106 The Politics of Human Needs
ECN 609 European Economic Development POL 208 Conflict and Change in World Politics
ECN 614 An Introduction to Game Theory QMS 522 Linear Algebra
ECN 640 The Economics of Immigration SOC 104 Understanding Society
ECN 715 Advanced Microeconomics * Available ONLY as an elec�ve to Fall 2008 and later 1st Year Admits.
ECN 815 Advanced Macroeconomics
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table II. (Con�nued)
* ECN 900 will be offered in both the Fall and Winter semesters.
† This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 79


FACULTY OF ARTS - INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND FINANCE

PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE II FACULTY/ADVISORY COUNCIL


Two courses are required from this Table.
Dean
Fall 2007 1st Yr Admits select three courses from this Table. Faculty of Arts
ACC 414 Intermediate Accounting I C. CASSIDY
ACC 504 Advanced Accounting
Chair
ACC 514 Intermediate Accounting II
CRB 502 Cultural Traditions in the Caribbean P. MISSIOS
ECN 503† Economic Development Faculty
ECN 601† The Economics of Information
C. ANGYRIDIS, BSc, Athens University of Economics and Business,
ECN 609† European Economic Development Greece, MA, York (Can.), PhD, Tor.
ECN 614† An Introduction to Game Theory C. BAJONA, BS, Universitat de Barcelona, MA, Universitat Autonoma de
Barcelona, PhD, Minn.
ECN 640† The Economics of Immigration T. P. BARBIERO, BA, MA, PhD, Tor.
ECN 715† Advanced Microeconomics V. CAPONI, BA, University of Pisa, MA, W. Ont.
ECN 802† The Economics of East Asia M. JOLLY, BCom, Auck., MSc, London School of Economics, PhD, Tor.
E. KAM, BA (Hons.), MA, PhD, York (Can.)
ECN 815† Advanced Macroeconomics
M. LOVEWELL, BA (Hons.), Alta, MA, Tor.
ENT 526 Introduction to Entrepreneurial Behaviour L. MICHELIS, BA, MA, York (Can.), PhD, Qu.
FIN 611 Applied Investment Management P. MISSIOS, BComm, Tor., MA, PhD, York (Can.)
FIN 701 Financial Intermediation C. NING, BS, University of Science and Technology of China, MA, Shanghai
University of Finance and Economics, MA, York (Can.), PhD, W. Ont.
FIN 710 Advanced Corporate Finance A. PENG, BA, Hebei Economy and Trade University, China, MA, PhD,
FIN 711 Advanced Investment Management Guelph
M. ROCHE, BA, MA, University College Dublin, PhD, Qu.
FIN 800 Ethics in Finance D. SEN, BSc (Hons.), Calc., MStats, I. Stat. I., MA, PhD, N.Y. State
FIN 801 Financial Risk Management L. TAJIBAEVA, BSc, Minn., MA, Wis.
GEO 520 Global Political Geography B. THOMPSON, BComm (Hons.), Ryerson, MA, York (Can.)
R. E. WRIGHT, BA, Wat., MA, McM., PhD, York (Can.)
GEO 720 The Inner Landscape of Culture
H. YILDIZ, BS, Middle East Technical University, Ankara/Turkey, MA, PhD,
GEO 811 Global Environmental Issues Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas
GMS 522 International Marketing
Professor Emeriti/ae
GMS 550 Business-to-Business e-Commerce
GMS 723* International Trade C. J. BRIANT
I. A. BRYAN
HST 533 Themes in African History I
D. CAPE
HST 555 Reform and Revolution: China 1840-1949 G. E. CARTER
HST 633 Themes in African History II L. W. FERRIS
ITM 360 Establishing an eBusiness Operation J. E. HUGHES
D. RAJAGOPAL
LAW 525 The Law of the Marketplace T. A. TUSHINGHAM
LAW 722 Law and Canadian Business D. J. WHEATON
LAW 723 Issues in Information Technology Law
Advisory Council
LAW 724 Legal Aspects of International Business
MKT 423 Marketing Research BRIGID BRADY
Senior Representative, Toronto
MKT 500 Marketing Research Bank of Canada
MKT 510 Innovations in Marketing RUTH FOTHERGILL
MKT 530 eMarketing Regional Vice President, Ontario
Export Development Corporation
MKT 600 Integrated Case Analysis
PHILIP HOWELL
MKT 700 Business Intelligence/Decision Modelling Assistant Deputy Minister
MKT 731 Competitive Intelligence Ontario Ministry of Finance

PHL 621** Beyond the Western Academic Tradition JOHN JOHNSTON


Chief Economist
POL 540 Issues in Third World Politics RBC Dominion Securities
POL 607 Technology and Globalization DON MIKOLICH
Commercial Sales, Foreign Exchange & Money Market
SOC 702 Anatomy of Human Conflict CIBC World Markets
SOC 706 Sociology of the Global Economy RAYMOND PROTTI
SOC 801 Social Change: International Perspectives President and C.E.O.
Canada Bankers’ Association
SOC 802 Issues in War and Peace
EDGARDO SEPULVEDA
† Not available to Fall 2008 1st Yr Admits. Economist
* Students planning a career in expor�ng are encouraged to choose McCarthy Tetrault
GMS 723.
** Available ONLY as an elec�ve to Fall 2008 and later 1st Year
Admits.
NOTE: Students cannot take more than one Economics course.

pg 80 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - PHILOSOPHY AND MUSIC DEPARTMENT / POLITICS AND GOVERNANCE

PHILOSOPHY AND MUSIC DEPARTMENT POLITICS AND GOVERNANCE


The Department of Philosophy and Music offers courses Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Arts (BA)
in all programs of the University. Some deal with such is- Administered by the Department of Politics and Public
sues as the problem of objective moral judgement, moral Administration
issues posed by medicine and psychiatry, business,
education, law, politics, the media, problems of punish-
ment and responsibility, human rights, sexual behaviour, ADMISSION INFORMATION
social change, rising technocracy and technological DEGREE: Four years of study following Grade 12 U/M
development, and so on. Others analyse the foundations graduation.
of knowledge, religion, and the arts, problems in the pure
and applied natural and social sciences, divergent social ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses,
and economic ideologies, political freedom and free will, including Grade 12 U English.
human nature and the relation between mind and body. NOTES:
In sum, they provide the critical enlightenment expected
of professionals who have been educated in the social 1. ENG4U/EAE4U is the preferred English.
and cultural contexts of their practices and in the forms of 2. A minimum grade of 70 percent or higher will be
knowledge in which these practices have their roots. required in Grade 12 U English.
The Department of Philosophy and Music includes a Mu- 3. Subject to competition, candidates may be required
sicology Section which offers courses in Music History. to present averages/grades above the minimum.

Dean PROGRAM OVERVIEW


Faculty of Arts
The four-year baccalaureate degree program in Politics
C. CASSIDY and Governance has as its major focus a critical under-
standing of how important decisions are made – at the
Chair
international, national, provincial, and local levels – by
R. D. MURRAY both governmental and non-governmental organizations
(NGOs). Students will learn to question the assumptions
Faculty
behind both administrative practice and policies that
J. CARUANA, BA, (Hons.), McG., MA, PhD, York (Can.) emerge from a variety of sources, and to evaluate them
D. CHECKLAND, BA, MA, Alta., PhD, Tor. on a range of criteria, including empirical, theoretical and
K. CHOW-MORRIS, BMus (Hons.), Tor., MA, PhD, York (Can.) ethical bases. The program offers a number of profes-
D. CIAVATTA, BA (Hons.), Tor., PhD, Penn. sional electives drawn from five traditional sub fields of
J. DIANDA, BSc, MA, Toledo, PhD, McM.
Political Science: Canadian, Comparative, Global, Policy,
L. HALL, BA, MA, PhD, Tor.
A. HUNTER, BA, Car., MA, PhD, Tor. and Theory. Students may choose depth in a small
D. HUNTER, BA (Hons.), McG., PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technol- number of thematic categories, or choose breadth by
ogy, Cambridge sampling in several such categories.
R. J. KORNEGAY, MA, PhD, Tor.
K. KRAAY, BA (Hons.), PhD, Tor. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
K. MACLAREN, BA (Hons.), Tor., PhD, Penn
Graduates of the Politics and Governance program will
R. D. MURRAY, PhD, Tor.
G. PARSONS, BA (Hons.), BSc (Hons.), Acad., MSc, PhD, Alta.
be able to pursue careers in a variety of capacities both
E. TROTT, BA, MA, Tor., PhD, Wat. inside and outside government. These may include
A. WELLINGTON, BA (Hons.), LLB, MES, LLM, PhD, York (Can.) becoming a policy analyst for the federal, provincial, or
municipal government, a decision-maker in a third sector
Professor Emeriti/ae (voluntary/non-profit) organization, or taking a private-
E. ASPEVIG sector position, with a company that has extensive
G. BILEK interactions with government, or that conducts public
E. HARLOW research. It might also include positions in international
R. D. SLEEP governmental organizations (such as the UN and World
Bank), or non-governmental organizations [such as
UNICEF or Médicins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without
Borders)]. Graduates may also pursue further educa-
tion through law school or graduate studies in disciplines
such as Government, Political Science, Public Adminis-
tration, or Public Policy.
CURRICULUM INFORMATION
Politics and Governance draws on the theories, meth-
ods and practices of a broad range of social sciences.
The Politics and Governance program thus builds on
two years of predominantly social science foundations,

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 81


FACULTY OF ARTS - POLITICS AND GOVERNANCE

shared with Ryerson’s Bachelor of Arts programs in Politics Course Equivalencies:


Criminal Justice, Psychology, and Sociology, with spe-
New Courses Former Courses
cialized study in Politics and Governance in the final two
years. POG 110 POL 402

Semesters One through Four: Students are introduced POG 230 PPA 524
to Politics and Governance through a ‘survey course’ POG 310 PPA 522
which provides a broad overview of what might be ex-
pected in the subject area. Students also take four addi- POG 315 PPA 521
tional core courses that explore Canada’s political actors POG 317 POL 506
and institutions of government, the emerging institutions
and practices of global governance and the quantitative POG 440 POL 440
research skills relevant to the study of politics and gover- POG 443 POG 420/POL 222
nance. In addition to Politics and Governance courses,
students select courses from other social science disci- POL 332 POL 302
plines including Criminal Justice, Economics, Geography,
Transferability Guidelines
Psychology, and Sociology. To ensure breadth, students
may take no more than four courses in any one of the Students admitted to either the Bachelor of Arts in
social science disciplines in the first two years. Criminal Justice, Politics and Governance, Psychology,
or Sociology may transfer from their current program and
Because students achieve breadth in the Social Sciences plan to any one of the other three plans for the Fall term
through course selection in Table I, only the following of either their second or third year of studies. Applica-
lower level Liberal Studies (Table A) subject courses can tions are available through the Program Office and must
be selected: ENG, FRE, HST, IRL, ITM, MUS, NPF, PHL, be submitted by February 2nd. Transfer applications are
SCI, SPN and THL. considered on a competitive basis subject to program
Semesters Five through Eight: In the upper years, stu- capacity, and therefore program choice cannot be guar-
dents are introduced to the remaining sub-fields (Com- anteed.
parative, Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector, Policy, Theory), and In order to transfer to Politics and Governance from
then pursue the study of political and governance issues Criminal Justice, Psychology, or Sociology, students
in greater depth. Students may choose to focus upon must: (1) have a CLEAR Academic Standing at the end
courses within one or two of the thematic categories or of the Winter term in which they apply to transfer; and (2)
to sample broadly from several such categories. Either have successfully completed POG 100 and POG 110.
way, it will be possible to explore such topics as provin-
cial politics; race and ethnicity; human rights (both within Liberal Studies
Canada and in a Global context); economic, education, Students must take three lower level liberal studies
environmental, foreign, and social policy; social identity courses and three upper level liberal studies courses to
and citizenship; the governance of urban areas (both graduate.
in Canada and elsewhere); political thought; voters,
elections, and parties; and Aboriginal Governance and Minors
Justice. In addition to program courses, students choose Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson (with
courses from a broad range of disciplines that comple- exceptions), and are eligible for only one Minor. Please
ment their professional studies and broaden their career refer to the Minors Policy section of this calendar for
preparation. These include courses in Accounting, Child further information on individual Minor requirements and
and Youth Care, Communication, Criminal Justice, restrictions.
Economics, English, Food Security, French, Geography,
Human Resource Management, Business Technology The G. Raymond Chang School of Con�nuing Educa�on
Management, Law, Non-profit and Voluntary Sector Cer�ficates
Management, Sociology, Spanish, Psychology, Urban Undergraduate students wishing to pursue a continuing
Planning, and sciences such as Biology, Chemistry, education certificate program should be aware of pos-
Mathematics, and Physics. sible restrictions. Please refer to the Curriculum Advis-
Through a range of courses in all four years, students ing website at www.ryerson.ca/curriculumadvising for
also develop core competencies necessary to succeed complete details.
at the university level and in the modern workforce.
Through an introduction to the Social Sciences, students
explore an approach to critical analysis that is shared
by several disciplines and will guide life-long learning.
Students will also develop skills in basic quantitative and
qualitative research methodologies, critical and analytical
thinking, and effective communication.

pg 82 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - POLITICS AND GOVERNANCE

Bachelor of Arts REQUIRED GROUP 1 TABLE I


POLITICS AND GOVERNANCE
Five courses are required. No more than four courses may be
1st SEMESTER taken from any one subject area.
CRM 100 Introduction to Canadian Criminal Justice
REQUIRED:
CRM 102 Introduction to Crime and Justice
POG 100 People, Power and Politics
CRM 200 Criminal Law
SSH 100 Introduction to the Social Sciences
CRM 202 Victims and the Criminal Process
SSH 205 Academic Writing and Research
ECN 104 Introductory Microeconomics
REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from Table I. ECN 204 Introductory Macroeconomics
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A. ECN 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics I
ECN 504 Intermediate Microeconomics I
2nd SEMESTER GEO 131 Environmental Analysis
GEO 141 Geography and GIS
REQUIRED:
GEO 151 Urban Analysis
POG 110 Canadian Politics
GEO 231 Principles in Recreation and Demography
SSH 105 Critical Thinking I
POG 100* People, Power and Politics
REQUIRED GROUP 1: Two courses from Table I.
POG 110* Canadian Politics
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A. POG 210* Canadian Government
POG 225* Global Governance
3rd SEMESTER
PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology I
REQUIRED: PSY 124 Social Psychology
POG 210 Canadian Government PSY 202 Introduction to Psychology II
SSH 301 Research Design and Qualitative Methods PSY 325 Psychological Disorders
SOC 105 Introduction to Sociology
REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from Table I.
SOC 107 Sociology of Everyday Life
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
SOC 470 Toronto: The Changing City
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III. SOC 525 Media and Images of Inequality
SSH 102 Learning and Development Strategies
4th SEMESTER
* Required courses POG 100, POG 110, POG 210, and POG 225 are not
available as a choice in Table I.
REQUIRED:
POG 225 Global Governance
POG 230 Research and Statistics (Con�nued)

REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from Table I.


PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table III.

5th & 6th SEMESTER

REQUIRED:
INP 900 Intro to the Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector
POG 314 Controversial Policy Topics
POG 320 Social Identity and Citizenship
POG 330 Western Political Thought
POG 340 Intro to Comparative Politics
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
PROFESSIONAL: Three courses from Table II.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III or IV.

7th & 8th SEMESTER

LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table B.


PROFESSIONAL: Six courses from Table II.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table III or IV.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 83


FACULTY OF ARTS - POLITICS AND GOVERNANCE

PROFESSIONAL TABLE II PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE III


A total of nine courses is required. A minimum of three courses is required.
NOTE: Every course will not be offered every semester. Stu- ACC 100 Introductory Financial Accounting
dents may opt for depth by selecting courses within thematic ACC 333 Core Concepts of Accounting
categories, or may opt for breadth by sampling broadly across ACC 406 Introductory Management Accounting
those categories.
ACC 414 Intermediate Accounting I
Canadian BLG 143 Biology I
POG 310 Ontario Politics BLG 144 Biology II
POG 313 Race and Ethnicity in Canada BLG 151 Microbiology I
POG 315 Equity and Human Rights CHY 103 General Chemistry I
POG 410* Canadian Urban Politics CHY 113 General Chemistry II
POG 416* Canadian Federalism CHY 213 Analytical Chemistry I
POG 417* Canadian-American Relations CMN 279 Introduction to Contemporary Business Comm
Policy CMN 313 Org Problem Solving and Report Writing
CMN 314 Professional Presentations
POG 316 Social Policy
CYC 101 Intro to Child and Youth Care
POG 317 Education Politics and Policy
CYC 201 Child Abuse and Neglect
POG 411* Canadian Foreign Policy
CYC 401 Theories of Change for Children and Youth
POG 412* Government and the Economy
INP 901 Developing Effective Organizations
POG 415* Environmental Politics and Policy
INP 902 Program Evaluation
Global
INP 910 Strategic Planning
POG 323 The Politics of Development INT 900 Program Planning and Evaluation Strategies
POG 423* Nationalism and Identity INT 905 Conflict Resolution in Community Services
POG 424* Human Rights and Global Politics INT 908 Homelessness in Canadian Society
POG 425* Regional Economic Integration INT 917 Urban Community Development
POG 426* Contemporary Global Conflicts ITM 102 Business Information Systems I
Comparative ITM 305 Systems Analysis and Design
POG 440* Aboriginal Governance/Justice ITM 350 Concepts of eBusiness
POG 442* Women and Politics LAW 122 Business Law
POG 443* Global Cities LAW 525 Law of the Marketplace
POG 444* Politics, Media and Technology LAW 529 Employment and Labour Law
POG 446* Voters, Elections, and Parties MHR 405 Org Behaviour and Interpersonal Skills
Theory MHR 505 Organizational Behaviour II
MHR 522 Industrial Relations
POG 430* Contemporary Political Thought
MKT 100 Principles of Marketing
POG 431* Power, Hegemony and Resistance
MKT 300 Marketing Metrics and Analysis
Unclassified
MKT 423 Marketing Research
POG 499* Field Experience
MKT 600 Integrated Case Studies
* A minimum of five of these courses must be taken prior to gradua�on.
OHS 208 Occupational Health and Safety Law
NOTE: With advance wri�en approval of the Department, Public Ad-
ministra�on (PPA) courses and/or Upper Level Poli�cs Liberal Studies OHS 477 Integrated Disability Management
courses may be subs�tuted for Table II Professional courses. OHS 508 Occupational Health
PCS 120 Physics I
PCS 130 Physics II
SCI 102 Chaos and Fractals
SCI 104 Physics Answers to Everyday Questions

pg 84 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - POLITICS AND GOVERNANCE

PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE IV ENG 921 Narrative in a Digital Age


