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Drainage guide for

the Commercial kitchen

www.aco-kitchendrainage.co.uk
1

2.1. Floor drainage


2.1.1 Floor drainage functionality
2 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen
3

Contents

1. Introduction

2. Drainage types

3. Kitchen areas

4. Product portfolio

5. Installation examples

6. Cleaning and
Maintenance

7. Material properties

8. Kitchen drawing
examples
4 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen
5

1. Introduction
1. Introduction

1.1 The ACO group

1.2 T
 he commercial
kitchen: a hazardous
environment

1.3 H
 ygiene, Health
& Safety

1.4. Flexible product


portfolio
6 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

1.1 The ACO group

With over 60 years experience in the design and manufacture of drainage components ACO
have developed a unique global competence that has resulted in development of innovative
and award winning products. As a recognised leader in many of our markets, our success
is attributable to anticipating and understanding our customer needs: whether a large
international producer or independent local operator, our resources extend to provide the levels
of service and product excellence that are only possible from global research, development and
production facilities that are implemented with local considerations in mind.

ACO – focus on hygiene


ACO is one of the world’s leading drainage specialists. We are familiar with HACCP and the
prerequisites, including suitable drainage, which underpins it. We are thus committed to
implement the requirements of the food industry into our product’s design and development
to meet the sector’s needs on a risk reduction basis. Furthermore we are active in cooperation
with major European institutions such as the EHEDG (European Hygienic Engineering & Design
Group) or FCSI (Fooodservice Consultants Society International) who have expertise in hygienic
design and commercial kitchen operations.
7

1. Introduction
1.2 The commercial kitchen:
a hazardous environment

All commercial kitchens can be characterised as a “hazardous working environment” they


are extremely busy with the potential for wet and greasy floors due to the abundance of
liquids in both the cooking and cleaning processes, and of course, liquids are often very hot!

In combination, these factors may affect Food Safety and Health & Safety
aspects of the kitchen.

There are three principle areas in the commercial kitchen: storage and preparation,
production, washing and disposal area. Each area represents different processes in the
Commercial kitchen environment and therefore place different demands on floor drainage.
Nevertheless there are some aspects which are common for all three. All areas have
high demands on durability, long-life time, hygienic parameters and proper function of all
drainage elements.
8 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Storage and preparation area


Storage areas represent all rooms where the food is stored such as deep freeze rooms, cold
rooms, and storage rooms. Food storage areas will require occasional clean down as part of
either a planned cleaning programme or in case of spillage.
The preparation of food involves washing, paring or peeling, cutting, trimming or shaping.
All these operations produce food debris, many use water either in automated machinery or
manually in a sink.

Production area
The busy heart of the kitchen, where potentially most slips & falls can occur, requires the
strategic positioning of floor drainage to aid in the removal of water that is  being used
in, or discharged from specialist cooking equipment such as Bratt Pans, Boiling Pans and
Combination Ovens.

Washing and disposal area


Ware washing operations involve the removal of residual food, scraping, pre-soaking, rinsing
and washing stages. Care must be taken to reduce the build up of fats oils and grease (FOG)
in  drainage plumbing and simply wiping off food residues can have a dramatic impact on
the overall system. However every kitchen should have a proper FOG management strategy,
ideally using EN certified Grease Separators.
9

1. Introduction
1.3 Hygiene, Health & Safety

HACCP
Efficient drainage assists in managing risk: operationally, it helps prevent accidents;
hygienically, it is required by European Law - EC 852, and is embodied within the
HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point) framework through the Prerequisite
Programme (PRP). Illustrating adequate drainage design together with appropriate
cleaning and maintenance procedures within the PRP is the prime objective of this guide.
This process should also form part of the Design Risk Analysis for any building design.

To incorporate these requirements ACO focus on three principle attributes in product


conception and design:
■ Hygienic design features
■ Safety features
■ Durability and functionality features

Hygiene design features


■ Easy clean design
■ Appropriate materials (corrosion resistant in aggressive environments)
■ Accessibility for cleaning
■ Minimisation of bacteria traps
■ Simple food debris collection and removal
■ Design with maintenance in mind
■ Protection against odour and backflow
10 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Safety features:
■ Slip resistant surfaces
■ Efficient surface water removal
■ Products specific to kitchen equipment type
■ Ergonomic convenience enabling regular maintenance

Durability and functionality features:


■ Self draining gradients
■ Optimal surface area to flow rate where high interception is required
■ Accessibility to ongoing drainline
■ Fully pickle passivated to enhance corrosion resistance
■ Tested and certified to EN 1253 (gullies) and EN 1433 (channels)
■ Fat and grease removal to EN 825
11

1. Introduction
1.4. Flexible product portfolio

At ACO we go the extra mile to make sure your needs are accommodated. Whether your
project is new-build or refurbishment our design advice and product range meet all your
drainage needs – internally and externally.

Whether you are the client, the designer or contractor it’s likely you will value two key
attributes:
■ Flexibility
■ Economy

These are often conflicting requirements; however we believe our sophisticated production
facilities and investment in our skilled design team allow us to deliver on both measures.
Stainless steel products can be segregated into three categories:

Standard
We hope to have a product that meets your application need precisely. Many of our
products are modular in that they can be part of a larger system – such detail in our
product range assists the designer and contractor who no longer need wait for a ‘special
branch channel’ or ‘corner unit’. The product is defined in our catalogues with a part
number. Generally it is held in stock and available for immediate delivery. Products are
designed and tested in accordance with relevant national standards.

Modified
We can tailor many of our standard stainless steel products to your exact requirements
with minimum impact on cost and delivery time. The product allows variation to a number
of dimensions, dimension parameters are given at www.acobd.co.uk. Examples include
drainage channels that need to fit precisely in a given space, or are required to intercept
unusual quantities of liquid.

Bespoke
ACO’s competence in drainage is world renowned, generally market leading companies
have little flexibility in their offer. ACO has chosen a different path with key competence
centres and experts at your disposal to offer advice and design on your special drainage
product requirements.
12 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen
13

2. Drainage types

2. Drainage types
2.1 Floor drainage

2.2 Drainage management


14 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

2.1. Floor drainage


2.1.1 Functionality

Floors must be designed so that any liquids present on the floor are quickly and safely removed.
This can be achieved with a floor gradient to the drainage point in the order of 1–1.5%.
Floor drain capacity must be adequate for the intended application. Overall drain capacity
can be affected by combination of factors including hydraulic head, outlet size, grating
design, filter basket or sieve design and any foul air trap provision. Generally specify more
capacity than is required to accommodate any debris build up between cleaning cycles, and
in the longer term, changes in the scale of the operation or use of the area.
The surface of all gullies and channels should have the same slip resistance as the adjacent
floor. The surface should be designed so that larger quantities of fluid can be discharged
smoothly and splashing of the fluid is substantially prevented.
When selecting grates or covers consider the cleaning conditions of the environment,
together with chemical use.

Floor drainage systems offer a number of functions broadly defined as


■ interception

■ conveyance

■ barrier

Product types such as gullies, slot, box and tray channels exhibit different levels of each of
these functions in combination.

