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P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription

Guidelines
Projects

Exported on  05/12/2020


Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Table of Contents
No headings included in this document

 –  2
Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

• General Introduction(see page 4)


• Writing(see page 5)
• Punctuation(see page 6)
• Incomplete Thoughts(see page 6)
• Other Punctuation(see page 7)
• Hyphen(see page 8)
• Special Characters(see page 8)
• Capital letters(see page 10)
• Numbers(see page 12)
• Contractions(see page 13)
• Abbreviations(see page 14)
• Acronyms(see page 15)
• Initialisms(see page 16)
• Spelled Letters(see page 17)
• Fragments(see page 18)
• span tags(see page 19)
• Interjections(see page 19)
• Mispronounced(see page 20)
• Intelligible Foreign(see page 21)
• Best Guess(see page 22)
• Event tag(see page 23)
• Fillers(see page 23)
• Foreign words(see page 24)
• Unintelligible Foreign Words(see page 24)
• Unintelligible Speech(see page 24)
• Untranscribable(see page 25)
• No Speech(see page 25)
• Pause(see page 26)
• Speaker noises(see page 27)
• Other noises(see page 28)
• Truncations(see page 30)
• Labelling Speaker Gender(see page 31)
• Male(see page 31)
• Female(see page 31)
• Unknown(see page 31)
• Labelling speaker proficiency (see page 31)
• Native(see page 32)
• NonNative(see page 32)
• Unknown(see page 32)
• Mismatch(see page 33)
• Additional words(see page 33)
• Omitted words(see page 33)
• Words in wrong order(see page 34)
• Word substitution(see page 34)
• Unnatural(see page 35)

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

General Introduction
In this project you will be listening to short audio files i.e. utterances that contain people speaking. For each
utterance you will also be provided with a hypothesis, which are the word/phrase that the person was supposed
to say.
Your task is to validate these utterances by checking that the recorded speech matches the script.

• If the speech matches the script entirely, you can just press "Save" and go on to the next
utterance. "Matching the script entirely" here means that the speech and the script match exactly word for
word.

example

  Hypothesis: drive to the last destination.

  Speaker: drive to the last destination.

  Transcription: drive to the last destination .

• If the speech does not match the hypothesis because there are differences such as extra words, words
missing, words changed, etc. 

example

Hypothesis: i sing in the rain.


Speaker: i dance in the rain.

In this case it's mismatch, click mismatch label and save. Do not transcribe the mismatch audio.

 please do not confuse mismatch with utterance where you need to add tags or utterances
with mispronounced word. 
tags are not part of hypothesis. please see Mismatch1 section for further detail. 

 • Missing/incorrect punctuation and any spelling errors in the hypothesis are NOT mismatch.
• Please add/correct punctuation where needed, you can find more details about punctuation and
spellings in section bellow.

1 https://wiki.appen.com/display/projects/P14631+Transcription+Guideline+Template#P14631TranscriptionGuidelineTemplate-
Mismatch

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

General Introduction
• you will also see some additional info after punctuation following "//"  don't worry about anything
after punctuation and you can leave it as.

example

Hypothesis: can i have the offer displayed again? // NULL // NULL // Insurance 
Speaker: can i have the offer displayed again?
Transcription: can i have the offer displayed again ? // NULL // NULL // Insurance

Please refer to The Oxford Dictionary, via this link https://


Writing en.oxforddictionaries.com/, as a standard reference for any spellings
you are unsure of . You may also find the following link, https://
en.oxforddictionaries.com/grammar/spelling, useful if you are unsure
about the treatment of certain abbreviations, initialisms, or even to
clarify the differences between Indian English and other varieties of
English. To reference the names of song titles, movies, TV shows,
brands etc. please use Amazon2, or if necessary, Google3.

2 http://amazon.com/
3 http://google.com/

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Use sentence-final punctuation marks . and ? or ! . Alternatively,


use # to indicate an incomplete sentence or thought. Commas may be
Punctuation used to make the transcription easier to read or understand, for
example if a sentence is very long. Exclamation marks may be used but
are not essential and should be inserted only where clearly appropriate.

Use punctuation symbols that are an essential part of the word, such


as apostrophes and hyphens.

 Please leave a space before and after punctuation.

example

• isn't that simple ?


• you know the answer, don't you ?