ENG 941 Gender and Sex in Literature and Culture
Professionally-related courses other than those listed in
ENG 942 Postcolonial Interventions
the following table may be selected subject to Program
ENH 121 Environmental Health Law
and Teaching Department approval, space availability
and requisite requirements. ENH 721 Public Health Law
FIN 300 Managerial Finance I
CMN 315 Issues in Comm and the Contemporary Workplace
FIN 401 Managerial Finance II
CMN 413 Corporate Communications
FIN 501 Investment Analysis I
CMN 414 Interpersonal Communication in Management
FIN 512 Risk Management and Insurance
CMN 444 On-Site Study in Commun: Non-Profit Sector
FIN 562 Personal Finance
CMN 447 Communication and Law
FIN 610 Short-Term Financial Management
CMN 448 Introduction to Visual Communication
FIN 611 Applied Investment Management
CMN 450 The Art of Podcasting
FIN 701 Financial Intermediation
CRM 100 Introduction to Canadian Criminal Justice
FIN 710 Advanced Corporate Finance
CRM 102 Introduction to Crime and Justice
FIN 800 Ethics in Finance
CRM 200 Criminal Law
FNY 403 Food Security Concepts and Principles
CRM 202 Victims and the Criminal Process
FNY 404 Food Policy and Programs for Food Security
CRM 300 Policing in Canada
FNY 405 Applied Research Methods and Evaluation
CRM 306 Corrections in Canada
FNY 406 Economics of Food Security
CRM 308 Criminal Courts in Canada
FNY 408 Urban Food Security
CRM 314 Criminal Justice and the Charter
FRE 402 French Conversation and Pronunciation
CRM 402 Criminal Justice and Social Inequality
FRE 502 Advanced Business French I
CRM 404 Criminal Justice Policy
FRE 515 Introduction to Business French
ECN 104 Introductory Microeconomics
FRE 602 Advanced Business French II
ECN 204 Introductory Macroeconomics
GEO 131 Environmental Analysis
ECN 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics I
GEO 141 Geography and GIS
ECN 321 Introduction to Law and Economics
GEO 151 Urban Analysis
ECN 504 Intermediate Microeconomics I
GEO 231 Principles in Recreation and Demography
ECN 510 Environmental Economics
GEO 351 The Internal Structure of the City
ECN 605 Labour Economics
GEO 551 Urbanization and Regional Development
ECN 703 Public Finance I
GEO 581 GIS, Geographic Data and Mapping
ECN 803 Public Finance II
GEO 681 GIS and Geographic Analysis
ENG 108 The Nature of the Narrative I
GEO 691 Canadian Immigration: Patterns and Place
ENG 200 Writing as a Cultural Act
GEO 721 Project Management
ENG 208 The Nature of the Narrative II
INP 911 Advocacy and Governmental Relations
ENG 222 Fairy Tales and Fantasies
INP 912 Marketing for NonProfit Organizations
ENG 224 Children’s Fiction
INP 913 Leading Through Change
ENG 413 Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures
INP 914 Diversity and Conflict Resolution
ENG 416 Modern American Experience
INP 915 Financial Management
ENG 421 16C Literature and Culture
INP 916 NGOs and World Governance
ENG 422 17C Literature and Culture
INP 920 Critical Issues
ENG 520 The Language of Persuasion
ITM 410 Business Process Design
ENG 531 18C Literature and Culture I
ITM 505 Managing Information Systems
ENG 532 18C Literature and Culture II
ITM 750 IT Project Management
ENG 621 Reading Gender in a Global Context
LAW 603 Advanced Business Law
ENG 624 20C Literature and Culture I
LAW 723 Issues in Information Technology Law
ENG 626 20C Literature and Culture II
MHR 523 Human Resources Management
ENG 631 Reading/Writing Women
MHR 600 Diversity and Equity in the Workplace
ENG 632 19C Literature and Culture I
MHR 623 Recruitment and Selection (Staffing)
ENG 633 19C Literature and Culture II
MHR 700 Cross-Cultural Dimensions Org Behaviour
ENG 701 Studies in Canadian Literature
MHR 721 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution
ENG 703 Popular Literature of Sensation
MHR 741 Managing Interpersonal Dynamics
ENG 705 Reading Visual Cultures
MHR 841 Organization Theory and Design
ENG 706 Shakespeare and Performance
MUS 110 Music and Film
ENG 801 Canada on the World Stage
MUS 211 Music Culture of the City
ENG 803 Popular Literature of Exploration
MUS 401 Music, Religion and Spirituality
ENG 888 Television Texts and Contexts
(Con�nued)

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 85


FACULTY OF ARTS - POLITICS AND GOVERNANCE

PHL 334 Ethics in Professional Life Faculty


PHL 400 Human Rights and Justice
T. AMIN-KHAN, MA, Tor., PhD, York (Can.)
PHL 420 Philosophy, Diversity and Recognition S. ARAT-KOC, BA, Bogazici Universitesi, Turkey, MA, Wat., PhD, Tor.
PHL 621 Beyond the Western Academic Tradition T. BASKOY, BSc, Middle East Technical University, MA, Bilkent, PhD, York
(Can.)
PLE 525 Urban Transportation Planning
M. BURKE, BA, MA, Windsor, PhD, York (Can.)
PLE 535 Housing C. CASSIDY, BA (Hons.), York (Can.), MA, PhD, McM.
PLE 545 History of City Development P. DUTIL, BA (Hons.), York (Can.), MA, Montr., PhD, York (Can.)
PLE 565 Community Sustainable Development B. EVANS, BA (Hons.), Laur., MA, PhD, York (Can.)
G. E. GALABUZI, BA, Winn., BA (Hons.), MA, PhD, York (Can.)
PLE 855 Strategic Planning
C. GORE, BSc, Guelph, MA, PhD, Tor.
PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology I G. INWOOD, BA, MA, W. Ont., PhD, Tor.
PSY 124 Social Psychology C. JOHNS, BA (Hons.), W. Laur., BEd, Tor., MA, PhD, McM.
PSY 202 Introduction to Psychology II J. LUM, BA, MA, Tor., PhD, York (Can.)
D. MacLELLAN, BA (Hons.), Diploma in Public Administration, Dal., MA,
PSY 300 Psychology and Law Guelph, PhD, Tor.
PSY 325 Psychological Disorders C. MOOERS, BA (Hons.), Ott., MA, Tor., PhD, York (Can.)
PSY 605 Psychology of Health and Health Care P. O’REILLY, BA, MA, Qu., PhD, Tor.
PSY 805 Adjustment, Stress and Coping P. PALMATER, BA, St. Thomas (NB), LLB, New Br., LLM, JSD, Dal.
W. PETROZZI, BA (Hons.), Windsor, MA, McM., Doctor Rerum Politicarum,
PSY 806 Behaviour Modification Ukranian Free University
PSY 808 Community Psychology T. RANEY, BA (Hons.), Qu., MA, Car., PhD, Calg.
PSY 941 Cross-Cultural Psychology A. ROSS, BA (Hons.), Winn., MSc, London School of Economics, PhD, Tor.
D. RUBENSON, BSocSc, Lund University, PhD, London School of Economics
SOC 105 Introduction to Sociology A. SALOOJEE, BA, MA, PhD, Tor.
SOC 107 Sociology of Everyday Life M. SENGUPTA, BA (Hons.), MA, McG., PhD, Tor.
SOC 300 The Sociology of Diversity J. SHIELDS, BA, MA, Windsor, PhD, Br. Col.
SOC 302 The City and Society M. SIEMIATYCKI, BA (Hons.), McG., MA, Sus, PhD, York (Can.)
A. SUNDAR, BA (Hons.), University of Delhi, BA, Camb., MA, McG.
SOC 402 The City and Social Problems
N. THOMLINSON, BA, Calg., MA, Sask., PhD, Tor.
SOC 470 Toronto: The Changing City
SOC 472 Sociology of Work and Occupations Professor of Distinction
SOC 474 Immigration, Minorities and Citizehship J. REBICK, BSc, McG.
SOC 479 Communities and Social Networks Adjunct Professors
SOC 525 Media and Images of Inequality
G. KAEGI, MA, Tor.
SOC 600 Globalization and Health
SOC 606 Work and Families in the 21st Century Professor Emeriti/ae
SOC 706 Sociology of the Global Economy G. KAEGI
SOC 941 Race, Ethnic and Aboriginal Studies J. L. PACKHAM
SOC 943 Poverty Issues
Advisory Council
SPN 515 Introduction to Business Spanish
SPN 702 Advanced Business Spanish JOHN CAMPEY
Executive Director
SSH 500 Peer Learning Experience Community Social Planning Council of Toronto
SSH 502 Community Action Research RICHARD CLARKE
SWP 909 Social Work and the Law: Children and Family Director, Transformation, Innovation and Excellence Branch
Modernization Division/Secretariat
SWP 910 Queer Theory and Identities (Ontario) Ministry of Government Services
SWP 919 Substance Use and Abuse JENNY GUMBS
SWP 920 Addressing Substance Use and Abuse Honorary Consul General
Consulate General of Grenada in Toronto
THF 406 Performance Entrepreneurship I
DR. RONALD MANZER
Professor Emeritus
Department of Political Science
FACULTY/ADVISORY COUNCIL University of Toronto
KYLE RAE
Dean Councillor, Ward 27
Faculty of Arts City of Toronto
TED RICHMOND
C. CASSIDY Team Leader, Research & Evaluation
(Ontario) Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration
Chair
WILLIAM STEWART
N. THOMLINSON Fire Chief
City of Toronto
Undergraduate Director PATRICIA WALCOTT
Director General, Benefits Processing
P. DUTIL (Canada) Employment Insurance, ON Region
JOAN WOODROW
Executive Director
(Canada) Ontario Federal Council

pg 86 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - PSYCHOLOGY

medicine, physiotherapy, nutrition and health, speech


PSYCHOLOGY pathology and audiology, criminology and law, education
and business (particularly apt for MBAs specializing in
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Arts (BA)
human resources management) kinesiology, and more.
Administered by the Department of Psychology
CURRICULUM INFORMATION
Through a carefully chosen set of courses, students
ADMISSION INFORMATION
delve into experimental and clinical research methods
DEGREE: Four years of study following Grade 12 U/M and explore the program’s core areas — cognition and
graduation. neuroscience, developmental and social psychology,
clinical and health psychology and advanced research
ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses,
specialization. The Psychology curriculum builds on two
including Grade 12 U English.
years of predominantly social science foundations fol-
NOTES: lowed by two years of specialized study in Psychology.
1. ENG4U/EAE4U is the preferred English.
Semesters one through four: In the first two years of
2. A minimum grade of 70 percent or higher will be the program, students learn the fundamentals of psychol-
required in Grade 12 U English. ogy in up to four courses such as Introduction to Psychol-
ogy I and II, Social Psychology and Psychological Disor-
3. Subject to competition, candidates may be required
ders. In addition to Psychology courses, students select
to present averages/grades above the minimum.
courses from other social science disciplines including
PROGRAM OVERVIEW Criminal Justice, Economics, Geography, Politics and
Governance and Sociology. To ensure breadth, students
Psychology is of fundamental relevance to our society. may take no more than four courses in any one of
The discipline addresses important questions about the these subject areas in the first two years.
very nature of human thought, emotion and behaviour,
such as: How do we perceive, remember and process Because students achieve breadth in the Social Sciences
information? How do these processes change over through course selection in Table I, only the following
our lifespan? How are addictions and brain chemistry lower level Liberal Studies (Table A) subject courses can
related? How are psychological disorders and traumatic be selected: ENG, FRE, HST, IRL, ITM, MUS, NPF, PHL,
brain injury diagnosed and treated? How do we cope with SCI, SPN and THL.
stress in a changing world? In this program, students Semesters five through eight: In the final two years of
learn about the evolution of psychology as a thriving the program, students develop a sharper focus on psy-
academic discipline, as well as cutting-edge research chological issues and research tools. Students complete
on a wide variety of current issues, including how that a broad range of courses that encompass topics such as
research is conducted. The core goals of the program aging and memory, adolescent health and nutrition, eye-
are to: witness evidence, children’s problem- solving, childhood
• educate students in the science of psychology and its disorders, drugs and addictions, gender and diversity,
application to real-life situations; psychology and law and the working of the brain. In addi-
tion to program courses, students choose courses from a
• prepare students for careers in which they will con-
broad range of disciplines (including the natural sciences)
front, elucidate, and solve problems that have psycho-
that complement their professional studies and broaden
logical components;
their career preparation. Through a range of courses
• provide the foundation for students who wish to pur- in all four years, students also develop core competen-
sue post-graduate studies in a variety of areas includ- cies necessary to succeed at the university level and in
ing Psychology. the modern workforce. Students develop skills in basic
quantitative and qualitative research methodologies,
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES critical and analytical thinking, effective communication
There are many careers for a psychology graduate. and strategies for life-long learning. Students interested
The classic path leads to a variety of mental health care in pursuing graduate studies in Psychology will have the
professions and roles such as rehabilitation counselling, option of taking advanced courses from the Advanced
psychogeriatric case management, addictions support, Methods and Independent Study Group and will conduct
assessment and treatment of young offenders and learn- supervised research with a faculty member.
ing disability support. Psychology also prepares students
for post-graduate studies in Psychology, eventually lead- Transferability Guidelines
ing to careers in public or private settings, independent Students admitted to either the Bachelor of Arts in
practice or academia. Other careers that benefit from a Criminal Justice, Politics and Governance, Psychology,
degree in Psychology include sports science, media de- or Sociology may transfer from their current program and
velopment, computer application design, human resourc- plan to any one of the other three plans for the Fall term
es management, pharmaceutical development, training, of either their second or third year of studies. Applica-
policy analysis, conflict mediation and human-factors tions are available through the Program Office and must
engineering. An undergraduate degree in Psychology be submitted by February 2nd. Transfer applications are
can also prepare students for post-graduate studies in considered on a competitive basis subject to program

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 87


FACULTY OF ARTS - PSYCHOLOGY

capacity, and therefore program choice cannot be guar- 4th SEMESTER


anteed.
In order to transfer to Psychology from Criminal Justice, REQUIRED:
Politics and Governance, or Sociology, students must: PSY 124 Social Psychology
(1) have a CLEAR Academic Standing at the end of the PSY 411 Research Methods and Statistics
Winter term in which they apply to transfer; and (2) have
REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from Table I.
successfully completed PSY 102 and PSY 202.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table III.
Liberal Studies
Students must take three lower level liberal studies 5th SEMESTER
courses and three upper level liberal studies courses to
graduate. REQUIRED:
PSY 302 Child Development
Minors
PSY 324 Biological Psychology
Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson (with
exceptions), and are eligible for only one Minor. Please LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
refer to the Minors Policy section of this calendar for PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table II.
further information on individual Minor requirements and
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III or IV.
restrictions.

The G. Raymond Chang School of Con�nuing Educa�on 6th SEMESTER


Cer�ficates
REQUIRED:
Undergraduate students wishing to pursue a continuing
education certificate program should be aware of pos- PSY 654 Cognitive Psychology
sible restrictions. Please refer to the Curriculum Advis- LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
ing website at www.ryerson.ca/curriculumadvising for
PROFESSIONAL: Two courses from Table II.
complete details.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III or IV.
Bachelor of Arts
PSYCHOLOGY
7th SEMESTER

1st SEMESTER REQUIRED:


PSY 731 Theories and History of Psychology
REQUIRED:
PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology I LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.

SSH 100 Introduction to the Social Sciences PROFESSIONAL: Two courses from Table II.
SSH 205 Academic Writing and Research PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III or IV.
REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from Table I.
8th SEMESTER
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
PROFESSIONAL: Four courses from Table II.
2nd SEMESTER
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III or IV.
REQUIRED:
PSY 202 Introduction to Psychology II
SSH 105 Critical Thinking I
REQUIRED GROUP 1: Two courses from Table I.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.

3rd SEMESTER

REQUIRED:
PSY 325 Psychological Disorders
SSH 301 Research Design and Qualitative Methods
REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from Table I.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III.

pg 88 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - PSYCHOLOGY

REQUIRED GROUP 1 TABLE I PSY 605 Psychology of Health and Health Care
PSY 721 Psychological Testing
Five courses are required. No more than four courses may be
PSY 802 Death, Dying and Bereavement
taken from any one subject area.
PSY 805 Adjustment, Stress and Coping
CRM 100 Introduction to Canadian Criminal Justice
Advanced Seminar – Minimum one of:
CRM 102 Introduction to Crime and Justice
PSY 904 Advanced Cognition Seminar
CRM 200 Criminal Law
PSY 905 Advanced Psychopathology Seminar
CRM 202 Victims and the Criminal Process
PSY 908 Advanced Developmental Seminar
ECN 104 Introductory Microeconomics
PSY 914 Advanced Neuropsychology Seminar
ECN 204 Introductory Macroeconomics
PSY 915 Advanced Health Psychology Seminar
ECN 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics I
PSY 918 Advanced Social Psychology Seminar
ECN 504 Intermediate Microeconomics I
GEO 131 Environmental Analysis Advanced Methods and Independent Study†:

GEO 141 Geography and GIS PSY 700 Research Practicum


GEO 151 Urban Analysis PSY 711 Advanced Research Methods and Statistics
GEO 231 Principles in Recreation and Demography PSY 751 Special Topics in Psychology
POG 100 People, Power and Politics PSY 961 Thesis Project I
POG 110 Canadian Politics PSY 971 Thesis Project II
POG 210 Canadian Government
POG 225 Global Governance PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE III
PSY 102* Introduction to Psychology I A minimum of three courses is required.
PSY 124* Social Psychology
ACC 100 Introductory Financial Accounting
PSY 202* Introduction to Psychology II
ACC 333 Core Concepts of Accounting
PSY 325* Psychological Disorders
ACC 406 Introductory Management Accounting
SOC 105 Introduction to Sociology
ACC 414 Intermediate Accounting I
SOC 107 Sociology of Everyday Life
BLG 143 Biology I
SOC 470 Toronto: The Changing City
BLG 144 Biology II
SOC 525 Media and Images of Inequality
BLG 151 Microbiology I
SSH 102 Learning and Development Strategies
CHY 103 General Chemistry I
* Required courses PSY 102, PSY 124, PSY 202, and PSY 325 are not
CHY 113 General Chemistry II
available as a choice in Table I.
CHY 213 Analytical Chemistry I
PROFESSIONAL TABLE II CMN 279 Introduction to Contemporary Business Comm
CMN 313 Org Problem Solving and Report Writing
A total of nine courses is required between 5th and 8th semes-
ters as grouped and noted below. CMN 314 Professional Presentations
CYC 101 Intro to Child and Youth Care
† Students selecting from the Advanced Methods and Inde-
CYC 201 Child Abuse and Neglect
pendent Study group will select a minimum of one course from
each of Cognition and Neuroscience, Developmental and Social CYC 401 Theories of Change for Children and Youth
Psychology, and Clinical and Health Psychology. INP 901 Developing Effective Organizations
INP 902 Program Evaluation
Cognition and Neuroscience† – Minimum two of:
INP 910 Strategic Planning
PSY 214 Psychopharmacology INT 900 Program Planning and Evaluation Strategies
PSY 434 Brain and Behaviour INT 905 Conflict Resolution and Dispute Negotiation
PSY 514 Sensory and Perceptual Processes INT 908 Homelessness in Canadian Society
PSY 544 Evolutionary Psychology INT 917 Urban Community Development
Developmental and Social Psychology† – Minimum two of: ITM 102 Business Information Systems I
PSY 300 Psychology and Law ITM 305 Systems Analysis and Design
PSY 402 Adult Development ITM 350 Concepts of eBusiness
PSY 518 Environmental Psychology LAW 122 Business Law
PSY 535 Gender Issues in Psychology LAW 525 Law of the Marketplace
PSY 808 Community Psychology LAW 529 Employment and Labour Law
PSY 941 Cross-Cultural Psychology MHR 405 Org Behaviour and Interpersonal Skills
Clinical and Health Psychology† – Minimum two of: MHR 505 Organizational Behaviour II
PSY 215 Psychology of Addictions MHR 522 Industrial Relations
PSY 335 Clinical Psychology MKT 100 Principles of Marketing
(Con�nued)
PSY 602 Developmental Psychopathology