Interception
A primary function of a drain is the Interception of fluids produced in operational or cleaning
processes. The property of interception can be related to the efficiency of surface fluid
removal: products with high interception remove fluids over a wide area quickly. The type
of drainage selected – gully or channel, will depend on the nature of the operation and its
requirements. Channels simplify floor gradients and offer better interception than gullies.
A good example of the interception benefits of even small channel lengths is given by
considering the use of a floor wipe blade - it is far easier to move cleaning liquids to a 1m
channel than a single gully. Ideally drains should be positioned near the source with space
allowing access for cleaning and maintenance.
15

2. Drainage types
■ Tray channel. Highest interception potential, large fluid flows, minimal or zero fluid passover.
■ Box channel. Medium interception potential.
■ Slot channels have a lower interception capability due to greater fluid pass-over potential
however the effect is negated if the slot channel is positioned in the floor valley (low point).
■ Gully. Lowest interception potential, but often adequate if sited at point of discharge.
■ Tundish Intercepts surface and above surface fluids locally. They prevent splashing
which is useful where the fluid is potentially hazardous; for example hot, condensate
based or fluid laden with oils.

Conveyance
Conveyance relates to the physical movement of fluid, it may take place in a sealed system
such as a pipe, or in an open system such as a Box Channel. Conveyance in a channel is
related to gradient – channels with built-in-fall increase conveyance rate. Conveyance of
fluids across the floor ideally should be completely avoided.

■ Box channel. Highest conveyance potential. In channel conveyance minimises drainage


invert and may help in retrofit applications.
■ Slot channels offer medium conveyance due to physical size and therefore capacity.
■ Tray channel. Low conveyance potential limited by one piece nature of the tray.
■ Gully. Conveyance only to ongoing drainage pipework.
 arrier
B
Prevention of fluids impacting other areas
■ Box channel. Most adaptable system for drainage between rooms, narrow or slot


systems especially are suitable for the expected high traffic load.
■ Tundish components provide a localised barrier.


■ Tray channel. May provide a barrier but large grating areas are not ideal for regular


traffic.
■ Gully. Not generally suitable as a barrier system unless combined with a Tundish for


above surface drainage.


16 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

2.1.2 Types

Gullies
A single unitary or point drain comprising a body that houses the grating or Tundish, foul
air trap, connecting spigot, and accessories such as debris baskets. Gully spigots may be
vertically or horizontally orientated – selection depends on building design and pipework
dimensions. Gully bodies can be one piece or two-part telescopic. One piece gullies offer
better hygienic performance, two-part systems allow for membrane bonding or clamping for
intermediate water and damp proof layers.
The gully may serve specific items of equipment (steamers, combination ovens, cold rooms
etc) normally sited behind or to one side of the equipment and away from circulation routes.
The Tundish is required where prevention of splashing is important. European standard for
gullies is EN 1253.
17

2. Drainage types
Tray channels
It is often difficult to accurately locate a run of several gullies to match individual outlet
locations – the use of a stainless steel preformed gullies with single trapped outlet
overcomes the problems of location and produces a more hygienic solution. The difference
between a box and tray channel is the tray channel body is a one-piece construction, which
is then connected to a gully body. These systems tend to be wider and therefore offer
excellent interception of large ‘point’ fluid discharges. They are less suitable to areas of
frequent high load. Semi-bespoke gives the convenience of specifying dimensions to match
equipment. European standard for tray channels is EN 1253.
18 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Slot channels
Slot channels offer a modular system that is both robust and discrete and ideal where
gratings are not required. Suited to lower flows, they make ideal barrier systems between
wet and dry areas. They are suitable for regular traffic due to minimal surface area and
simple design. European standard for slot channels is EN 1253 and in addition we test and
certify our channels to the stringent requirements of EN 1433.
19

2. Drainage types
Box channels
Box channels offer a modular – bolt together system that can be assembled on-site to
specific requirements. Available in built-in-fall or level invert. Where regular fluid removal is
required a built-in-fall system should be used. Level inverts suffice where the main function
is to act as a barrier. Popular sizes are 125 and 200 mm grating widths, though the semi
bespoke offering can include wider systems. A key attribute is accessibility enabling more
effective cleaning - important in applications where residues are likely to accumulate in
the channel. These systems are among the most versatile, offering high interception and
conveyance capacities. European standard for Box Channels is EN 1253 and in addition we
test and certify our channels to the stringent requirements of EN 1433.
20 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Tundishes
The Tundish is required where prevention of splashing or aerosol formation is important.
The Tundish also provides a vital air gap between the equipment and the drain, and is often
the preferred method for draining of combination ovens, steaming units, boilers and cafe
sets. Attached covers can be specified as a grating - to receive surface fluids, or solid – to
serve the connected equipment only.
21

2.2. Drainage management

2. Drainage types
2.2.1 Functionality

Once surface and equipment based liquids are intercepted and conveyed to a gully outlet
it is necessary to manage the wastewater proactively to prevent problem occurrence in
the building and in the receiving external drainage system. In the commercial kitchen, the
focus may be on only the local drain infrastructure, however, drainage should be considered
from a ‘system’ perspective in that moving a problem down the line ultimately creates the
potential for feedback: reduced capacity in sewers is now a recognised problem due to FOG
contamination, coupled with increased rainfall intensities, sewer backflow is becoming a
significant issue, especially where the facility is vulnerable because of its location.

Proactive drainage management helps mitigate problems at kitchen, building, local and
regional level. The net effect is more sustainable drainage – a credible aim for all!

Drainage management may be characterised functionally by considering:


■ Directing liquids

■ Managing wastewater quality

■ Providing protection

■ Maintainability

ACO’s range provides a true integrated system solution – from source to sewer. As with
floor drainage, many of the system component functions provide real benefit to drainage
‘adequacy’, and therefore might feature within the Prerequisite Programme (PRP) for an
integrated approach.

biological waste
Drainage management Lifting Grease Backflow
Pipe grease disposal
function station separators valves
traps units
Direction
Quality
Protection
Maintainability
22 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

■ Directing liquids
Once intercepted and conveyed to outlet point the liquid must be efficiently directed. ACO
Pipe provides the necessary components to manage direction for any kitchen application,
safely and hygienically. When used with ACO lifting stations liquids can be pumped over
significant distance with height gain.

■ Managing wastewater quality


Removal of FOG and sediments improves waste effluent quality. This is achieved by physical
separation, or in combination with biological processes. Many authorities now require
commercial kitchens to manage wastewater quality.

■ Providing protection
FOG treatment protects against reduced pipe capacity, possible flooding, and unhygienic
conditions those suit rodents, insects, other pests and bacteria. Lifting stations and
dedicated backflow valves prevent sewage ingress, and may also alert the operator of such
occurrence.

■ Maintainability
As well as preventing on-going drainage problems ACO systems often incorporate crucial
maintenance functions, relieving the necessity of manual intervention that often causes
unhygienic conditions.
23

2. Drainage types
2.2.2 Types

Grease separators
A comprehensive range addresses all size requirements within the EN 1825 specification,
with performance at or beyond the Standard’s requirement. Critically, separators can be
specified with varying degrees of sophistication: grease removal and cleaning maintenance
can be automated, minimising disruption in the busy catering environment. Separators are
tested and certified according to EN 1825 and therefore CE marked. European Standards
for Grease Separators are EN 1825 – Part 1 and EN 1825 – Part 2.
24 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Waste disposal systems


The ACO Waste-Jet system combines collection, processing and disposal all in one system:
the shredded food waste moves from the collection stations to the wet waste collection
system using low pressure suction, once there the food waste is prepared for further
treatment and to allow easy removal by recycling companies, by extracting its moisture.
In bio-gas systems further secondary conversion into raw materials takes place. European
Regulations for Food Waste Disposal are 1774/2002/EC, 852/2004/EC and 853/2004/EC.
25