When people speak naturally, they do not always produce complete


sentences or ideas. If the person speaking stops before they complete a
Incomplete Thoughts sentence or idea and then go on to talk about something else, use a #
symbol.

example

Example - speaker trails off after the word "the"

what is the name of the #

Example - speaker stops one thought at the word "for" and


starts a new thought/idea after

set my alarm for # what is this song called ?

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Please use punctuation when it is required for a word to be acceptable


(e.g. the apostrophe in you're).
Other Punctuation
example

eleven o'clock .

Sinead O’Connor .

read Jess's email .

that's where it's at .

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Hyphens should be used when they appear in brand names.

Hyphen
example

Brand Name

X-Box

Hyphens must also be used in the following English words:

examples

• a-line
• d-day
• ex-boyfriend, ex-drummer, ex-girlfriend, ex-husband, ex-wife
• extra-loud
• self-aware
• t-shirt
• u-turn
• v-neck
• x-ray


Special Characters
Special characters such as quotation marks, dollar signs, etc.
are NOT to be used. Please transcribe all full words spoken.

example

$ → dollar
% → percent
Example - speaker pronounces the word "slash"
You hear: it was great slash weird
You transcribe: it was great slash weird

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

INCORRECT: it was great/weird

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Name Entities (e.g. person names, place names) should be spelled with
a capital letter as per usual writing conventions for Indian English.
Capital letters

examples

John

Monday

Initials in proper names should be spelled with a capital letter


and highlighted with Initialism tag 

George W. Bush

J.K. Rowling

If a business name is spelled with a capital letter in the middle of the


word, this is acceptable.

example

eBay

iPhone

YouTube

 Do NOT use a capital letter just because a word is at the start


of a sentence. Personal pronoun 'I' should NOT be capitalised.

the first word is only capitalised if it is a proper name


they think Sydney is a beautiful city .
i think Sydney is a beautiful city .
what is on my calendar for Tuesday night ?

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Do NOT use any digits (e.g. 1 2 3 4 5 ...). All numbers must be spelled out
as full words in the way they were spoken.
Numbers
Example - the number '2020' may be spoken in many different
ways:

2020  →  twenty twenty

2020  → two thousand twenty

2020  → two zero two zero

Example

5th → fifth

1st → first

if the number zero is pronounced as 'oh', transcribe as oh

example

the number zero is pronounced as oh

0101 → oh one oh one

Example - the number zero is pronounced as zero

0101 → zero one zero one

When spelling out numbers, use hyphens as required by the rules of the
language. In English, numbers from twenty-one through ninety-nine are
spelled with hyphens. Others are not hyphenated.

examples

• twenty-five
• three hundred
• five hundred fifty-two
• nineteen forty-five

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Standard contractions should be transcribed as they are pronounced

Contractions
examples

can't
won't
isn't
where's
you're

y'all → if the speaker pronounces y'all it is acceptable to


transcribe it with this spelling

If a speaker pronounces the following contractions, transcribe them as s


ingle words with the provided spelling:

examples

• gimme
• gonna
• gotta
• lemme
• wanna
• watcha

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Do NOT  introduce any abbreviations, always spell out the words when
pronounced as words.
Abbreviations
examples

he is 6f 2!  →  he is six foot two .

talk to Doctor Smith.  →  talk to Doctor Smith .

The only exception is if someone pronounces the word as an


abbreviation.

examples

Appen Butler Hill Inc  → Appen Butler Hill Inc  (if the person
pronounced 'Inc' as 'Inc', not 'Incorporated')

i live in Cambridge Mass → i live in Cambridge Mass (if the person


pronounced 'Mass' as 'Mass', not 'Massachusetts')

 In English, titles like Ms, Mr, Mrs that prefix people's names are
not abbreviations, therefore transcribe it as:

my name is Ms. Edwards .

Mr. Smith this way please .

i am called Mrs. Jones .

 If titles are used without proper nouns, transcribe it as full


spelled-out word.

example:

You hear:  you hear in audio "hey mister can you please help
me with this survey? 
You TRANSCRIBE: hey mister can you please help me with this
survey ?

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

An acronym is a word formed from the first letters of other words, but
pronounced as a single word(e.g. NASA, FIFA). Acronyms are spelled
Acronyms using capital letters joined with no space. 

examples

NASA

FIFA

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Initialisms refer to terms spoken as series of letters e.g., IBM, IMDB,


HTTP
Initialisms Initialisms should be written as upper case letters no space in between
and then tag with highlighted tag of 

Initialism

examples

I work for IBM.  ==>  I work for IBM.

http://www.amazon.com4 ==>

HTTP colon slash slash

WWW dot Amazon dot com .