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 89


FACULTY OF ARTS - PSYCHOLOGY

MKT 300 Marketing Metrics and Analysis MHR 600 Diversity and Equity in the Workplace
MKT 423 Marketing Research MHR 721 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution
MKT 600 Integrated Case Analysis MHR 741 Managing Interpersonal Dynamics
OHS 208 Occupational Health and Safety Law MKT 502 Consumer Behaviour
OHS 477 Integrated Disability Management MKT 504 Effective Persuasion
OHS 508 Occupational Health MUS 110 Music and Film
PCS 120 Physics I MUS 211 Music Culture of the City
PCS 130 Physics II MUS 401 Music, Religion and Spirituality
SCI 102 Chaos and Fractals PHL 400 Human Rights and Justice
SCI 104 Physics Answers to Everyday Questions PHL 602 Health Care and Distributive Justice
POG 100 People, Power and Politics
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE IV
POG 110 Canadian Politics
Professionally-related courses other than those listed in the fol- POG 210 Canadian Government
lowing table may be selected subject to Program and Teaching POG 225 Global Governance
Department approval, space availability and requisite require- POG 313 Race and Ethnicity in Canada
ments.
POG 314 Controversial Policy Topics
BLG 251 Microbiology II POG 315 Human Rights and Governance
BLG 307 Molecular Biology POG 316 Social Policy
BLG 311 Cell Biology POG 330 Western Political Thought
BLG 400 Genetics POG 340 Intro to Comparative Politics
BLG 600 Physiology POG 415 Environmental Politics and Policy
BLG 700 Anatomy POG 423 Nationalism and Identity
BLG 785 Developmental Biology POG 424 Human Rights and Global Politics
BLG 788 Applications of Biotechnology POG 425 Regional Economic Integration
CLD 231 Families in a Canadian Context I POG 426 Contemporary Global Conflicts
CLD 332 Families in a Canadian Context II POG 430 Contemporary Political Thought
CLD 443 Working with LCD Children POG 431 Power, Hegemony and Resistance
CPS 109 Computer Science I POG 440 Aboriginal Governance/Justice
CPS 721 Artificial Intelligence I POG 442 Women and Politics
CRM 100 Introduction to Canadian Criminal Justice POG 443 Global Cities
CRM 102 Introduction to Crime and Justice QMS 521 Business Optimization
CRM 200 Criminal Law SOC 105 Introduction to Sociology
CRM 202 Victims and the Criminal Process SOC 402 The City and Social Problems
CRM 304 Youth Justice in Canada SOC 472 Sociology of Work and Occupations
CRM 306 Corrections in Canada SOC 474 Immigration, Minorities and Citizenship
CRM 402 Criminal Justice and Social Inequality SOC 500 Youth and Society
ENG 108 The Nature of Narrative I SOC 502 Violence and the Family
ENG 200 Writing as a Cultural Act SOC 504 Children and Society
ENG 208 The Nature of Narrative II SOC 600 Globalization and Health
ENG 222 Fairy Tales and Fantasies SOC 605 Canadian Families: Myth and Legal Reality
ENG 224 Children’s Fiction SOC 606 Work and Families in the 21st Century
ENG 621 Reading Gender in a Global Context SOC 706 Sociology of the Global Economy
ENG 631 Reading/Writing Women SOC 943 Poverty Issues
ENG 941 Gender and Sex in Literature and Culture SSH 500 Peer Learning Experience
FNF 100 Families and Health SSH 502 Community Action Research
FNF 401 Canadian Family: Diversity and Change
GEO 151 Urban Analysis
GEO 691 Canadian Immigration: Patterns and Place
GMS 422 Quality Management
INP 900 Intro to the Nonprofit/Vol Sector
INT 902 Disability Issues
INT 904 Health Promotion and Community Development
INT 906 Sexuality: Power and Pleasure
INT 911 International Community Development
MHR 523 Human Resources Management

pg 90 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - PSYCHOLOGY

FACULTY/ADVISORY COUNCIL

Dean
Faculty of Arts Professor Emeriti/ae

C. CASSIDY E. BANNERMAN
A. C. ELLIOTT
Chair I. ENGEL
W. E. GLASSMAN
J. P. BOUDREAU B. RABINOWICZ
C. A. RAMSEY
Faculty
J. D. ROTH
M. ANTONY, BSc (Hons.), Tor., PhD, S.U.N.Y. (Albany), C Psych, ABPP C. E. SEQUEIRA
L. ATKINSON, BA, Tor., MA, PhD, York (Can.) R. SETHNA
J. P. BOUDREAU, BA (Hons.), New Br., MA, Laur., PhD, Tufts University G. SWEDE
T. BURKE, BA, W. Ont, MA, PhD, Tor. J. K. WAALEN
C. CARNEY, BSc, Tor., MA, PhD, Louisiana State University
D. DAY, BA (Hons.), York (Can.), MA, PhD, Windsor, CPsych. Advisory Council
M. DIONNE, BSc (Hons.), Mt. All., MA, PhD, York (Can.)
J. RICHARD BLICKSTEAD
B. DYSON, BSc (Hons.), Leeds University (U.K.), MSc, Lancaster University Chief Executive Officer
(U.K.), PhD, York (U.K.)
Wellesley Central Health Corporation
T. GIRARD, BSc (Hons.), MA, PhD, Wat. and the University of Toronto
A. GOODWILL, BSc (Hons.), McM, MSc, Liv., PhD, Birm.
DR. RUTH BERMAN
M. GUREVICH, BSc (Hons.), Tor., MA, PhD, York (Can.) Executive Director
M. HADAD, BSc, Tor., MA, PhD, Qu. Ontario Psychological Association
S. HART, BA, Mich., MA, PhD, USC DR. H. BRUCE FERGUSON
T. HART, BA (Hons.), Mich., PhD, Temple University Director (Community Health Systems Resource Group,
N. KOERNER, BA (Hons.), MA, McG., PhD, C’dia. The Hospital for Sick Children) and the University of Toronto
K. McSHANE, BSc (Hons.), Tor., MA, PhD, C’dia. LYNNE FITZGERALD
C. MONSON, BSc, West Texas A & M University, PhD, University of Nebraska Inkwell Montessori Pre-School
M. MOSHÉ, BA, Wis., MA, PhD, York (Can.) KAREN LIBERMAN
M. MOULSON, BSc (Hons.), McM, MA, Qu., PhD, Minn. Executive Director
T. ORNSTEIN, BA (Hons.), York, PhD, Camb., CPsych The Mood Disorders Association of Ontario
W. PICKREN, BA, University of Central Florida, MSc, PhD, Flor. DONNA McNICOL
B. RABINOWICZ, BSc, MA, Tor. Vice-President, Human Resources
M. REED, BA (Hons.), Qu, MA, PhD, York (Can.) Rogers Wireless Communications Inc.
F. RUSSO, BA (Hons.), York (Can.) MA, PhD, Qu. DR. J. FRASER MUSTARD
J. SPANIOL, BA, Trier University, Germany, MA, PhD, North Carolina Founding President
J. TURTLE, BA (Hons.), MA, PhD, Alta. Canadian Institute for Advanced Research
and the Founders’ Network
K. VICKERS, BA, MA, PhD, Harv.
S. WANT, BSc (Hons.), Birm., PhD, Oxf. DR. JOHN C. SERVICE
Executive Director
L. YANG, BEd, MA, Hebei Normal University, China, PhD, Chinese Academy Canadian Psychological Association (Ottawa)
of Sciences, China

Professor of Distinction

M. BEISER, MD, Br. Col.

Adjunct Professors

J. ADDINGTON
D. BRECHER, EdD, Tor.
P. FARVOLDEN
K. FERGUS
N. KOCOVSKI
C. McBRIDE
T. McFARLANE
S. McMAIN
R. SCHACHAR
J. FLEMING
L. VETTESSE

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 91


FACULTY OF ARTS - PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND GOVERNANCE

Faculty
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND GOVERNANCE
T. AMIN-KHAN, MA, Tor., PhD, York (Can.)
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Arts (BA) S. ARAT-KOC, BA, Bogazici Universitesi, Turkey, MA, Wat., PhD, Tor.
Administered by the Department of Politics and Public T. BASKOY, BSc, Middle East Technical University, MA, Bilkent, PhD, York
(Can.)
Administration M. BURKE, BA, MA, Windsor, PhD, York (Can.)
C. CASSIDY, BA (Hons.), York (Can.), MA, PhD, McM.
DEGREE: Offered on a part-time basis only. Please refer P. DUTIL, BA (Hons.), York (Can.), MA, Montr., PhD, York (Can.)
to the 2010-2011 Part-Time Undergraduate calendar. B. EVANS, BA (Hons.), Laur., MA, PhD, York (Can.)
G. E. GALABUZI, BA, Winn., BA (Hons.), MA, PhD, York (Can.)
The Public Administration and Governance Program C. GORE, BSc, Guelph, MA, PhD, Tor.
consists of three levels of study that allow students to G. INWOOD, BA, MA, W. Ont., PhD, Tor.
set their own educational goals. Students may apply to C. JOHNS, BA (Hons.), W. Laur., BEd, Tor., MA, PhD, McM.
graduate with a Certificate after completing Level 1, with J. LUM, BA, MA, Tor., PhD, York (Can.)
an Advanced Certificate after completing Level 2, and D. MacLELLAN, BA (Hons.), Diploma in Public Administration, Dal., MA,
Guelph, PhD, Tor.
with a Degree after completing Level 3. To enhance the
C. MOOERS, BA (Hons.), Ott., MA, Tor., PhD, York (Can.)
flexibility of learning opportunities, the Program offers P. O’REILLY, BA, MA, Qu., PhD, Tor.
courses in various teaching modes including classes at P. PALMATER, BA, St. Thomas (NB), LLB, New Br., LLM, JSD, Dal.
the Ryerson campus, distance education, intensive study, W. PETROZZI, BA (Hons.), Windsor, MA, McM., Doctor Rerum Politicarum,
and on-site delivery in various locations. The Program Ukranian Free University

is also delivered to First Nations Administrators through T. RANEY, BA (Hons.), Qu., MA, Car., PhD, Calg.
A. ROSS, BA (Hons.), Winn., MSc, London School of Economics, PhD, Tor.
a partnership with the First Nations Technical Institute
D. RUBENSON, BSocSc, Lund University, PhD, London School of Economics
(FNTI) and to fire services personnel through a partner- A. SALOOJEE, BA, MA, PhD, Tor.
ship with the Ontario Fire Marshal’s Office (OFM) and the M. SENGUPTA, BA (Hons.), MA, McG., PhD, Tor.
Ontario Association of Fire Chiefs (OAFC). J. SHIELDS, BA, MA, Windsor, PhD, Br. Col.
M. SIEMIATYCKI, BA (Hons.), McG., MA, Sus, PhD, York (Can.)
The program is specifically designed for those working
A. SUNDAR, BA (Hons.), University of Delhi, BA, Camb., MA, McG.
in the public, para-public, and non-profit sectors; those N. THOMLINSON, BA, Calg., MA, Sask., PhD, Tor.
students aspiring to careers in those sectors; and those
interested in gaining knowledge about public admin- Professor of Distinction
istration and public policy in Canada. The curriculum J. REBICK, BSc, McG.
reflects the latest developments in public sector issues
and initiatives, and features a mix of courses providing Adjunct Professor
students with a broad understanding of the Canadian
G. KAEGI, MA, Tor.
political process. The courses emphasize the importance
of linking the theory and practice of public administration Professor Emeriti/ae
to concerns of political economy and public policy.
G. KAEGI
A Minor in Public Administration is available to students J. L. PACKHAM
of all programs, some of which include Business Man-
Advisory Council
agement, Early Childhood Education, Geographic Analy-
sis, Business Technology Management, Journalism, JOHN CAMPEY
Nursing, Occupational and Public Health, Social Work, Executive Director
Community Social Planning Council of Toronto
and Urban and Regional Planning. Consult the curricu-
lum of individual programs and the Minors Policy in this RICHARD CLARKE
Director, Transformation, Innovation and Excellence Branch
calendar for details. Modernization Division/Secretariat
(Ontario) Ministry of Government Services
The Department also offers a full-time Bachelor of Arts JENNY GUMBS
degree program in Politics and Governance, as well as Honorary Consul General
a full range of undergraduate courses in political studies Consulate General of Grenada in Toronto
to students at Ryerson. DR. RONALD MANZER
Professor Emeritus
Department of Political Science
University of Toronto
FACULTY/ADVISORY COUNCIL
KYLE RAE
Councillor, Ward 27
Dean City of Toronto
Faculty of Arts TED RICHMOND
Team Leader, Research & Evaluation
C. CASSIDY (Ontario) Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration
WILLIAM STEWART
Chair Fire Chief
City of Toronto
N. THOMLINSON
PATRICIA WALCOTT
Director General, Benefits Processing
Undergraduate Director (Canada) Employment Insurance, ON Region
P. DUTIL JOAN WOODROW
Executive Director
(Canada) Ontario Federal Council

pg 92 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - SOCIOLOGY

CURRICULUM INFORMATION
SOCIOLOGY
As a discipline within the Social Sciences, Sociology
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Arts (BA) combines theory, methods, research, and practice.
Administered by the Department of Sociology Students will take two years of fundamental preparatory
courses, shared with students in Criminal Justice, Politics
and Governance, and Psychology; and then two years of
ADMISSION INFORMATION specialized courses in Sociology, including sociological
DEGREE: Four years of study following Grade 12 U/M theory both classical and contemporary, research design
graduation. and methods, and professionally-related courses on a
wide range of themes from gender identity to action mov-
ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses, ies to racial and ethnic inequality and many more.
including Grade 12 U English.
Semesters One through Four: In the first two years,
NOTES: students are introduced to Sociology as a discipline, and
1. ENG4U/EAE4U is the preferred English. explore some of the diverse ways in which the contem-
porary social world can be understood, using Toronto as
2. A minimum grade of 70 percent or higher will be the primary reference point. The core Sociology courses
required in Grade 12 U English. will introduce students to basic theoretical knowledge
3. Subject to competition, candidates may be required and help develop practical skills in writing and critical
to present averages/grades above the minimum. analysis. The first two years share a common foundation
with Ryerson’s Bachelor of Arts programs in Criminal
PROGRAM OVERVIEW Justice, Politics and Governance, and Psychology includ-
ing two mandatory Sociology courses, in addition to Arts
The degree in Sociology is a four-year program of study,
and Contemporary Studies courses, and a selection of
with a relevant focus that is unique to Ryerson University.
courses from Criminal Justice, Economics, Geography,
Students will graduate with practical research skills, in
Politics and Governance, and Psychology. To ensure
addition to critical analytical skills, communication skills,
breadth, students may take no more than four courses
and a mature, reflective understanding of their social
in any one of these subject areas in the first two years.
world. With Ryerson’s downtown location, metropolitan
Toronto itself becomes the laboratory to study contempo- Because students achieve breadth in the Social Sciences
rary society. Identified as the world’s most multicultural through course selection in Table I, only the following
city, Toronto offers a rare opportunity to study complex lower level Liberal Studies (Table A) subject courses can
issues unique to a socially and culturally diverse metro- be selected: ENG, FRE, HST, IRL, ITM, MUS, NPF, PHL,
politan environment, such as the dynamics of social inter- SCI, SPN and THL.
action, multicultural communication, cultural representa-
Semesters Five through Eight: During the upper years,
tion, and social problems and policies. Students will learn
the focus will be specifically on Sociology, where stu-
to critically assess their social world and conduct original
dents will study classical and contemporary sociological
research to investigate social issues in this career-ori-
theories, analyze the world as it is presented through the
ented degree program in Sociology.
media, and learn practical research skills. In the fourth
The program offers four main benefits: (i) a focus on and final year of study, students will develop a unique
social change and cultural issues; (ii) a focus on research research proposal within the metropolitan environment
methodologies; (iii) an opportunity for a professionally-re- based on their specific interests. Sociology students will
lated minor; and (iv) training for competencies. conduct their research project with a faculty supervisor.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Through a range of courses in all four years, students will
develop essential career-oriented skills, including how
Graduates of the Sociology program will have portable
to think critically, how to communicate effectively, how to
research skills – practical tools – that can easily be
do research and strategies to promote life-long learning,
brought into any type of employment. Sociologists mainly
how to negotiate and work in teams, and how to under-
find employment within career areas such as govern-
stand written, graphic, and computer communications.
ment, business, community development, public af-
fairs, human resources, research, teaching, consulting, Transferability Guidelines
community affairs, public administration, the arts, media
Students admitted to either the Bachelor of Arts in
industries, and marketing. This may include working
Criminal Justice, Politics and Governance, Psychology,
for private companies, non-profit organizations, social
or Sociology may transfer from their current program and
services, government agencies, or even starting an
plan to any one of the other three plans for the Fall term
independent consulting practice. The Sociology program
of either their second or third year of studies. Applica-
also allows graduates to continue with future academic
tions are available through the Program Office and must
pursuits, including graduate studies and teacher train-
be submitted by February 2nd. Transfer applications are
ing. With a background in Sociology, students can also
considered on a competitive basis subject to program
springboard themselves into other professional areas,
capacity, and therefore program choice cannot be guar-
such as law, education, and business.
anteed.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 93


FACULTY OF ARTS - SOCIOLOGY

In order to transfer to Sociology from Criminal Justice, 4th SEMESTER


Politics and Governance, or Psychology, students must:
(1) have a CLEAR Academic Standing at the end of the REQUIRED:
Winter term in which they apply to transfer; and (2) have SOC 411 Intro to Quantitative Data Analysis
successfully completed SOC 105 and SOC 107. SOC 525 Media and Images of Inequality

Liberal Studies REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from Table I.

Students must take three lower level liberal studies PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table III.
courses and three upper level liberal studies courses to
graduate. 5th SEMESTER

Minors REQUIRED:
Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson (with SOC 473 Classical Sociological Theory
exceptions), and are eligible for only one Minor. Please SOC 481 Survey Design and Analysis
refer to the Minors Policy section of this calendar for LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
further information on individual Minor requirements and
restrictions. PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table II.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III or IV.
The G. Raymond Chang School of Con�nuing Educa�on
Cer�ficates 6th SEMESTER
Undergraduate students wishing to pursue a continuing
education certificate program should be aware of pos- REQUIRED:
sible restrictions. Please refer to the Curriculum Advis- SOC 482 Sociological Methods of Media Research
ing website at www.ryerson.ca/curriculumadvising for SOC 483 Advanced Research and Statistics
complete details.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table II.
Bachelor of Arts
SOCIOLOGY PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III or IV.

1st SEMESTER 7th SEMESTER

REQUIRED: REQUIRED:

SOC 105 Introduction to Sociology SOC 475 Contemporary Sociological Theory

SSH 100 Introduction to the Social Sciences SOC 490 Sociological Practice I

SSH 205 Academic Writing and Research LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from Table I. PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table II.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A. PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III or IV.

2nd SEMESTER 8th SEMESTER

REQUIRED: PROFESSIONAL: Four courses from Table II.


SOC 107 Sociology of Everyday Life PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III or IV.
SSH 105 Critical Thinking I
REQUIRED GROUP 1: Two courses from Table I.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.

3rd SEMESTER

REQUIRED:
SOC 470 Toronto: The Changing City
SSH 301 Research Design and Qualitative Methods
REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from Table I.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III.

pg 94 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - SOCIOLOGY

REQUIRED GROUP 1 TABLE I SOC 903 Action Cinema and Modernity


SOC 904 Women and Popular Culture
Five courses are required. No more than four courses may be
SOC 931 Western Perspectives on Consumerism
taken from any one subject area.
SOC 932 The Entertainment Industry
CRM 100 Introduction to Canadian Criminal Justice
SOC 941 Race, Ethnic and Aboriginal Studies
CRM 102 Introduction to Crime and Justice
SOC 942 Women and Structural Change
CRM 200 Criminal Law
SOC 943 Poverty Issues
CRM 202 Victims and the Criminal Process
* Departmental approval required.
ECN 104 Introductory Microeconomics
ECN 204 Introductory Macroeconomics PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE III
ECN 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics I
A minimum of three courses is required.
ECN 504 Intermediate Microeconomics I
GEO 131 Environmental Analysis ACC 100 Introductory Financial Accounting

GEO 141 Geography and GIS ACC 333 Core Concepts of Accounting

GEO 151 Urban Analysis ACC 406 Introductory Management Accounting

GEO 231 Principles in Recreation and Demography ACC 414 Intermediate Accounting I

POG 100 People, Power and Politics BLG 143 Biology I

POG 110 Canadian Politics BLG 144 Biology II

POG 210 Canadian Government BLG 151 Microbiology I

POG 225 Global Governance CHY 103 General Chemistry I

PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology I CHY 113 General Chemistry II

PSY 124 Social Psychology CHY 213 Analytical Chemistry I

PSY 202 Introduction to Psychology II CMN 279 Introduction to Contemporary Business Comm

PSY 325 Psychological Disorders CMN 313 Org Problem Solving and Report Writing

SOC 105* Introduction to Sociology CMN 314 Professional Presentations

SOC 107* Sociology of Everyday Life CYC 101 Intro to Child and Youth Care

SOC 470* Toronto: The Changing City CYC 201 Child Abuse and Neglect

SOC 525* Media and Images of Inequality CYC 401 Theories of Change for Children and Youth

SSH 102 Learning and Development Strategies INP 901 Developing Effective Organizations
INP 902 Program Evaluation
* Required courses SOC 105, SOC 107, SOC 470, and SOC 525 are not
available as a choice in Table I. INP 910 Strategic Planning
INT 900 Program Planning and Evaluation Strategies
PROFESSIONAL TABLE II INT 905 Conflict Resolution in Community Services
A total of six courses is required. INT 908 Homelessness in Canadian Society
INT 917 Urban Community Development
SOC 25A/B Media and Society
ITM 102 Business Information Systems I
SOC 300 The Sociology of Diversity
ITM 305 Systems Analysis and Design
SOC 302 The City and Society
ITM 350 Concepts of eBusiness
SOC 402 The City and Social Problems
LAW 122 Business Law
SOC 472 Sociology of Work and Occupations
LAW 525 Law of the Marketplace
SOC 474 Immigration, Minorities, and Citizenship
LAW 529 Employment and Labour Law
SOC 476 Sociology of Fear
MHR 405 Org Behaviour and Interpersonal Skills
SOC 477 Sociology of Advertising
MHR 505 Organizational Behaviour II
SOC 478 Sociology of Fun
MHR 522 Industrial Relations
SOC 479 Communities and Social Networks
MKT 100 Principles of Marketing
SOC 491* Sociological Practice II
MKT 300 Marketing Metrics and Analysis
SOC 500 Youth and Society
MKT 423 Marketing Research
SOC 502 Violence and the Family
MKT 600 Integrated Case Analysis
SOC 504 Children and Society
OHS 208 Occupational Health and Safety Law
SOC 605 Canadian Families: Myth and Legal Reality
OHS 477 Integrated Disability Management
SOC 606 Work and Families in the 21st Century
OHS 508 Occupational Health
SOC 608 Feminism and Society
PCS 120 Physics I
SOC 609 Women and Human Rights
PCS 130 Physics II
SOC 700 Men and Masculinities in the 21st Century
SCI 102 Chaos and Fractals
SOC 706 Sociology of the Global Economy
SCI 104 Physics Answers to Everyday Questions
SOC 708 Environmental Sociology

