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NSW Year 11 – Biology 1

Module 1: Cells as the Basis of Life


Cells are the basis of life. They coordinate activities to form colonial and multicellular organisms. Students examine the structure and function of
organisms at both the cellular and tissue levels in order to describe how they facilitate the efficient provision and removal of materials to and from
all cells in organisms. They are introduced to and investigate biochemical processes through the application of the Working Scientifically skills
processes. Students are introduced to the study of microbiology and the tools that scientists use in this field. These tools will be used throughout
the course to assist in making predictions and solving problems of a multidisciplinary nature.

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Cell Structure
 Inquiry question: What distinguishes one cell from another?

1 Theory lesson 1 Prokaryotic cell Investigate different cellular  Prokaryotic cell variety and  1.1.1.1
variety and structure structures, including but not limited to: structure
 Examining a variety of prokaryotic
and eukaryotic cells
 Describe a range of technologies
that are used to determine a cell’s
structure and function

2 Theory lesson 2 Eukaryote cell variety Investigate different cellular  Eukaryotic cell variety and  1.1.1.2
and structure structures, including but not limited to: structure
 Examining a variety of prokaryotic
and eukaryotic cells
 Describe a range of technologies
that are used to determine a cell’s
structure and function
NSW Year 11 – Biology 2

3 Theory lesson 3 Microbiological Investigate different cellular  Microbiological technologies  1.1.1.3


technologies structures, including but not limited to:
 Examining a variety of prokaryotic
and eukaryotic cells
 Describe a range of technologies
that are used to determine a cell’s
structure and function

4 Theory lesson 4 Biological drawing Investigate a variety of prokaryotic  Biological drawing  1.1.2.1
and eukaryotic cell structures,
including but not limited to:
 Drawing scaled diagrams of a
variety of cells
 Comparing and contrasting
different cell organelles and
arrangements
 Modelling the structure and
function of the fluid mosaic model
of the cell membrane

5 Theory lesson 5 Organelle structure Investigate a variety of prokaryotic  Organelle structure and  1.1.2.2
and function and eukaryotic cell structures, function
including but not limited to:
 Drawing scaled diagrams of a
variety of cells
 Comparing and contrasting
different cell organelles and
arrangements
 Modelling the structure and
function of the fluid mosaic model
of the cell membrane

6 Theory lesson 6 Fluid mosaic model Investigate a variety of prokaryotic  Fluid mosaic model of the  1.1.2.3
of the cell membrane and eukaryotic cell structures, cell membrane
including but not limited to:
 Drawing scaled diagrams of a
variety of cells
 Comparing and contrasting
different cell organelles and
arrangements
 Modelling the structure and
function of the fluid mosaic model
of the cell membrane

7 Progress check 1 (covering theory lessons 1-6)


NSW Year 11 – Biology 3

Cell Function
 Inquiry question: How do cells coordinate activities within their internal environment and the external environment?

8 Theory lesson 7 Diffusion and Investigate the way in which materials  Diffusion and osmosis  1.2.1.1
osmosis can move into and out of cells,
including but not limited to:
 conducting a practical investigation
modelling diffusion and osmosis
 examining the roles of active
transport, endocytosis and
exocytosis
 relating the exchange of materials
across membranes to the surface-
area-to-volume ratio, concentration
gradients and characteristics of the
materials being exchanged

9 Theory lesson 8 Active transport and Investigate the way in which materials  Active transport and  1.2.1.2
bulk transport can move into and out of cells, facilitated diffusion
including but not limited to:  Bulk transport (endocytosis  1.2.1.3
 conducting a practical investigation and exocytosis)
modelling diffusion and osmosis
 examining the roles of active
transport, endocytosis and
exocytosis
 relating the exchange of materials
across membranes to the surface-
area-to-volume ratio, concentration
gradients and characteristics of the
materials being exchanged