2. Drainage types
Lifting plants
Lifting plants are used when the grease separator is installed below the backflow level.
EN 1825 requires a twin pump system to improve overall system reliability.
26 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Pipes
Stainless steel push-fit pipe system designed for grey or black water and are both
temperature and chemically tolerant. ACO Pipe offers 40+ years product life thanks
to stainless steel material. Easy installation and handling on site is ensured by push-fit
assembly. ACO Pipe is more hygienic, robust and durable when compared to plastic pipes
systems for gravity and vacuum drainage. European Standards for stainless steel pipes are
EN 1124–1 and EN 1124–2.
27

2. Drainage types
Access covers
Access covers provide quick and easy access to underground services and enable
decorative floor finishes to be maintained with minimal interference. Access covers are
easy to integrate in the overall design for supply and drainage installations to close off the
end of the structure.
Access covers are available in different load classes. They are watertight and odourtight.
European standard for access covers is EN 1253-4 and EN 124.
28 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen
29

3. Kitchen areas

3.1 Storage and


preparation area

3. Kitchen areas
3.2 Production area

3.3 Wash and


disposal area
30 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

3.1. Storage and preparation area


3.1.1 Description

Storage area
The goods receiving or stores area is the main location for the receipt of all goods delivered
to the catering facility including dry goods, oils, pre-packed foods, chilled & frozen foods,
and even cleaning products and chemicals. The location of this area will be close to the rear
of the building or service yard to accommodate the delivery vehicles and palletised loads.
Care should be taken to specify load class for gully or channel - see guidance on page 100.

Food storage areas will require occasional clean down as part of either a planned cleaning
programme or in the case of a spillage. In most circumstances capacity of the floor drain
need only accommodate low flows.The choice between channel and gully is dependent on
the nature of the operation, and what functional attributes are required – see the Floor
Drainage section for details.

Ideally the drainage unit will be accessible in the centre of an area or in entrance ways
as a barrier. They should not be under immobile equipment enabling easy cleaning and
maintenance of the drain itself. Gratings should be removable, but also allow mobile racks
and goods trolleys to travel easily over the system without risk of grating displacement.

Where Cold Storage rooms are used (coldrooms) local drainage is required for the evaporator
condensate water to be discharged. The ideal solution is an adjacent drainage gully complete
with a Tundish to prevent splashes and provide an air break to the main drainage.
31

Preparation area
The preparation of food involves washing, paring or peeling, cutting, trimming or shaping
and can be carried out in up to three separate areas:

3. Kitchen areas
■ Vegetable preparation area: where fresh vegetables are received, stored and
prepared prior to being forward to the production area.
■ Meat/Fish preparation area: will be closest to the cooking equipment where all
meat and fish can be prepared and limit cross contamination
■ General preparation areas: will be where all other food items will be prepared and
again will work closely with the production area

All these operations produce food debris and will use water either in automated machinery
or manually via a sink. Within the vegetable preparation area mobile sinks can be used to
transport the prepared goods to the cooking areas.
The drainage layout should ensure efficient surface water removal from within these areas
using centrally located Box Channels, with simple one way floor gradients.
The Box Channel’s narrow section may also aid staff safety and comfort as it is less likely
to be stood on whilst ensuring they will be easy to clean and maintain.
Dependant upon the size of the operation slot or Box Channel’s may be required at
entrance way thresholds to prevent the transfer of water to corridors and other areas, thus
reducing the risk of slips & falls.
Well designed systems should have a debris filter at the outlet, easily removable gratings,
and easily removable foul air trap.
32 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

3.1.2 Appliances

Coldrooms
A Coldroom is a pre-fabricated unit/room which stores food that requires refrigeration or
freezing to maintain the product at the required temperature. The walk in coldroom or
freezer will be constructed from 75mm – 100mm thick modular panels. Each panel will
have an insulation material foamed between two sheets of metal.
Coldrooms or freezers are specified with either local or remote refrigeration systems
(compressors).
Local refrigeration units are normally located on the ceiling of the room with remote
systems located at varying distances away from the room. Inside the room itself, normally
mounted on the ceiling, will be an evaporator which will blow constant cold air around the
room. The refrigeration process begins with the compressor. Gas is compressed until it
becomes very hot from the increased pressure. This heated gas flows through the coils
above the cold store, which allow excess heat to be released into the surrounding air.
Then the gas cools down to the point where it becomes a liquid. This liquid is then forced
through a device called an expansion valve which turns into a very cold, fast-moving mist,
evaporating as it travels through the coils into the store. This will produce condensation
within the evaporator and needs to be drained away.
It is normally recommended that some form of air break is used in the drainage discharge,
and this is where the ACO drainage should be used with a Tundish fitted externally.
It will not be acceptable to have this point within the coldroom.
33

3.1.3 Typical drainage products

3. Kitchen areas
ACO gully

ACO Box Channel

ACO pipe
34 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

3.1.4 Example layouts

Storage area
ACO Tundish Function
- interception of condensate
from coldroom

Wash hand basin

Coldroom

Wall
Bench ACO slot or Box
Channel Function -
barrier protection
ACO gully Function -
low volume interception
Sink Unit from various sources

4 Tier
Rack

4 Tier
Rack

Wall
Bench

4 Tier 4 Tier 4 Tier


Rack Rack Rack
35

Preparation area

3. Kitchen areas
ACO slot or boxchannel Function -
Barrier protection to other areas

Wash hand basin

Sink Unit
Insectocutor

ACO gully or Box


Channel Function -
low volume intercep- Wall
Bench
tion from various
Sink Unit sources

Vertical
Bowl
Chopper
Meat
Slicer

Upright Blast
Food Wall Chiller Wall
Refrigerator
Processor Bench Bench
36 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

3.2 Production area


3.2.1 Description

The production area of the kitchen is the main hub of the facility and is often located at the
centre of the whole catering operation. Its prime function is the cooking and finishing of food.
Greasy residues may accumulate steadily on surfaces including the floor, combined with
food spills this area exhibits a large potential for slips & falls. The strategic positioning of
floor drainage is crucial to facilitate cleaning and aid in the removal of water that is being
produced or discharged from specialist cooking equipment such as Bratt Pans, Boiling Pans
& Combination Ovens.
These appliances can also be used for the pouring of produce into containers so the sizing and
positioning of Box Channels, Tundishes or custom made gullies for these appliances must be
co-ordinated with the specialist designers or equipment manufacturers, otherwise splashing
can occur causing water, grease and food debris to be spread to the surrounding floor area.
The perimeter of the main cooking area would also further benefit from the strategic location
of smaller gullies or channels to facilitate the cleaning of the facility at the end of the cooking
period. A smaller kitchen where production volumes are not so high may rely on the specific
gullies only for this purpose.
Well designed systems should have the volume capacity sized to cope with appliance
discharge, debris filter at outlet, easily removable non slip gratings, and easily removable foul
air trap.
Ladder gratings are ideal for the high point loads that might be imposed in these areas.
37

3.2.2 Appliances

Boiling Pan
A Boiling Pan is a double-jacketed cooking vessel with an inner and outer skin. Between
these two skins the medium of steam and its condensation is used to provide a constant