Use period only for initials standing for given names

example

George W. Bush .

E.B. White

4 http://www.amazon.com/

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Spelled letters are where a word is pronounced letter by letter (e.g. L I A


I S E). Spelled letters are transcribed using capital letters joined by
Spelled Letters underscores.

examples

You hear: my name is John jay, oh, haitch, en.

You TRANSCRIBE: my name is John J O H N .

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

When a speaker pronounces only part of a word, write that part of the
word and attach a hyphen to it. Make sure there is a space after the
Fragments hyphen. 

examples

someone begins to say 'music' but stops after 'mu'

Alexa stop the mu- i mean song .

Example: someone begins to say 'music' but stops after 'mu'


and then repeats the word in full

Alexa stop the mu- music .

Example: someone begins to say 'music' but stops/trails off


after 'mu'

Alexa stop the mu- #

If it is not completely clear what the fragmented word is, do NOT transc


ribe the word and instead use the unintelligible tag. For more on
unintelligible tags, see unintelligible speech

 the speaker fragments the word following "song" and you


can't make out what the fragment is at all.

play the song   .

Example - someone fragments the word after "the" but you


can't make out what the fragment is at all.

Alexa stop the   i mean the song .

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Description
span tags
Interjections are very common in spoken language, but strictly speaking
they are not 'words' and would be unlikely to show up in a dictionary or a
Interjections newspaper article. You should write all interjections and spell them as per
the table below. Use the interjection highlighting tag to highlight the
interjection once you have transcribed it.

example

you hear the speaker say mmhm

YOU TRANSCRIBE: 

mhm

Description Sounds like ...

Agreement mhm, uh-huh, mm

Disagreement uh-uh, nuh-uh, mm-mm

Surprise ohh (as in 'ohh really'), whoa, jeez,


gee, wow

Seeking Confirmation huh, eh

Disgust yech, ugh, ew

Delight ooh, aah, yay

other ow, uh-oh, aww, shh, oops, whew

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Description
span tags
When it is obvious that a speaker has mispronounced a word, use the
mispronounced tag to highlight the word. When you type the
Mispronounced mispronounced word, use the normal correct spelling.

example

you hear the speaker say "bargage" instead of "garbage"

YOU TRANSCRIBE:  garbage

 When a speaker uses a different word from what is intended or


what would make sense in the context, but it is still a valid word,
then you should transcribe the word as it was spoken. This is NO
T a mispronunciation. 

example

you hear the speaker say "the volcano said I lava you ."
YOU TRANSCRIBE: the volcano said I lava you .

 Words pronounced with a regional accent are NOT considered


mispronounced. If you are unsure, imagine asking the person
after they spoke if they made a mistake. If that person would
admit they made a mistake, then the word was mispronounced.
Words pronounced with dialectic variation should be
transcribed with an orthographically standard spelling.
Example:
You hear: issall well n' good darlin
You transcribe: it's all well and good darling
***Note that the words in this example are NOT mispronunciatio
ns. They are regional variations. Therefore they should be
transcribed with the standard orthographic spellings and they
should NOT be tagged as mispronunciations.

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Description
span tags
If someone uses just the occasional foreign word and you definitely
know how to spell it, write out the word and then highlight it using the
Intelligible Foreign "foreign word" highlighting tag.

examples

the word in bold is highlighted because it is not English

does

arrivederci mean goodbye in Italian ?

 foreign names (people's names, place names, festival names,


etc.) do NOT constitute foreign words and should be transcribed
in full without highlighting tag. If you are unsure of the spelling,
please search for it in Google to find the most common variant of
spelling.

 Loanwords
Loanwords are words of foreign origin which are considered part
of the language now. This often happens when another language
is widely spoken in a community (e.g. English words in the
Netherlands), when a word is needed for a modern concept such
as a computer mouse, or when a language does not have a word
of its own to describe a concept. In English the word 'guru' may
be considered a loanword, i.e. it is NOT foreign and can
appear untagged in an English transcript.
If a word of foreign origin is commonly used and/or understood
by speakers (or a community of speakers) in the language you
are transcribing, it should always be transcribed. If it appears in
a dictionary for your language, it does not require a span tag as a
foreign word.