10 Theory lesson 9 Efficiency of Investigate the way in which materials  Efficiency of exchange  1.2.1.4
exchange can move into and out of cells, related to surface area to
including but not limited to: volume ratio
 conducting a practical investigation  Efficiency of exchange  1.2.1.5
modelling diffusion and osmosis related to concentration
 examining the roles of active gradients
transport, endocytosis and  Efficiency of exchange  1.2.1.6
exocytosis related to characteristics of
 relating the exchange of materials materials
across membranes to the surface-
area-to-volume ratio, concentration
gradients and characteristics of the
materials being exchanged
NSW Year 11 – Biology 4

11 Theory lesson 10 Cell requirements Investigate cell requirements,  How energy enters cells  1.2.2.1
including but not limited to:  Chemical requirements of  1.2.2.2
 suitable forms of energy, including cells
light energy and chemical energy  Wastes that must be  1.2.2.3
in complex molecules removed
 matter, including gases, simple
nutrients and ions
 removal of wastes

12 Theory lesson 11 Photosynthesis Investigate the biochemical processes  Photosynthesis  1.2.3.1


of photosynthesis, cell respiration
and the removal of cellular
products and wastes in eukaryotic
cells

13 Theory lesson 12 Cellular respiration Investigate the biochemical processes  Cellular respiration  1.2.3.2
of photosynthesis, cell respiration
and the removal of cellular
products and wastes in eukaryotic
cells

14 Theory lesson 13 Cellular waste Investigate the biochemical processes  Cellular waste removal in  1.2.3.3
removal of photosynthesis, cell respiration eukaryotic cells
and the removal of cellular
products and wastes in eukaryotic
cells

15 Theory lesson 14 Enzyme action Conduct a practical investigation to  What an enzyme is  1.2.4.1
model the action of enzymes in  How enzymes work  1.2.4.2
cells

16 Theory lesson 15 Enzyme activity: Investigate the effects of the  Effect of temperature on  1.2.5.1
Effect of temperature environment on enzyme activity enzyme activity
and pH through the collection of primary or  Effect of pH on enzyme  1.2.5.2
secondary data activity

17 Theory lesson 16 Enzyme activity: Investigate the effects of the  Effect of cofactors on  1.2.5.3
effect of cofactors, environment on enzyme activity enzyme activity
inhibitors and through the collection of primary or  Effect of inhibitors on  1.2.5.4
substrate and secondary data enzyme activity
enzyme  Effect of substrate  1.2.5.5
concentration concentration on enzyme
activity
 Effect of enzyme  1.2.5.6
concentration on enzyme
activity
NSW Year 11 – Biology 5

18 Progress check 2 (covering theory lessons 7-16)

19 Working scientifically – Module 1

Module 1: Topic test


NSW Year 11 – Biology 6

Module 2: Organisation of Living Things


Multicellular organisms typically consist of a number of interdependent transport systems that range in complexity and allow the organism to
exchange nutrients, gases and wastes between the internal and external environments. Students examine the relationship between these
transport systems and compare nutrient and gas requirements. Models of transport systems and structures have been developed over time,
based on evidence gathered from a variety of disciplines. The interrelatedness of these transport systems is critical in maintaining health and in
solving problems related to sustainability in agriculture and ecology.

Class Edrolo video Difficulty


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Organisation of living things


 Inquiry question: How are cells arranged in a multicellular organism?

1 Theory lesson 1 Unicellular, colonial Compare the differences between  Defining unicellular,  2.1.1.1
and multicellular unicellular, colonial and multicellular colonial and multicellular
organisms organisms by: organisms
 Investigating structures at the level  Comparison of unicellular,  2.1.1.2
of the cell and organelle colonial, multicellular
 Relating structure of cells and cell organisms at the cellular
specialisation to function level
 Comparison of unicellular,  2.1.1.3
colonial, multicellular
organisms at the organelle
level

2 Theory lesson 2 Relationship Impact of cell specialisation on  Relationship between  2.1.1.4


between organelles organelles organelles and cell
and cell specialisation
specialisation