3. Kitchen areas
heat over the whole area of the inner vessel. This steam is created by a steam generator
powered either by gas or electricity. The pan would normally have a heavily insulated
outer skin, and a double jacketed lid. Although named “Boiling Pan” these pieces of
equipment are rarely used to boil foods, but normally to gently simmer bulk dishes such
as custard, sauces, soups, or stews. Most Boiling Pans will have a fixed drain tap at the
bottom of the pan, which will be a wide mouthed tap for the drawing off of wet dishes
such as soups, sauces and custards. It is this drain tap that needs to be suitably catered
for with an with an appropriately sized and specified ACO tray channel to suit the volumes
being discharged from this appliance.
38 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Bratt Pan
Bratt Pans are deep, rectangular cooking vessels that typically have a counter-balanced pull
down lid. The heat source is direct to the underside of the vessel and can be gas or electric.
A Bratt Pan is able to carry out a range of cooking functions including braising, boiling,
steaming, poaching, stewing, and frying. Some models have a pressurised lid so that the
vessel can be used as a pressure cooking vessel. They all have a tilting feature, which
depending upon the size can be operated electrically or by a hand-driven mechanism. Food
product or liquids can be poured from the Bratt Pan through a “V” in the front top edge of
the vessel. It is this “V” that needs to be suitably catered for with an appropriately sized and
specified ACO tray channel to suit the volumes being discharged from this appliance.
39

Combination Ovens
The combination oven is probably one of the most versatile pieces of catering equipment
any kitchen can have. A combination oven uses either a dry heat or steam injection or

3. Kitchen areas
a combination of both to cook food in a variety of different formats. Breads, Cakes, Meat,
Vegetables and Fish can all be cooked in these ovens.
Regeneration (or the reheating) of food which has been pre-cooked and chilled, can
rapidly be brought up to serving temperature, making combination ovens ideal for a busy
banqueting or function facility, handling both ready-plated meals and multi-portion
containers.
Given the high temperatures that these ovens work to the drainage discharge can often be
in the form of stream or close to it, and therefore drainage connections should be in Copper
or Stainless Steel.
It is normally recommended that some form of air break is used in the drainage discharge,
and this is where the ACO drainage should be used with a Tundish fitted. In addition to the
cooking fluids and steam discharge by this appliance, at the end of each day or cooking
cycle the Combination Oven should run though a wash or clean down cycle using cleaning
products which are then discharged to the drain via the Tundish.
40 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Tilting Kettle
A Tilting Kettle is most commonly used within a catering operation to prepare many
different menu items, including soups, stews, gravies, puddings, sauces, pasta and rice.
A Tilting Kettle can also be used to braise meats, boil large quantities of water and reheat
food. Most Tilting kettles consist of an inner & outer stainless steel hemisphere which
are welded together. Between these two hemispheres is a jacket into which steam is
introduced. The steam entering the jacket condenses on the inner wall, which in turn
transfers the heat to the food being cooked.
Once the food has been cooked or reheated, the product will then need to be transferred to
a large trolley/pan. This will be carried out by the entire kettle body tilting forward pouring
out the liquid contents. Tilting will be achieved by either a manual handle crank or an
electric push button.
When the produce is poured out, this is where an ACO tray channel will need to be
strategically positioned to contain any spillages. The sizing and specification of this channel
or gulley is critical in supporting the volumes being discharged from the appliance.
41

3.2.3 Typical drainage products

3. Kitchen areas
ACO tray channel

ACO gully

ACO pipe
42 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

3.2.4 Example layouts


Bench
Production area
Wall cookline
Bratt
Pan

ACO tray channel


Primary function
-high volume Bratt Pan
interception

Bench

Bench

ACO Tundish
Extract canopy Function - interception
of waste discharge
from combi ovens
Bench
Bench

Oven range

Refrigerator
Bench

Sink Unit
43

Mid size cookline

ACO Tundish

3. Kitchen areas
Function - low volume
interception of waste
Boiling pan
Combi oven discharge from
combi oven

ACO tray channel


Primary function
- high volume
interception

Grill
Tilting kettle

Oven range

Bratt Pan

ACO tray channel


Primary function
- high volume
interception
Bench

Bratt Pan

Fryer
44 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Large scale cookline

Tilting kettle

Tilting kettle

ACO tray channel -


Primary function -high
volume interception

Boiling pan

Boiling pan

Boiling pan

Bratt Pan
45

3. Kitchen areas
46 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

3.3. Washing and disposal area


3.3.1 Description

Dishwash area
The ware-washing area will be the wettest area of the kitchen operation. The process will
involve the removal of residual food, space needed scraping, pre-soaking, rinsing and
washing stages.
Care must be taken to reduce the build up of fats, oils and grease (FOG) in drainage
plumbing (see drainage treatment), and while grease separators offer solutions, simply
wiping off food residues can have a dramatic impact on overall drainage functionality.
All drainage plumbing should be routed to a grease separator designed and tested in
accordance with EN 1825 parts 1 and 2, ideally situated close to source.
Floor drainage also features predominantly in these areas, specifically in front of larger
conveyor or ‘flight’ type washers, or centrally in any dishwash or potwash area
■ Box Channel runs are useful in front of ‘flight’ type dishwashers
■ wastewater should be treated for removal of fats, oils and grease (local regulations vary -
check with your local authority)
■ wastewater should be treated for removal of food debris and ideally sediment or debris
baskets should be used at the outlet in every gully or channel run.
47

Disposal area
This area (when included within a facility) shall be accessible from the kitchen area and
also directly from the external yard to allow removal of the waste without the requirement

3. Kitchen areas
for entering the kitchen. Ideally the disposal area will be separated from preparation and
storage areas. It shall be used to store waste for short durations prior to being collected for
recycling or disposal.
Due to the high risk of food liquids and other substances being spilt or deposited on the
floor internal & external disposal areas or rubbish stores must have a drainage gully with
slip resistant gratings and the means to clean the area.
External areas for waste bins should be specified for larger point loads – with channels to
EN 1433, and gullies to EN 124, Load Class D 400 where heavier vehicles are expected
such as waste trucks. In all situations there should be access to a water supply for the
cleaning down of spillages or leaks, therefore the ACO drainage gully or channel is vital.
48 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

3.3.2 Appliances

Dishwashers
There are many different types of dishwasher ranging from under counter units that can
provide glass washing and ware washing to pass through machines, flight dishwashers
and utensil washers. They all carry out the same basic function being that of washing the
crockery, glasses or utensils.

Under Counter
These tend to be front-loading compact machines for small to moderate usage of glasses,
or crockery, often fitting under a counter or on a bench in a kitchen area. Being compact
leads to fast turnaround and avoiding the need for large stocking levels of crockery or
glasses.
Drainage can be pumped which sometimes allows them to be sited some distance from
a drain point. Drainage can be a direct connection, although in many bar locations with
multiple pieces of equipment discharging to a single drain, a drainage gully with a Tundish
is used allowing better cleaning access. In these instances this needs to be suitably catered
for with an ACO gully complete with ACO Tundish fitting.
49

Rack Pass Through


This tends to be the next stage up in machine design, and typically has a pull-down hood.
These are more powerful, faster and are manually loaded with a basket of soiled tableware.

3. Kitchen areas
They are usually configured with stainless steel tabling either side of the dishwasher so
while a basket of tableware is being washed, another basket of dirty tableware is being
loaded ready to go in, and a washed basket on the other side of the hood washer is waiting
to be emptied. This gives a continual cycle of plate washing.
This is where you would use an ACO Gully and ACO Tray Channels.
50 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Flight Dishwasher
These are a semi-automatic dishwashing systems. Used in a range of locations from
hospitals, and large airline catering facilities to education or staff feeding where large
numbers are being fed in a short period of time.
In large facilities a number of these types of machine can be linked together using a series
of conveyors to create a very busy and wet operational area.
In these locations drainage gullies and channels are arranged to suit the layout of the room
and functionality of the system in place.
For this application gullies & channels from the standard ACO range can be used, although
custom made channels are also very common.
51

Utensil Washer
These machines are specifically designed for the washing and cleaning of the utensils, pots
and pans used during the cooking process.