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Description
span tags
If you think you know what a speaker says but you are not sure, transcribe
the speech and highlight using the best guess. This tag should be used
Best Guess with care and only when speech is not clear. Your accuracy score will be
impacted by overuse of the tag or for transcribing nonsense speech.

example

 it is not 100% clear to you what the speaker says after 'me' but
you can guess:

Please read me Cat in the Hat tonight .

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Event tag
Fillers are the sounds people make while they are thinking of what to
say next, for example "um", "ah", "er".
Fillers Whenever you hear a filler, insert one of the following tags, selecting
which ever sounds closest to what you hear:

Filler tags

example

speaker says "um" after "was"

i was   just wondering .

Example: speaker says something which sounds sort of like


"eh" after "was", you select  because it
sounds the most similar

i was   just wondering .

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Event tag
You may hear someone speaking in a foreign language. If you cannot

Foreign words understand the foreign speech, place a    tag in


place of the foreign word or words you cannot understand.

Unintelligible Foreign
example
Words
The speaker says a foreign word after "does" and you
cannot identify the foreign word

what does   mean in Russian ?

If you come across a word or several words that are not clear
because there is interference, audio problems, or because the person
Unintelligible Speech is not talking clearly, enter this tag in place of the unintelligible
speech.

Of course you should try your best to listen and determine what was
said, but in natural speech there will be unintelligible words often. As
a guide you should try at least three times to understand what was
being said. If it is not clear, insert the tag and move on.

You only need to insert the tag ONCE regardless of whether it is a


single unintelligible word or a string of unintelligible words.

example

speaker mumbles a word following "her" and then


continues with intelligible speech

well i already told her   you know i told her .

Example - speaker mumbles a string of words after "her"


and you cannot make them out

well i already told her   .

 –  24
Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Event tag
If an entire utterance is completely unintelligible due to noise or

Untranscribable distortion in the audio, insert the  tag only.

example

the audio is distorted by loud static and you cannot make


out any words in the utterance

If an ENTIRE utterance contains no speech (e.g. there is only silence

No Speech or noises) insert the   tag only and move on. The


noises in such utterances should not be tagged.

 Unintelligible speech, fillers and interjections ARE consider


ed speech.
All other noises - human and non-human i.e. lipsmack,
laugh, breath, cough, click, ring, dtmf and int, are NOT consi
dered speech.

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Event tag
Whenever there is a pause in speech for a period of 1 second or
more, insert this tag. The word "Mississippi" takes approximately
Pause one second to pronounce. You can use this as a reference if you are
unsure whether a pause is long enough to be tagged.

 speaker takes a two second pause between "just" and


"feels"

i don't know why it just   feels different now .

 Use the tag for pauses of 1 second or more within


speech (between words) and also for silence of 1 second or
more before the person commences speaking or after
they finish.

 –  26
Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Event tag
All noises made by the main speaker must be marked with one of the
tags below.
Speaker noises
• Insert the tag exactly where the noise first occurs.
• If it occurs at the same time as a word, put the tag BEFORE the
word.
• If the noise occurs more than once in sequence, you only need a
single tag.

• lip smacks
• tongue clicks

• loud inhalation and exhalation between


words
• yawning

• coughing
• throat clearing
• sneezing

• laughing
• chuckling

To indicate crying or sobbing. We expect that


your usage of this noise tagging will be
infrequent.

 –  27
Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Event tag
Insert the relevant tag when you hear a noise that is not made by the
speaker and which is at a comparable volume to the speech.
Other noises
• Insert the tag exactly where the noise first occurs.
• If it occurs at the same time as a word, put the tag BEFORE the
word.
• If the noise occurs more than once in sequence, you only need a
single tag.

Any interference from the phone line (e.g.


crackling sounds).

The sound of a phone ringing.

The sound made by pressing the telephone


keypad (DTMF stands for Dual Tone Multi-
Frequency).

Any long noises that continue over longer


periods of time and perhaps multiple words
(generally lasting more than one second), for
example: wind, rain, background speech
music, or noticeable static. This tag is placed w
hen the noise begins. The point at which the
long noise ends is NOT marked. Low level
background sounds are expected and do
not need to be tagged.

Any other short noises other than the above


that:

• do not continue over several words


(generally lasting less than one second)
• cannot be easily identified with absolute
certainty
Most short noises will be categorised in this
way

If there is music playing in the foreground or in


the background and there is no other
information to transcribe.