3 Theory lesson 3 Cell differentiation Investigate the structure and  Define cell differentiation  2.1.2.1
and specialisation; function of tissues, organs and and specialisation
tissues, organs, systems and relate those functions  Define tissues, organs and  2.1.2.2
body systems to cell differentiation and organ systems.
specialisation  Structure/function - links to  2.1.2.3
cell differentiation and
specialisation
NSW Year 11 – Biology 7

4 Theory lesson 4 Justification of Justify the hierarchical structural  Recall definitions of  2.1.3.1
hierarchical organisation of organelles, cells, organelles, cells, tissues,
structural of MC tissues, organs, systems and organs, systems and
organisms organisms organisms
 Limitations in size due to  2.1.3.2
SA:Vol ratio
 Justification of hierarchical  2.1.3.3
structural organisation of
MC organisms

5 Progress check 1 (covering theory lessons 1- 4)

Nutrient and Gas Requirements


 Inquiry question: What is the difference in nutrient and gas requirements between autotrophs and heterotrophs?

6 Theory lesson 5 Autotroph Investigate the structure of  Define and distinguish  2.2.1.1
structures autotrophs through the examination between autotrophs and
of a variety of materials, for heterotrophs
example:  Types of autotrophs  2.2.1.2
 Dissected plant materials  Identify a range of macro  2.2.1.3
 Microscopic structures and micro structures of
 Using a range of imaging autotrophs using stained
technologies to determine plant images from light and
structure electron microscopes,
including leaf, stem, flower
and root structure

7 Theory lesson 6 Function of Investigate the function of structures in  Explain the function of a  2.2.2.1
autotroph structures a plant, including but not limited to: range of the above
 Tracing the development and structures in plants
movement of the products of
photosynthesis

8 Theory lesson 7 Case study - Investigate the function of structures in  Case study - Tracing the  2.2.2.2
Tracing the a plant, including but not limited to: products of photosynthesis
products of  Tracing the development and
photosynthesis movement of the products of
photosynthesis
NSW Year 11 – Biology 8

9 Theory lesson 8 Introduction to gas Investigate the gas exchange  Explain the general role of  2.2.3.1
exchange structures in animals and plants gas exchange surfaces
through the collection of primary and  Explain how gas exchange  2.2.3.2
secondary data and information, for occurs in microscopic
example: alveoli
 Microscopic structures: alveoli in  Explain how gas exchange  2.2.3.3
mammals and leaf structure in occurs at the microscopic
plants level in leaves
 Macroscopic structures: respiratory
systems in a range of animals

Investigate the exchange of gases


between the internal and external
environments of plants and animals

10 Theory lesson 9 Gas exchange in Investigate the gas exchange  Compare the respiratory  2.2.3.5
animals structures in animals and plants systems of a range of
through the collection of primary and animals; insects, fish,
secondary data and information, for amphibians, mammals
example:
 Microscopic structures: alveoli in
mammals and leaf structure in
plants
 Macroscopic structures: respiratory
systems in a range of animals

Investigate the exchange of gases


between the internal and external
environments of plants and animals

11 Theory lesson 10 Translocation and Interpret a range of secondary-  Define and distinguish  2.2.4.1
transpiration- sourced information to evaluate between hypotheses,
cohesion-tension processes, claims and conclusions theories and models
theory that have led scientists to develop  Describe the current  2.2.4.2
hypotheses, theories and models translocation and
about the structure and function of transpiration-cohesion-
plants, including but not limited to: tension theory
 Photosynthesis
 Transpiration-cohesion-tension
theory
NSW Year 11 – Biology 9

12 Theory lesson 11 Contribution of Interpret a range of secondary-  Outline the contribution of  2.2.4.3
scientists to sourced information to evaluate a range of scientists to our
understanding processes, claims and conclusions understanding of
translocation and that have led scientists to develop photosynthesis (include
transpiration- hypotheses, theories and models any relevant hypotheses,
cohesion-tension about the structure and function of theories and models)
theory plants, including but not limited to:
 Photosynthesis
 Transpiration-cohesion-tension
theory