3. Kitchen areas
They can in addition be used for the washing of excess crockery, although the dishwashers
described previously would be a more efficient machine for this purpose.
A Utensil Washer is the next step up from a large double bowl pot wash sink, and by the
shear nature of the operation being that of the cleaning of large pots, pans and trays a
volume of water is spilled on the floor. Any utensil wash area should be equipped with a
floor gully as a minimum, and more ideally with a suitably sized ACO drainage channel to
ensure that the floor surface stays as dry and clean as possible.
52 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

3.3.3 Typical drainage products

ACO gully

ACO grease separator

ACO pipe
53

3.3.4 Example layouts

Dishwash area
Large dishwash area

3. Kitchen areas
Cleans Cleans
Flight conveyor dishwasher System
out out

ACO Box
Channel or
gully Function -
medium volume
interception
from various
ACO tray channel sources
Primary function -
interception
Secondary function
- conveyance to
common outlet

conveyor

ACO Slot channel


Dirties Function - General area Trolleys
in cleaning out
54 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Dishwash area
Small dishwash area

4 Tier Rack 4 Tier Rack 4 Tier Rack

ACO slot or box


Function - barrier
Dishwash protection to other
Outlet areas
Tabling

ACO channel or gully


Condense Function - medium
Pass through
Canopy volume interception
dishwash
from various sources

ACO slot or box


Water Function - barrier
Softner protection to other
areas
Potwash inlet tabling with
pre-spray and bowl

Scrapping and put


Grease
down table
Dosing Unit
55

Disposal area

3. Kitchen areas
ACO slot or box
channel
Function - barrier
protection to other areas

ACO gully
Function - high
volume intercep-
tion
from hose reel
ACO slot or box
channel
Function - barrier
Hose reel
protection to other
areas

Waste bin Waste bin


Waste compactor

ACO load class


D4OO gully
Function - medium
volume interception
from various sources
56 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen
57

4. Product portfolio

4.1 ACO gullies

4.2 ACO tray channels

4.3 ACO slot channels

4.4 ACO Box Channels

4. Product portfolio
4.5 ACO gratings

4.6 ACO grease


separators

4.7 ACO waste disposal


systems

4.8 ACO lifting plants

4.9 ACO pipes

4.10 ACO access covers


58 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

4.1. ACO gullies

ACO stainless steel gullies are designed to be used in commercial applications where
hygiene, durability and performance requirements are paramount. ACO applies standards
reserved for food contact surfaces EN 1672 and EN ISO 14159 to the gully design. ACO
gullies are characteristic with:
■ Deep-drawn body ensuring smooth contours eliminating crevices that can nest
dangerous bacteria.
■ All radiuses larger than 3mm which greatly increases the cleaning effectiveness.
■ Dry sump design, completely drainable - eliminating potential problems of bacteria
growth.
■ Edge in-fill ensuring stable and durable transmission between the gully and surrounding
floor and helping to minimise the risk of floor cracks that prevents bacteria growth.

ACO gullies are available in a number of versions featuring different flow rates (up to
6.3l/s), sizes, spigot outlet diameters and grating designs to suit various applications.
The floor construction and depth together with the use of any waterproofing membrane
play an important role in the selection of the appropriate type of gully. ACO offers gully
configurations as shown below. Fixed height gullies are convenient, freestanding units
suitable for cementitious, resin or tiled floors. Telescopic gullies can be installed either
with ACO gully tops or with ACO stainless steel linear drainage channels in most flooring
constructions, including floors with waterproofing membranes. All ACO gullies are available
with vertical or horizontal spigot outlets.

European Standard for gullies:


ACO tests gullies to EN 1253 – Gullies for buildings
59

Gully types

4. Product portfolio
Fixed height gully Telescopic gully

Fixed height gully Telescopic gully

Round gully top for vinyl flooring Gully top for tiled, resin or Gully top for thin-bed
cementious flooring applications
60 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Features
All radiuses larger than 3mm Edge in-fill ensures stable and durable
which greatly increases cleaning transmission between the gully
effectiveness and surrounding floor and helps to
minimise risk of floor cracks which
could harbour micro-organism

Deep-drawn body ensures Dry sump design, completely


smooth contours eliminating drainable - eliminating stagnant
crevices that can nest dangerous water, smells, microbial growth
bacteria and potential chemical hazards.

Please find detailed information and relevant article numbers in ACO gully
catalogue or at www.acobd.co.uk
61

4.2. ACO tray channels

ACO tray channels are designed to be used in commercial applications where hygiene,
durability and performance requirements are paramount. ACO tray channels are available in
number of different versions featuring different channel volume, flow rates, size and spigot
outlet diameter to suit various applications. In all cases the base of the tray incorporates a
gradient to ensure rapid liquid removal minimising debris build up.
The floor construction and depth together with use of any waterproofing membrane play an
important role in selection of the appropriate type of ACO tray channel. ACO tray channels
are available in a number of versions featuring different channel edges, sizes, capacity and
spigot outlet diameters to suit various applications.

4. Product portfolio
150–800 mm
300–3000 mm

60–200 mm
ø 100–200 mm

European Standard for tray channels:


ACO tests tray channels to EN 1253 – Gullies for buildings
62 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Tray channel types

Standard type for concrete, tiled or resin floor

Extended type for tiled floor

Vinyl type for vinyl floor

Telescopic type for tiled floor


63

Tray channel components

Grate

Silt basket

4. Product portfolio
Foul Air Trap

Tray channel

Friction ring

Gully

Please find detailed information and relevant article numbers in ACO tray
channel catalogue or at www.acobd.co.uk
64 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

4.3. ACO Modular 125 (Box Channels)

ACO Box Channel systems enable simple selection and specification from a wide range
of components. These modular or bespoke systems are extremely adaptable to specific
circumstances, and are ideal where existing equipment has to be accommodated.

They offer excellent waste water conveyance and interception properties - and are ideally
suited to areas where medium to high volumes of liquids are present.

Removable gratings facilitate cleaning and maintenance, and built-in-falls with a 'V' channel
base profile help minimise sediment build up in the channel.

Box channels should preferably be specified with a gradient - level inverts can be provided
but are not preferred. ACO slot channel systems consist of various straight channels (length
up to 6000mm), corner and branch units and outlets. This system is suitable for various
applications.

Features
■ Stainless steel construction for durability and long life
■ V-bottomed profiled channel for enhanced flow efficiency at low flow rates and for
improved self cleaning performance
■ Modular concept allows specification of standard channel units to surround machinery and
fit within existing tiling patterns
■ Wide choice of grates to suit the application and load class

Hydraulic capacity calculation for linear channels is a complex process that can require
computational analysis. ACO provides this service free of charge.

European Standards for slot channels:


ACO tests slot channels to EN 1253 – Gullies for buildings and EN 1433 Drainage channels
for vehicular and pedestrian areas.
65

Slot channel components

5
8
4
9

4. Product portfolio
1

7
3

1 Outlet unit 6 Grating

2 Level invert and sloping invert channel 7 Gully

3 Corner unit 8 Silt basket

4 Branch unit 9 Foul air trap

5 End plate

Detailed information for Box Channel systems available on www.acobd.co.uk


66 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

4.4. ACO AS601 (Slot Channels)

ACO slot channel systems with 20mm surface aperture offer simple and effective waste
water interception and conveyance suitable for a wide range of applications where
accessibility to the channel is not critical - for example any area where low volumes of fluid
are expected without significant food debris. Combined with a gully, they provide effective
central washdown drainage solutions. Through its simple construction the system is reliable
and robust - with no potential grating loss where that might otherwise present a hazard.

