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INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

SOCIOLOGY 1301
SPRING 2011

INSTRUCTOR: Carol Cirulli Lanham


OFFICE: 3.314
OFFICE HOURS: MW 8:30-9:30 and by appointment
EMAIL: ccl054000@utd.edu (Please do not use e-learning for email.)

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION:


MWF 9:30 – 10:20 – GR 2.302

COURSE PRE-REQUISITES, CO-REQUISITES AND/OR OTHER RESTRICTIONS:


None

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of sociology and provides insight into how
we shape society and how society shapes us. We will explore the basic principles of sociology,
and their application in social research and social policy. We also will examine how social
interaction and social structures influence both intimate relationships and global society. Topics
will include gender, age, social class, culture, race-ethnicity, group dynamics, deviance, and
social institutions, such as religion and marriage and family. By reviewing sociological
explanations of various forms of social behavior, we will pave the way for further study in the
field.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

1. Understand the sociological perspective and its use in analysis of group behavior.

2. Identify the three main sociological perspectives and be able to apply them to specific
contemporary social problems.

3. Know the major figures in the field and key terms used by sociologists in their study of
society.

4. Explain the basic sociological concepts of culture, social structure, and socialization.

5. Describe social diversity and inequality.

6. Be acquainted with the process of social change

7. Be familiar with how sociologists examine the major institutions of society including
religion, family, political structures and the economy
REQUIRED TEXTBOOK AND MATERALS:

James M. Henslin, Essentials of Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 9th edition, Allyn and
Bacon, 2009. ISBN: 978-0205763122

If you purchase the book at the on-campus or off-campus book stores, it comes packaged with an
access card for MySocLab. All supplementary course readings listed in this syllabus are
available in MySocLibrary, which is part of MySocLab. You may also purchase an online
version of the textbook at www.coursesmart.com

CLASS FORMAT AND INSTRUCTOR’S EXPECTATIONS

This course will consist of lectures, class discussions and exercises, and four scheduled exams as
well as a series of unscheduled quizzes that will occur throughout the semester. You also will
write a short research paper. You are responsible for reading the assigned course material before
class, and coming prepared to discuss the topics covered in the textbook and supplementary
readings. Although attendance is not mandatory, we will have richer and more rewarding
sessions if everyone comes to class regularly. The different viewpoints that you will bring to
discussions will enhance our exploration of topics and issues. If you do have to miss class, please
arrange to get notes from another student.

GRADING POLICY

Total points will be calculated at the end of the course, and your grades will be awarded based on
the percentage of points earned on the following grading scale.

Four exams worth 150 points each 600 points


One research paper 200 points
Quizzes (20 points each) 100 points
In class exercises/participation 100 points

TOTAL 1000 points

Letter Grade Percentage Points

A+ 97-100
A 94-96
A- 90-93
B+ 87-89
B 84-86
B- 80-83
C+ 77-79
C 74-76
C- 70-73
D+ 67-69
D 64-66
D- 60-63
F 59 and below
EXAMS

Exams will consist of multiple choice and true/false questions, and will cover both the assigned
readings and topics discussed in the lecture. Please bring a SCANTRON to class on exam days.
The quizzes will consist of multiple choice and/or short answer questions and will cover only the
supplementary readings from MySocLibrary.

WRITING ASSIGNMENT

Each student is required to complete one four-to-five page research paper. Students may choose
between four topics involving sociological concepts and/or fieldwork. More detailed information
on the paper will be provided in a separate handout.

MAKE-UP EXAMS AND LATE ASSIGNMENTS

The dates of exams and other assignments are indicated on the class schedule. Make-up exams
will only be given for legitimate reasons (for example, illness) and with proper written
documentation. If you fail to take an exam or turn in an assignment without a reasonable excuse,
you will receive a “0” for that portion of the course. THERE WILL BE NO MAKE-UPS FOR
QUIZZES.

INCOMPLETE GRADE POLICY

As per university policy, incomplete grades will be granted only for work unavoidably missed at
the semester’s end and only if 70% of the course work has been completed. An incomplete
grade must be resolved within eight (8) weeks from the first day of the subsequent long semester.
If the required work to complete the course and to remove the incomplete grade is not submitted
by the specified deadline, the incomplete grade is changed automatically to a grade of F.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

The faculty expects a high level of responsibility and academic honesty from students. Because
the value of an academic degree depends upon the absolute integrity of the work done by the
student for that degree, it is imperative that a student demonstrate a high standard of individual
honor in his or her scholastic work.

SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY

Any student who commits an act of scholastic dishonesty is subject to discipline. Scholastic
dishonesty includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, the submission for credit
of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an
examination for another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the
attempt to commit such acts.

Plagiarism, especially from the web, from portions of papers for other classes, and from any
other source is unacceptable and will be dealt with under the university’s policy on plagiarism.
CLASS SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIGNMENTS

Week 1 Overview of the Course


1/10 – 1/14 The Sociological Perspective
Henslin (H): Chapter 1
MySocLibrary (MSL):
Berger-“Invitation to Sociology”
Charon – “What Does it Mean to be Human?

Week 2 The Sociological Perspective (continued)


1/17-1/21 Culture
H: Chapter 2
MSL:
Miner – “Body Ritual Among the Nacirema”
Alwin – “Generations X, Y and Z”
NO CLASS: MONDAY, JANUARY 17

Week 3 Culture (continued)


1/24-1/28 Socialization
H: Chapter 3
MSL:
David – “Final Note on a Case of Extreme Socialization
Heath – “Parents’ Socialization of Children”
WRITING ASSIGNMENT #1 DUE: FRIDAY, JANUARY 28

Week 4 Socialization (continued)


1/31-2/4 FIRST EXAM – WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 2

Week 5 Social Structure and Social Interaction


2/7-2/11 H: Chapter 4
MSL:
Thompson: “Hanging Tongues”
Anderson – “The Code of the Streets”
Putnam – “Bowling Alone: America’s Declining Social Capital”

Week 6 Social Structure and Social Interaction (continued)


2/14/-2/18 Social Groups and Formal Organizations
H: Chapter 5
MSL:
Meyer – “If Hitler Asked You to Electrocute a Stranger, Would You?”
Simmel – “Dyads, Triads, and Larger Groups”
Ritzer – “McDonaldization of Society”
Week 7 Social Groups and Formal Organizations (continued)
2/21-2/25 Deviance and Social Control
H: Chapter 6
MSL:
Western & Pettit – “Beyond Crime and Punishment”
Becker- “Becoming a Marijuana User”
WRITING ASSIGNMENT #2 DUE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23

Week 8 Deviance and Social Control (continued)


2/28-3/4 MSL: Chambliss – “The Saints and the Roughnecks”
SECOND EXAM – WEDNESDAY MARCH 2

Week 9 Global Stratification


3/7-3/11 H: Chapter 7
MSL:
Scanlan et al – The Scarcity Fallacy”
Eglitis – “The Uses of Global Poverty”

Week 10 NO CLASS – SPRING BREAK


3/14-3/18

Week 11 Social Class in the United States


3/21-3/25 H: Chapter 8
MSL:
Mantsios – “Media Magic: Making Class Invisible”
Reuss - “Cause of Death: Inequality”
Wilson – “When Work Disappears”
WRITING ASSIGNMENT #3 DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 25

Week 12 Social Class (continued)


3/28-4/1 Race and Ethnicity
H: Chapter 9
MSL:
Gans – “Race As Class”
Takaki – “A Different Mirror”

Week 13 Race and Ethnicity (continued)


4/4-4/8 MSL:
Lee et al. – “Beyond Black and White”
THIRD EXAM – WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6

Week 14 Gender and Age


4/11-4/15 H: Chapter 10
MSL:
Lorber – “Night to His Day”
Rosser – “Too Many Women in College
Week 15 Gender and Age (continued)
4/18-4/22 Marriage and Family
H: Chapter 12
MSL:
MacArthur Foundation – “Facts and Fictions About an Aging America”
Coontz – “The Way We Weren’t”
WRITING ASSIGNMENT #4 DUE FRIDAY, APRIL 22

Week 16 Marriage and Family (continued)


4/25-4/29 MSL:
Clawson & Gerstel – “Caring for Our Young”

Week 17 FOURTH EXAM MAY 2

NOTE: This schedule is tentative and may be subject to change.

GENERAL POLICIES

For UT Dallas policy related to the following go to: http://go.utdallas.edu/syllabus-policies

Field Trip Policies


Student Conduct & Discipline
Email Use
Withdrawal from Class
Student Grievance Procedures
Disability Services
Religious Holy Days