13 Theory lesson 12 Introduction to Trace the digestion of foods in a  Define digestion  2.2.5.1
Digestion mammalian digestive system,  Distinguish between  2.2.5.2
including: physical and chemical
 Physical digestion digestion
 Chemical digestion  Define carnivore, herbivore  2.2.5.3
 Absorption of nutrients, minerals and omnivore
and water  Compare digestive  2.2.5.4
 Elimination of solid waste systems of carnivore,
herbivore and omnivore

14 Theory lesson 13 Tracing the Trace the digestion of foods in a  Define nutrient and mineral  2.2.5.5
digestion of food mammalian digestive system,  Identify where the  2.2.5.6
including: absorption of key nutrients,
 Physical digestion minerals and nutrients
 Chemical digestion occur within the digestive
 Absorption of nutrients, minerals system followed by the
and water elimination of solid waste
 Elimination of solid waste

15 Theory lesson 14 Nutrient and gas Compare the nutrient and gas  Recall the difference  2.2.6.1
requirements of requirements of autotrophs and between autotrophs and
autotrophs and heterotrophs heterotrophs
heterotrophs  Compare the nutrient  2.2.6.2
requirements of autotrophs
and heterotrophs
 Compare the gas  2.2.6.3
requirements of autotrophs
and heterotrophs

16 Progress check 2 (Part 1) (covering theory lessons 5-14)

17 Progress check 2 (Part 2) (covering theory lessons 5-14)

Transport
 Inquiry question: How does the composition of the transport medium change as it moves around an organism?
NSW Year 11 – Biology 10

18 Theory lesson 15 Transport systems Investigate transport systems in  Distinguish between open  2.3.1.1
in animals and animals and plants by comparing and closed circulatory
plants structures and components using systems
physical and digital models, including
but not limited to:
 Macroscopic structures in plants
and animals
 Microscopic samples of blood, the
cardiovascular system and plant
vascular systems

Compare the structures and function


of transport systems in animals and  Describe the function of  2.3.3.1
plants, including but not limited to: macro and micro structures
 Vascular systems in plants involved in open and
and animals closed transport systems of
 Open and closed transport animals
systems in animals  Describe the function of  2.3.3.2
macro and micro structures
involved in the transport
systems of vascular plants

19 Theory lesson 16 Changes in Compare the changes in the  Identify a range of blood  2.3.4.1
transport medium composition of the transport medium constituents that change in
as it moves around as it moves around an organism concentration in different
organism organs; e.g. oxygen, co2,
glucose, urea
 Compare the changes in  2.3.4.2
the composition of the
transport medium as it
moves around an organism

20 Progress check 3 (covering theory lessons 15-19)

21 Working scientifically – Module 2

22 Module 2: Topic test


NSW Year 11 – Biology 11

Module 3: Biological Diversity


Biodiversity is important to balance the Earth’s ecosystems. Biodiversity can be affected slowly or quickly over time by natural selective
pressures. Human impact can also affect biodiversity over a shorter time period. In this module, students learn about the Theory of Evolution by
Natural Selection and the effect of various selective pressures. Monitoring biodiversity is key to being able to predict future change. Monitoring,
including the monitoring of abiotic factors in the environment, enables ecologists to design strategies to reduce the effects of adverse biological
change. Students investigate adaptations of organisms that increase the organism’s ability to survive in their environment.

Class Edrolo video Difficulty


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Effects of the Environment on Organisms


 Inquiry question: How do environmental pressures promote a change in species diversity and abundance?