Slot channels should preferably be specified with a gradient - level inverts can be provided
but are not preferred. ACO slot channel systems consist of various straight channels (length
up to 6000 mm), corner and branch units and outlets. This system is suitable for various
applications.

Features
■ Stainless steel construction for durability and long life
■ V-bottomed profiled channel for enhanced flow efficiency at low flow rates and for
improved self cleaning performance
■ Modular concept allows specification of standard channel units to surround machinery
and fit within existing tiling patterns

Hydraulic capacity calculation for linear channels is a complex process that can require
computational analysis. ACO provides this service free of charge.

European Standards for Box Channels:


ACO tests slot channels to EN 1253 – Gullies for buildings and EN 1433 Drainage channels
for vehicular and pedestrian areas.
67

Box channel components 6

7
4
1 Outlet unit

2 Level invert and sloping invert channel


2
3 Corner unit

3
4 Grating

4. Product portfolio
6

5 Gully

6 Silt basket

7 Foul air trap


1

Detailed information for slot


1
channel systems available on
www.acobd.co.uk

50 5
10

50
10 60 to 120
2

60 to 120
2

20 29 Up to 3000 Maximum length as standard

20 29 Up to 3000 Maximum length as standard

Please Note: If channel depth is greater than channel bore then a ‘V’ bottom will be
incorporated. All dimensions are in mm.
68 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

4.5 Gratings

Standard grating overview

Aditional
ACO tray ACO slot ACO Box Load class
Grating slip resistant ACO gully
channel channel Channel up to
feature

Mesh
C250
grating

Quad-
L15
rato

Ladder
C250
grating

Heel-
L15
safe

ARLA
L15
grating

Vulcano
B125
grating

Slot
M125
cover

Perfo-
rated B125
grating

Plastic
A15
grating

Com-
posite C250
grating
Load class A15, B125, C250 according to EN 1433 and EN 124,
Load class L15, M125 according to EN 1253
69

Slip resistance
ACO offers gratings with additional slip resistance feature - slip resistant gratings.

Plain grating: to be used in areas with reduced demand for slip resistance for example
where trolleys are turning.

Slip resistant grating: to be used in all areas where there is an increased risk of accident
caused by slipping

4. Product portfolio
Plain grating Slip resistant grating

Please find detailed information and relevant article numbers in ACO gully,
ACO tray channel and ACO slot and box channel catalogue or at
www.acobd.co.uk
70 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

4.6. ACO grease separators

Many commercial and industrial food processing and production facilities generate waste
water contaminated with animal and /or vegetable fats, oil and grease. This particularly
applies to large kitchens in restaurants, hotels and canteen, and also abattoirs. Fats,
oils and grease (FOGs) from these applications can cause pipe blockages, corrosion and
ultimately malfunction of public sewage networks. These risks give rise to considerable water
damage and repair costs – not to mention the hygienic and environmental issues resulting in
flooding of the food preparation area and the increased potential for rodent infestation.

Grease separators (or grease interceptors) solve these problems with an effective functional
principle: gravity separation.

Functional principal of a grease separator


71

ACO Grease separators according to European Standard (EN) 1825 rely on the relative density
naturally present in the influent. FOGs, whilst wide ranging in relative density, are always
less dense than water and naturally float on the surface of the water within the separator
unit. Similarly, solid particulates common to most cooking processes are denser than water
and sink to the separator base. The Standard prescribes the various separator compartment
dimensions, which are a function of the required flow through the separator. Conveniently,
the design section of the Standard allows the specifier to arrive at a single figure expressed
as nominal size (NS), which relates to the flow through the separator in litres per second. A
secondary “figure”” is also derived which relates specifically to the size of the solids retention

4. Product portfolio
compartment – thus a typical specification would read “NS 7” – 700 relating to a separator
capable of sustaining 7 litres/second flow and with solids capacity of 700 litres.

Disposal types
FOGs and solids are retained inside the grease separator. FOGs and solids must be periodically
removed from the grease separator to prevent blockage. Usually, certified recycling companies
use disposal trucks to empty the entire contents of the separator. The choice of the disposal
types mainly depends on two questions:
■ Are suction trucks available?
■ Is the interruption of operations (for example: 24-hour kitchen) permissible?
Therefore there are two types of grease separators available: Grease separators for complete
disposal (full disposal) and grease separators for partial disposal (fresh grease separators).
72 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Grease separators for complete disposal


ACO grease separators for complete disposal usually have to be emptied at least every four
weeks. For that purpose a recycling truck has to remove the entire separator content via a
suction line. Once emptied, the grease separator has to be cleaned and refilled with clean
water and then operation in the kitchen can start again.

ACO full disposal grease separators are made of polyethylene or stainless steel and can
optionally be equipped with a suction line, high pressure cleaning and a disposal pump. The
separators can be built in oval or round design according to project specifications.

Grease separator for complete disposal


73

Grease separators for partial disposal


ACO partial disposal grease separators for partial disposal separate the FOGs and solids
from the wastewater into discrete collecting drums by opening the relevant drainage valve
on the separator body (specifics depend on the type of operation). This can be undertaken
independently of normal operations and can be done without interruption to the kitchen.
Because the collecting drums only take grease and sludge, the grease separator does not
have to be filled after disposal with expensive fresh water.

4. Product portfolio

Grease separator for partial disposal

Please find detailed information and relevant article numbers in ACO grease
separators catalogue or at www.acobd.co.uk
74 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

4.7 ACO waste disposal system

Food waste management is an important task within commercial kitchen operation, where
food is handled and waste is produced. Food waste can create food hygiene risks whether
stored in local containers, double bagged within external bins or during transportation and
its handling can be a time, energy and space consuming process.
Therefore the management of food waste needs to be considered as a specific issue within
commercial appliances. Current management of food waste is carried out in conjunction
with Multi Activity Contractors to include the in house management, collection, processing,
segregation, marketing and sale of reclaimed materials and arranging the disposal of final
waste residues.
Operators of commercial kitchens should address the management of food waste and
consider ways to reduce costs and alternative sustainable food waste disposal methods.
The Waste Disposal System “ACO Waste Jet” allows storage and disposal of food stuff and
can be used to solve the most important mentioned problems.
75

4. Product portfolio
Food waste disposal system combined with grease separator

European Regulations for Food Waste Disposal


1774/2002/EC: h ealth rules concerning animal by-products not intended for human
consumption
852/2004/EC: hygiene of foodstuffs
853/2004/EC: hygiene of food of animal origin

Input stations as stand-alone device


The waste disposal unit is pre-installed in an operating case. It can be located on specific
locations desired by the client.

Input stations as integrated device


The waste disposal unit has to be integrated in an already existing kitchenette. Therefore, the
unit only consists of the input pit, hand shower, hammer mill and the necessary control units.

Please find relevant article numbers in ACO waste disposal system catalogue
or at www.acobd.co.uk
76 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

4.8 ACO lifting plants

Active backflow safety valve units are also differentiated according to the type of
wastewater: either wastewater containing faeces or wastewater free of faeces. A large
number of lifting plants, submersible pumps and pump stations are available for this
purpose. Active backflow safety valves are used wherever there is no natural gradient
towards the sewer, or when wastewater must be disposed of even during backflow affecting
a system with a proper natural gradient.