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 95


FACULTY OF ARTS - SOCIOLOGY

PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE IV PHL 400 Human Rights and Justice


PHL 420 Philosophy, Diversity and Recognition
Professionally-related courses other than those listed in the fol-
PHL 621 Beyond the Western Academic Tradition
lowing table may be selected subject to Program and Teaching
Department approval, space availability and requisite require- PLE 565 Community Sustainable Development
ments. Please consult with the Department of Sociology. PLE 855 Strategic Planning
PLE 895 Conflict Resolution and Dispute Negotiation
ACC 514 Intermediate Accounting II
POG 100 People, Power and Politics
ACC 605 Public Sector Accounting
POG 110 Canadian Politics
ACS 403 Introduction to Diversity and Equity
POG 210 Canadian Government
CMN 315 Issues in Comm and the Contemporary Workplace
POG 225 Global Governance
CMN 413 Corporate Communications
POG 314 Controversial Policy Topics
CMN 443 Contemporary Intercultural Communication
POG 330 Western Political Thought
CRB 600 Postcolonial Caribbean Society
POG 340 Introduction to Comparative Government
CRB 614 Caribbean Critical Thought
POG 410 Canadian Urban Politics
CRM 100 Introduction to Canadian Criminal Justice
POG 440 Aboriginal Governance/Justice
CRM 102 Introduction to Crime and Justice
POG 442 Women and Politics
CRM 200 Criminal Law
PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology I
CRM 202 Victims and the Criminal Process
PSY 124 Social Psychology
CRM 302 Criminological Theories
PSY 202 Introduction to Psychology II
CRM 312 Representing Crime
PSY 300 Psychology and Law
CRM 402 Criminal Justice and Social Inequality
PSY 402 Adult Development
ECN 104 Introductory Microeconomics
PSY 518 Environmental Psychology
ECN 204 Introductory Macroeconomics
PSY 808 Community Psychology
ECN 605 Labour Economics
SSH 500 Peer Learning Experience
ENG 108 The Nature of Narrative I
SSH 502 Community Action Research
ENG 200 Writing as a Cultural Act
SWP 910 Queer Theory and Identities
ENG 208 The Nature of Narrative I
ENG 413 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature
ENG 416 Modern American Experience
ENG 520 The Language of Persuasion
ENG 706 Shakespeare and Performance
ENH 121 Health Law
ENH 721 Public Health Law
GEO 151 Urban Analysis
GEO 231 Principles in Recreation and Demography
GEO 351 The Internal Structure of the City
GEO 551 Urbanization and Regional Development
GEO 581 GIS, Geographic Data and Mapping
GEO 681 GIS and Geographic Analysis
GEO 691 Canadian Immigration Patterns and Place
INP 900 Intro to the Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector
INP 911 Advocacy and Governmental Relations
INP 914 Diversity and Conflict Resolution
INT 902 Disabilities Issues
INT 910 First Nations Issues
ITM 505 Managing Information Systems
LAW 603 Advanced Business Law
LAW 723 Issues in Information Technology Law
MHR 523 Human Resources Management
MHR 600 Diversity and Equity in the Workplace
MHR 700 Cross-Cultural Dimensions of Org Behaviour
MKT 423 Marketing Research
MUS 110 Music and Film
MUS 211 Music Culture of the City
MUS 401 Music, Religion and Spirituality

pg 96 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - SOCIOLOGY / UNDECLARED ARTS

FACULTY/ADVISORY COUNCIL UNDECLARED ARTS


Dean ADMISSION INFORMATION
Faculty of Arts

C. CASSIDY
ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses,
including Grade 12 U English.
Chair
NOTES:
C. T. GILLIN
1. ENG4U/EAE4U is the preferred English.
Faculty 2. A minimum grade of 70 percent or higher will be
P. ALBANESE, BA (Hons.), W. Ont., MA, PhD, Tor. required in Grade 12 U English.
R. ARGUE, BA (Hons.), Regina, MA, Calg.
3. Subject to competition, candidates may be required
J. BRAYTON, BA (Hons.), MA, Qu., PhD, New Br.
S. DRAKULIC, PhD, Tor. to present averages/grades above the minimum.
D. FUMIA, BA (Hons.), MA, PhD, Tor.
C. T. GILLIN, BA, San Francisco, MA, McM., MA,York (Can.), MA (Legal UNDECLARED ARTS OVERVIEW
Studies), Baltimore
J. F. GOLDEN, BA, MA, CSFT, Tor. The four-year degree programs in Criminal Justice,
C. HERNANDEZ-RAMDWAR, BA (Hons.), York (Can.), MA, PhD, Tor. Politics and Governance, Psychology, and Sociology
A. JAMAL, MA, University of Karachi, Pakistan, MEd, PhD, Tor. share a common two-year foundation, in which students
M. KOC, BA, Bogazici University, MA, Wat., PhD, Tor. acquire breadth in the social sciences, followed by two
P. MOORE, BSc (Hons.), Mt. All., MSc, Qu., MA, PhD, York (Can.) years of a specific program of study. Students who are
S. MUZZATTI, BA (Hons.), MA, PhD, York (Can.) initially undecided about which one of these programs
N. NEVERSON, BA (Hons.), Car., MA, PhD, McM.
best matches their interests and goals may be admitted
A. NOACK, BA (Hons.), W. Laur, MA, PhD, York (Can.)
M. POMERANCE, AB, Mich., MA, S.U.N.Y. (Buffalo)
as Undeclared. The common two-year foundation gives
C. SCHIFELLITE, BSc, Georgetown University, MA, PhD, Tor. Undeclared students time to explore the program areas
A. SEARS, BA (Hons.), MA, Car., PhD, Warw. before transferring into a program.
P. SUGIMAN, BA, MA, PhD, Tor.
Students who have already decided which of the four
C. TEELUCKSINGH, BA (Hons.), Qu., MCS, Calg., PhD, York (Can.)
V. TYYSKÄ, BA, MA, PhD, Tor. social science programs they are interested in should
apply to those programs directly, and should consult the
Professor Emeriti/ae relevant pages of this calendar for program details.
R. ARGUE Semesters One through Four: Undeclared students
learn more about the program areas by selecting, in
Advisory Council
semesters one and two, introductory courses in Crimi-
DAVID CROMBIE nal Justice, Politics and Governance, Psychology, and
President, David Crombie & Associates Sociology. In semesters three and four, students continue
President and CEO, Canadian Urban Institute
Chair, Ontario Place
to explore these program areas as well as other social
science areas, including Economics and Geography.
CATHY CROWE
Sherbourne Health Centre Through a range of courses in the first four semesters,
MARGRIT EICHLER Undeclared students develop core competencies neces-
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
sary to succeed at the university level and in the modern
MARGOT FRANSSEN
President & CEO
workforce. Through an introduction to the Social Scienc-
Bibelot o/a Accessorize es, students explore an approach to critical analysis that
MICHELE LANDSBERG is shared by several disciplines and will guide life-long
Author and Journalist learning. Students develop skills in basic quantitative and
Columnist Retired, The Toronto Star
qualitative research methodologies, critical and analytical
UZMA SHAKIR thinking and effective communication. Students also se-
Executive Director
Council of Agencies Serving South Asians lect professionally-related courses from a broad range of
BOBBY SNIDERMAN areas including Accounting, Human Resources Manage-
The Senator Restaurant ment, Law, Marketing, Science and more.
HASSAN YUSSUFF
Secretary-Treasurer Because students achieve breadth in the Social Sciences
Canadian Labour Congress through course selection in Table I, only the following
lower level Liberal Studies (Table A) subject courses can
be selected: ENG, FRE, HST, IRL, ITM, MUS, NPF, PHL,
SCI, SPN and THL.

Transferability Guidelines
Students who have been admitted into the Bachelor of
Arts – Undeclared must declare one of Criminal Justice,
Politics and Governance, Psychology or Sociology by

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 97


FACULTY OF ARTS - UNDECLARED ARTS

fourth semester. No student can remain Undeclared past Bachelor of Arts


fourth semester. UNDECLARED
Students are to follow this curriculum until they choose and are
Transfers may occur for the Fall term of either their sec-
admitted to, one of the following specific programs of study:
ond or third year of studies. Students must declare their
program online via RAMSS by February 2nd. All program Criminal Justice, Politics and Governance, Psychology, Sociology.
transfers will be considered on a competitive basis and
are subject to program capacity. 1st SEMESTER
Students must have successfully completed CRM 100 REQUIRED:
and CRM 102 in order to transfer to Criminal Justice for
SSH 100 Introduction to the Social Sciences
the Fall term of either their second or third year of stud-
ies. SSH 205 Academic Writing and Research

Students must have successfully completed POG 100 REQUIRED GROUP 1: Two courses from the following:
and POG 110 in order to transfer to Politics and Gover- CRM 100 Introduction to Canadian Criminal Justice
nance for the Fall term of either their second or third year POG 100 People, Power and Politics
of studies. PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology I
Students must have successfully completed PSY 102 SOC 105 Introduction to Sociology
and PSY 202 in order to transfer to Psychology for the LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
Fall term of either their second or third year of studies.
2nd SEMESTER
Students must have successfully completed SOC 105
and SOC 107 in order to transfer to Sociology for the Fall REQUIRED:
term of either their second or third year of studies.
SSH 105 Critical Thinking I
Liberal Studies REQUIRED GROUP 1: One course from the following:
Students must take three lower level liberal studies CRM 100 Introduction to Canadian Criminal Justice
courses during their first four semesters. POG 100 People, Power and Politics
PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology I
Minors
SOC 105 Introduction to Sociology
Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson (with
exceptions), and are eligible for only one Minor. Please REQUIRED GROUP 2: Two courses from the following:
refer to the Minors Policy section of this calendar for CRM 102 Introduction to Crime and Justice
further information on individual Minor requirements and POG 110 Canadian Politics
restrictions. PSY 202 Introduction to Psychology II
The G. Raymond Chang School of Con�nuing Educa�on SOC 107 Sociology of Everyday Life
Cer�ficates LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
Undergraduate students wishing to pursue a continuing
education certificate program should be aware of pos- 3rd SEMESTER
sible restrictions. Please refer to the Curriculum Advis-
REQUIRED:
ing website at www.ryerson.ca/curriculumadvising for
complete details. SSH 301 Research Design and Qualitative Methods
REQUIRED GROUP 1: Two courses from Table I.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table II.

4th SEMESTER

REQUIRED GROUP 1: Select one course from the following:


CRM 204 Criminal Justice Research and Statistics
POG 230 Introduction to Research and Statistics
PSY 411 Research Methods and Statistics
SOC 411 Introduction to Quantitative Methods
REQUIRED GROUP 2: Two courses from Table I.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table II.

pg 98 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF ARTS - UNDECLARED ARTS

NOTE: The following Tables were omitted from the PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE II
original print publication/PDF in error.
A total of three courses is required.
ACC 100 Introductory Financial Accounting
REQUIRED GROUP 1 TABLE I ACC 333 Core Concepts of Accounting
A total of four courses is required. No more than four courses ACC 406 Introductory Management Accounting
may be taken from any one subject area. ACC 414 Intermediate Accounting I
CRM 100* Introduction to Canadian Criminal Justice BLG 143 Biology I
CRM 102* Introduction to Crime and Justice BLG 144 Biology II
CRM 200* Criminal Law BLG 151 Microbiology I
CRM 202* Victims and the Criminal Process CHY 103 General Chemistry I
ECN 104 Introductory Microeconomics CHY 113 General Chemistry II
ECN 204 Introductory Macroeconomics CHY 213 Analytical Chemistry I
ECN 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics I CMN 279 Intro to Contemporary Business Communication
ECN 504 Intermediate Microeconomics I CMN 313 Org Problem Solving and Report Writing
GEO 131 Environmental Analysis CMN 314 Professional Presentations
GEO 141 Geography and GIS CYC 101 Intro to Child and Youth Care
GEO 151 Urban Analysis CYC 201 Child Abuse and Neglect
GEO 231 Principles in Recreation and Demography CYC 401 Theories of Change for Children and Youth
POG 100* People, Power and Politics INP 901 Developing Effective Organizations
POG 110* Canadian Politics INP 902 Program Evaluation
POG 210* Canadian Government INP 910 Strategic Planning
POG 225* Global Governance INT 900 Program Planning and Evaluation Strategies
PSY 102* Introduction to Psychology I INT 905 Conflict Resolution in Community Services
PSY 124* Social Psychology INT 908 Homelessness in Canadian Society
PSY 202* Introduction to Psychology II INT 917 Urban Community Development
PSY 325* Psychological Disorders ITM 102 Business Information Systems I
SOC 105* Introduction to Sociology ITM 305 Systems Analysis and Design
SOC 107* Sociology of Everyday Life ITM 350 Concepts of eBusiness
SOC 470* Toronto: The Changing City LAW 122 Business Law
SOC 525* Media and Images of Inequality LAW 525 Law of the Marketplace
SSH 102 Learning and Development Strategies LAW 529 Employment and Labour Law
* Upon transfer to Criminal Jus�ce, Poli�cs and Governance, Psy- MHR 405 Org Behaviour and Interpersonal Skills
chology, or Sociology, courses with an asterisk that correspond to MHR 505 Organizational Behaviour II
the program selected will be used to sa�sfy four of the core course
MHR 522 Industrial Relations
requirements within the respec�ve program and are thus not included
in the four courses to be selected from this table. MKT 100 Principles of Marketing
MKT 300 Marketing Metrics and Analysis
MKT 423 Marketing Research
MKT 600 Integrated Case Analysis
OHS 208 Occupational Health and Safety Law
OHS 477 Integrated Disability Management
OHS 508 Occupational Health
PCS 120 Physics I
PCS 130 Physics II
SCI 102 Chaos and Fractals
SCI 104 Physics Answers to Everyday Questions
.
FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - FASHION

Students of Ryerson’s School of Fashion are prepared


Faculty of Communication & Design for a variety of careers in Fashion Communication and
PROGRAMS AND ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS Fashion Design. The first year of the four-year program
is common to all Fashion students. This foundation year
is designed to give a general overview of the knowledge
FASHION COMMUNICATION and skills applicable to all branches of the fashion indus-
FASHION DESIGN try. Introductory studies range from art history, textiles,
clothing construction and pattern-making, design and
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Design (BDes)
colour, and fashion drawing. In addition, courses in liberal
Administered by the School of Fashion studies provide the broad foundation necessary for later
specialization. In second year students begin their spe-
ADMISSION INFORMATION cialization in either: Fashion Communication or Fashion
Design.
DEGREE: Four years of study following Grade 12 U/M
graduation. FASHION COMMUNICATION

ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses Specialization in Fashion Communication also begins in
including Grade 12 U English and one Grade 11 U or second year. Business-related courses in areas such as
M or Grade 12 U Mathematics course (one of MCF3M, marketing, business, communication, fashion in interna-
MCR3U, MHF4U, MCV4U, MDM4U). tional markets, fashion and society are combined with
professional studies in communication design, illustra-
NOTES: tion, typography, curation and exhibition, photography,
video production and fashion journalism to produce a
1. ENG4U/EAE4U is the preferred English.
graduate who can work in all areas of fashion communi-
2. The minimum grade(s) required in the subject pre- cation. Through the selection of elective courses in sec-
requisites (normally in the 65-70 percent range) will ond, third and fourth year, students may elect to pursue a
be determined subject to competition. minor or to otherwise customize their elective package to
focus on their individual career objectives. Students also
3. Admission to the School of Fashion is equally based work in teams to produce a series of fashion events cul-
on meeting the academic requirements determined minating in the year-end fashion presentation, attended
by Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment and by over 3,500 people, including industry and media
on the portfolio guidelines set and evaluated by the representatives.
School of Fashion.
FASHION DESIGN
4. Applicants must state their intended specialization at
the time of application, i.e., Fashion Communication Students accepted into the Design program begin spe-
or Fashion Design. cialization in the second year. Within the third and fourth
year there are core courses in intermediate and ad-
5. A non-academic assessment fee of $50 CDN (sub- vanced apparel design, computer aided design, tailoring,
ject to change) is required and will be requested by production management, fashion and society, interna-
Ryerson as applicable. tional marketing, grading and materials management. In
addition students may further focus on such subjects as
6. Subject to competition, candidates may be required
contour and knitwear design, theatre/historical costume,
to present averages/grades above the minimum.
surface (textile) design, and curation and exhibition
Although Art/Visual Art and Sewing or Sewing classes through the selection of elective courses in second, third
are not treated as an academic prerequisite for entry into and fourth year. Senior students work with some of Can-
the Fashion program, it is strongly recommended that ada’s most noted designers to develop their own apparel
if Art courses (e.g. Life and/or Mechanical Drawing, Art collections, which are critiqued by industry buyers and
History, and Introductory Sewing and/or basic sewing manufacturers and shown in the annual year-end fashion
skills) are offered in the candidate’s secondary school events. The collections may be produced individually or
curriculum, they should be pursued. as part of a design team.

Applicants will be required to submit a portfolio which WORKSTUDY PLACEMENTS


provides evidence of creative versatility and ability. Through work placements students gain experience in
Candidates may be asked to attend an interview to show a range of professional settings and are given an op-
a portfolio or submit a mail-in portfolio. As part of the portunity to observe the various sectors in the fashion
admission selection process, applicants must visit industry: manufacturing, design, styling, retail, import-
www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/overview/ export, promotion, multimedia, packaging and publishing.
nonacademicrequirements for details about the non-aca- These placements help students clarify their educational
demic requirements. goals, integrate classroom theory into an applied setting
and provide contacts for employment opportunities after
PROGRAM OVERVIEW graduation. Students are required to complete 400 hours
of documentable work experience between first and
The School of Fashion’s aim is to provide career-oriented fourth year. Students who do not complete the required
education at a degree level which will ultimately lead to 400 hours of workstudy will receive an ‘incomplete’ grade
professional careers for men and women in all industries in FSN 402 (workstudy).
related to fashion.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 99


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - FASHION

Liberal Studies 4th SEMESTER


Students must take three lower level liberal studies
courses and three upper level liberal studies courses to REQUIRED:
graduate. FFC 200 Topics in Fashion Photography
FFC 403 Communication Design II
Minors FFC 404 Intermediate Illustration for Communication II
Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson (with MKT 100 Principles of Marketing
exceptions), and are eligible for only one Minor. Please
refer to the Minors Policy section of this calendar for LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
further information on individual Minor requirements and PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED†: One
restrictions. course from Table I, II or III.

The G. Raymond Chang School of Con�nuing Educa�on † Students must successfully complete two courses from each of
Tables I, II and III prior to gradua�on.
Cer�ficates
Undergraduate students wishing to pursue a continuing 5th SEMESTER
education certificate program should be aware of pos-
sible restrictions. Please refer to the Curriculum Advis- REQUIRED:
ing website at www.ryerson.ca/curriculumadvising for FFC 300 Art Direction for Photography
complete details. FFC 503 Digital Illustration and Product Development
Bachelor of Design SOC 656 Fashion and Society
FASHION COMMUNICATION / FASHION DESIGN
REQUIRED GROUP 1*: One course from the following:
1st SEMESTER FFC 521 Fashion Promotion I
FFC 552 Typography and Graphic Production I
Common to Both Fashion Communication and Fashion Design
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
REQUIRED:
PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED†: One
FSN 101 Textiles I course from Table I, II or III.
FSN 120 Fashion Design I
* Students must complete either FFC 521/621 or FFC 552/652 in 5th
FSN 121 Fundamentals of Design and Colour I and 6th semester.
FSN 122 Illustration I † Students must successfully complete two courses from each of
Tables I, II and III prior to gradua�on.
FSN 123 Intro to Fashion I-The Industry
IRH 102 History of Art I 6th SEMESTER

2nd SEMESTER REQUIRED:


Common to Both Fashion Communication and Fashion Design FFC 603 Advertising Design
FSN 302 History of Costume I
REQUIRED:
MKT 504 Effective Persuasion
FSN 220 Fashion Design II
REQUIRED GROUP 1*: One course from the following:
FSN 221 Fundamentals of Design and Colour II
FFC 621 Fashion Promotion II
FSN 222 Illustration II
FFC 652 Typography and Graphic Production II
FSN 223 Intro to Fashion II-Concepts and Theory
FSN 232 History of Art II LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.

LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A. PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED†: One
course from Table I, II or III.

Bachelor of Design * Students must complete either FFC 521/621 or FFC 552/652 in 5th
and 6th semester.
FASHION COMMUNICATION
† Students must successfully complete two courses from each of
Tables I, II and III prior to gradua�on.
3rd SEMESTER
7th SEMESTER
REQUIRED:
CMN 373 Fashion Communication: Professional Approaches REQUIRED:
FFC 303 Communication Design I BRD 400 Introductory Video Production
FFC 304 Intermediate Illustration for Communication I FFC 700 Communication Senior Project I
FSN 203 History of Design FSN 707 Research Methods

LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A. LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.

PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED†: One PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED†: One


course from Table I, II or III. course from Table I, II or III.

† Students must successfully complete two courses from each of † Students must successfully complete two courses from each of
Tables I, II and III prior to gradua�on. Tables I, II and III prior to gradua�on.

pg 100 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - FASHION

8th SEMESTER 6th SEMESTER

REQUIRED: REQUIRED:
FFC 800 Communication Senior Project II FFD 303 Integrated Visual Communication I
FSN 400 Fashion in International Markets FFD 613 Advanced Fashion Design II
FSN 402* Internship FSN 203 History of Design
PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED†: One LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
course from Table I, II or III.
PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED†: One
* This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. course from Table I, II or III.
† Students must successfully complete two courses from each of
Tables I, II and III prior to gradua�on. † Students must successfully complete two courses from each of
Tables I, II and III prior to gradua�on.

Bachelor of Design 7th SEMESTER


FASHION DESIGN
REQUIRED:

3rd SEMESTER FFD 400 Computer Aided Design II


FFD 403 Integrated Visual Communication II
REQUIRED: FFD 710 Design Senior Project I
FFD 313 Intermediate Fashion Design I FSN 707 Research Methods
FFD 314 Intermediate Illustration for Design I LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
FSN 302 History of Costume I
PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED†: One
MKT 100 Principles of Marketing course from Table I, II or III.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A. † Students must successfully complete two courses from each of
PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED†: One Tables I, II and III prior to gradua�on.
course from Table I, II or III.
8th SEMESTER
† Students must successfully complete two courses from each of
Tables I, II and III prior to gradua�on.
REQUIRED:

4th SEMESTER FFD 801 Design Senior Project II


FFD 802 Strategic Production Management
REQUIRED: FSN 400 Fashion in International Markets
FFD 200 Textiles II FSN 402* Internship
FFD 413 Intermediate Fashion Design II PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED†: One
FFD 414 Intermediate Illustration for Design II course from Table I, II or III.
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A. * This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
† Students must successfully complete two courses from each of
PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED†: One Tables I, II and III prior to gradua�on.
course from Table I, II or III.
† Students must successfully complete two courses from each of
Tables I, II and III prior to gradua�on.

5th SEMESTER

REQUIRED:
FFD 300 Computer Aided Design I
FFD 405 Grading
FFD 513 Advanced Fashion Design I
SOC 656 Fashion and Society
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED†: One
course from Table I, II or III.
† Students must successfully complete two courses from each of
Tables I, II and III prior to gradua�on.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 101


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - FASHION

PROFESSIONAL TABLE I PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE III


Fashion Communication Fashion Communication and Fashion Design
Students must successfully complete two courses from Table I Students must successfully complete two courses from Table III
prior to graduation. prior to graduation.
FFC 301 Packaging Design CMN 313 Org Problem Solving and Report Writing
FSN 209 Textile Design I CMN 314 Professional Presentations
FSN 304 Introduction to Fashion Journalism CMN 315 Issues in Commun and the Contemporary Worplace
FSN 500 Accessories Design CMN 373* Fashion Communication: Professional Approaches
FSN 505 Textile Design II CMN 413 Corporate Communications
FSN 507 Product Data Management CMN 414 Interpersonal Communication in Management
FSN 506 Surface Design CMN 443 Contemporary Intercultural Communication
FSN 700 Advanced Illustration ECN 220 Evolution of the Global Economy
ENT 500 New Venture Start Up
FSN 701 Copywriting
ENT 501 Family Business in Canada
FSN 703 Visual Merchandising and Display
ENT 526 Entrepreneurial Behaviour and Strategy
FSN 705 Merchandise Analysis
ENT 527 Studies in Entrepreneurship
FSN 706 Fashion Event Planning
ENT 601 Identifying Opportunities
FSN 711 Curation and Exhibition
ENT 725 Management of Innovation
FSN 712 Fashion: Creativity in Design
ENT 727 Applied Research in Entrepreneurship
GMS 200 Introduction to Global Management
Fashion Design
HST 600 Innovators, Capitalists and Managers
Students must successfully complete two courses from Table I HST 723 The Material Cultures of North America
prior to graduation. MHR 405 Org Behaviour and Interpersonal Skills
FFD 501 Contour Design MKT 300 Marketing Metrics and Analysis
FFD 502 Fur Design MKT 400 Understanding Consumers and the New Media
FFD 503 Knitwear Design MKT 403 Marketing Communications I
FFD 504 Women’s Block Development MKT 423 Marketing Research
MKT 500 Marketing Research
FFD 510 Functional Apparel Design
MKT 504* Effective Persuasion
FFD 520 Menswear Development
MKT 510 Innovations in Marketing
FSN 209 Textile Design I
MKT 600 Integrated Case Analysis
FSN 500 Accessories Design
MKT 700 Business Intelligence/Decision Modelling
FSN 505 Textile Design II
MKT 723 Marketing in the Service Industry
FSN 506 Surface Design
MKT 730 Assessing/Managing Market Opportunities
FSN 507 Product Data Management MKT 731 Competitive Intelligence
FSN 700 Advanced Illustration NPF 553 Modern Movements in the Arts I
FSN 703 Visual Merchandising and Display NPF 554 Modern Movements in the Arts II
FSN 706 Fashion Event Planning NPF 558 Topics and Issues in Design
FSN 711 Curation and Exhibition PHL 307 Business Ethics
FSN 712 Fashion: Creativity in Design PHL 921 Intellectual Property and Technology
PSY 209 Industrial Psychology
PSY 518 Environmental Psychology
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE II
PSY 714 Visual Information Processing
Fashion Communication and Fashion Design PSY 814 Principles of Aesthetic Production
PSY 941 Cross Cultural Psychology
Students must successfully complete two courses from Table II
prior to graduation. RMG 100 Issues and Innovations in Retailing I
RMG 200 Introduction to Retail Management
FSN 501 Advanced Colour Theory
RMG 400 Buying Process I
FSN 503 Design, Text and Ideas
RMG 909 Advanced Buying Process II
FSN 504 Fashion Culture-From Suffragettes to CEO’s SOC 931 Western Perspectives on Consumerism
FSN 509 Topics in Fashion History and Theory THP 315 Corsetry: History and Construction
FSN 510 Symbiosis and Evolution: Film, Photo, Fashion THP 333 Costume: Special Topics
FSN 555 History of Fashion Illustration THP 612 Fabric Dyeing and Costume Painting
FSN 556 History of Design II THP 845 Costume III
FSN 704 History of Costume II THT 419 Costume Design II
* Available to Fashion Design students only.

pg 102 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - FASHION

FACULTY/ADVISORY COUNCIL

Dean JACQUELINE HOWE


Faculty of Communication & Design Vice President and Group Publisher
Transcontinental Media
D. DOZ ANDREW JENNINGS
Group Managing Director of Retail
Associate Dean, Faculty and Student Affairs Woolworths

G. MOTHERSILL ROBIN KAY


President
Fashion Design Council of Canada
Associate Dean, SRC
CARYN LERNER
A. GOODRUM President
Holt Renfrew
Chair GERRY MAMONE
President
R. OTT Mamone & Partners

Faculty DARREN MASON


President/Owner
Andrew’s
J. AITKEN, BFA, York (Can.), MVA, Alta.
S. BARNWELL, MA, York (Can.), NDD, ATC NORMA MENEGUZZI-SPALL
President, The Result Group
D. BRAME, BFA, Columbus College of Arts & Design, MFA, Cincinnati
A. CHU, BFA, National Taiwan, DipEd, McG., MA, Col. SAUL MIMRAN
L. DELL’AGNESE, Dip, Ryerson, MA, C’nell. President
Mimran Group Inc.
P. KELLY, AAS, BS, MA, Conn.
L. LAFRENZ, BS, Iowa State Univ., MS, PhD, Ohio State Univ. FRANCO MIRABELLI
Owner/Designer
T. LEWIS, BA, MS, Ohio State Univ. Franco Mirabelli Design Inc.
G. LYNCH, BFA, Univ. of Windsor, MFA, Guelph
A. MATTHEWS DAVID, BA, McG., MA, PhD. Stanford Univ. ALAN SEYMOUR
Senior Sales Executive
B. MURRAY, BEd, MEd, Brock Gerber Technology Ltd.
R. OTT, BAA, Ryerson
MARY TURNER
O. RAHMAN, Higher Diploma in Fashion and Clothing Technology, Hong Merchandise Vice President
Kong Polytechnic Univ., MDes (RCA) Royal College of Art Women, Mens, Kids & Intimates
S. J. G. STEWART, DipAD, Middlesex Univ. The Bay
S. TULLIO-POW, Dip, BAA, Ryerson, MEd, Brock
K. WAHL, BA, BFA, York (Can.), MA, W. Ont., PhD, Qu.

Adjunct Professor

K. CLEAVER, BSc, MSc, Tor.

Professor Emeriti/ae

J. C. FREEMAN
L. R. LEWIS

Advisory Council

JEANNE BEKER
Host/Segment Producer
“FT-Fashion Television” &
“Fashion Television Channel”
LAURIE BELZAK
Sector Development Officer
Economic Development Office
Fashion, Apparel & Design
NINA BUDMAN
President Budman & Associates
Chair Advisory Council
DAVID DIXON
Designer
LYNDA FRIENDLY
Lynda Friendly and Associates Inc.
LORNE GERTNER
CEO
Hill & Gertner Capital Corporation
THOMAS HAIG
President, Fashion and Footwear
Retail Division
M.H. Alshaya, W.L.L.
PETER HOUSLEY
Consultant

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 103


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT

Between third and fourth years students are involved


GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT in a mandatory internship, as an employee of a printing
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Technology (BTech) company.
Administered by the School of Graphic Communications Fourth year features a course involving the preparation
Management of a complete business plan for a new manufacturing
business.
ADMISSION INFORMATION
Liberal Studies
DEGREE: Four years of study following Grade 12 U/M Students must take three lower level liberal studies
graduation. courses and three upper level liberal studies courses to
ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses graduate.
including Grade 12 U English and one Grade 11 U or
M or Grade 12 U Mathematics course (one of MCF3M, Minors
MCR3U, MHF4U, MCV4U, MDM4U). Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson (with
exceptions), and are eligible for only one Minor. Please
NOTES: refer to the Minors Policy section of this calendar for
1. ENG4U/EAE4U is the preferred English. further information on individual Minor requirements and
restrictions.
2. The minimum grade(s) required in the subject pre-
requisites (normally in the 65-70 percent range) will The G. Raymond Chang School of Con�nuing Educa�on
be determined subject to competition. Cer�ficates
3. Students are encouraged to take Grade 12 M Undergraduate students wishing to pursue a continuing
Principles of Financial Accounting (BAT4M) and/or education certificate program should be aware of pos-
Communication Technology (TGJ4M). sible restrictions. Please refer to the Curriculum Advis-
ing website at www.ryerson.ca/curriculumadvising for
4. Subject to competition, candidates may be required
complete details.
to present averages/grades above the minimum.
Bachelor of Technology
PROGRAM OVERVIEW GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT
The printing industries are among the most important
and the largest employers in Canada. These industries 1st SEMESTER
produce all of the printed materials which play significant
REQUIRED:
roles in our lives from books, magazines, and newspa-
pers, to boxes, posters, and record jackets. GRA 102 Layout and Typography I
GRA 103 Introduction to Electronic Premedia I
Ryerson’s Bachelor of Technology (Graphic Communica-
GRA 104 Printing Processes I
tions Management) program aims to graduate individuals
who will become effective professionals in the printing in- MKT 100 Principles of Marketing
dustries and who will have a foundation upon which they LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
may develop themselves as managers. Naturally, the
program cannot produce instant managers or executives. 2nd SEMESTER
Graduates must gain acceptance and prove capability
before winning the opportunity to acquire managerial REQUIRED:
responsibility. CMN 279 Introduction to Contemporary Business Comm
The program curriculum reflects the opinions of industry GMS 200 Introduction to Global Management
managers regarding the educational content required GRA 202 Layout and Typography II
to produce capable, knowledgeable graduates. The GRA 203 Introduction to Electronic Premedia II
program stresses the application of theory to practical GRA 204 Printing Processes II
problems. Emphasis is placed on business and manage-
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
ment subjects, which account for about half of the cur-
riculum. The balance between technology and business 3rd SEMESTER
management in the program makes graduates versatile
and therefore flexible in terms of career development. REQUIRED:
In laboratories, students operate equipment similar to ACC 100 Introductory Financial Accounting
that used in the printing industries, learn the fundamental GRA 320 Binding and Finishing I
principles underlying industry processes, and acquire GRA 322 Electronic Document Design I
practical insight into production problems by completing GRA 323 Intermediate Electronic Premedia I
projects which simulate industry conditions. State-of-
GRA 324 Printing Processes III
the-art equipment and instruments in the labs enable
MKT 300 Marketing Metrics and Analysis
students to investigate materials and processes in detail.

pg 104 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT

4th SEMESTER PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE I


REQUIRED: ACC 333 Core Concepts of Accounting
ACC 406 Introductory Management Accounting CMN 314 Professional Presentations
CMN 315 Issues in Comm and the Contemporary Workplace
GRA 420 Binding and Finishing II
CMN 414 Interpersonal Communication in Management
GRA 422 Electronic Document Design II CMN 444 On-Site Study in Commun: Non-Profit Sector
GRA 423 Intermediate Electronic Premedia II CMN 447 Communication and Law
GRA 424 Quality Control in Printing CMN 448 Introduction to Visual Communication
ECN 104 Introductory Microeconomics
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
ECN 204 Introductory Macroeconomics
5th SEMESTER ECN 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics I
ECN 321 Introduction to Law and Economics
REQUIRED: ECN 501 Industrial Organization
ECN 504 Intermediate Microeconomics I
GRA 216 Manufacturing Management for the Graphic Arts
ENT 500 New Venture Startup
GRA 230 Selling in the Graphic Arts
ENT 501 Family Business in Canada
GRA 530 Management Studies I ENT 526 Entrepreneurial Behaviour and Strategy
GRA 533 Adv Electronic Premedia I ENT 527 Studies in Entrepreneurship
GRA 534 Printing Processes IV ENT 601 Identifying Opportunities
ENT 725 Management of Innovation
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
FIN 300 Managerial Finance I
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table I. FIN 401 Managerial Finance II
FIN 502 Personal Finance Planning
6th SEMESTER FIN 510 Entrepreneurial Finance
GMS 402 Introduction to Managerial Economics
REQUIRED:
GMS 522 International Marketing
GRA 116 Estimating in the Graphic Arts GMS 550 Business-to-Business e-Commerce
GRA 630 Management Studies II GMS 724 Management of International Enterprise
GRA 633 Adv Electronic Premedia II GMS 850 Global Management Strategy
GRA 634 Printing Processes V ITM 102 Business Information Systems I
ITM 305 Systems Analysis and Design
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
ITM 350 Concepts of e-Business
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table I. ITM 410 Business Process Design
ITM 500 Logical Database Analysis and Design
7th SEMESTER ITM 505 Managing Information Systems
ITM 729 Data Mining and Warehousing Methods
REQUIRED: ITM 750 IT Project Management
GRA 704 Management of Workflow I MHR 405 Org Behaviour and Interpersonal Skills
GRA 741 Management Studies III MHR 522 Industrial Relations
GRA 743 Managing Advanced Technology I MHR 523 Human Resources Management
MHR 640 Leadership
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
MKT 300* Metrics and Analysis
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table I. MKT 400 Understanding Consumers and the New Media
MKT 403 Marketing Communications I
8th SEMESTER MKT 500 Marketing Research
MKT 502 Consumer Behaviour
REQUIRED: MKT 504 Effective Persuasion
GRA 804 Management of Workflow II MKT 510 Innovations in Marketing
GRA 841 Management Studies IV MKT 530 eMarketing
GRA 843 Managing Advanced Technology II MKT 600 Integrated Case Analysis
MKT 621 Business-to-Business Marketing
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table I.
MKT 700 Business Intelligence/Decision Modelling
MKT 723 Marketing in the Service Industry
MKT 724 Sales Management
MKT 731 Competitive Intelligence
PSY 209 Industrial Psychology
* MKT 300 is not available as an elec�ve for Fall 2009 (and subse-
quent) 1st year admits.
A maximum of one credit course offered by the Ted Rogers School of
Business Management, outside of this Table, and approved by this
department and the Ted Rogers School of Business Management may
be taken by way of a course direc�ve.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 105


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT

FACULTY/ADVISORY COUNCIL

Dean BOB HAYES


Faculty of Communication & Design Senior Vice President, Operations
Bowne of Canada, Ltd.
D. DOZ MICHAEL HILL
Director of Sales
Associate Dean, Faculty and Student Affairs Alcan Packaging
DR. HADI MAHABADI
G. MOTHERSILL VP and Director
Xerox Research Centre of Canada (XRCC)
Associate Dean, SRC
MICHAEL MAKIN
A. GOODRUM President & CEO
PIA|GATF
Chair GUY MANUEL
President,
to be determined Transcontinental Printing
Marketing Products & Services Sector
Faculty TERRY PITCHFORD
VP, Strategic Development
R. ADAMS II, BS, Union, MS, RIT, PhD, C’nell Paperlinx of Canada, Spicers
I. C. BAITZ, BTech, Ryerson, BEd, Tor., MEd, S. Qld.
RUBEN SILVA
N. GILEWICZ, BTech, Ryerson Managing Director
M. HABEKOST, Dr.rer.nat, Germany Agfa Graphic Systems Canada
C. E. KULAR, BTech, Ryerson, MS (Hons.), Print Media, RIT NANCY SOBHY
J. LISI, BTech, Ryerson, MEd, Univ. of S. Qld. Marketing Coordinator
G. MOTHERSILL, BTech, Ryerson, MBA, Qu. Spicers
A. SETO, MBA, Athab. DR. PATRICIA SORCE
A. SHARMA, BSc (Hons.), University of Westminster, PhD, Lond. Chair, School of Print Media
Rochester Institute of Technology
Professor Emeriti/ae

R. B. ATKINS
M. E. BLACK
M. H. BREEDE
R. GOODYEAR
M. M. JOHNSTON
F. McGUIRE
D. C. MILTON

Advisory Council

RICHARD ARMSTRONG
President
Heidelberg Canada Graphic Equipment Limited
PATRICK BOLAN
President & CEO
Avanti Computer Systems Limited
ROBERT COCKERILL
President
Schawk Canada Inc.
MICHAEL COLLINGE
President & CEO
Webcom Inc.
ANDREW DUNKERLY
Manager, In Store Communications
HBC
MARIE EVELINE
Executive Director
Canadian Printing Industries Sector Council
DON GAIN SR.
President
Harmony Printing Limited
TONY GALASSO
President
Quebecor World Canada
WINIFRED GLEUE
President & CEO
Hostmann-Steinberg
ANN GRANT
Quality Control
Globe & Mail

pg 106 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - IMAGE ARTS

program provides a general background in design, art


IMAGE ARTS history, and cultural studies, along with professional edu-
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) cation in the three areas of Film, New Media, and Pho-
tography Studies. There is a strong link between theory
Administered by the School of Image Arts (Film - New
and practice in each of these options. The program is en-
Media - Photography Studies)
hanced by a broad offering of liberal studies and profes-
sional and professionally-related electives. The School of
ADMISSION INFORMATION Image Arts is equipped to high standards and students
are expected to develop a professional approach to their
DEGREE: Four years of study following Grade 12 U/M
work. Access to facilities is governed by School policies
graduation.
and procedures. Students will be required to own certain
ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses items of equipment appropriate to the option they enter.
including Grade 12 U English. Aptitudes of applicants will Please refer to the sections on Special Department
be carefully assessed. Charges and on the Cost of Attending Ryerson in the
NOTES: Student Services portion of this calendar.