1 Theory lesson 1 Selection pressures Predict the effects of selection  What is a selection  3.1.1.1
pressures on organisms in pressure?
ecosystems, including:  Biotic selection pressures  3.1.1.2
 Biotic factors  Abiotic selection pressures  3.1.1.3
 Abiotic factors

2 Theory lesson 2 Changes in Investigate changes in a population  Changes in populations due  3.1.2.1
population due to of organisms due to selection to selection pressures
selection pressures pressures over time, for example: -Example 1
 Cane toads in Australia  Changes in populations due  3.1.2.2
 Prickly pear distribution in to selection pressures -
Australia Example 2

Adaptations
 Inquiry question: How do adaptations increase the organism’s ability to survive?

3 Theory lesson 3 Adaptations Conduct practical investigations,  Structural adaptations  3.2.1.1


individually or in teams, or use  Physiological adaptations  3.2.1.2
secondary sources to examine the  Behavioural adaptations  3.2.1.3
adaptations of organisms that
increase their ability to survive in
their environment, including:
 Structural adaptations
 Physiological adaptations
 Behavioural adaptations
NSW Year 11 – Biology 12

4 Theory lesson 4 Evolution Investigate, through secondary  Genetic variation within  3.2.2.1
sources, the observations and populations
collection of data that were obtained  Organisms produce more  3.2.2.2
by Charles Darwin to support the offspring than required to
Theory of Evolution by Natural replace themselves
Selection, for example:  Struggle for survival  3.2.2.3
 Finches of the Galapagos Islands  Regional variation in  3.2.2.4
 Australian flora and fauna structure seen as
adaptations

5 Module 3: Progress check 1 (covering theory lessons 1-4)

Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection


 Inquiry question: What is the relationship between evolution and biodiversity?

6 Theory lesson 5 Natural selection Explain biological diversity in terms of  Natural selection  3.3.1.1
the Theory of Evolution by Natural  Changes in life on earth  3.3.1.2
Selection by examining the changes over evolutionary history
in and diversification of life since it
first appeared on the Earth

7 Theory lesson 6 Impact of Analyse how an accumulation of  Directional selection  3.3.2.1


microevolutionary microevolutionary changes can drive  Allopatric speciation  3.3.2.2
changes evolutionary changes and speciation
over time, for example:
 Evolution of the horse
 Evolution of the platypus

8 Theory lesson 7 Divergent and Explain, using examples, how Darwin  Divergent evolution  3.3.3.1
convergent evolution and Wallace’s Theory of Evolution by  Convergent evolution  3.3.3.2
Natural Selection accounts for:
 Convergent evolution
 Divergent evolution

9 Theory lesson 8 Punctuated Explain how punctuated equilibrium  Punctuated equilibrium  3.3.4.1
equilibrium is different from the gradual process (compared to gradualism)
of natural selection

10 Module 3: Progress check 2 (covering theory lessons 5-8)

Evolution – the Evidence


 Inquiry question: What is the evidence that supports the Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection?
NSW Year 11 – Biology 13

11 Theory lesson 9 Evidence for Investigate, using secondary  Evidence for evolution from  3.4.1.1
evolution sources, evidence in support of biochemistry
Darwin and Wallace’s Theory of  Evidence for evolution from  3.4.1.2
Evolution by Natural Selection, comparative anatomy –
including but not limited to: homology
 Biochemical evidence,  Evidence for evolution from  3.4.1.3
comparative anatomy, comparative anatomy –
comparative embryology and analogy
biogeography  Evidence for evolution from  3.4.1.4
 Techniques used to date fossils comparative anatomy -
and the evidence produced vestigial structures
 Evidence for evolution from  3.4.1.5
comparative embryology
 Evidence for evolution from  3.4.1.6
biogeography
 Techniques used to date  3.4.1.7
fossils and the evidence
produced

12 Theory lesson 10 Modern-day Explain modern-day examples that  Modern-day example 1  3.4.2.1
examples demonstrate evolutionary change, for  Modern-day example 2  3.4.2.2
example:
 The cane toad
 Antibiotic-resistant strains of
bacteria