Wastewater lifting plants are normally equipped with one pump. If wastewater drainage
or wastewater inflow must be maintained without interruption during normal operations,
EN 12056-4 specifies that a lifting plant with two pumps (twin system) each with the same
output must be used. This always applies when draining deeper lying parts of multiplexes,
offices, commercial buildings, hospitals, warehouses, or when wastewater is drained from
separators.
77

The lifting plants/pump stations are operated so that the pumps are always operating
alternately to ensure that they both undergo the same amount of wear. Twin units do therefore
not mean that two pumps are normally operating at the same time. The wastewater lifting
plants are compact systems for free-standing installation in cellars or shafts. EN 12056-4
stipulates that a working space of minimum 60 cm height and width must be present above
and around the operating units to ensure that the necessary maintenance and control work
can be carried out. Another stipulation is that the room in which the lifting plant is installed
is adequately ventilated and aerated, has lighting, and has a pump sump. Electrical
components which must not be flooded should be installed in dry rooms not at risk of

4. Product portfolio
flooding. The following must be laid before installing a wastewater lifting plant:
■ Inlet pipes
■ Power supply
■ Blank cable duct if necessary (when installed in floor recesses)
The wastewater is drained into the collecting tank of the wastewater lifting plant via the
inlet pipes. The inlet pipes are usually DN 100 – DN 150 depending on the volume of
wastewater.
All of the pipe connections must be unstressed. Pipes laid through walls and ceilings must
be tight and sound proofed. (e.g. by using ACO APLEX pipe ducts).

Installation example: lift plant installed behind a grease separator


Please find detailed information and relevant article numbers in ACO lifting
plants catalogue or at www.acobd.co.uk
78 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

4.9 ACO pipes

ACO pipe is a reliable, lightweight and durable push-fit pipe work system, designed,
produced and tested for soil, waste, rainwater and industrial wastewater drainage
applications. Together with the other products of ACO Group it creates a perfect system for
building drainage and offers a sustainable drainage solution with unique advantages to the
customers.

The push-fit system ensures quick and easy assembly for a reliable installation for gravity
and vacuum drainage. All ACO pipe interconnecting seals and fittings incorporate a unique
double sealing system providing a trouble-free, reliable sealing system
– every time. The wide range of fittings available utilises advanced cold forming
techniques, thereby reducing the manufacturing cost and minimising the amount of welded
components, to provide the ultimate in system reliability.

ACO pipe stainless steel pipes and fittings are available in 50mm, 75mm, 110mm, 125mm,
160mm and 200mm external diameters with the standard lengths from 0.15 metres up to
6 metres for optimum practicality and ease of assembly.

European Standards for stainless steel pipes:


ACO tests pipes to EN 1124–1 and EN 1124–2 Pipes and fittings of longitudinally welded
stainless steel pipes with spigot and socket for waste water systems.
79

Pipe components

4. Product portfolio
Bends

Socketed pipes

Single branches Double branches

Double branch reductions Swept single branches „P“ traps


80 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Couplings

Connectors

Access units

Socket plugs

Rat-stop pipes

Socket clamps Vent cowls

Seals

Please find detailed information and relevant article numbers in ACO pipe
catalogue or at www.acobd.co.uk
81

4.10 ACO access covers

ACO access covers are a range of high quality access covers which, whilst providing quick
and easy access to underground services, enable decorative floor finishes to be maintained
with minimal interference.
ACO access covers are basically provided with a customer choice of surface. By filling the
covers on-site with tiles, floor panels, carpet or other materials they blend harmoniously
with the surrounding floor covering. Covers made from anti slip tread “checker” plate are
also available for light industrial applications. ACO Access Covers are available up to load
class C250, watertight and odourtight, certified according to EN 1253-4 or EN 124. There
are three material variants available:

4. Product portfolio
■ Stainless steel, material grade 304 (1.4301)
■ Galvanised steel
■ Aluminium alloy

Access cover- standard

Access cover with opening assistance

Please find relevant details and article numbers in ACO access covers
catalogue or at www.acobd.co.uk
82 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen
83

5. Installation Examples

5. Installation Examples
84 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Telescopic flanged
gully installed in sus-
pended concrete slab 1
construction with 2
intermediate water/
damp- proofing layer
3 4

5
6

1 Ceramic tiles

2 Tile cement

3 Mastic sealant

4 Floor screed

5 Water/Damp proof membrane

6 Gully

7 Suspended concrete slab core-boared to accept gully body


85

Ground floor gully with


intermediate water/ 1
damp proof membrane -
fixed height horizontal
2

3
4

5. Installation Examples
8

9
1 Ceramic tiles

2 Tile cement

3 Mastic sealant

4 Floor screed

5 Dampf proof membrane (DPM)

6 Gully

7 Outlet pipe

8 Floor slab

9 Compacted soil
86 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

ACO tray channel –


standard type – gully
with adhesive bonding 1
flange Tiled floor 2
3

5 4
6

1 Ceramic tiles

2 Tile cement

3 Mastic sealant

4 Rubber infill

5 Floor screed

6 Water proof membrane

7 Solid concrete floor slab


87

ACO Box Channel –


direct connection to
sewage pipe system
Resin floor
1

2 3

5. Installation Examples

1 Epoxy/resin floor

2 Floor screed

3 Rubber infill

4 Solid concrete floor slab

5 Compacted soil
88 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen
89

6. Cleaning and Maintenance

6.1. Introduction

6.2. Drainage cleaning


principles

6. Cleaning and maintenance


90 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

6.1. Introduction

Cleaning and maintenance is critical to the hygienic and safe performance of a drainage
system such that the drain system can be considered as part of the Operational
Prerequisite Programme (O-PRP) itself integral to HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical
Control Point).By positioning drainage components with the Operational PRP, the operator
ensures adequate and clearly defined cleaning processes at predetermined intervals.

The cleaning process itself should be validated prior to its implementation – ideally by
internal audit and may include assessment of microbial limits in the area concerned.
Evidence for the correct drain cleaning process is the verification record of the inspections
undertaken by independent personnel.

It is now well understood that drains provide a harbourage site for bacteria and of particular
relevance is the pathogen Listeria Monocytogenes, which has been shown to establish
itself and persist in drainage. This bacterium proves resilient to cold – surviving and
multiplying at refrigeration temperatures. Therefore attention should be paid to refrigeration
condensate drainage. Other common pathogens that easily survive and multiply within the
kitchen environment include Salmonella and Escherichia Coli. The cleaning programme
should therefore contain measures to inhibit the development of bio-films in drains –
which tend to be resistant to sanitising measures. Biofilm development occurs where local
conditions suit bacterial adhesion and growth: dirty surfaces, containing nutrients, as might
be found in a drain are key bio-film formation areas.

The following section details general propositions for cleaning:


■ methods for cleaning
■ protocols of those undertaking cleaning
■ system points which can be monitored
■ sediment basket deposition level
■ foul air trap water level
■ visible surfaces of the drain system components
91

These lend themselves to easily managed visual inspections which may be incorporated
in instructions that readily form part of the frequent monitoring programs in the
establishment.