1. ENG4U/EAE4U is the preferred English. FILM STUDIES OPTION

2. The minimum grade required in the subject prereq- The Film Studies Option offers a comprehensive aca-
uisite (normally in the 65-70 percent range) will be demic framework for undergraduate studies in the theory
determined subject to competition. and practice of film and video leading to career choices
in the Canadian screen industries and to further scholarly
3. Applicants will be required to provide samples of activity at the graduate level. The program has an em-
work appropriate to the option they intend to enter, phasis on experiential learning and is designed to nurture
as well as a written statement of interests and objec- personal visions that will contribute to the growth of Ca-
tives. Applicants should be aware that the submis- nadian culture as well as enhancing the Canadian voice
sion will not be returned. As part of the admission in international film and video. In addition, the program
selection process, applicants must visit www. aims to create flexible, quick-thinking, highly adaptable
ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/overview/ film/video makers capable of working effectively in an
nonacademicrequirements for details about the non- enormous variety of circumstances and equipped to take
academic requirements. advantage of many different artistic and commercial op-
4. A non-academic assessment fee of $50 CDN (sub- portunities in the world of visual communication.
ject to change) is required and will be requested by NEW MEDIA OPTION
Ryerson as applicable.
The New Media Option provides a solid theoretical and
5. Assessment will be made on the basis of academic practical background in creative production methods and
performance, proficiency in communication skills, techniques employed in interface, interaction, and experi-
and creative potential, as demonstrated by the ence art and design. Commensurate with the technologi-
applicant’s history and submissions. cal challenge it faces within an ever-evolving field, the
6. Applicants must state their intended option at the program uses a variety of innovative teaching approach-
time of application, i.e., Film Studies, New Media, or es to move students through an immersive, hands-on
Photography Studies. Application may be made to course of study. Emphasizing creativity, the New Media
change options after first year, but space is limited option expands the idea of computing. It encourages risk
and will be filled on a competitive basis. taking and experimentation within a supportive, col-
laborative environment designed to address the emerg-
7. Students wishing to study on a part-time basis, as ing challenges of the communication age. To this end,
well as Special or Auditing Students are not normally students engage new technologies not only as a means
admitted to this program. of production but as instruments of social, cultural, and
8. Subject to competition, candidates may be required artistic change. The curriculum is unique both in its
to present averages/grades above the minimum. substance and in its structure, which emphasizes depth
as well as breadth and flexibility. The remarkable learning
environment offered by the department, combined with
PROGRAM OVERVIEW Ryerson’s proximity to the media production, telecom-
The curriculum in the School of Image Arts program is munications, and cultural industries, provide unparalleled
designed to lead to careers in the film, photography, new opportunities for developing not only the tools, but an
media, communications and cultural industries. Gradu- understanding of the medium in a field that is continually
ates are capable of performing responsibly in these in the process of self-invention.
industries as professionals in both creative and manage- PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIES OPTION
rial positions, and in undertakings ranging from the highly
commercial to the artistic and experimental. The curricu- The Photography Studies Option offers an integrated
lum will also provide students with the necessary ground- academic framework for undergraduate studies in the
ing to move on to advanced study in a variety of media- theory and practice of photography, leading to career
related academic and artistic disciplines. The Image Arts possibilities in the many creative and commercial fields

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 107


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - IMAGE ARTS

which utilize the photographic image, or to further schol- Bachelor of Fine Arts
arly activity at the graduate level. The aim of the program IMAGE ARTS
is to produce graduates capable of working effectively in
both traditional and electronic image-making systems. 1st & 2nd SEMESTER
The curriculum is designed for maximum flexibility.
The foundation years provide a base for working in an Common to all Options
interdisciplinary mode at upper levels. An atmosphere REQUIRED:
of creative and critical inquiry across all four years
MPC 13A/B Art History
gives students a rich awareness of the visual, aesthetic,
technological, and cultural issues affecting the creation MPC 101 Visual Studies I
of effective images, as well as an enhanced appreciation MPC 201 Concepts and Theories
of the rapid and radical changes now occurring in the REQUIRED GROUP 1: Two courses from the Option selected:
professions they will be entering.
FILM
PROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED
MPF 16A/B Film Production
COURSES
MPF 17A/B Tools and Applications
Professional courses include three kinds of courses: in-
termediate and advanced production courses for majors NEW MEDIA
in the four primary media; intermediate and advanced MPM 16A/B Intro to Media for Experience Design
production courses for students who wish to minor in a MPM 17A/B Research for Experience Design
second medium; and specialized courses in such techni-
cal adjuncts as lighting, cinematography, photographic PHOTOGRAPHY
printing, film/video editing, animation, screenwriting and MPS 16A/B Photographic Production
directing, sound recording and synthesis, special effects, MPS 17A/B Tools and Applications
graphic design, computer programming, interactive ap-
plications, and so on. Professionally-Related courses LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table A.
include intermediate and advanced courses in subjects
ranging from art history and aesthetics through cultural,
critical, communication, and film theory to business and Film Studies Option
professional development seminars in all three options.
3rd & 4th SEMESTER
Liberal Studies
REQUIRED:
Students must take two lower level liberal studies
courses and four upper level liberal studies courses to MPC 25A/B Visual Studies II
graduate. MPF 22A/B* Film Production
MPF 23A/B Technology
Minors MPF 24A/B Writing for Film
Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson (with MPF 27A/B Film History and Criticism
exceptions), and are eligible for only one Minor. Please
* This course has a weight of 3.00.
refer to the Minors Policy section of this calendar for
further information on individual Minor requirements and
5th & 6th SEMESTER
restrictions.

The G. Raymond Chang School of Con�nuing Educa�on REQUIRED:


Cer�ficates MPF 32A/B* Film Production
Undergraduate students wishing to pursue a continuing MPF 35A/B Film Theory
education certificate program should be aware of pos- MPF 300 Technology
sible restrictions. Please refer to the Curriculum Advis- MPF 301 Business of Film
ing website at www.ryerson.ca/curriculumadvising for
LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table B.
complete details.
PROFESSIONAL¶: One or two courses from Table I.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED¶: One or two courses from
Table II.
* This course has a weight of 3.00.
¶ A total of three single-term courses or equivalent are required be-
tween 5th and 8th semesters. Students may take these requirements
in any combina�on. For example: two in 5th and 6th semesters and
one in 7th and 8th semesters, or one in 5th and 6th semesters and two
in 7th and 8th semesters.

pg 108 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - IMAGE ARTS

Film Studies Option (Cont’d) Photography Studies Option

7th & 8th SEMESTER 3rd & 4th SEMESTER


Revised Program Commencing 2010-2011 REQUIRED:
REQUIRED: MPC 25A/B Visual Studies II
MPF 42A/B* Senior Project MPS 21A/B History of Photography
MPS 26A/B Theories of Representation
LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table B.
MPS 27A/B Photographic Technology
PROFESSIONAL¶: One or two courses from Table I.
MPS 28A/B Photography Production and Critique
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED¶: One or two courses from
Table II. 5th & 6th SEMESTER
* This course has a weight of 3.00.
¶ A total of three single-term courses or equivalent are required be- REQUIRED:
tween 5th and 8th semesters. Students may take these requirements MPS 34A/B Concepts and Theory
in any combina�on. For example: two in 5th and 6th semesters and
one in 7th and 8th semesters, or one in 5th and 6th semesters and two MPS 35A/B Photography Production
in 7th and 8th semesters. MPS 36A/B Digital Applications
LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table B.
New Media Option
PROFESSIONAL¶: One or two courses from Table I.

3rd & 4th SEMESTER PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED¶: One or two courses from


Table II.
REQUIRED: ¶ A total of three single-term courses or equivalent are required be-
MPC 25A/B Visual Studies II tween 5th and 8th semesters. Students may take these requirements
in any combina�on. For example: two in 5th and 6th semesters and
MPM 21A/B New Media History
one in 7th and 8th semesters, or one in 5th and 6th semesters and two
MPM 26A/B Theories of Representation in 7th and 8th semesters.
MPM 27A/B Artistic Applications for Interaction Design
MPM 28A/B Artistic Applications for Interface Design 7th & 8th SEMESTER

5th & 6th SEMESTER Revised Program Commencing 2010-2011

REQUIRED:
REQUIRED:
MPS 42A/B* Senior Project
MPM 33A/B Communication within Hybrid Environments
MPM 34A/B Cultural Theory and Research Studio LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table B.
MPM 35A/B Visualization and Generative Processes PROFESSIONAL¶: One or two courses from Table I.
LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table B. PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED¶: One or two courses from
PROFESSIONAL¶: One or two courses from Table I. Table II.
* This course has a weight of 3.00.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED¶: One or two courses from ¶ A total of three single-term courses or equivalent are required be-
Table II. tween 5th and 8th semesters. Students may take these requirements
¶ A total of three single-term courses or equivalent are required be- in any combina�on. For example: two in 5th and 6th semesters and
tween 5th and 8th semesters. Students may take these requirements one in 7th and 8th semesters, or one in 5th and 6th semesters and two
in any combina�on. For example: two in 5th and 6th semesters and in 7th and 8th semesters.
one in 7th and 8th semesters, or one in 5th and 6th semesters and two
in 7th and 8th semesters.

7th & 8th SEMESTER


Revised Program Commencing 2010-2011

REQUIRED:
MPM 42A/B* Senior Project
LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table B.
PROFESSIONAL¶: One or two courses from Table I.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED¶: One or two courses from
Table II.
* This course has a weight of 3.00.
¶ A total of three single-term courses or equivalent are required be-
tween 5th and 8th semesters. Students may take these requirements
in any combina�on. For example: two in 5th and 6th semesters and
one in 7th and 8th semesters, or one in 5th and 6th semesters and two
in 7th and 8th semesters.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 109


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - IMAGE ARTS

PROFESSIONAL TABLE I NPF 555 Experimental Media


NPF 557 Topics in Film
Students must complete a total of three single-term courses (or
NPF 558 Topics and Issues in Design
equivalent) from Table I, between 5th & 8th semester. The order
in which students access these courses is flexible and may be NPF 559 Adv Topics in Photo History and Theory
changed with permission of the School, providing requisites are NPF 560 Adv Topics in Film History and Theory
completed. Contact the School for further enrollment information. NPF 561 Adv Topics in New Media History and Theory
FPN 31A/B* Production Design and Scenography NPF 562 Media and Communication
FPN 32A/B* Directing Screen Performance NPF 563 Directors and Composers - 1940 to Present
FPN 33A/B* Screen Writing NPF 564 Contemporary World Cinema
FPN 323 Sound Design for Visual Media I NPF 565 Contemporary Canadian Cinema
FPN 531 Cinematography and Lighting Design I NPF 566 History of Animation
FPN 532 Advanced Studio Lighting NPF 567 Exhibition Practices in Contemporary Art
FPN 533 Sound Design for Visual Media II NPF 568 Analogue as Meaning
FPN 534 Graphic Design NPF 569 Disaster Images: Memory and Response
FPN 535 Interaction Design PSY 714 Visual Information Processing
FPN 536 Media Business Studies PSY 814 Principles of Aesthetic Production
FPN 537 Programming for Multimedia Production * A mul�-term course.
FPN 538 Authoring for New Media
FPN 539 Human Figure FACULTY/ADVISORY COUNCIL
FPN 541 Digital Animation Concepts
FPN 542 Advanced New Media Topics Dean
FPN 543 Historical Processes Workshops Faculty of Communication & Design
FPN 544 Experimental Film Processes D. DOZ
FPN 545 Multimedia Workshop
Associate Dean, Faculty and Student Affairs
FPN 546 Curation and Exhibition
FPN 547 Co-operative Internship G. MOTHERSILL
FPN 600 Film Craft Workshop Associate Dean, SRC
FPN 631 Cinematography and Lighting Design I
A. GOODRUM
FPN 632 Advanced Studio Lighting II
* A mul�-term course. Chair

to be determined
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE II
Program Director, Film Studies
Students must complete a total of three single-term courses
M. CONFORD
(or equivalent) from Table II, between 5th & 8th semester. The
order in which students access these courses is flexible and Program Director, New Media
may be changed with permission of the School, providing req-
L. PINE
uisites are completed. Contact the School for further enrollment
information. Program Director, Photography Studies
CMN 450 The Art of Podcasting R. BURLEY
ENG 108 The Nature of Narrative I
Faculty
ENG 208 The Nature of Narrative II
HST 723 The Material Cultures of North America A. ALTER, MFA, Cranbrook
A. ANDERSON, BA (Hons.), Tor., MA, York (Can.)
MUS 31A/B* Music in Film and Media
C. AYLWARD, BA (Hons.), McG., MA, Tor., MFA, York (Can.)
NPF 34A/B* Technology, Culture and Communication A. BAL, BAA, Ryerson, DEA, Paris XIII
NPF 35A/B* History and Theory of Independent Cinema M. BRAUN, BA (Hons.), Tor., MA, (magna cum laude) N.Y. State, ARCT
NPF 36A/B* Art History/Theories of Art J. BRUCE, PhD, C’dia.
R. BURLEY, BAA, Ryerson, MFA, Art Institute of Chicago
NPF 37A/B* Critical and Cultural Theory G. CAMMAER, BA, MA, K. U. Leuven, BFA, MFA, C’dia
NPF 548 Modern Movements/Issues in Photography M. CONFORD, A.B., Brandeis University, Master of Journalism, Univ. Calif.
(Berkeley)
NPF 549 Theories of Photography: Contemporary Topics
B. DAMUDE, BA, McG., MFA, N.Y.
NPF 550 New Media Applications S. DANIELS, BSc, MSc, Manit.
NPF 551 Interactivity and Networking D. DOZ, DU, DESIPAC, DEA, Doctorat (Paris VIII), Dip Arch (D PLG, France)
NPF 552 The Political Economy of Culture R. B. ELDER, BA (Hons., summa cum laude), McM., BAA Ryerson, MA
(magna cum laude), Tor.
NPF 553 Modern Movements in the Arts I G. FILEWOD, BEd, Brock
NPF 554 Modern Movements in the Arts II B. FITZPATRICK, BAA, Ryerson, MA, Ohio State, PhD, Tor.

pg 110 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - IMAGE ARTS / INTERIOR DESIGN

D. HARRIS, BA (Hons.), Tor., MA, Univ. of New Mexico


V. INGELEVICS, MFA, Visual Arts, York (Can.) INTERIOR DESIGN
B. LESSARD, BA, Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, MA, Laval, PhD, Montr.
M. K. McCORMICK, BA, Calif., MFA, School of the Art Inst. of Chicago Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Interior Design (BID)
W. MICHALAK, MA, Univ. of LodZ, PhD, Alta.
Administered by the School of Interior Design
L. PINE, BA, Mt. St. Vin. MFA, York (Can.)
W. PITTENDREIGH, BAA, Ryerson
I. PRUSKA-OLDENHOF, BAA, Ryerson, MA, PhD, York (Can.) ADMISSION INFORMATION
E. SLOPEK, Dip, MMFA, Montr., MA, Leicester, PhD, McG.
J. M. SNYDER, BA, Yale, MA, Goddard College DEGREE: Four years of study following Grade 12 U/M
P. TREMBLAY, BAA, Ryerson, BFA, Laval, LIC A.T.I., Université de Paris VIII graduation. Accredited by (CIDA) Council for Interior
Professor Emeriti/ae
Design Accreditation.
ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses
P. BERGERSON
L. J. CAZA including Grade 12 U English, Grade 11 U or M or Grade
D. GILLIES 12 U Mathematics (one of MCF3M, MCR3U, MHF4U,
J. B. KELLY MCV4U, MDM4U), and one additional Grade 12 U or M
E. KOLOMPAR course from: Visual Arts (AVI4M), Economics: Analyzing
L. LEWIS Current Economic Issues (CIA4U), Canadian & World
J. LUTZ Issues: A Geographical Analysis (CGW4U), Canada:
D. MILES
History, Identity and Culture (CHI4U), Physics (SPH4U),
I. MORGULIS
E. SAURO
Communications Technology (TGJ4M) or Technologi-
F. W. SCANLON cal Design (TDJ4M). Other Grade 12 U or M courses
R. B. SCOTT in Canadian & World Issues may be considered on an
G. E. SHENNETTE individual basis.
J. SOLOWSKI
H. WESTERBLOM NOTES:
1. ENG4U/EAE4U is the preferred English.
Advisory Council
2. The minimum grade(s) required in the subject pre-
ROB DAVIDSON requisites (normally in the 65-70 percent range) will
Photographer
be determined subject to competition.
SEAN FARNEL
Director of Programming 3. Students should select Physics (Grade 11 or higher)
Hot Docs Film Festival
and the Art option in Grades 11 and 12 if available.
VERA FRENKEL
Multidisciplinary Artist 4. Preference may be given to students who have
BRUCE HORSBURGH included History or Visual Arts/Art History in their
Director, Corporate Communications and Public Affairs
Kodak Canada Inc.
Grade 12 U/M studies.
GEOFFREY JAMES 5. A portfolio submission will be required and will be
Photographer/Writer used with the applicant’s academic performance in the
MICHAEL KENNEDY admission process. An interview with faculty may be
Film and Television Director/Writer
required. As part of the admission selection process,
ANN THOMAS
Curator, Photographs Collection
applicants must visit www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/
The National Gallery of Canada admission/overview/nonacademicrequirements for
TONY TOBIAS details about the non-academic requirements.
President, Executive Producer
Pangaea Media & Music Inc. 6. A non-academic assessment fee of $50 CDN (sub-
ject to change) is required and will be requested by
Ryerson as applicable.
7. Subject to competition, candidates may be required
to present averages/grades above the minimum.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW
This program prepares graduates for a career as a
professional Interior Designer. While most graduates be-
come registered members of A.R.I.D.O. (Association of
Registered Interior Designers of Ontario) or of the Interior
Design Associations in other provinces, some pursue
graduate studies in Interior Design or related disciplines,
and others enjoy successful careers in allied fields.
The first year concentrates on giving all students a
common base of theory, knowledge and skills. In the
second year, Interior Design is a key professional course

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 111


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - INTERIOR DESIGN

conducted in conjunction with other supportive and BACHELOR OF INTERIOR DESIGN


developmental courses. From the beginning students are
encouraged to become self-sufficient with the guidance 1st & 2nd SEMESTER
and assistance of the faculty. REQUIRED:
Through the third and fourth years the development of IRC 102 Communications I
the necessary common capabilities continues, add- IRC 103 Communications II
ing professional practice courses and giving students IRD 100* Design Dynamics Studio I
progressive opportunities to explore a few areas in depth IRD 200* Design Dynamics Studio II
and to develop a high level of competency in an area of IRH 102 History of Art I
design of their own choosing. IRH 202 History of Art II
Courses in Liberal Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences IRN 100* Interior Design Studio I
and the History of Design provide intellectual depth and IRN 200* Interior Design Studio II
breadth and prepare the graduate for the legal, social IRT 101 Design Technology I
and ethical responsibilities of professional practice.
LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table A.
Communication skills, emphasized throughout the * This course has a weight of 2.00.
program, focus on freehand drawing in varied colour
media and include manual drafting, CAD, writing and oral 3rd & 4th SEMESTER
presentation. REQUIRED:
Technology studies cover principles and practice, regu- IRC 201 Communications II
lations and standards of interior construction, fitment IRD 300 Design Dynamics III
detailing, material finishes, building services, incorporat- IRD 400* Design Dynamics Studio IV
ing ‘sustainable design’, barrier-free access and environ- IRH 101 History of Design I
mental health. IRN 300 Interior Design Studio III
The design dynamics courses in the first and second IRN 400 Interior Design Studio IV
years develop the theoretical and practical understand- IRT 201* Design Technology II
ing of the design process, creativity, design theory and
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
human factors engineering, with an emphasis on their
application in the studio and workshop. PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table II.
* This course has a weight of 2.00.
The Interior Design courses through all four years
involve the application and synthesis of all accumulated 5th & 6th SEMESTER
understanding and capabilities to develop competency
as the creative problem-solving interior designer. They REQUIRED:
culminate in the fourth year final project, utilizing and IRC 301 Communication III - Advanced Rendering
exercising each student’s area of greatest strength and IRH 201 History of Design II
inclination, which is publicly presented to a panel of pro- IRN 500* Interior Design Studio V
fessional designers and faculty. IRN 600* Interior Design Studio VI
Field trips of varying lengths form part of the formal cur- IRP 601 Professional Study Preparation
riculum and may occur in each of the years in connection IRT 301 Design Technology III
with one or more courses. PSY 217 Psychology and Design
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
Liberal Studies
PROFESSIONAL: Two courses from Table I.
Students must take three lower level liberal studies PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table II.
courses and three upper level liberal studies courses to
* This course has a weight of 2.00.
graduate.
7th & 8th SEMESTER
Minors
Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson (with REQUIRED:
exceptions), and are eligible for only one Minor. Please IRH 401 Design Seminar I
refer to the Minors Policy section of this calendar for IRH 402 Design Seminar II
further information on individual Minor requirements and IRN 700* Interior Design Studio VII
restrictions. IRN 800* Interior Design Studio VIII
IRP 701 Professional Study Practicum
The G. Raymond Chang School of Con�nuing Educa�on
Cer�ficates IRP 801 Professional Practice
IRT 401 Design Technology IV
Undergraduate students wishing to pursue a continuing
education certificate program should be aware of pos- IRT 501 Design Technology V
sible restrictions. Please refer to the Curriculum Advising LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table B.
website at www.ryerson.ca/curriculumadvising complete PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table I.
details. * This course has a weight of 2.00.