14 Module 3: Progress check 3 (covering theory lessons 9-10)

15 Working scientifically skills

Module 3: Topic test


NSW Year 11 – Biology 14

Module 4: Ecosystem Dynamics


The Earth’s biodiversity has increased since life first appeared on the planet. The Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection can be used to
explain periodic increases and decreases in populations and biodiversity. Scientific knowledge derived from the fossil record, and geological
evidence has enabled scientists to offer valid explanations for this progression in terms of biotic and abiotic relationships. Students engage in the
study of past ecosystems and create models of possible future ecosystems so that human impact on biodiversity can be minimised. The study of
ecosystem dynamics integrates a range of data that can be used to predict environmental change into the future.

Clas Difficulty
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Population Dynamics
 Inquiry question: What effect can one species have on the other species in a community?

1 Theory lesson 1 Abiotic and biotic Investigate and determine  Define biotic and abiotic with  4.1.1.1
factors relationships between biotic and examples
abiotic factors in an ecosystem,  Define ecological niche with  4.1.1.2
including: examples
 The impact of abiotic factors  Describe the impact of a  4.1.1.3
 The impact of biotic factors, range of abiotic factors
including predation, competition  Define predation  4.1.1.4
and symbiotic relationships competition and symbiotic
 The ecological niches occupied by relationships  4.1.1.5
species  Describe the impact of a
 Predicting consequences for range of biotic factors
populations in ecosystems due to
predation, competition, symbiosis
and disease
 Measuring populations of
organisms using sampling
techniques
NSW Year 11 – Biology 15

2 Theory lesson 2 Effect of predation Investigate and determine  Case study: effect of  4.1.1.6
and competition relationships between biotic and predation on populations
abiotic factors in an ecosystem,  Case study: effect of  4.1.1.7
including: competition (intra and inter
 The impact of abiotic factors specific) on populations
 The impact of biotic factors,  Case study: effect of  4.1.1.8
including predation, competition symbiosis on populations
and symbiotic relationships  Case study: effect of  4.1.1.9
 The ecological niches occupied by disease on populations
species
 Predicting consequences for
populations in ecosystems due to
predation, competition, symbiosis
and disease

3 Theory lesson 3 Sampling techniques Investigate and determine  Describe a range of  4.1.1.10
relationships between biotic and sampling techniques
abiotic factors in an ecosystem,
including:
 Measuring populations of
organisms using sampling
techniques

4 Theory lesson 4 Extinction events Explain a recent extinction event  Define extinction  4.1.2.1
 Identify the 5 mass  4.1.2.2
extinction events
 Explain recent extinction  4.1.2.3
events: Cretaceous
 Anthropocene and the 6th  4.1.2.4
major extinction. Fact or
fiction?

5 Module 4: Progress check 1 (covering theory lessons 1-4)

Past Ecosystems
 Inquiry question: How do selection pressures within an ecosystem influence evolutionary change?
NSW Year 11 – Biology 16

6 Theory lesson 5 Palaeontological and Analyse palaeontological and  Distinguish between  4.2.1.1
geological evidence geological evidence that can be used palaeontological and
of changes in to provide evidence for past changes geological evidence
ecosystems in ecosystems, including but not  Explain how Aboriginal rock  4.2.1.2
limited to: paintings provide evidence
 Aboriginal rock paintings for past changes in
 Rock structure and formation ecosystems
 Ice core drilling  Explain how rock structure  4.2.1.3
and formation provide
evidence for past changes
in ecosystems
 Explain how ice core drilling  4.2.1.4
provide evidence for past
changes in ecosystems

7 Theory lesson 6 Technologies Investigate and analyse past and  Define radiometric dating  4.2.2.1
-evidence for past present technologies that have been and gas analysis
changes used to determine evidence for past  Explain how radiometric  4.2.2.2
changes, for example: dating has been used to
 Radiometric dating determine evidence for past
 Gas analysis changes
 Explain how gas analysis  4.2.2.3
has been used to determine
evidence for past changes