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Event tag

Example: a customer is put on hold and only


music is audible in the utterance.

The music tag is a special case and is not expect


ed to be used often. It should not be used with
any other tags or speech since it indicates only
music and music alone occurs within an
utterance.

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Event tag
If a word gets cut off at the very beginning or the very end of an
utterance by the recording device, this is called a truncation. This is
Truncations different from a fragment (where a speaker stops talking part way
through a word). In a truncation, the recording has cut someone off
while they were saying a word. Therefore, truncations only occur at
the start or end of an utterance.

When you hear a truncation at the end of an utterance, transcribe


the full word at the end of the first utterance followed by

 tag to show that the word was cut off by the


recording device.

When you hear a truncation at the start of the next utterance,

insert the tag only.

example

The sentence "in that case we should probably consider


other options" is split across two utterances, and the word
'probably' was cut off at the end of the first utterance and at
the start of the second.

In the first utterance you hear "prob" at the end of the


utterance before the truncation. In the second utterance
you hear "ably" at the start of the utterance after the
truncation.

UTTERANCE 1: in that case we should probably

UTTERANCE 2:   consider other options .

 If you can tell that a word was truncated but you don't


know what the word is, simply insert the 

tag in place of the truncated word and

use the    tags as above.

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

Event tag
Example - the sentence "in that case we should probably
consider other options" is split across two utterances,
and the word 'probably' got cut off at the end of the first
utterance and at the start of the second, but you
couldn't make out the truncated word

UTTERANCE 1: in that case we should  

UTTERANCE 2:  consider other options .

One of the three labels that specifies the gender of the


Labelling speaker: Male, Female, Unknown
Speaker Gender
Use Male label for all male speakers

Male

Use Female label for all female speakers

Female

Use unknown label if you cannot identify the speaker gender.

Unknown

One of the three labels that specifies the proficiency of the speaker
Labelling speaker on the primary language specified for the data: Native, NonNative,
proficiency  Unknown.

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

One of the three labels that specifies the gender of the


Labelling speaker: Male, Female, Unknown
Speaker Gender
Use this when the speaker speaks the primary language with no or
a slight foreign accent, and their speech contains little non-native
Native grammatical features and word choices.

 Note that speakers speaking with grammatical patterns


or an accent of a regional or ethnic dialect should be
labeled as Native for Indian English

Use this label when the speaker speaks the primary language with
a discernible foreign accent, and their speech contains non-native
NonNative grammatical features and word choices.

Example: A speaker with a Russian accent would be considered


NonNative in the case of this Indian English project. 

Use this label whenever you cannot confidently determine


whether the speaker is a native speaker of the primary language or
Unknown not. When proficiency/nativeness is Unknown, use the unknown
label.

 –  32
Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

One of the three labels that specifies the gender of the


Labelling speaker: Male, Female, Unknown
Speaker Gender

Mismatch
• If the speech does not match the hypothesis because there
are differences such as extra words, words missing, words
changed, etc. 

example

Hypothesis: I sing in the rain .


Speaker: I dance in the rain .

In this case it's mismatch, click mismatch label and save.


Do not transcribe the mismatch audio.

 please do not confuse mismatch with utterance


where you need to add tags or utterances with
mispronounced word. 
tags are not part of hypothesis.  

MISMATCH UTTERANCES
Below are cases that require the use of Mismatch label:

• Additional words

example

Hypothesis: the weather is bad

Speaker: the weather is very bad

• Omitted words

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Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

One of the three labels that specifies the gender of the


Labelling speaker: Male, Female, Unknown
Speaker Gender

example

Hypothesis: directions to the city centre

Speaker: directions to the city

• Words in wrong order

example

Hypothesis: play FM radio

Speaker: play radio FM

• Word substitution

example

Hypothesis: directions to the city centre 

Speaker: directions to town centre 

 Mismatch should only be used to reject utterances where


a content word is different - i.e. a verb or a noun

 –  34
Projects  –  P14631 - 20541 Alum Indian English Transcription Guidelines

One of the three labels that specifies the gender of the


Labelling speaker: Male, Female, Unknown
Speaker Gender

example

This would NOT be considered a mismatch,


because it does not have a change in the content
words. 

Hypothesis: directions to the city centre 


Speaker: directions to city centre 

Use this label when the speech is unnatural for example the
Unnatural speaker is pretending to be a robot or trying to make silly voice .

 –  35