pg 112 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - INTERIOR DESIGN

PROFESSIONAL TABLE I
F. ONGUC-KLASSEN, BArch, Middle East Technical Univ., MArch, McG.,
A total of three courses is required. UIA, IDEC, ARIDO, NCIDQ #017308
M. PLASSE-TAYLOR, BID, Manit., MSc (Interior Design) Pratt Institute,
IDE 301 Furniture Design ARIDO, IDC, IDEC, NCIDQ #016409
IDE 302 Design Management J. SCALZO, BA, MA, PhD, Tor.
B. VOGEL, RCA, OAA, ARIDO
IDE 303 Housing in Society
IDE 304 Set Design Professor Emeriti/ae
IDE 305 Strategy in Interior Design P. G. GILBERT
IDE 306 Advanced Detailing T. E. HENRICKSON
IDE 307 Colour and Space D. JOHNSTON
L. KELLY
IDE 308 The Design Context
W. KILBORN
IDE 309 Sustainable Design J. H. KITAMURA
IDE 310 Advanced Portfolio Presentation D. G. TAYLOR
IDE 311 Facilities Management A. C. VASILEVICH
W. E. VINE
IDE 312 Technology of Historic Interiors
IDE 500 Selected Topics in Interior Design Advisory Council
IDE 501 Selected Topics in Interior Design
INGER BARTLETT
Partner
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE II Bartlett & Associates Ltd.
TRACY BOWIE
A total of two courses is required. VP of Sales
IIDEX/NeoConCan
CMN 313 Org Problem Solving and Report Writing MMPI Canada
CMN 314 Professional Presentations DIEGO BURDI
Principal
ENT 500 New Venture Startup Burdifilek
HST 723 The Material Cultures of North America LORAINE BUYAR
PSY 714 Visual Information Processing Market Manager, Architect & Design
Teknion Furniture Systems
RMG 100 Issues and Innovations in Retailing I
LINNEA CAIN
SOC 300 The Sociology of Diversity Account Executive
InterfaceFlor
NELLA FIORINO
FACULTY/ADVISORY COUNCIL Principal
Fiorino Design

Dean VICTORIA HOROBIN


Partner
Faculty of Communication & Design KBH Interior Design Inc.
D. DOZ RON T. HUGHES
Vice President, Sales
Associate Dean, Faculty and Student Affairs Teknion Furniture Systems
TREVOR KRUSE
G. MOTHERSILL Principal
Hudson Kruse
Associate Dean, SRC RORY PLANT
Regional Sales Director, Canada
A. GOODRUM Steelcase Canada Ltd.

Chair SUSAN MOLE


Partner
A. N. G. MITCHELL Mole White & Associates Ltd.
DAVID MORETTI
Associate Chair Sales Representative
Maharam
B. VOGEL
Honorary Members
Faculty
JOE PETTIPAS
L. DI CINTIO, BEnvDes, Tor., MArch, Cranbrook, ARIDO, IDEC HOK Canada
C. DOWLING, BID, Manit., BES, BArch, Wat. Senior Vice President
A. FURMAN, BAA, Ryerson, MArch, Br. Col., ARIDO, IDC, IDEC, NCIDQ Hospitality & Commercial Interiors
#017502 GLENN PUSHELBERG
A. KOLODZIEJ, MFA, Academy of Fine Arts, Poland, MArch, Technical President
University of Krakow, ARIDO, DGC, ZPAP Yabu Pushelberg
J. MACALIK, BEnvDes, MArch, Dal., NCIDQ #020055
A. N. G. MITCHELL, BA, Tor., DipAA, Sheridan College, ARIDO, IDC

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 113


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - JOURNALISM

Liberal Studies
JOURNALISM Students must take two lower level liberal studies
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Journalism (BJourn) courses and four upper level liberal studies courses to
graduate.
Administered by the School of Journalism
Minors
ADMISSION INFORMATION Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson (with
exceptions), and are eligible for only one Minor. Please
DEGREE: Four years of study following Grade 12 U/M refer to the Minors Policy section of this calendar for
graduation. further information on individual Minor requirements and
ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses restrictions.
including Grade 12 U English (ENG4U)/Anglais (EAE4U).
The G. Raymond Chang School of Con�nuing Educa�on
Candidates will be screened on the basis of their overall
Cer�ficates
Grade 12 U/M average (i.e., six Grade 12 U/M courses or
equivalent). Undergraduate students wishing to pursue a continuing
education certificate program should be aware of pos-
NOTES: sible restrictions. Please refer to the Curriculum Advis-
1. A minimum grade of 70 percent or higher will be ing website at www.ryerson.ca/curriculumadvising for
required in ENG4U/EAE4U. complete details.

2. Applicants are required to answer a questionnaire


BACHELOR OF JOURNALISM
on their journalism and life experience and submit a
300-word essay on a topic to be provided. A portfolio
1st & 2nd SEMESTER
of published work is encouraged. As part of the admis-
sion selection process, applicants must visit www. Revised Curriculum Commencing 2010-2011
ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/overview/ REQUIRED:
nonacademicrequirements for details about the non-
ENG 108 The Nature of Narrative I
academic requirements.
ENG 208 The Nature of Narrative II
3. A non-academic assessment fee of $50 CDN (sub- JRN 100 Information and Visual Resources for Journalists
ject to change) is required and will be requested by JRN 120 The Culture of News
Ryerson as applicable. JRN 121 Introduction to Reporting
4. Subject to competition, candidates may be required JRN 199* Grammar
to present averages/grades above the minimum. LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table A.
PROGRAM FOR UNIVERSITY GRADUATES: The PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III.
Journalism Program for University Graduates has been
* This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
discontinued. A Master of Journalism (MJ) is offered
through the School of Graduate Studies. Please refer to 3rd & 4th SEMESTER
www.ryerson.ca/graduate/journalism.
Revised Curriculum Commencing 2011-2012
PROGRAM OVERVIEW
REQUIRED:
Students are introduced to journalism as practised JRN 112 Introduction to Online Journalism
across all forms of media within the first two years, after JRN 124 Elements of Feature Writing
which they may choose courses to concentrate in a spe- JRN 125 Introduction to Television Journalism
cific medium (online, newspaper, magazine or broadcast)
LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table B.
or gain expertise in a cross-media skill such as editing, or
in a specific beat in journalism (including sports, business PROFESSIONAL: Two courses from Table II.
or international reporting).
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III.
After taking courses building skills and evaluating theo-
ries associated with journalism, students may finish their 5th & 6th SEMESTER
program with an internship at a professional news organi- Revised Program Commencing 2012-2013
zation and/or with the chance to produce our newspaper
(The Ryersonian), our magazine, (The Ryerson Review REQUIRED:
of Journalism), our online portal, or news and public af- JRN 123 Ethics and Law in the Practice of Journalism
fairs programs for radio and television. LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table B.
Students are coached and assisted by instructors drawn PROFESSIONAL*: Five one-count (or equivalent) courses from
from major newspapers, magazines, online news, and Table I.
television and radio networks. PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table II.
Students also take a variety of liberal studies and profes- PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III.
sionally related subjects. * Course selec�on must total a minimum of 15 hours.

pg 114 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - JOURNALISM

7th & 8th SEMESTER PROFESSIONAL TABLE I


Revised Program Commencing 2013-2014 Revised curriculum 2010-2011. A minimum of 12 hours must be
completed for graduation. Please verify course hours prior to
PROFESSIONAL*: One two-count course or two one-count
course selection. A total of 15 hours is recommended.
courses from either Table I or Table II.
Fall 2010 1st year Admits require a minimum of 15 hours
PROFESSIONAL: Three courses from Table IV.
from Table I.
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III.
JRN 201* Introductory Photojournalism
*Course selec�on must total a minimum of six hours. JRN 202 Copy Editing
JRN 203 Page Design for Print Media
BACHELOR OF JOURNALISM JRN 204 Infographics
Fall 2009 and Prior 1st Yr Admits JRN 302* Magazine Editing
JRN 303* Feature Reporting Workshop
3rd & 4th SEMESTERS JRN 304* Reporting for Newspapers Workshop
JRN 305* Online Reporting Workshop
Last Offered 2010-2011
JRN 306* Reporting for Radio Workshop
REQUIRED: JRN 310 TV Production Techniques
JRN 112 Introduction to Online Journalism JRN 314* Reporting for TV Workshop
JRN 124 Elements of Feature Writing JRN 315* Advanced Research Methods for Journalists
JRN 125 Introduction to Television Journalism JRN 316 The Freelance Career
LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table A. JRN 317 Exactly So: The Challenge of Precision
JRN 318 Basics of Radio Reporting
PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table II.
JRN 319 Special Topics in Journalism Practice
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III. JRN 320 Innovation Workshop

5th & 6th SEMESTERS * This course has a course count of two, and a course weight of 2.00.

Last Offered 2011-2012 PROFESSIONAL TABLE II


REQUIRED: A minimum of three courses are required and, at least one
JRN 123† Ethics and Law in the Practice of Journalism course must be taken from each of the three groupings below.
LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table B. All courses are three hours in length.

PROFESSIONAL*: A minimum of four one-count, or two two- One of:


count courses from Table I. It is recommended that this course selection be taken in 3rd and
PROFESSIONAL: Two one-count, or one two-count courses 4th semester.
from either Table I or Table II.
JRN 400 Critical Issues in Journalism
PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table II. JRN 401 History of Journalism
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table III. One of:
* Must total a minimum of 12 hours. It is recommended that this course selection be taken in 3rd and
† First offered in 5th and 6th semester 2010-2011. 4th semester.
JRN 402 Theory in Journalism and Mass Communications
7th & 8th SEMESTERS
JRN 403 Journalism and Ideas
Revised Program Commencing 2010-2011 JRN 404 Journalism’s Best
Last Offered 2012-2013 JRN 405 Special Topics in Journalism Theory
REQUIRED: One of:
JRN 123† Ethics and Law in the Practice of Journalism It is recommended that this course selection be taken in 5th and
LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table B. 6th semester.

PROFESSIONAL: One one-count course from either Table I or JRN 412 Documentary Survey
Table II. JRN 500 Journalism and the Arts
PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table II. JRN 501 Sampling the Beats
JRN 502 Journalism and the World of Business
PROFESSIONAL: Three courses from Table IV.
JRN 503 Critical and Opinion Writing
† Last offered in 7th & 8th semester 2010-2011.
JRN 504 Fashion Journalism
JRN 505 Health and Science Journalism
JRN 506 International Journalism
(Con�nued)

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 115


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - JOURNALISM

JRN 507 Justice and the Courts GEO 703 Perspectives on Environmental Management
JRN 508 Literary Journalism GEO 714 GIS for the Municipal Professional I
JRN 509 Journalism and the Political Arena GEO 719 GIS in Business: Strategic Management Decisions
JRN 510 Reporting Religion GEO 803 Recreation and Tourism Analysis
JRN 511 News They Can Use GMS 402 Introduction to Managerial Economics
JRN 512 Reporting Sports HST 581 Canada, The Origins of Conflict
HST 681 Canada, Defining a Nation
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE III INP 900 Intro to the Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector
A total of four courses is required. Students may substitute, MHR 405 Org Behaviour and Interpersonal Skills
upon approval of the School, any undergraduate course, subject MHR 522 Industrial Relations
to course requisites. MHR 523 Human Resources Management
CRM 400 Aboriginal Governance/Justice PHL 400 Human Rights and Justice
ECN 104 Introductory Microeconomics PHL 449 Issues in the Philosophy of Punishment
ECN 204 Introductory Macroeconomics POG 100 People, Power and Politics
ECN 220 Evolution of the Global Economy POG 110 Canadian Politics
ECN 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics I POG 210 Canadian Government
ECN 321 Introduction to Law and Economics POG 225 Global Governance
ECN 501 Industrial Organization POG 310 Ontario Politics
ECN 502 Economics of Natural Resources POG 313 Race and Ethnicity in Canada
ECN 504 Intermediate Microeconomics I POG 314 Controversial Policy Topics
ECN 506 Money and Banking POG 315 Equity and Human Rights
ECN 510 Environmental Economics POG 316 Social Policy
ECN 600 Intermediate Macroeconomics II POG 317 Education Politics and Policy
ECN 605 Labour Economics POG 320 Social Identity and Citizenship
ECN 606 International Monetary Economics POG 323 The Politics of Development
ECN 614 An Introduction to Game Theory POG 330 Western Political Thought
ECN 700 Intermediate Microeconomics II POG 340 Intro to Comparative Politics
ECN 703 Public Finance I POG 410 Canadian Urban Politics
ECN 707 Economics of International Trade POG 411 Canadian Foreign Policy
ECN 710 Transportation Economics POG 412 Government and the Economy
ECN 803 Public Finance II POG 415 Environmental Politics and Policy
ENG 200 Writing as a Cultural Act POG 416 Canadian Federalism
ENG 222 Fairy Tales and Fantasies POG 417 Canadian-American Relations
ENG 224 Children’s Fiction POG 423 Nationalism and Identity
ENG 421 16C Literature and Culture POG 424 Human Rights and Global Politics
ENG 422 17C Literature and Culture POG 425 Regional Economic Integration
ENG 520 The Language of Persuasion POG 426 Contemporary Global Conflicts
ENG 531 18C Literature and Culture I POG 430 Contemporary Political Thought
ENG 532 18C Literature and Culture II POG 431 Power, Hegemony and Resistance
ENG 621 Reading Gender in a Global Context POG 440 Aboriginal Governance/Justice
ENG 624 20C Literature and Culture I POG 442 Women and Politics
ENG 626 20C Literature and Culture II POG 443 Global Cities
ENG 631 Reading/Writing Women POG 444 Politics, Media and Technology
ENG 632 19C Literature and Culture I POG 446 Voters, Elections, and Parties
ENG 633 19C Literature and Culture II PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology I
ENG 701 Studies in Canadian Literature PSY 108 Applied Problem Solving
ENG 703 Popular Literature of Sensation PSY 124 Social Psychology
ENG 705 Reading Visual Cultures SOC 25A/B* Media and Society
ENG 801 Canada on the World Stage SOC 104 Understanding Society
ENG 803 Popular Literature of Exploration SOC 300 The Sociology of Diversity
ENG 888 Televisual Texts of Contexts SOC 319 Sociological Perspectives on Crime
ENG 921 Narrative in a Digital Age SOC 402 The City and Social Problems
ENG 941 Gender and Sex in Literature and Culture SOC 500 Youth and Society
ENG 942 Postcolonial Interventions SOC 502 Violence and the Family
FIN 562 Personal Finance SOC 504 Children and Society

pg 116 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - JOURNALISM

SOC 525 Media in Images of Inequality W. REYNOLDS, BA, Calg., MA, Wat.
SOC 605 Canadian Families: Myth and Legal Reality I. SHAPIRO, B.Th (Hons.), S.A., MA, Capetown
J. E. SMITH, BA, Tor., MA, W. Ont., PhD, Natal
SOC 606 Work and Families in the 21st Century
V. SRIVASTAVA, BA, Tor., MSc, New School Univ.
SOC 608 Feminism and Society
SOC 609 Women and Human Rights Adjunct Professors
SOC 700 Men and Masculinities in the 21st Century B. BRUSER
* A mul�-term course. B. M. ROGERS , BA (Hons.), Qu. LLB, Tor.

Professor Emeriti/ae
PROFESSIONAL TABLE IV J. DOUGLAS
Revised Curriculum 2010-2011 D. GIBB
L. LIND
Three courses are required for graduation. Students may se- J. D. R. McCALLUM
lect all three from Group I; OR one course from Group I PLUS J. MILLER
two courses from Group II OR two courses from Group III. D. OBE
P. RUSH
Group I: D. TUDOR
JRN 800 TV Documentary Advisory Council
JRN 801 Radio Documentary
JRN 805 Senior Reporting ARNOLD AUGUSTE
Publisher
JRN 806 Advanced Feature Writing Share Newspaper
JRN 807 Advanced Photojournalism STEVE HURLBUT
Director of News Programming
Group II: CITY-TV
JRN 808 Magazine Production ROBERT HURST
President, News
JRN 950* Magazine Masthead CTV Inc.
Group III: JIM JENNINGS
The Globe and Mail
JRN 850* Internship
TRINA McQUEEN
JRN 902* Television Masthead President
JRN 903* Newspaper Masthead Hutton Belleville Inc.
CYNTHIA REYES
JRN 905* Online Masthead Vice President
* Enrollment in these courses may require an interview. Pro Media International Inc.
MARY SHEPPARD
Executive Producer
FACULTY/ADVISORY COUNCIL CBC Online

Dean
Faculty of Communication & Design

D. DOZ

Associate Dean, Faculty and Student Affairs

G. MOTHERSILL

Associate Dean, SRC

A. GOODRUM

Chair

to be determined

Faculty

G. ALLEN, BA, Tor., MA, York, (Can.), PhD, Tor.


K. AL-SOLAYLEE, MA, Keele Univ., PhD, Nott.
M. BARBER, BA (Hons.), McG., MA, Tor.
J. CARR-LOCKE, BA, C’dia, BEd, MA, Tor.
L. CUNNINGHAM, BA, Tor., MA, York (Can.)
A. GOODRUM, BSc, Radio-Television-Film, MLISc, Texas, PhD, North Texas
S. KELMAN, BA, MA, Tor.
P. KNOX, BA, MA, Br. Col.
A. LINDGREN, BJ, Car., Dip. Graduate Inst. of Int’l Studies, Geneva
A. McNEILLY, BA, Qu. MA, W. Ont.
J. NEIL, BJ, MA, Car.
A. RAUHALA, BA, Tor., BAA, Ryerson, MA, Tor.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 117


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - PERFORMANCE

The four-year Acting and Dance programs offer an inten-


PERFORMANCE ACTING sive conservatory approach in performance complement-
PERFORMANCE DANCE ed by academics which are a crucial part of the program
PERFORMANCE PRODUCTION curriculum. Actors and dancers spend a portion of each
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) day in the studio, and each year brings fresh opportuni-
ties to perform in productions of original, innovative and
Administered by the Theatre School
established works. The program trains performers who
are distinguished by their capacity to generate original
ADMISSION INFORMATION artistic material and their ability to bring a rich mixture of
skills into the multi-disciplinary environment. Graduates
DEGREE: Four years of study following Grade 12 U/M of the program will be ready for immediate entry into a
graduation. wide range of performance-related careers and for future
ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses professional growth.
including:
The four-year Production program is designed for those
Performance Acting: Grade 12 U English. who wish to become professionals in the production
areas of the performing arts/entertainment industries
Performance Dance: Grade 12 U English.
– design, artisan, technical, production management and
Performance Production: Grade 12 U English. arts administration, publicity and promotion, as well as
NOTES: manufacturing and sales. A rigorous balance of aca-
demic and production work is integral to all four years. As
1. ENG4U/EAE4U is the preferred English. students progress, they assume positions of increasing
2. The minimum grade required in the subject prereq- responsibility for all facets of Theatre School dance and
uisite (normally in the 65-70 percent range) will be theatre productions. This brings them into close working
determined subject to competition. contact with the prominent professional directors, design-
ers and choreographers engaged by the School. As well,
3. Applicants will be expected to appear for an
Production students network with their acting and dance
entrance audition or in the case of Performance
Production an evaluation interview. As part of the colleagues in both the School’s shows and common
admission selection process, applicants must visit courses and form creative partnerships that can continue
www.ryerson.ca/undergraduate/admission/ beyond the School.
overview/nonacademicrequirements for details The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree awarded to our
about the non-academic requirements. Performance graduates is recognized internationally in
4. A non-academic assessment fee of $50 CDN (sub- the profession and gives the option of further pursuing
ject to change) is required and will be requested by studies at the graduate (Master’s) level.
Ryerson as applicable.
Toronto: Centre for Canadian Theatre and Dance
5. Dance applicants must demonstrate exceptional Toronto is one of the major centres of performing arts
physical ability and possess a satisfactory back- activity in North America and Ryerson, located in the
ground of training in dance (minimum of five years of heart of Toronto, offers students unsurpassed access to
ballet, jazz and/or modern technique is preferred).
shows, performers, and the theatre environment. With
6. Subject to competition, candidates may be required more than 125 professional dance and theatre compa-
to present averages/grades above the minimum. nies, commercial and non-profit, producing over 10,000
live dance and theatre performances per year, students
PROGRAM OVERVIEW have plenty of opportunity for theatre-going and inter-
The Ryerson Theatre School’s Performance programs action with working performers - the key to developing
in Acting, Dance and Production are highly respected discerning critical skills and to bring training into sharper
by the theatre, dance, and entertainment communi- focus.
ties across the country. With an emphasis placed on a
conservatory approach to training, the education our stu-
The Program of Study
dents receive, both practical and academic, is uniquely The Performance program challenges students with
rigorous and thorough. creative study, critical analysis, and exciting traditional
and innovative areas of application for their performance
The combination of intensive practical training and skill development.
academic university theory truly distinguishes Ryerson’s
Performance programs. While learning to achieve their In the tradition of all Ryerson programming, the program
professional goals, students gain a well-rounded edu- offers a very strong conservatory perspective to the
cation in the humanities and liberal arts. They develop theoretical exploration of dance or acting. There is a wide
valuable skills in problem solving, adaptability, critical variety of practical/studio work, active learning projects,
thinking, research, and communication. These skills and performance-related assignments. Everyone has
are essential for success in the current arts and cultural the opportunity to perform under the guidance of working
industry and they enrich all facets of the student’s life. professionals who are leaders in the artistic community.