8 Theory lesson 7 Case study – Analyse evidence that present-day  Long term changes in  4.2.3.1
Evolution of organisms have evolved from Australia’s abiotic factors
Australian mammals organisms in the past by examining (geological history)
and interpreting a range of secondary  Short term changes in  4.2.4.1
sources to evaluate processes, claims Australia’s abiotic factors
and conclusions relating to the (recent climatic conditions)
evolution of organisms in Australia,  Case study: Impact on  4.2.4.2
for example: evolution of Australian
 Small mammals mammals (biotic)
 Sclerophyll plants

9 Theory lesson 8 Case study – Analyse evidence that present-day  Recall long and short term  4.2.4.3
Evolution of organisms have evolved from changes in Australia’s
Australian sclerophyll organisms in the past by examining abiotic factors
and interpreting a range of secondary  Case study: Impact on  4.2.4.4
sources to evaluate processes, claims evolution of Australian
and conclusions relating to the sclerophyll plants (biotic)
evolution of organisms in Australia,  Evaluating the evidence  4.2.4.5
for example:
 Small mammals
 Sclerophyll plants
NSW Year 11 – Biology 17

10 Module 4: Progress check 2 (covering theory lessons 5-8)

Future Ecosystems
 Inquiry question: How can human activity impact on an ecosystem?

11 Theory lesson 9 Human induced Investigate changes in past  Identify a range of human-  4.3.1.1
selection pressures ecosystems that may inform our induced selection pressures
approach to the management of  Examples of human-induced  4.3.1.2
future ecosystems, including: extinctions
 The role of human-induced  Explain how knowledge from  4.3.1.3
selection pressures on the human-induced extinctions
extinction of species can inform our approach to
 Models that humans can use to the management of future
predict future impacts on ecosystem
biodiversity
 The role of changing climate on
ecosystems

12 Theory lesson 10 Modelling impacts on Investigate changes in past  Describe the role of  4.3.1.4
biodiversity ecosystems that may inform our changing climate on
approach to the management of ecosystems
future ecosystems, including:  Explain how models can be  4.3.1.5
 The role of human-induced used to predict future
selection pressures on the impacts of humans on
extinction of species biodiversity
 Models that humans can use to
predict future impacts on
biodiversity
 The role of changing climate on
ecosystems

13 Theory lesson 11 Mining – Restoration Investigate practices used to restore  Identify the impact of mining  4.3.2.1
of damaged damaged ecosystems, Country or on a range of ecosystems
ecosystems Place, for example:  Case study - Explain how a  4.3.2.2
 Mining sites named ecosystem has been
 Land degradation from agricultural restored post mining site
practices  Case study – Evaluate the  4.3.2.3
Adani Carmichael coal mine
proposal
NSW Year 11 – Biology 18

14 Theory lesson 12 Agriculture – Investigate practices used to restore  Identify the impact of  4.3.2.4
Restoration of damaged ecosystems, Country or agricultural practices on a
damaged Place, for example: range of ecosystems
ecosystems  Mining sites  Case study - explain how a  4.3.2.5
 Land degradation from agricultural named ecosystem has been
practices restored post agricultural
practices
 Case study – saving the  4.3.2.6
Great Barrier Reef

15 Module 4: Progress check 3 (covering theory lessons 9-12)

16 Working scientifically – Module 4

Module 4: Topic test


NSW Year 11 – Biology 19

The unit outline has been developed by Edrolo presenters and is not approved or endorsed by the NESA.

The timeline and course materials are suggested as recommendations and are not meant to be prescriptive. We expect teachers will and should
personalise the plan to suit their school schedule.

In preparing the unit plan Edrolo have done their best to ensure complete coverage of the NESA Syllabus but we strongly recommend you
reference the relevant NESA Syllabus document when considering how you will plan your delivery of the course material.

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