Maintenance items can also be included in this check, of particular importance is:
■ the seal interface between floor and drain
■ Intermediate seals between channel components
■ inspection of gratings or covers
■ inspection of sediment basket
■ inspection of foul air trap

Reference documents
Codex Alimentarius GUIDELINES ON THE APPLICATION OF GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF
FOOD HYGIENE TO THE CONTROL OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN FOODS CAC/GL
61 - 2007 EN ISO 22000:2005 Food safety management systems —Requirements for any
organization in the food chain

6. Cleaning and maintenance


92 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

6.2. Drainage cleaning principles

Gully - hand wash


1. Cover all present foodstuffs, raw materials, covering materials and tools.
2. Cover all equipment that could be contaminated.
3. Remove rough dirt from floor and grating and them place into designated container.
4. Remove gratings.
5. Remove and empty silt basket and foul air trap.
6. Remove collected dirt into designated container and rinse grating, silt basket and foul air
trap by water.
7. Wash all surfaces by designated detergent and by designated hand brush.
8. Rinse the remains of detergent.
9. Visually check surface cleanliness - perform additional cleaning if neccessary.
10. Return foul air trap, silt basket and grating to original position.
11. Rinse entire equipment by water so foul air trap remains flooded.

Gully - foam
1. Cover all present foodstuffs, raw materials, covering materials and tools.
2. Cover all equipment that could be contaminated.
3. Remove rough dirt from floor and gratings - place them into designated container.
4. Remove grating.
5. Remove and empty silt basket and foul air trap.
6. Collected dirt place into designated container, grating, silt basket and foul air trap rinse
with water.
7. Use foam sprayer to apply foam to all surfaces.
8. Leave foam in for 15 minutes.
9. Rinse rest of foam by water.
10. Visually check surface cleanliness and perform additional cleaning if necessary.
11. Return silt basket and gratings to original position.
12. Rinse slot and gully by water so foul air trap remains flooded.
93

Slot channel – hand wash


1. Cover all present foodstuffs, raw materials, covering materials and tools.
2. Cover all equipment that could be contaminated.
3. Remove rough dirt from floor and slots.
4. Remove gully grating.
5. Remove and empty silt basket and foul air trap.
6. Collected dirt place into designated container.
7. Rinse slot with water.
8. Wash all surfaces by designated detergent and by designated hand brush.
9. Rinse rest of detergent by water.
10. Visually check surface cleanliness and perform additional cleaning if necessary.
11. Return silt basket and gratings to original position.
12. Rinse slot and gully by water so foul air trap remains flooded.

Slot channel – foam


1. Cover all present foodstuffs, raw materials, covering materials and tools.
2. Cover all equipment that could be contaminated.
3. Remove rough dirt from floor and slots.
4. Remove gully grating.
6. Cleaning and maintenance
5. Remove and empty silt basket and foul air trap.
6. Collected dirt place into designated container.
7. Rinse slot with water.
8. Use foam sprayer to apply foam to all inner surfaces of slot and gully.
9. Leave foam in for 15 minutes.
10. Rinse rest of foam by water.
11. Visually check surface cleanliness and perform additional cleaning if necessary.
12. Return silt basket and gratings to original position
13. Rinse slot and gully by water so foul air trap remains flooded.
94 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen
95

7. Material properties

7.1. Stainless steel

7.2. Load class

7.Material properties
96 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

7.1. Stainless steel

Stainless steel is the name given to a wide range of steels which have the characteristics
of greatly enhanced corrosion resistance over conventional mild and low alloy steels. The
enhanced corrosion resistance of stainless steel essentially comes from the addition of at
least 11% chromium, however most stainless steels commonly used contain around 18%
chromium. Other significant alloying elements include nickel and for superior corrosion
resistant properties, molybdenum. For ACO building drainage applications, the principal
properties of stainless steel may be summarised as follows:

■ Durable and corrosion resistant in highly aggressive environments.


■ Hygienic, easily cleaned surfaces.
■ Aesthetically attractive surface finish.
■ Good forming and fabrication characteristics.
■ E xcellent strength and resistance to oxidisation at high temperatures.
All of which make stainless steel an obvious first choice material for demanding
applications.

Austenitic Stainless Steels


This group of stainless steels is the most widely used and encompasses the generic
304 and 316 grades of material. These materials are used in the ACO Building Drainage
manufacturing process and are ideal for applications including food processing, leisure,
dairy, brewing, pharmaceutical, chemical and petrochemical industries.
304 grade stainless steels contain around 18% chromium and 10% nickel and provides
excellent corrosion resistance. For applications where superior corrosion resistance
properties are required under extreme conditions particularly where chlorides are involved,
316 grade stainless steels are used and contain around 17% chromium, 12% nickel and
2.2% molybdenum. Unlike all other grades of stainless steels, austenitic grades are
non-magnetic and as a consequence magnetic particles are not attracted to the system
surfaces which otherwise would encourage both contamination and corrosion.

Corrosion resistance
The single most important property of stainless steels and the reason for their existence
and widespread use, is their natural corrosion resistance. In spite of their name, stainless
steels can both ‘stain’ and corrode if used incorrectly.
97

Finishing processes
A stainless steel finish should appear clean, smooth and faultless. This is obvious when
the steel is used for such purposes demanding stringent hygiene or decorative trim
applications, but a fine surface finish is also crucial in respect to its corrosion resistant
properties.

Pickle Passivation - The standard ACO manufacturing process uses the pickle
passivation chemical finishing process to restore the products to their full optimum
corrosion resistant state without damaging the surface finish. This is considered the best
method for cleaning welded joints.

Electropolishing - Electropolishing is ideal for producing a uniform, highly reflective


lustre with an extremely smooth finish even on the most complex product contours. This
is a well proven method of polishing and is achieved by an electro-chemical process
which is essentially the reverse of electroplating. For pharmaceutical and food processing
industries, bacterial resistance is considerably improved by the electropolishing process.
Certain gratings within the ACO Building Drainage range are electropolished as standard. All
stainless steel products can be electropolished if required to special order.

7.Material properties
98 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

7.2. Load class

ACO specialise in external and internal drainage systems. It is likely that Standards will
eventually evolve to reflect the demands of both application areas. Related standards are
EN 1253 Gullies for buildings and EN 1433 Drainage channels for vehicular and pedestrian
areas. Meanwhile ACO have chosen to certify its internal drainage channel components to
the rigorous requirements of EN 1433. The table below provides an approximate guide to
cross reference between appropriate standards.

EN 1433 EN 1253
Application (Drainage channels) & EN (Gullies for Description
124 (Manhole & Gully Tops) Buildings)

Non-load bearing gullies in


H1.5 bathrooms & roof drainage
without pedestrian access

Areas without vehicular traffic,


A15 such as bathrooms, hotels, hos-
K3
pitals, schools, swimming pools,
public wash and shower areas

Areas with light vehicular


L15 traffic without fork lift trucks in
commercially used premises

Areas with vehicular traffic


B125 M125 such as workshops, factories
& car parks,

Heavy industrial areas subject


C250 to light fork lift trucks & slow
moving commercial vehicles

Particularly heavy duty ap-


plications where industrial fork
D400
lift trucks and heavy vehicles
are manoeuvring
99

7.Material properties
100 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen
101

8. Kitchen drawings

8.Kitchen drawing
8.Kitchen drawing

Notes
102
Preparation area

Disposal area
Dishwash area

Production area
Washing

Cookline

Potwash

Dry stores

Preparation
8.Kitchen drawing
106 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Office

Staff

Preparation
8.Kitchen drawing
Production area
Dishwash area

Disposal area
Preparation area

Storage
area
109 ACO I Drainage guide for the Commercial kitchen

Notes
110

2.1. Floor drainage


2.1.1 Floor drainage functionality
Drainage guide for
the Commercial kitchen

www.aco-kitchendrainage.co.uk