pg 118 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - PERFORMANCE

The Core Years - Ac�ng of Film, Dance Pedagogy, Audition preparation, Acting,
The Acting Program provides a multidisciplinary per- Staging the Theatrical Production, Musical Theatre Rep-
spective to performing through a varying combination of ertoire, Dance Criticism and many other courses.
studies in theatre, film, television, voice, music, acting
The Core Years - Produc�on
and dance, including all aspects of movement training. A
number of theatrical productions staged annually at Ryer- The first two general years of the Production program
son bring classroom theory to life. introduce the student to the multi-disciplinary and col-
laborative nature of production work. In core courses
Experienced directors are invited to stage and rehearse consisting of lectures and labs, students learn the basics
well-known theatrical works for annual fully produced of the skills required to mount a show and apply those
mainstage presentations, open to the public. Students skills in junior capacities on the School’s shows. Lecture
also have opportunities to present their own original courses include instruction in the management of the
works. process, theatre history and the research skills required
for critical thinking.
The first two years introduce the fundamentals of theatre
performance which include courses in Anatomy of In the third and fourth years, through a large menu of
Movement, Film Studies, Time-lines of Performance lecture and lab electives, students concentrate on those
History, Performance Arts in Canada, Music, Acting, areas where their interests are greatest. They take the
Production Techniques, Elements of Performance and gained knowledge with the skills learned in their first two
Creative Performance Studies. Through these foundation years and apply both to their duties in more senior posi-
courses, students learn to critically approach their work, tions on the School’s various dance and theatre produc-
to develop entrepreneurial initiative, and to find joy in the tions. Academic courses broaden the understanding of
creative process. the holistic process required for producing. Students also
take business and management electives to broaden
In the third and fourth years students engage in a Period their understanding of those issues.
Study, Clown Project, courses in Commedia dell’Arte and
Character Masks. The students may further refine their Advanced Courses
career goals through professional and professionally The advanced courses offered by the Ryerson Theatre
related electives. Students may choose to focus on Busi- School are unique opportunities for special students to
ness and Marketing oriented courses such as Entrepre- work in Stage Design, Directing, Playwriting and Dance,
neurship, New Venture Startup and Promotion. Elec- under the guidance of professionals in a complete theatre
tives are also available in the more traditional theatrical environment.
applications of Film, Vocal or Dance Pedagogy, Audition
preparation, Jazz. Staging the Theatrical Production, Mu- Admission to these courses is based on audition and/or
sical Theatre Dance Repertoire, Dance Styles: Historical portfolio of the applicant’s work and on a special project
to be discussed at the interview. It is assumed that appli-
Period or Modern Social and many other courses.
cants are already experienced in these areas. Students
The Core Years - Dance are selected on the basis of background and talent, and
have individual timetables prepared according to their
Throughout the four years of study, the Dance Program
own needs and wishes. Students may be required to take
offers intensive professional training with daily dance
other Theatre School courses where their knowledge is
classes in ballet, jazz, and modern dance. It is designed
limited, and may be permitted to take other courses at
to develop versatile dance professionals prepared for im-
Ryerson provided they have the prerequisite knowledge.
mediate entry into the performance industry, arts educa-
tion, and multi-media entertainment. Graduates in Demand
Well-known, experienced choreographers are invited to Students graduate with an entrepreneurial spirit and a
create, stage, and rehearse their works for annual fully wealth of versatile career skills. Their performance skills
produced mainstage presentations, open to the public. ensure that they are well-equipped to enter the Perform-
There is also an annual choreographic workshop featur- ing Arts and entertainment sector which includes The-
ing the students’ own original creations. atre, Dance Companies, Musicals, Videos, Cruise Lines,
The first two years introduce the fundamentals of theatre Commercials, Industrials, Film. Their exposure to the
performance including courses in Improvisation, Anatomy entrepreneurial dimensions of the Performing Arts equips
of Movement and Lifestyle, Time-lines of Performance them to function as a freelance artist, or as a member of
History, Performance Arts in Canada, The Rudiments creative companies.
of Music, a Dance History, and the Basics of Theatrical
Liberal Studies
Production and Creative Performance. Through these
foundation courses students learn to critically approach Students must take three lower level and three upper
their work, to develop an entrepreneurial initiative, and to level liberal studies courses to graduate.
find joy in the creative process.
Minors
In the third and fourth years students may further refine
Students may pursue any Minor offered by Ryerson (with
their career goals through professional and professionally
exceptions), and are eligible for only one Minor. Please
related electives. Students may choose to focus on Busi-
refer to the Minors Policy section of this calendar for
ness and Marketing oriented courses such as Entrepre-
further information on individual Minor requirements and
neurship and New Venture Startup. Electives are also
restrictions.
available in the more traditional theatrical applications

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 119


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - PERFORMANCE

The G. Raymond Chang School of Con�nuing Educa�on 5th & 6th SEMESTER
Cer�ficates
REQUIRED:
Undergraduate students wishing to pursue a continuing
education certificate program should be aware of pos- THF 31A/B Creative Performance Studies III
sible restrictions. Please refer to the Curriculum Advis- REQUIRED GROUP 1: Two courses from the following (one of
ing website at www.ryerson.ca/curriculumadvising for two pairs):
complete details. THA 300†* Performance Tech I: Acting
Bachelor of Fine Arts THA 301†* Performance Tech II: Acting
ACTING/DANCE OR
THD 300¶* Performance Tech I: Dance
1st & 2nd SEMESTER THD 301¶* Performance Tech II: Dance

REQUIRED: LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table B.


THF 10A/B Music I: Introduction PROFESSIONAL: Two courses from Table I.
THF 11A/B Creative Performance Studies I PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table II.
THF 100 Anatomy of Movement and Lifestyle I
† Required for students in Performance Ac�ng.
THF 101 Elements of Production I ¶ Required for students in Performance Dance.
THF 200 Time Lines of Performance History I * This course has a weight of 2.00 and will require addi�onal hours of
warm-ups, workshops and produc�on requirements.
THF 201 Time Lines of Performance History II NOTE: Addi�onal Advanced Professional courses are available with
REQUIRED GROUP 1: Two courses from the following (one of special permission of the School.
two pairs):
THA 100†* Fundamentals of Tech I: Acting 7th & 8th SEMESTER
THA 101†* Fundamentals of Tech II: Acting
REQUIRED
OR
THF 400 Creative Performance Studies IV
THD 100¶* Fundamentals of Tech I: Dance
THF 401 Independent Study Seminars
THD 101¶* Fundamentals of Tech II: Dance
REQUIRED GROUP 1: Two courses from the following (one of
LIBERAL STUDIES: Two courses from Table A.
two pairs):
† Required for students in Performance Ac�ng. THA 400†* Adv Performance Tech I: Acting
¶ Required for students in Performance Dance.
* This course has a weight of 2.00 and will require addi�onal hours of THA 401†* Adv Performance Tech II: Acting
warm-ups, workshops and produc�on requirements. OR
THD 400¶* Adv Performance Tech I: Dance
3rd & 4th SEMESTER THD 401¶* Adv Performance Tech II: Dance

REQUIRED: LIBERAL STUDIES**: One course from Table B.


FPN 200 The Moving Image in Performance I PROFESSIONAL: Two courses from Table I.
THF 20A/B Music II: Singing
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table II.
THF 21A/B Creative Performance Studies II
† Required for students in Performance Ac�ng.
THF 204 Performing Arts in Canada ¶ Required for students in Performance Dance.
REQUIRED GROUP 1: Three courses from the following (one * This course has a weight of 2.00 and will require addi�onal hours of
warm-ups, workshops and produc�on requirements.
of two pairs):
** Offered in Fall term.
THA 200†* Intermediary Tech I: Acting NOTE: Addi�onal Advanced Professional courses are available with
THA 201†* Intermediary Tech II: Acting special permission of the School.
THF 403† Landmarks in Canadian Theatre
OR
THD 200¶* Intermediary Tech I: Dance
THD 201¶* Intermediary Tech II: Dance
THF 404¶ Landmarks of Choreographic Development
LIBERAL STUDIES**: One course from Table A.
† Required for students in Performance Ac�ng.
¶ Required for students in Performance Dance.
* This course has a weight of 2.00 and will require addi�onal hours of
warm-ups, workshops and produc�on requirements.
** Offered in Fall Term.

pg 120 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - PERFORMANCE

PERFORMANCE ADVANCED COURSES PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE II


PERFORMANCE ACTING/DANCE
REQUIRED:
THA 628†¶ Acting Practicum II Students must successfully complete four courses from Table II
THD 151†† Dance Master Class I between 5th & 8th semester.
THD 251†† Dance Master Class II ENT 500 New Venture Startup
THG 32A/B* Staging the Theatrical Production FPN 201 The Moving Image in Performance II
THG 42A/B** Advanced Practicum in Production FSN 302 History of Costume I
* Op�onal course for 3rd year students in all Performance programs. HST 723 The Material Cultures of North America
Admission by interview, and permission of the Chair. This course may GMS 200 Introduction to Global Management
be subs�tuted, with permission, for a Professional (mul�-term) course,
by students in the Performance Produc�on program. MHR 405 Org Behaviour and Interpersonal Skills
** Op�onal course for Theatre School students; prerequisite THG 32A/B, MKT 100 Principles of Marketing
or special permission of the Chair. Open to mature students with ap-
MKT 300 Marketing Metrics and Analysis
propriate prerequisite professional experience or training. Hours vary
according to assignments. MKT 400 Understanding Consumers and the New Media
† A special intensive coaching and company produc�on appren�ce- MKT 500 Marketing Research
ship experience. Admission only by audi�on and permission of the
Chair. Offered during Spring/Summer term. MKT 510 Innovations in Marketing
†† These courses are open to mature students with appropriate MKT 600 Integrated Case Analysis
prerequisite training. Admission is by audi�on and permission of the MKT 700 Business Intelligence/Decision Modelling
Chair and is con�ngent upon available space.
¶ This course has a weight of 2.00. MUS 300 Musicology
THF 300 Anatomy of Movement and Lifestyle II
THF 402 Text Examination: Dramaturgy and Direction
PROFESSIONAL TABLE I THF 405 Human Development in the Arts
PERFORMANCE ACTING/DANCE THF 406 Performance Entrepreneurship I
Students must successfully complete the equivalent of four THF 408 Applications of Music in Performance
single-term courses from Table I, between 5th & 8th semester. THF 416 20th Century Performance Methods/Styles
The following courses will be offered in 2010-2011: THF 417 Dance, Writing and Criticism
THF 500 Performing Arts in the Media
THF 30A/B Dance Pedagogy: Children
THM 328 Theatre Management
THF 32A/B Vocal Pedagogy: Speech Arts
THF 33A/B Singing for Performers
THF 310 Audition Preparation Bachelor of Fine Arts
THF 311 Dance Styles: Historical Period PERFORMANCE PRODUCTION
THF 313 Special Topics
THF 314 Musical Theatre Repertoire 1st SEMESTER
THF 315 Drama/Dance in Education: Elementary
REQUIRED:
THG 32A/B Staging the Theatrical Production
THF 101 Elements of Production I
THG 42A/B Advanced Practicum in Production
THF 200 Time Lines of Performance History I
THP 312 Make-Up and Wiggery
THP 101* Production Technique I
The following courses will be offered in 2011-2012:
THT 100 Design Communication I
THF 32A/B Vocal Pedagogy: Speech Arts LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
THF 33A/B Singing for Performers
* This course has a weight of 2.00.
THF 40A/B Dance Pedagogy: Adolescence
THF 310 Audition Preparation 2nd SEMESTER
THF 313 Special Topics
THF 314 Musical Theatre Repertoire REQUIRED:
THF 411 Dance Styles: Modern Social THF 102 Elements of Production II
THF 415 Drama/Dance in Education: Secondary THF 201 Time Lines of Performance History II
THG 32A/B Staging the Theatrical Production THM 200 Production Communication I
THG 42A/B Advanced Practicum in Production THP 102* Production Technique II
THP 312 Make-Up and Wiggery THT 200 Design Communication II
* This course has a weight of 2.00.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 121


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - PERFORMANCE

3rd SEMESTER PROFESSIONAL TABLE I


PERFORMANCE PRODUCTION
REQUIRED:
IDF 201 Fundamentals of Design Theory A total of eight courses is required between 5th and 8th semes-
ters. Courses are offered in alternating years. Some courses
THF 403 Landmarks in Canadian Theatre
are companion courses and it is advised that they be taken to-
THM 300 Production Communication II
gether. Please contact the Theatre School for more information.
THP 201* Production Technique III
The following courses will be offered in 2010-2011:
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A.
FSN 302 History of Costume I
* This course has a weight of 2.00.
THG 32A/B Staging the Theatrical Production
4th SEMESTER THM 114 Advanced Stage Management
THM 301 Technical Direction
REQUIRED: THM 303 Administration Special Topics
THF 204 Performing Arts in Canada THM 327 Theatre Administration
THF 501 Research Methods THM 503 Tour Administration
THP 202* Production Technique IV THP 312 Makeup and Wiggery
THT 418 Design Communication III THP 325 Theatre Costume
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table A. THP 328 Scenic Construction
* This course has a weight of 2.00. THP 337 Lighting Design
THP 422 Scenic Painting
5th SEMESTER THP 515 Theatre Safety
THP 612 Fabric Dyeing and Costume Painting
REQUIRED:
THP 648 Construction Special Topics
MUS 300 Musicology THP 748 Scenic Construction III
THP 301* Production Technique V THT 318 Set Design
THP 500 Conceiving the Production THT 383 Sound Design
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B. THT 500 Structure for Performing Arts
PROFESSIONAL: Two courses from Table I. THT 893 Sound Special Topics

* This course has a weight of 2.00. Students may take up to two courses offered by the University
outside the Theatre School and approved by the School.
6th SEMESTER The following courses will be offered in 2011-2012:

REQUIRED: FSN 302 History of Costume I


THG 32A/B Staging the Theatrical Production
THP 302* Production Technique VI
THM 114 Advanced Stage Management
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
THM 327 Theatre Administration
PROFESSIONAL: One course from Table I. THM 401 Production Management
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: Two courses from Table II. THP 303 Music for Theatre
* This course has a weight of 2.00. THP 315 Corsetry: History and Construction
THP 325 Theatre Costume
7th SEMESTER THP 328 Scenic Construction
THP 333 Costume: Special Topics
REQUIRED:
THP 337 Lighting Design
THP 401* Production Technique VII THP 404 Lighting Design Special Topics
PROFESSIONAL: Three courses from Table I. THP 422 Scenic Painting
PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED: One course from Table II. THP 515 Theatre Safety

* This course has a weight of 2.00. THP 538 Properties: Design and Construction
THP 843 Pyrotechnics
8th SEMESTER THT 319 Costume Design
THT 383 Sound Design
REQUIRED: THT 582 Power and Electricity in Theatre
THP 403* Production Technique VIII
THP 800 Independent Study
LIBERAL STUDIES: One course from Table B.
PROFESSIONAL: Two courses from Table I.
* This course has a weight of 2.00.

pg 122 Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - PERFORMANCE

PROFESSIONALLY-RELATED TABLE II I. PAUZER, MFA, York (Can.)


PERFORMANCE PRODUCTION N. POTTS
S. ROSEN, MA, Syr., BA, Roch.
A total of three courses is required from Table II. V. ST. DENYS, MA, York (Can.)
P. SCHNEIDERMAN, BA, McG.
Select two courses:
Professor Emeriti/ae
ENT 500 New Venture Startup
LAW 529 Employment and Labour Law J. C. BLACK
MHR 405 Org Behaviour and Interpersonal Skills F. T. B. LOJEKOVA
I. MacGREGOR BANNERMAN
MHR 522 Industrial Relations B. MEESON
MKT 100 Principles of Marketing
Advisory Council
MKT 300 Marketing Metrics and Analysis
MKT 500 Marketing Research DANNY AUSTIN
MKT 510 Innovations in Marketing Independent Dance Performer,
Choreographer and Director
MKT 600 Integrated Case Analysis
DAVID BAER
MKT 700 Business Intelligence/Decision Modelling President
Local 58, IATSE
THF 406 Performance Entrepreneurship I
ERIC COATES
Select one course: Ryerson Alumni
Artistic Director
ENG 108 The Nature of Narrative I Blyth Festival
ENG 208 The Nature of Narrative II ANDREW FLEMING
FSN 706 Fashion Event Planning Senior Partner
Ogilvy Renault
PSY 813 Psychology of Art and Creativity
MALLORY GILBERT
SOC 932 The Entertainment Industry Consultant, Volunteer
THF 404 Landmarks of Choreographic Development MICHAEL HARRIS
Managing Partner
NOTE: At the Program’s discre�on, students with a strong Academic Canadian Institute for Theatre Technology
Standing may take up to two other courses offered by the University in
place of courses listed above. Students must obtain prior approval. EDA HOLMES
Director, Choreographer
MARY JAGO-ROMERIL
Former Principal Dancer
FACULTY/ADVISORY COUNCIL National Ballet of Canada
JANINE PEARSON
Head of Voice
Dean
Stratford Festival
Faculty of Communication & Design
FIONA REID
D. DOZ Actor
KELLY ROBINSON
Associate Dean, Faculty and Student Affairs Ryerson Alumni
Director of Creative Development
G. MOTHERSILL Mirvish Productions
SANDRA ROBINSON
Associate Dean, SRC Ryerson Alumni
Director of Operations
A. GOODRUM Hummingbird Centre for the Performing Arts

Chair SHAUNA SEXSMITH


Vice President
to be determined Senior Portfolio Manager
Manulife Financial
Associate Chair PETER SMITH
Architect
S. ROSEN Lett-Smith Architects

Program Directors

C. ASHPERGER, Performance Acting


N. POTTS, Performance Dance
S. DOLGOY, Performance Production
T. MENDES, Performance Production

Faculty

C. ASHPERGER, MA, PhD, Tor.


S. DOLGOY, MA, York (Can.)
K. DUPLISEA, MA, BFA, Hon. in Dance, York (Can.)
I. A. LEVINE, BA, Roch., MA, PhD, Tor.
T. MENDES, MA, Tor., BFA (Hons.), York (Can.)
C. O’BRIEN, BA, St. Thomas (NB), BHomeEcon(ED) in Clothing and
Textiles, Mt.St.Vin.

Ryerson University Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar 2010-2011 — www.ryerson.ca/calendar pg 123


FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION & DESIGN - SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION / RADIO AND TELEVISION

SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION


RADIO AND TELEVISION
The School of Professional Communication offers pro-
fessional communication courses to Ryerson programs. Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Arts (BA)
Offerings are individually tailored to meet the com- Administered by the School of Radio and Television
munication demands of students’ prospective careers.
Courses focus on the development and application of
analytical, organizational, and stylistic skills in a wide ADMISSION INFORMATION
range of oral and written communication situations.
DEGREE: Four years of study following Grade 12 U/M
The School also administers a Minor in Business Com- graduation.
munication.
ADMISSION: O.S.S.D. with six Grade 12 U/M courses
including Grade 12 U English